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muay thai thread
i watch fights and make clips when i see something that i thought was cool. i'll be dumping some of my clips, mostly muay thai but some kickboxing circuits too like K1 and rarely GLORY. maybe some pictures here and there
feel free to discuss muay thai, ask questions or post your favorite clips too.
love muay thai, simple as
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Love Veeraphol. He was succesful in western boxing as well. Had a disgusting low kick and used his hands to set them up, when a lot of Thais were still just kick crazy or clinch crazy. Super well rounded, probably my favorite nak muay of all time
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>>95622
there's a muay thai gym nearish to me that I just found out of. How do I know if it's worth going to as I have no background in it? It talks up the guy running it but again what should I be looking for in a gym and what should I do to prepare and learn quick as a beginner?
>https://www.siamno1.com/ajahn-suchart/
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>>95631
See if they have a trial class and give it a go. Most gyms do trial classes. Looking at your link, the coach appears to be a Thai who has experience fighting in Thailand. Definitely looks like a decent gym and the coach has been doing muay Thai for a long time and in Thailand. Nothing really stands out to me as a red flag, I'd for sure check it out.
As far as what to look for, as long as they have a sparring class and spar regularly they're probably not a terrible place to learn. Be wary of gyms that advertise themselves as muay Thai but are just aerobic kickboxing gyms. If the gym has a fight team that competes regularly that's a great sign that you're in a good gym, if they never spar you're in a mcdojo. And if they never practice clinching, you're in a kickboxing gym that uses elbows. Clinching is integral to muay Thai and a lot of western gyms slack on the clinching.
To get the most out of the experience as a beginner, just show up consistently. That's the most important aspect. Everything else will fall into place. Bring your mouthguard and cup, your class will definitely have loaner gloves and shinguards to use before you get your own pair if you decide to stick with it. Just show up and follow along. You'll feel dead the first week or two but you'll love it.
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>>95632
appreciate the insight. Looks like I'll have to go from yellow shorts to blue if I want to spar.
Looking at their sched, all the classes are conditioning and then technique drills, but I'll inquire about spar sessions and clinching at the trial(not to get ahead of myself). Seems like all fighting gyms have this qualifier of many months before allowing sparring (I know it's very prevalent in boxing gyms near me, one place has 20 conditioning classes and then 24 'training classes you have to do before you can get approved to spar)
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>>95633
yeah many gyms will make sure you know the basics before they let you spar, that's actually a good thing for most people. the point of sparring is to practice technique and test what you've learned, and if you have no technique and haven't learned anything there's not much of a point in sending you in the ring to get battered.
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>>95634
Thanks anon, and enjoying the clips
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>>95642
no problem, muay thai is a great way to get in shape and build confidence and it's a great sport for self defense and combat competency in general. i'd recommend it to just about anybody, you don't have to spar if you you're not concerned about fighting. even the exercises will help the average person out if they're coming from nothing.
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favorite combos/techniques? I like to fake a low kick into a side kick to the body or head.
i also find myself using a jab cross rear kick combo very often, almost throwing the hands as a distraction to set up the kick.
Im trying to incorporate slipping and counterpunching a la peekaboo boxing style
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>>95683
i like a good old 1-2-chop the leg. it's a common combo because it works. i'm also partial to the lead hook to the body, a cross to the body and then a lead hook to the head. there's a lot of jabbing and crossing to the abdomen in muay thai but there aren't a lot of Thai body punchers, most of the body punching specialists in muay Thai are the Dutch fellas.
careful with bobbing and slipping forward in muay thai. good way to get kneed in the face if your opponent gets a read on your timing. most slipping in muay thai is backwards, or in phonebooth range where neither fighter decides to clinch which is rare in high level muay thai. they tend to clinch in that range rather than trade punches
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Some resources:
Understanding traditional scoring:
https://khunkaogym.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/a-laymans-guide-to-scoring-a-muay-thai-fight/
https://youtu.be/7J4gzeJO-4Q

>For watching
For live shows try:
Lumpinee: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYMw_GleQjXnKMjhCY58V4w
MAX: https://www.youtube.com/user/maxmuaythaichannel
Ch8: https://www.youtube.com/c/Thaich8
PETCHYINDEE Promotions: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsN96OvHRSZWiecrdPvy5Wg
ONE Championship: https://www.youtube.com/c/ONEChampionship
Thai Fight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThaifightOfficial

