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Welcome to /diy/, a place to:

Post and discuss /diy/ projects, ask questions regarding /diy/ topics and exchange ideas and techniques.

Please keep in mind:
- This is a SFW board. No fleshlights or other sex toys.
- No weapons. That goes to /k/ - Weapons. The workmanship and techniques involved in creating objects which could be used as weapons or the portion of a weapons project that involves them (e.g., forging steel for a blade, machining for gunsmithing, what epoxy can I use to fix my bow) may be discussed in /diy/, but discussing weapon-specific techniques/designs or the actual use of weapons is disallowed. Things such as fixed blade knives or axes are considered tools, things such as swords, guns or explosives are considered weapons.
- No drugs or drug paraphernalia (See Global Rule 1). If you want to discuss something that could involve such things (e.g., carving a tobacco pipe from wood) that's fine, but make sure it's /diy/ related and doesn't involve drugs or it will result in deletion/ban.

Helpful links:
https://sites.google.com/site/diyelmo/
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/
>>
Some friendly suggestions for posting:
- First ask Google, then ask /diy/. Your question will probably be better received if you do so.
- List available resources (tools, materials, budget, time, etc.)
- Try to use pictures and explain the goal, if possible
- Be patient, this is a slow board; your thread will be around for days.
- Share your results! /diy/ loves to see problems solved and projects completed!

ye olde thread: >>1748210

>RULES
0. Electrics ≠ electronics. Appliances/mains/sparky stuff to /qtddtot/ or /sqt/. PC assembly >>>/g/
1. Search web first. Re-read all documentation/data-sheets related to your components/circuits. THEN ask. Show your work.
2. Pics > 1000 words. Post relevant schematic/picture/sketch with all part numbers/values/etc when asking for help. Focus/lighting counts.
2.5. State your skill level if asking an open-ended question.
3. Read posts fully. Solve more problems than you create.
4. /ohm/ is an anonymous, non-smoking general.

>I'm new to electronics. Where to get started?
It is an art/science of applying principles to requirements.
Find problem, learn principles, design and verify solution, build, test, post results, repeat

>Project ideas:

Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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>>1753589
>just use a ground plane
Fuck you, I would if I could. How else am I supposed to ground these bastards?
>>
>>1753597
ohhhhh. star ground is good
>>
This might be a stupid question but it's been bugging me for a while. Can a ldo regulator replace or perform better than a voltage reference?
I'm looking at my parts for a project and my reference voltage has a 48uV rms where as my regulator has a 300nV rms both at around 10hz-10khz.
>>
>>1753655
check the psrr in addition to noise. also check the temperature and load range over which that's measured. some good ldos probably are better than some shit references.
>>
Is there any way to connect/make an arduino/raspie powered cassette tape player? Cant find anything on the internet

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PayScale and Glassdoor seem to suggest otherwise, and so does basically every other reliable source I can think of.

Are the tradesmen who get paid a lot of money just a very loud minority of tradesmen?
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>>1753215
What do you do?
>>
Was a welder for about 6 years, got my journeyman ticket, did everything from fabrication to pipe and steel erection, heavy equipment repair. Ended up doing dragline maintenance and mine shutdowns, mmostly confined space carbon arc gouging, then preheat and fill with flux core, with intermittent hearing for the steel, worked 12 hour days for 24 days a month, not pay was 6k every 2 weeks, but I hated my life, switched trades because it left a salty taste in my life, switched to electrical, got an apprenticeship, did cocommercial for a year, then last year switched to industrial and now I do controls and build panels, for motor starters mostly, still making shitty apprentice wages but hoping once I have the 2nd ticket to get into a refinery or plant, in Alberta canada btw.
>>
>>1751707
No I’m a lowly apprentice sparky for a regular ol electrical contractor in southwest NM. The company I work for has a pretty big dick though so their footprint spreads through a good chunk of the state. I don’t want to do commercial electrical work my whole life though considering even head foremen on high scale jobs around here max out at like maybe $60k/yr.

