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File: bokhylla2.png (241 KB, 5120x3124)
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So i'm planing to build a "bookshelf" that also works as a "staircase" to my extra bed that's 130cm/51" froom the floor.

I do not know how to do this in the best way.
Maybe interlocking plywood?
28 replies and 2 images omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2010257
Building codes exist for a reason, retard. It's to keep people from hurting themselves on things that stupid people build improperly.
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>>2009993
It looks great. If it doesn't break In your usage, it's fine.
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>>2005117
3/4" ply would prolly be fine.
if youre concerned, use two 1/2" layers glued and screwed. makes for a bit mor of a puzzle, but will be prety solid
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>>2010832
and fuck all these 'look up stairs'
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>>2009993
not really sure how the joining of that is working from the pic.

id rec you put another vertical on the right side and do some religious screwing of the back sheet into all the board to stop shearing

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Hello /diy/ers
How the fuck can I reframe this?
I know this is done wrong. But how do I do this without damaging the structure? Exterior sheathing is in OK shape still
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>>2010801
>>2010800
Ah, you snuck that detail in on me. Eh, as I said, it hasn't fallen in yet and you have no support, so you should be okay. Just put in some king studs if you want peace of mind. You can use modern 2x6s without issue. Just put them on 16-inch centers and use some firing strips to build them out to match the depth of the original timbers.
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>>2010802
>firing strips
Furring strips, fucking autocorrect. Picture related is of older studs built up with furring strips to increase the depth and allow additional insulation. In your case, you are just building up the modern studs to match your old wall depth.
>>
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>>2010803
Solid advice, will do
Another thing, there was 1x4 and 1x6 strips, some 16 ft long nailed on the exterior walls throughout. Do these have a purpose, like for shear support, or will 5/8 gypsum board suffice nowadays?
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>>2010806
Looks like somebody had too many pallets lying around
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>>2010806
They would not provide any racking support. A common way of doing it back in the day was with a shear brace. This would normally be a 1x4 that ran from the top plate at the corner stud across the wall at 45 degrees down to the bottom plate. It was typically 'let in' (placed in notches in the studs) from the outside and nailed to each stud. You might also see diagonal blocking (picture related), another common method. Modern construction uses large sheet material to provide the bracing. It doubles as sheeting, is much stronger, goes up faster, and is cheaper. If your external walls are not covered in 4x8 sheets of plywood or OSB then you need some kind of shear bracing.

That said, I don't know for sure why they are on the inside of your external walls. Insulation? Noise reduction? I can only speculate. What was over them? Drywall?

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Since people are constantly making drill threads, I wondered if we should have a drill/drilling general. Let's see if it works or not.

Welcome to /holes/, 1st edition.
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>>2010350
You used to be able to get lithium cells and converters for it
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>>2008494
Cool. Thanks, buddy.
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>>2010571
They still sell new XRP batteries, I think there are Lithium XRP batteries as well. I had an idea going with one of the packs but haven’t followed through yet. At this point, I’m pretty commited to Orange stuff. The SDS is the only Yellow tool I don’t have a replacement for, so I would rather get a new brushless Orange SDS and run it off 4.0Ah and 6.0Ah batteries than spend $150 on a 2pk of outdated Yellow batteries to run an old tool.
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>>1988827
ALDI drill. She goes alright.
>>
So I have my first brushless now. Do all of them make this square wave type of sound?

Cheap tools. What’re your favorites?
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>>2010346
A Williams 3/8 socket set made in Taiwan is about as cheap as I'll go. Not bad for $40-$50, if you can't afford SK.
>>
I've used Harborfreight/Walmart hand tools for years. Only thing I woulndt cheap out on is torx/hex bits. Hand tools just buy the cheapest you can find dont listen to boomer tool nerds
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>>2010476
Nigga please, it's only boomers who shop at harbor freight and walmart.

Enjoy your ToolBasix™ nut drivers.
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>>2010346
women
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>>2010346
High-quality used tools I find at garage sales, estate sales, local auctions, etc. S-K socket set with 1/2 inch drive ratchet and 20 sockets for $8? Yoink. Craftsman toolbox filled with Craftsman "V" series wrenches for $20? Sure. A fucking Kennedy machinist box filled with Starrett tools for $100? All over it. I flip what I don't want and often times break even. Some of the Starrett stuff went for big money on eBay though.