For older fights and highlights, try these:
https://www.youtube.com/c/vrx_mt
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-GLytOn12hONKClFKipxLw
https://www.youtube.com/user/sasagym/videos
https://www.youtube.com/c/TheBOXINGWALLABYWORKSHOP
https://www.youtube.com/c/BoxingWorksHermosaBeach
https://www.youtube.com/c/SiamScholar1
https://www.youtube.com/c/ThaiClassic
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0h1-SKzondK8nGKCo-p8Q/videos
https://www.youtube.com/c/ThaifightOfficial
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7YLfEYzInp7HdTYJQX7SOA
https://www.youtube.com/c/RajadamnernChannel
https://www.youtube.com/user/K1(kickboxing)

And an online magazine: http://siamfightmag.com/ (currently down for maintenance, but when it's up it's a treasure trove. interviews with a bunch of golden age legends, all kinds of cool articles about everything muay thai. it's mainly in french but there's an english translation available)
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>>95727
poor guys getting wrecked
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>>95730
ratchasing be like that
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How do i become looser and more fast?
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>>95731
holy smokes, got a goal to get to now
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>>95715
I dont bob or weave or slip forward i just slip side to side slightly to turn with straight punches and get to the outside of them. Im very wary about changing my level even on body shots and stuff. If there is a good opening ill do a slip jab to the body a la Cus D'mato but im very selective with that shot cuz its sooooo easy to get kicked in the face
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>>95715
also on the lead hook to the body do you usually do it like a shovel hook where your head and your weight is shifted over the same side leg? or more like a normal hook where you shift your weight to the opposite side leg?
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>>95732
how become looser post many time four chan
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>>95732
Stretch more! Stretching helps everything in muay thai so much. Higher kicks, snappier kicks. Flexibility is very underrated in martial arts in general, not just muay Thai. in Thailand they all start fighting at such a young age and so regularly they don't really need stretching routines, but a lot of us westerners don't pick it up until we're older and we need to stretch out those muscles like the hip flexors and the popliteus behind the kneed. we spend a lot of time sitting in the west and sitting really tightens up the parts of your hips and legs that you need to use to kick proficiently.
In terms of speed, I think your best bet would be weight lifting and resistance training. I'm not a doctor but as far as I know speed comes from muscles and contractions, and the stronger they are and the more force you're able to contract with the more speed you'll have. Just general strength training should improve your speed as long as you don't let the muscles get tight and keep up with your stretching as well.
>>95748
i shift my head inside of theirs, almost like forehead on their shoulder closeness. it keeps my head and most of my body safe enough to shift my weight forward and let loose with the hook. my weight is mostly on my front leg at that range. i picked this up from watching one of Sylvie's patreon sessions with Eagle Den Junlaphan, an incredible Thai boxer. In their sessions he does this thing where he dips his head inside, almost like when you clinch, when he's in phonebooth range. it lets him really dig into his body shots and protects him at the same time
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>>95753
Lerdsila obliterated that guy. His name is Jacob Hebeisen and that was the Lion Fight promotion. Lion Fight are one of the few promotions that puts on pure muay Thai shows here in the west. Valentina Shevchenko was hanging out with the head of that promotion like a week ago, I wonder if she'll ever make an appearance there.
Apparently Jacob was a short-notice fill in for a guy that canceled against Lerdsila. I guess Lerdsila just wasn't in the mood to put on a show that night lol and just ended it early.
Lerdsila is one of my favorites of all time personally. There's not a lot of footage of him fighting in Thailand's elite stadiums, but the little footage there is shows he's still just as slippery and evasive even when fighting Thais as when he's styling on farang. I'd love to make it to his gym in China one day to meet him and train with him, he seems like such a cool guy.
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>>95787
yoga, starting strength, muay thai gym will make me stronger? Me need to be unstoppable
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>>95806
You know those normie shirts that say shopping or dancing are cardio?
Kicking a bag full force for 10min is the real deal
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>>95806