>>1751727
Do you recommend I pursue a position as a lvl 1 tech/trainee after getting a journeyman electricians license?
>>
>>1753525
Are you responding to >>1753498 ?
>>
>>1748025
No way there's that kind of work in Delaware

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I have to replace my jet water pump in my basement. The links to the well (side connections) are easy, but there's a lot of hard water corrosion on the join to the house plumbing (top connection) and I don't want to damage the pipes if I can. What can I use to get rid of this corrosion, or should I get a plumber before I make it worse?
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>>1753246
I can infer the path of the drain and vent layout by assuming they wanted to do the least amount of work and use the least material. But I’m hesitant to start cutting pipes.
There must be some clever method I haven’t dredged up from google.
>>
>>1753251

Meth. Not even once.
>>
OP here
>>1753242
My grown kid knows a bunch of these types, but they're usually high so I don't trust them that much. I'll ask my neighbor if he knows one.
>>1753245
Phone cam is busted, sorry, no pic. Diaphragm pump is about two feet away, nothing else within a yard.
>>1753278
Only one, pump is about six feet below ground level
>>1753293
I only have about 1K I can spend, I can get the pump in my OP for about 325 and if I can keep the labor below 750 I can manage it. Not covered by insurance as it's normal wear and tear.
>>
>>1753427
Strange, the old pump started again as soon as I tried to bleed the water out of the pipes in the basement. Maybe it was an air bubble or something. I'll still replace it, but it can wait for a bit now till I have more money saved.
>>
>>1753392
well I guess that’s helpful thanks

Best steel toe work boots? Best steel toe work boots between $90 and $150?
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>>
>>1752863
>oioioi do ya haf ya loicense
>>
>>1752230
Says the 25 year old hipster.
>>
>>1752390
Won't they just bounce off?
>>
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>>1752355
they are protective gear you wear them in case of shit happens...
interesting that you (incoherently) project the mere thought of pretending to be someone into this :-)
sure you dont need toe caps go ahead wear your flip-flops and be a handy man
there is a difference between carelessnes and the delicate ability of a professional to judge certain safety factors but in the case of an accident there is nothing that differentiates the two ways of ignoring SAFETY MEASURES
any gear should fit the exercise...
sure depending on the situation they actually can be dangerous but in those situations you will be fucked anyways... depending on the mass,...they could potentially "cut your toes off" but i guess a clean cut is easier to "repair" for a surgeoun than a squished mushy mess of toenail bone and tissue
luckily been there and only seen that...
so its a nice to have item for sane people in my opinion , i wear them and i dont give a fuck about the cool guys running around the site with their "running shoes"
>>
>>1752390
just go for comfort after sorting for toecap ( would go for carbon polymer ) and maybe step on pointy things protection
definitely avoid cheapo bugman stuff
nearly every nation has its own large workboots company i usually buy according to this
i normally spend around 160 to 270$ and had cheaper-ish models that require more time to ride them fit and expensive ones that are super comfortable
one thing in common they all die at some point
to me its usally the sole forward bale or at the heel or untill the upper material starts to die and rip (usually at the sides where the front part bends when you make a step)
i always buy always buy puncture proof toe capped water and fuel proof with ankle protection...
you really have to try it out... few things are worse than uncomfortable working shoes

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Hi everyone,

I have an electrical issue with my apartment's circuit breaker.

Right now in the photo you can see fuses 12-18 are dedicated to 3 electrical heating/cooling air conditioners.

When someone runs AC on fuse 12,14 and AC on fuse 13,15, the 12,14 fuse will always blow because it is the last thing on that electrical branch. 13,15AC will continue to run.

This apartment is in NJ in a huge tower with 36 floors. The apartment company doesn't seem to give a shit about this problem.

Is there a way to run both AC at the same time? I am assuming the amperage is supposed to be correct for the AC and wiring because the apartment company provided these appliances, not us

Thank you so much for your help
17 replies and 3 images omitted. Click here to view.
>>
guys, if i am able to run a 125v 12a (1500w) hair dryer on a normal 20 breaker, does it mean i can run a space heater from target on this line too?
>>
>>1753638
What is the amperage of the space heater? If it is 12 amps, definitely yes. If it is 15 amps, also probably yes. If it is 20 amps, maybe but probably not.
>>
>>1753630
They have different taps on their transformers to correct for voltage drop over long drops to customers.
>>
>>1753627
New York City has some of the best tenant rights in the entire US. You're just afraid of contact your landlord because you're either doing something stupid or illegal or a millennial afraid of confronting someone.