I'm a commercial stonemason looking to become superintendant. Courses are offered in my region and are paid for by the union.
Are they worth doing in early 20s or will you only be taken seriously if you're a salty dog in your 40s etc?
>>
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>>2010715
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>>2010715
superintendant? u wot m8? like a manager or something? wtf makes masonry so special?
>>
We dont have superintendents in Australia so i cant say but im a construction manager in my mid 20s running 10-40m projects and definitely received little to no respect early on.

My experience has been you have to work harder to win respect the younger you are, kind of how women complain they have to. If one of the 100+ contractors on one of my sites corrects me or makes me look stupid i lose credibility infront of everyone. You basically have to be the smartest, most knowledgeable person onsite, every day, before your age stops being a factor. You have to be that guy that fixes the problems they cant work out and always have the correct answer. I am not there yet but alot closer than 2 yrs ago. The reason the older guys get respect is they have generally developed that ability over 10-20 years in the industry
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>>2010715
Courses? To make sure a bunch of degenerates are laying blocks in a straight line? Leadership is leadership my friend. I got my first job as a foreman (wood framing) when I was 25. You need be decently knowledgeable in your trade first and foremost, but the most important thing is knowing when to be mean and when to take care of your guys. Understanding that different personalities require different management styles to get the most out of them. Observe the best foreman you have and strive to emulate him. And be better than him.

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SOUL
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>>2003917
Unironically one of the best brands of hand tools, if not the best.
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>>2007452
Oh shit I live in Perth you nigger
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>>2010434
I do. Also Channellock. Which is why I know Knipex > Channellock for nearly everything.
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>>2010676

I also own both and think you're a fag.
>>
>>2010696
Thx bby ;^)

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Anyone know what these parts are for? Are they strictly necessary? I don't want to waste wood
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Make sure to look at the wood before you buy, hopefully you didn't take this picture OP.
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>>2010649
It is fine. This is clearly a box which puts function before form.
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>>2010655
That would bug the shit out of me and it would end up in the burn pit. Also, it looks like those are during strips and not regular 1x2 pine board. The 1x2s usually are going to be a bit better for being straight, but you're still going to pass on about 1/3 of them.
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>>2010494
This. Never put fasteners into end grain.
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>>2010720
A box has no form without function and a box whos form fits its function is the best box there is. I love a good box made purely for function and they are the things i enjoy making most.

File: OIP.jpg (29 KB, 474x316)
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So I purchased a house about two years ago. It was a nice deck (not picrel) that is about 30 feet above the street with nice privacy but plenty of sun. The previous owner told me he had put down a coating of Behr deck coating, like thick paint. He told me he had gotten tired of putting down oil or waterproofing every year.

At that point I started to worry since that would never stick to the wood. Sure enough, the deck is pealing like a son of a bitch.

I'd like to get down to bare wood and oil/waterproof (which I don't mind doing). What's the best way to get the rest of the crap.
16 replies omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2009690
Serious answer: Pressure wash the deck first. This will get everything out that can come out. If something doesn't come out it's because it's oil that's seeped into the wood. That's fine, it means it's protecting it. Just pressure wash out what you can. Pressure washing WILL leave the wood a little rough, so you will need to do some light sanding when it's done. Obviously this project will be spread out over multiple days as you will need to let it dry after pressure washing, etc. Once it's dry sand it with some 120 grit to make sure the new deck coating will be able to seep into the wood. If you're lazy put down a full sheet of sand paper and rig up something to push around a whole sheet of sandpaper at once. If your not lazy get on your hands and knees with an electric sander and get to it. 220 grit will be too smooth and not much will be able to penetrate the wood so use 120 grit. Once you've finished sanding clean all the sawdust off with a blower and a broom. Now you're ready to apply the new sealer. The best way to get a bunch on at once is to use a sort of sponge mop. Dip the sponge in the liquid and begin spreading it around. Use a lot of sealer, put more than you need. The thicker the better so it will last longer. Once you're done, let it set for a week to fully cure. You're not done yet. You HAVE to apply a second coat so plan for that. The whole point of this is to do a quality job that will last a really long time so you don't have to do it again for a long time. Wait about a week for everything to seep in and the chemicals to dry and evaporate, and then "mop" it a second time again with another thick coat of the sealer. Let this dry for about a week as well and you should be good for a long time. I know it's a pain in the butt to have to remove the last guy's shotty work, but in doing it right and prepping everything good with the pressure wash and sanding going forward it will be much easier to reseal in the future when it's time.
>>
>>2010095
Adding to this, I've sprayed stain on a fence with a HVLP air compressor spray paint gun, and it really stretches the stain but it doesn't apply as much. Using a paint brush or something that actually pushes the stain into the wood makes for a much better application. I started with a brush and it was taking forever and the stain was going quick. I switched to spraying the rest of the fence and it went much quicker, but the ones I painted were much darker because much more of the stain had been pressed into the fence plank. I don't care because we're selling the house in a few months, but if I was living here full time no way in hell would I use a hvlp gun again. I would take the time and paint it. Even though it takes longer and uses more stain, the results are infinitely better. If you choose to spray, at least back brush your work to press the stain in. Or make it a two person job. One person using the sprayer to apply the stain, and another person immediately brushing it in a few inches above where it's being applied.
>>
>>2010095