yessir. it might be hard to balance weightlifting and muay thai at first. find a schedule that works for you and stick with it bro you'll be a monster compared to 90% of people. don't forget nutrition though, it's as important as the exercise. if you have a shitty diet you'll be working against yourself
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>>95722
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk3THNGRpNmCsRbCaWNeWSA
Forgot this one for older full fights. Excellent channel, has fights from tons of amazing fighters including people like Rodtang back when he was fighting in stadiums still.
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For learning muay Thai, obviously the best bet is to get inside of a gym. But if you can't for whatever reason, I think the gold standard for muay Thai instructionals is from Sylvie von Duuglas-Ittu, a female nak muay from the US who has been living in and fighting in Thailand for years now. She has over 250 fights in Thailand and she does private 1 on 1 sessions with the best fighters from the golden age and puts the full sessions onto Patreon.
Her YouTube where she puts up samples and sometimes full videos and a bunch of other useful muay thai related vids like massaging out knots etc: https://www.youtube.com/c/8limbsUs
Her Patreon that has all the private sessions: https://www.patreon.com/sylviemuay
It's $10 a month for full access, that's the one I get. Compared to a sport like BJJ where people charge hundreds of dollars for a single 2 hour instructional I consider the muay Thai library a godsend lol. It's so fucking good. She just has private sessions with these golden age legends, records them, and gives commentary over the video sometimes (she speaks Thai). Dudes like Dieselnoi and Samart are in there giving tips and teaching how to do this or that. Don't want to shill too hard but the MTL is easily the best $10 I spend a month
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>>95819
forgot to mention, a portion of the money from the patreon goes directly to the legends themselves. i forget how much but it's not insignificant. they gave dieselnoi a check for like $2000 a couple months ago.
when you're a poor farm kid and all you've ever known is fighting and your body gets too old to fight there's not a lot you can fall back on a lot of these guys are still poor and barely getting by so it's cool to be able to directly help em out.
-end shilling-
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>>95638
holy fuk
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The ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix will start on Friday, May 20th. Should be great. I want to see Rodtang vs Superlek
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>>96033
and since Savvas is fighting, here's a webm of 38 year old Lerdsila breaking his arm
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I think I'm becoming predictable. I have a few go-to combos that I use, its my bread and butter. I'm real good at landing them but when I go against someone who is far better than me, they can defend it even if I switch up targets and timing. I always, always start with boxing combos to set up my other "big" strikes and then string them together with more boxing combos. I always make sure to end the combo on a big kick. Sometimes it's a big rear roundhouse but sometimes I'll try to catch you with a step through lead roundhouse.
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>>96177
being predictable is a good way to become unpredictable. once your opponent thinks they have a read on you that's when you switch it up. throw the combo your comfortable way a couple times, then when you feel he's starting to get a read instead of throwing the low kick step in and blast him, for example. striking is all mind games and trying to be 2 steps ahead of your opponent at all times and feeding him some info to give him false confidence is a big part of it.
you just have to make sure you actually switch it up and don't fall back onto what you're comfortable with, which is hard when you're actually in the ring. it just takes time and eventually you'll get into the flow and be making actions quicker than your opponent can think.
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What is a good stretching routine for muay thai? I can't go to a gym until I move in 2 months, but am rather stiff and would wanna work on that already.
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>>96222
Sean Fagan has a decent beginner routine. I pretty much do these ones myself with the addition of some Lotus positions for my hips.
https://youtu.be/NsslSF7_m0c
I don't go yoga crazy, I just do basic stretches and it helps a shit ton. I had really weak and closed hip flexors when I first started and stretching was the best thing for my kicks. I'm sure if you went in depth and started doing yoga and shit it'd help even more, I just don't
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>>96214
It's always like this. I can't string together combos using my legs. Sometimes I double it up and throw 2 kicks in rapid succession or a kick and knee combo but that's it.

Boxing combo -> kick or knee -> boxing combo -> kick or knee -> (repeat) -> power low kick or step through lead kick finish.