Call 311 and say that your heat is broken.

>>1753630
I think you missed the sarcasm in his post.
>>
>>1753591
Look for gfis in the first run of a branch circuit. Also look for intermittent neutral connections (60~ volts from hot to neutral) Check meter can for corrosion on terminals. Fuck the little red lock this is diy

My bayonet light fixture has cracked, is there any way of just replacing the blue part so I don’t have to replace the entire fixture? If so what’s the part called. Thanks
1 reply omitted. Click here to view.
>>
>>1753453
https://www.screwfix.com/p/crabtree-capital-lamp-holder-bc/23150
>>
>>1753454
>>1753453
Thanks a lot
>>
>>1753454
>>1753453
If I already have a whole new light fixture, could I unscrew that bottom part off it and use it to replace the broken one?
>>
>>1753465
why would you do that when you can return the new fixture and buy only the socket you need for a few dollars?
>>
>>1753643
interestingly they cost almost the exact same price

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I just moved into my apartment and this is my space for my PC setup. I plan on putting up shelves and maybe getting a few plants, but I am useless when it comes to designing a sleek looking layout. Any talented anons here who could help or give me some tips? Thanks.
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>>1752154
Keep that quiver lower on your back and reach for the shaft of the arrow, not the knock. Easier to pull out. Alternatively, you can keep it in your lap like the mongols do in this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vt7Gs2EIR-E

>>1752181
Thank god that fad is fading quick in the 30+ demography.

>>1752103
Here's a photo of my tab. have you ysed something like this, or you tried it with your fingers on the string? Finger gloves maybe? I don't recommend those gloves, they do a hanf-job of protecting your fingers, while making it hard to aim.

If you did it without, try archery with such a tab. I recommend horse leather, it's strong and will stay strong with use. Pig leather gets soft with use. Some like that, I don't. It's not an option to hurt my fingers when I make a living smashing keyboards. :)

Thank you for your kind words. I hope you figure something with your illness. I've checked the wikipedia article, it sure sounds bad. Cold weather triggering it would devastate me, as I prefer colder, wet climates.
>>
>>1752154
kek
>>
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>>1751795
Fix that Ikea leg (red circle) and make a simple hutch and move all small stuff on top of it (ie: cds/dvds, games, figures/models). You can also add a light under the hutch if you want. Also add some support under the top part of the hutch so it wont bow over time.
>>
>>1752154
>>1752338
>quivers
>putting the arrow on the left side

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEG-ly9tQGk
>>
First, get rid of all the faggot shit, then we can talk.

Whats the first drill I should get?
Pic related
13 replies omitted. Click here to view.
>>
>>1753033
Get a Ryobi setup, Home Depot has the sales. Hammer drill option if you want to drill the occasional small hole into brick or concrete
>>
>>1753033
My suggestion, save up some money and get one of three brands:
Ridgid 18v stuff
Ryobi 18v stuff
or Milwauke M12 stuff.

Ryobi is decent but super affordable and they have quite a good selection of tools. Ridgid is a little better quality but I feel like they have a little less in the overall tool department. Milwaukee is expensive, especially their FUEL line, but their M12 stuff is fucking amazing and they have a huge tool lineup, as good, if not better than Ryobi's entire lineup.
>>
>>1752129
this
>>
>>1753119
>cordless drills with hammer options are just a waste of money and make the drill bigger and heavier
If you will never be drilling in masonry, sure. If you will regularly be drilling in masonry, or even just have a single project with a bunch of holes, sure. But if you might occasionally need a couple small holes it's the specific tool for the job. A proper SDS drill won't come close to repaying its investment under such use conditions.
>>
>>1753110
the average homeowner asking which drill to buy would never notice the differance between a 3/8 and 1/2" drill, beyond the 1/2" being "too heavy!!!!".

Sure the 1/2" will drill holes in 18g steel plate much better than its little brother, but either will drill small holes in dry wall to hang a toilet paper holder just as well as the other.

Know who's asking, and what theyre asking. Better is the enemy of good enough. Dont be a hyperbolic faggot.