This guy knows what he's talking about. Another option I would look into would be spraying the stain on, but not with an HVLP air sprayer, but your typical pump up garden sprayer for pesticides and herbicides. Obviously you don't want to do this close to the house so you'll have to do the edges by hand with a brush or roller, but in the large open areas where it won't overspray onto anything else you can use the garden sprayer to save some time and effort.
>>
OP here. Thanks for everyone's help. Sound like pressure washing and staining should work.

BTW - The space under the deck is tall enough to stand up and it gets plenty of airflow.

BTW #2 - Yeah, I was too lazy to take a picture of the actual deck. It was late, dark, cold.
>>
>>2009958
I replaced the Deck with pavers. Now it's dry but ants love to build colonies right under the pavers.

File: sljive.png (287 KB, 1582x906)
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So, here is a thing:

>My father has orchard
>plums are cheap here
>dried plums ain't that cheap and they don't spoil that easy
>???

Maybe I should build a fruit dehumidifier.

I was thinking to make some kind of chamber with stone wool insulation. Air input should get as dry air as possible.

1. How?

Other problem is how to make it easy to control. As I seen, it is cheap to just buy some thermostat electrical outlet and use that (same with time). Problem is, electricity is expensive.


Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
18 replies and 2 images omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2009275
The cheapest and easiest way will likely be the old local way. Just ask old people how they did it. If plums are common in your area the old people probably used to dry them or had parents/grand parents who did and someone will know how if you ask about. I always just asked grandma, she always knew such things.
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>>2009918
Pitting sucks, easier to just eat around the pits. Most plums seem to be cling stone fruits and probably can not be pitted. The only none cling stone plum I know of is the prune/Italian plum.
>>
>>2009906
>energy inp vs. energy moved
To be more specific, it's work input over heat output/input at the relevant side. A heat pump will have a hot and cold side, so whether you measure 140% or 40% CoP depends on whether you want a refrigerator or heater. Though the concept of "work in" gets a little less clear when considering solid-state heat pumps like peltiers and LEDs.
>>
>>2010657
which is a lot different than traditional filament heaters which do have 100% efficiency and don't waste time doing other shit
>>
>>2010691
Are you implying that heat-pump heaters are worse? Because that's the 140% I was talking about. Heat pumps always have more than 100% CoP for heating, the 40% would be refrigeration.
>W_input = Q_heat - Q_cold
>CoP = Q/W_input
>CoP_heating = Q_heat/W_input
>CoP_heating = 1 + Q_cold/W_input

The walls of my low rise condo (apartment) all have whatever the fuck this stain is. There’s also cracks all over the walls in various places.

Should I be concerned?
9 replies and 3 images omitted. Click here to view.
>>
Windowsill

There was water coming from my light fixtures but not anymore after I called the condo board so I don’t know if either a pipe burst or something
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>>2010633
Why are you even worried. It's not your property. If you don't like it, go rent another apartment you rent cuck. Your jew landlord won't give two shits if you bring fucking stains and cracks on the wall to his attention.
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>>2010646
Is right next to my job tho
>>
>>2010646
I just want to learn as much as I can about it, my landlord is a cum guzzler but if I know what to look for I can get the landlord to pay for repairs through small claims court and the system here. I just need an educational opportunity
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>>2010646
I just want to make sure when I get my landlord to do shit about it that he does the right thing, that he doesn’t just get some cheap paint when it needs to be removed etc

File: Ck6zAu8.jpg (297 KB, 1440x960)
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That's some real nice woodwork you got there. Would be a real shame if someone were to
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>>2010136
I don't think anyone wants to live in the radiation-soaked remains of socialist architecture.
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>>2003890
underrated
>>
Moon and Navaeh came over and we finished tiling the bathroom hun!
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>>2010643
Thats alot of work to make something look terrible
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>>2010643
That ... doesn't look terrible, in fact the toilet itself looks out-of-place here. Looks like the nook is a tiled shower basin?