My coach says if I had more cardio I'd improve a lot because he says that a lot of my classmates are overwhelmed with my hands and then get hit with the big strikes. I don't have good boxing or anything because people who box will fuck me up.
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BUAKAW RETURNS
>>96377
just takes time, the more you spar the more comfortable you'll get and you'll be able to have more agency instead of relying solely on your muscle memory. you can probably overwhelm people with your hands because it doesn't require many deliberate intentions, you can just unload on the dude and react. that can get you in trouble against good counterpunchers though. just keep grinding and listen to your coach.
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Stupid question, but what do your guys routine look like between this and the other stuff in your life like the gym and work?
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I feel like lead leg kicks are so underutilized these days, not just in muay thai but in combat sports in general. I think a lot of people don't feel they can generate enough power off the lead leg but man I just watched webm related fight and Boonchai was swinging them shits like a baseball bat. Can't remember too many people swinging that lead leg so powerfully
>>96505
I work for a contractor. He's old and takes a lot of time off so I usually have weeks off at a time, I also live with my girlfriend who has a job herself. Thankfully this affords me lots of free time that I can train and study with.
I usually wake up early, I like to get up around 5am and go run because I live in Florida and I don't like running in the heat, 5am is right before the sun starts coming up. Then I'll come home, tend to my plants (i have a garden, love plants) stretch and eat my breakfast. Days I'm not going to the gym I like to lift weights, nothing serious though I just have a callisthenic, kettlebell and dumbbell routine that I go through. I don't typically go to a conventional weightlifting gym for S&C, but that's just me. I'll usually do my plant shit, stretch, eat my breakfast and then chill for a while then midday I'll do my strength routine. Chilling usually involves watching old fights, watching instructionals, reading books, catching up on combat sport news, and just general shitposting. If I'm burned out I'll play a video game sometimes.
I'm lucky in that I have a lot of free time, enough money for my interests, and I don't have many interests outside of combat sports, literature and plants all of which can be pretty inexpensive compared to other hobbies.
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>>96632
Living a sweet life anon, nice
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will boxing help me beat muay thai guys? I just really want to have those fast hands
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>>96680
it could, absolutely. it's just hard for some people to balance two different sports at once. there are things you can do in boxing that will get you in trouble in muay thai and vice versa. but yeah, it's not uncommon that good boxing can give average muay thai guys some trouble.
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>>96689
i was thinking of using boxing as base for learning other striking martial arts. Doing a few months competing and then going to learn muay thai when i have the hands sharp and haed movement and guard good
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lawl nice acting from blue
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banger card tomorrow
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>>96846
haggerty pulled out for medical reasons, josue cruz will replace him
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>>96693
Boxing work is very different from MT. 1920s boxing was more similar. The reason is modern boxing is heavily influenced by amateur boxing, so it's less about power. MT and 1920s boxing is all about power.
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>>96693
I ended up doing this inadvertently i did a lil boxing as a kid and took up MT as an adult a few years ago.
The footwoork and defense is great (I was taught peekaboo style) but there is a lot of stuff that needs to be modified or thrown out transitioning from that to MT. You can still slip in MT but youre not bending down at the waist, just moving your torso just enough for the gloves to glance off of you. You also cant get as heavy on your feet as a boxer and cant get as low with as much knee bend. Ducking and bobbing and weaving is generally too big of a motion so what i do is just slip straight punches to the outside, block hooks with a helmet guard, and just generally keep a high tight guard with my chin tucked looking thru my eyebrows. All the punches from boxing still apply but the application is different because you cant bend at the hips or knees as much as in boxing. Overall it definitely helped but some bad habits that dont transfer will need to be unlearned. I think it does work nicely as a base overall tho. But if you wanna learn MT or MMA go with MT and just focus extra on making sure u have good hands
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>>96885
tldr
the punches and the guard transfer very well from boxing to MT but the head movement and footwork is subtly but importantly different and less exaggerated in MT than it is in boxing
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had some family visit for the weekend, wasn't watching anything. back to muay thai now
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ayy SiamFightMag is back up! this magazine is sweet if you love muay thai. they have all kinds of articles about all kinds of muay thai shit.
https://www.siamfightmag.com/en/the-champions-of-muay-thai-and-the-boxing-in-thailand/
i like this one for example because people are always talking about "nak muay can't box" and other trash yet they always have success when they transition from muay thai to western boxing (you never see boxers transition to muay thai though; riddick bowe tried muay thai and got bodied for example lol)
the klitschkos did muay thai young and transitioned to boxing iirc
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>no 8 or 10oz leopard print fairtex in stock
why live?
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>>97803
lol no kidding i just almost ordered myself a 16oz of those the other day but i couldn't decide between the tiger or the leopard
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Just got back from MT class, my drill partner was pretty bad today, one of those ppl u can tell isnt really into it or even slightly serious. She kept complaining how sweaty i was, especially when we were gonna clinch after the drills. I wiped myself off a few times out of courtesy but then she slapped a paper towel on my back and complained again.