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I'm fuckin primed and ready to kill. I want them to suffer.
Will post results. Any advice would be appreciated.
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>>
>>1751947
You need a water jug and a good dog
https://youtu.be/WVM00SySPSU
>>
>>1752955

what kind of reddit homo doesn't show the good part.
>>
I have tried traps, poison, and spikes that make vibrations/noises. Non of that shit works for moles. Then one day I thought what would Hitler do? Gas those moles. Duck tape a garden hose to an exhaust pipe. I used my golf cart. Cover entrance holes if there are any. If not then just insert hose into a tunnel. Then let it run for an hour.
>>
>>1753253
a friend of mine fixed a nato gas can spout onto the exhaust of his generator, then aimed the spout down into the holes.

does that count as a war crime?
>>
>>1753253
That shouldn't work if the car has a carburetor.

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any techs here ever work on these machines? they are the mcdonalds machine that makes the frappes and smoothies, model ma-8-2

what im lookin for is the password to reset the 7 day lockout. the service and tech manuals dont have them, and the one I found has incorrect passwords.
32 replies and 3 images omitted. Click here to view.
>>
>>1753022
ask your manager for the password
>>
>>1752921
This is why you work at mcdicks peasant
>>
>>1752921
If you could postpone it then nobody would clean it.
>>
I laugh at this minimum wage mcdonalds faggot trying to make employee of the month by hacking the ice machine (by googing, then asking ppl on 4chan for the password)

Then trys to suggest people who cant solve his problems for him need to go back to /b/. Fuck you anon, were not your personal army.
Clean the fucking machine you autist faggot.
>>
>>1753022
We dont work at mcdonalds like you do, you angry autist. Furthermore, we dont care about your loser life struggles.

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I designed and built this still because I wanted to use solar-generated electricity to power it and thereby get free distilled *water*. All you need is a battery bank and an inverter to power the electric burner and water pump. I want to make this design open-source in hopes that it will become useful to others such as myself. It works really well, and cost me like $70 to build. My next step is to make the water cooling jacket obsolete by using some kind of heat-exchange system like you find in air conditioning units. I would appreciate any input on that subject. This is an alembic still and I assure you that coils are not needed. ITT I will provide details concerning my off-grid electric *water* still.
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This is a little trick I learned from Popcorn Sutton. Because I insist on purity in my product and I drink this shit I don't use solder to join the condenser tubes. Instead, I welded the 2 tubes together using a copper elbow and oxy-acetylene welding. I got the copper filler rod from the local scrap yard: barebright copper wire is easy to find. I find that the oxy-acetylene process works better than TIG welding: TIG welding copper is hard because the arc dances around a lot. I'm an expert welder with over a decade as a professional metal fabricator but never tried to weld copper until this project. It's pretty hard. My weld wasn't perfect and had little pinholes in it so I covered the joint with bread dough with yeast. This is non-toxic, and the yeast makes the dough expand to fill any pinholes when it heats up. In hindsight, threaded mechanical joints would probably make a little more sense.
>>
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This is the part that you at home reading this might struggle with. In order to make the cheap $30 stainless 5 gallon pot I got from walmart airtight, I devised a system using these little studs to then support c-clamps to hold the lid tight to the pot. I TIG welded them to the pot. If you aren't a TIG welder with your own equipment you're gonna have to solve this problem your own way or take your $30 pot to a local metal fabrication shop. I'm sure a similar job won't cost too much. It took me only a few minutes to do. You can barely see the hinge that I TIG welded to the pot and the lid to make the lid an easier animal to handle. You will also notice the support for the copper condenser I rigged up. I actually need another one on the other side of the pot, but the hole I cut in the lid to allow the copper condenser inside is airtight without any bread-dough-glue needed. My last still needed that shit at that junction.
>>
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Here is another view of the pot and its hinge. This system I designed works well, but don't think you have to do it this way. Theres more than one way to skin a cat, as they say. But keep in mind that it's critical to keep your steam inside the system, so you don't want any leaks. The leaks show themselves easily in cooler temperatures. I heard that they can cause a catastrophic flash of fire if they concentrate in a room and then ignite. Anyway, that's my little electric alembic still. Let me know what you think.
>>
>>1753505
You'd get purer """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""water"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""", quicker, if you loosely packed your main column with copper or stainless scrubbing pads and insulated the bottom half of your column. Don't fill it so full and solids won't clog it up, and it'll boil faster.