My home was built during World War 1, and the upstairs has no insulation under the plaster. Absolutely none. I guess it's better than asbestos.

Without tearing out the plaster, what are my solutions for insulating the upstairs?

I think insulation boards would work but they are pretty thick. I want something I can glue or staple up without being proud of the molding.
11 replies and 1 image omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2008397
I intend to do that, I just wanted a cheap way to do something till then. It could be years before I can afford to do the big job of ripping everything
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>>2008748
Take it a wall at a time man. Install a new breaker box so you can update electric along the way. Ripping it all out at once means paying for it all at once. Hell why waste the money on the trying to make it better temporary when you can kick it in the ass and do it right. Takes a little longer but every penny in stays in. The one thing you can do right away is blow in insulation in the Attic. Double check to make sure there isn't old exposed wiring first.
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>>2007972
>better than asbestos
Asbestos is unironically top tier insulation
>>
>>2009156
>>2009156
because my heating costs are low already despite no insulation upstairs. I only have Natural gas running to the furnace and the heating bill was less than $100 last month due to strategic use of doors and keeping the register closed upstairs. I use a bit of kerosene when I go up there.

It would take a long ass time to re-coup the cost.
>>
>>2010570
Come on your living like a Savage though. Can't take that money with ya. Try making it cheaper with reclaimed lumber

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Who has this thread? Post it plox
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>>2009644
based boomer
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>>2009644
Someone on /sci did a rat and took notes on it for weeks
>>
>>2008328
Member the shot of black meme?
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>>2009750

You shouldn’t shoot blacks. Other blacks get mad and riot. Only if you’re a cracker/honkey though and the riots/looting/arson are mostly peaceful. If you’re black it’s ok though. It’s confusing but my advice is don’t do it.
>>
>>2009479
Haha the whole one inch of it? Say it isn't so hahaha

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I just bought the Makita systainers, I own the extra large box and can't fit my recip. saw into it. Does anyone have a workaround to this?
9 replies omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2008954
Just duct tape it to the outside
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>>2009820
Or just glue the cupboard door small rubber bumpers on the bottom corners of your toolbox.
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>>2009950
I still hit doors and doorframes with the hard metal edges as I am moving through.
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>>2010025
Ah so you are a mong.
>>
>>2010025
Jesus Christ letting the liquor do the thinking eh? Sounds like your awesome to have as an employee haha human wrecking ball

Hi /diy/, just bought a condo. It’s 20 years old and in decent shape, but the kitchen is in desperate need of help. It is similar to pic related, but not the same.

I’ll have about 8,000-12,000 CAD to work with. The appliances are ok for now, but the counters need to go, there’s a stupid ledge that I’d like to level out, and the cabinet doors should be replaced. I’m hoping that the cabinets themselves can be kept.

I was wondering if what I’m thinking is realistic. For counters I’ve heard the ikea quartz is good. I’ve got a guy who can do custom cabinet doors for $20 a square foot.

Any other tips on making a place livable affordable is appreciated!
6 replies omitted. Click here to view.
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>>2008575
The elevated area is done on purpose. Leave it. It looks fine. I would buy new doors and slow close hardware from a big box store and then budget in a countertop replacement and diy in your back splash because you have a lot of it. This granite ran me $2200 but my kitchen is smaller. I diy my backslash but it was still $600 in materials.
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>>2008583
Looks good anon. Did you get a deal on your granite?

The elevated area just breaks up the room so much, I’d rather a smoother transition into the dining room.
>>
If you want granite/quartz, find a local professional who will give a shit about getting you a good result. I can't imagine Ikea are sourcing "better" quartz. Probably chinese made, and sold at italian or spanish prices.
>>
Great looking kitchen ! Im doing mine now. Nice bright sharp look to it.
>>
>>2008152
>just bought a condo
That was your first mistake




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