i was like yeah i do get sweaty when i workout
(not a drop of sweat on her mind you)

and even tho i was going super light on all the strikes just like i do 80% of the time and 100% of the time with really weak or unskilled ppl, even tho i was going that light i saw her complaining to the instructor.

but then we did pyramid roundhouse kick from 1-10 and back down for 100 on each side on the bag and that improved my mood a bit :)

How are all of you Muay Thai Chads doing this evening?
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>>97822
oh and also when we switched partners for clinch work i got one of the actual fighters at my gym and he caught me with a knee to the ribs harder than he meant to by accident and my ribs made a cracking sound lmao but i tried to keep going but i had to take a few seconds to walk it off then got right back to it

I got him with a pretty good sweep from the clinch too, I dont think i even used my feet/legs that much i kinda just led him around and unbalanced him then pulled him down to the side with a collar tie/bicep grip.

he also complained i was sweaty after we clinched lol I know i sweat a lot. Maybe it gives me an advantage tho since im so slippery hehehe.

should i just bring a mf towel with me to wipe off between rounds out of courtesy? i really do sweat an absurd amount
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>>97822
>>97825
nice, that pyramid drill is awesome. that's one of the bad things about muay thai getting more popular, more "casuals" i guess you could call them. especially if your gym advertises as a "kickboxing" gym, kickboxing seems to attract a lot bitchy people just looking to exercise instead of learn to fight or do muay thai specifically
that sweep from the clinch catches a lot of people, they underestimate how much control you have on them if you can get that clinch position well. i like to dig my elbow into their collarbone with my collar arm, then you can push them with that arm with ease and you can pull them with the other hand. like doing judo almost lol push and pull them around then use their own resistance to toss them.
a lot of the jocky gym guys like saenchai and lerdsila don't really like clinching so they use this position and dump their opponents a lot. that position and underhooks, they got double underhooks all the time when their opponent would clash into them trying to clinch. then they just slip around and dump em. kek Lerdsila would sometimes just bodyslam people
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>>97829
that almost reminds me of a suplex with underhooks. even tho im a tard when it comes to grappling