Also you should pump from the bottom of the condenser up to the top, not the other way around. That way it fills all of the way up and drains out the top to repeat the cycle.

Add a shower head at the outlet with a sizeable drop back into the bucket to increase cooling capacity further for when you insulate your pot and move to enclosed gas or wood as a heat source.
>>
>>1753571
>if you loosely packed your main column with copper or stainless scrubbing pads

What is the idea behind this?

> insulated the bottom half of your column

this makes sense

>>1753571
>Also you should pump from the bottom of the condenser up to the top, not the other way around.

I see your point, but I have it nailed as to the water leaves the jacket at exactly the same rate that it goes in. I'm going to phase out water cooling asap. I already have a window mounted AC unit I plan on taking apart and using for my heat-exchange condenser cooler

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Late edition

Old Thread >>1745595

All the info you need about 3D-printing: https://pastebin.com/7Sb4TVdy

>Need help with prints? Go to:
https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/

If that doesn't help you solve your print problems, please post:
>A picture of the failed part
>Printer make & model
>Filament type/brand
>Bed & extruder temperature
>Print speed

Comment too long. Click here to view the full text.
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>>
>based random tennessee college put their 2020 solidworks activation code on an open access webpage

WE OUTCHEA
>>
>>1753507
I'm using 2016 and while I have had the solver fuck things up when I get sloppy a time or two, as long as I don't actually mess with the mates it's never done this. I haven't used 11 but in 16 it's really easy to hide individual parts of an assembly if you want better visibility, opening them separately and then reintegrating if you want to make something completely isolated, or just using the explode feature to temporarily move the assembly apart. The last one does mess up referencing for new sketches, but anything old is preserved.
>>
DAMN I FUCKING CALLED IT
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hvw3DrVAeTA

I have big brain
get a 32 bit board anons
>>
>>1753663
When I got my 32 bit board I raised the buffer from the original (ten commands or something like that, absolutely tiny) to two hundred, and even though I use octoprint I've never since had the printer slow down because it ran out of buffer, even when it's doing curves or .5mm wide infill or something else like that.

An alternative is to print from SD. Even if you have a tiny buffer SD reads much faster than serial ASCII so you're very unlikely to run into problems.
>>
>>1753667
its the display or some feature in firmware thats polling the sensors or data too frequently, most printers under 60mm/sec shouldn't have issues, but most printers can reach speeds higher than 60 these days.

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How does /diy/ melt their metals?
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>>
I work in a refinery with tons of free space, alone time and lots of scrap alumunium and copper rotting away. Is it possible to build an electric one on the cheap using parts from something like chinese soldering irons or camping stoves? I don't want to use briquettes and create a panic when someone smells something burning or sees a lot of smoke
>>
>>1752782
Get MAP gas next time. Yellow bottle. Burns hot as fuck. If you can coble together a nozel and get air to it you can use basically anything flammable. Wood fires probably won't cut it unfortunately.

Maybe you could diy some moonshine and use that?

Sry anon. You either need a metric fuckload of good charcaol and air or a better fuel.

Also next time mix 50/50 sand or limestone screenings with the plaster. Or that small use refractory cement if you can swing it in the future.

I know being broke sucks fucking ass man. Good luck
>>
>>1753111
Doubt anyone would have an answer for that, so I'll just say to experiment with it (try not to kill yourself) and see what kinds of temps you can create
>>
>>1753111
Just ask a superior you trust if you can take some of it home. And then build a home furnace and stuff in your house
>>
i plan to build a forge by pouring a form with refractory cement. it will be a square box about 2 cubed, about 2 inches thick. before I go spend 200 dollars on cement, can anyone see anything wrong with this?

I plan to use propane and a blower motor piped in through the bottom of one of the sides.

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Last thread
>>1735451
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>>
>>1750599
>all the higherups just get that 1000 yard stare for a minute before moving on.
higherups dont even set foot in server rooms let alone understand cable management
>>
>>1753501
>keeps the cabin warm and cozy
even gives off some dim soothing light 10/10
>>
>>1753501
Chimneyfire.jpg
>>
>>1744177
what do those words mean?
>>
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>>1753662
literally nothing,its gibberish, but its a reference to a movie called joe dirt, pic relate


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