Fucking love Lerdsila's style
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>>97832
i just bought this the other day
https://amz.run/5d0V
it's kinda goofy kek but lerdsila hasn't done a lot of instructionals. i think he does videos for that muay thai iyariin app or whatever that he's sponsored by now but i don't pay for that shit. i wish sylvie could get him in the muay thai library but he lives in china these days
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this card looks okay. not crazy stacked but I love watching Tawanchai fight. guy is next level, always makes it look easy
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38 years old here and still fast. These little Thai dudes age so well, especially after literal hundreds of fights
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>>98034
It gives me hope for starting relatively late in life. I plan to have my first amateur fight (mma probably) next summer and ill be 26
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>>98036
Ciryl Gane didn't start doing muay thai until he was 24, and didn't start MMA until a few years after that. At 32 he was 10-0 in the UFC, interim champion, was fighting for the real belt and hadn't even lost a round until he got wet blanketed by Ngannou.
Sylvie von Duuglas Ittu also started when she was 24 and now has over 250 fights in Thailand against the most competitive female muay thai fighters in the world.
There's a bunch of other successful fighters who started in their 20s who I can't recall off the top of my head but yeah, this isn't one of those sports where you have to be bred in a test tube with genetics specifically designed to play or else you'll never get to compete. It's fighting. There's genetic freaks who are gifted with athletic ability of course like any other sport, but the sport is also full of "average" people who just like to fight. Fighting professionally isn't "easy" to get into, but compared to playing a lot of other sports professionally it's much easier. Not a lot of people are willing to sign up to potentially get beat up for fun, a lot of promotions take what they can get. MMA specifically is still a relatively young sport. We're still in the early stages of evolution, the sport science isn't as exact and researched as a lot of other big sports and it's still not socially acceptable in a lot of places. There's tons of opportunity for people to get involved because it is still relatively niche and the skill ceiling isn't impossibly high. If you're a fast learner, have dedication and discipline, and are a good athlete you can catch up as a late bloomer easily. You just have to be a student of the game and not just coast. Put in effort to learn instead of just showing up and going through motions
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webm-brah, you got any Dekkers?
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>>98093
just this one of him getting knocked out lol
i don't watch a lot of farang. dany bill is my favorite. i feel dekkers is overrated. he had an entertaining style but people portray him as some kind of thai slayer for some reason when dude was losing more than he won
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>>95622
this ref is worse than Aubrey Edwards
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>>98198
what for? samson nodded and said he could still fight so the ref let him fight
betting is huge in muay thai and bettors get really uppity if anything they don't like happens. refs don't really stop fights in muay thai that often unless one guy is physically unable to continue
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>>98269
and the fighters themselves insist on fighting until they physically cannot because they don't want to disappoint the people who bet on them. if bettors think you gave up or quit they'll be less likely to bet on you next time and that's less money for you as a fighter because bettors like to give them bonuses if they win them big money
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hey guys, can a nice anon tell me the difference between power and strength.
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>>98282
you don't necessarily need a ton of strength to be powerful. power is what you feel when somebody hits you; strength is what you feel when somebody grabs you.
someone who's not very strong can generate a lot of power by understanding biomechanics and kinematics. everyone weighs enough to hurt another person, it's understanding how to put your bodyweight in motion in order to generate force that makes a "powerful" fighter.
strength on the other hand is typically determined by genetics and background. if someone has really strong grip strength in judo or bjj for example it's probably because they've been doing the sport for a long time, they have a grip training regiment, and/or they've done something else that increases hand strength (like being a mechanic, or working in construction)
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>>98283
obviously that's not to say that strength doesn't contribute to power. if you have a lot of dense, big muscles that's more weight to generate force with, and stronger muscles lets you put them into motion with more "violence", eg more acceleration, again generating more force. just that strength isn't necessarily the only contributing factor to someone's power
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>>98283
i understand, what kind of carryover do you think weightlifting has to both striking and grappling?
by weightlifting im reffering to strength training, squat, bench, deadlift, overhead press, pullups
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>>98285
i know a lot of hobby martial artists don't do a lot of traditional weightlifting. but almost every professional fighter does "functional" weightlifting, and i think every athlete should. lifting regiments that target muscles that affect the motions you do in your sport. pulling and pushing motions for punches, squats are amazing for kicks and punches (glutes are arguably one of the most important muscles for both striking and grappling), neck and shoulder exercises for chin and clinch, etc. things that make sense. lots of calisthenics too, bodyweight exercises help a lot with muscular endurance.
i know in bjj specifically a ton of guys don't lift weights at all, even professionals that compete at things like ADCC. and personally I think it's retarded. you'll never ever be at a disadvantage because you're stronger, and S&C makes you infinitely stronger than JUST rolling. in bjj you can get away with it just by being more knowledgeable than the other guy, but if the other guy has just as much knowledge as you AND is stronger than you, he wins. that's probably part of why Gordon Ryan is as good as he is, he's strong as fuck in addition to being a student of the game
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>>98287
you think deadlift could make someone harder to knockout? i do honestly.
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>>98288
sure, deadlifts help your traps and big traps can definitely give someone a better chin. the more solid your head sits on your neck the harder it is to knock you out. it's generally thought that what causes a knockout is your brain bashing against the inside of your skull due to the whiplash from a punch, that's why getting hit right on the chin puts people out because it generates the most whiplash of the head on the neck.
if your neck is one giant solid piece, it's going to absorb more of the force. probably a large reason why someone like Yoel Romero is impossible to knockout. he's been "KO'd" once in his whole career and he didn't even go out, and his neck is fused together surgically and he can't turn his head.
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>>98287
i do hindu pushups and pike pushups coupled with overhead press and an assortment of pushing exercises, do you think i am putting myself in the best position to hit hard with ease?
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>>98289
thank you, this is really good food for thought :)
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>>98290
most force in a punch is generated with the legs and hips, not a lot of a punch comes from the arm and shoulders funny enough. something like squats would probably go further to make you a harder hitter than presses and pushups imo
pushups and presses will give you way more aerobic endurance in your arms though, so your arms won't get as tired when you fight. you'll be able to keep them up longer and clinch longer, which is a common issue for people starting out
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>>98292
copy that, im 5'10 146 my sqt max is 275x3 from your expertise you think i could decimate people?
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>>98293
no clue bro. i don't think it directly correlates like that lol. depends how good you are at punching. that's a pretty good squat so no reason you shouldn't be able to generate some good power but it's a combination of things, not just your squat strength
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>>98295
uhhh, i know how to kinetically link with proficiency, i took 6 months of muay thai,boxed sometimes in hs, i follow several differnt martial arts which i try to decode for the sake of incorporation. the most complex combination ive mastered which ive used splendidly in sparring is lead teep, rear knee, left hook, cross, uppercut.
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>>98298
cross to body, uppercut to face
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>>98290
Do pulling exercises too like pull ups chin ups or rows. The shoulder and tricep may be responsible for snapping a punch out, but the back (traps, rear delts, and biceps) is responsible for snapping your hand back to your guard. This part is equally as important but often under emphasized. Also the lats and again biceps are very important for grappling. If you wanna be as good as possible you should literally exercise every single muscle you can think of to some degree. I do toe raises where i pick up only my big toe and ill workout my fingertips and hand extensors with a rice bucket I do neck raises for my neck and sometimes I even do Yoga type exercises that stretch and stengthen the tongue, face, and even eye muscles. Why not work on everything?
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>>98303
thats really intuitive, ill definitely do things of this sort
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i have another question, does the centerline exist in muay thai?
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>>98293
you're strong
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>>98306
yes it does, kicks rely on powerline more than punches. But mt doesn't have complex footwork like boxing, just simple lateral movement and get off the powerline.
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>>98311
yea, did i mention that i squat olympic style ass-to-grass.
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>>98312
would i be wise to keep these principles seperate per the discipline they belong to? or are the elements of both interchangeable enough to work synergistically?
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>>98312
>>98315
by principles i mean like center line in mt coupled with boxing footwork like shifting through dimensional planes
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>>98312
you don't need complex footwork for muay thai but it's not like it doesn't work. like a lot of things in muay thai when compared to western boxing, it's just more subtle because there's more dangers to worry about. you're right though there is a lot of lateral movement. but there's also a lot of in-and-out towards each other, depending on the style of the fighter. a lot of the advanced footwork in muay thai is about feinting and creating openings to score moreso than evasion or general defense
karuhat is one of my favorites with really good footwork. he often fought people who outweighed him and had more length so he had to be tricky to touch them. samart of course also had really good footwork, i've heard people call him the muhammad ali of muay thai lol.
like i said it kind of depends on the style of the gym and the fighter. some fighters have no footwork and just walk forward to get into the clinch over and over, some of them fight backwards the whole fight and are really good at getting away from whoever's chasing them. some gyms produce fighters with more technical footwork than others for sure
>>98315
you just have to be aware of the extra dangers present. it's one thing to step inside someone's leg in boxing, in muay thai you might get elbowed, or clinched, or kneed, or swept, or all four. etc. the ranges are different because of kicks, and that takes getting used to too. you'd be surprised how far away some people can kick you from lol.
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>>98318
the Thai stance is narrower and more upright you can't just lean like a joystick. Most outrageous thing you see is the matrix lean to dodge head kick. Slip and counter is good if you can do it but aggressive head movement to push in for body shots and slip&uppercut can be punished fairly easily.
You may want to let your combo fly right when you cut an angle and square up again because of the threat of the switch kick (or a spin hook kick).
But you may want to experiment for yourself, maybe with a wider stance like kickboxing and be more aggressive with your heads n hands
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>>98350
is lateral slipping and level changes followed by attacks a viable counter to someone initiating clinch and trying to set up combos? or is pullback+ angle readjustment a safer bet. i can imagine one can use a switch-kick setup to kick off counter punching.
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>>98351
they can both work but in muay thai you'll notice just off angling is the most common way people get away from a clincher or just whenever they don't want to be infighting. lots of teeps and stiff arms and you'll see them angle out off the stiff arm, or grab them then step off and throw using the attacker's momentum to carry them
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>>98352
stiff arm is foreign to me, when and where should that be executed?
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>>98384
just join a gym and learn man. It's nice to know thing but it's better to do them
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I'm interested in trying muay thai, but cte and general brain damage stuff sort of spooks me. I realize you need to sparr to learn, and that danger is a part of what you sign up for. I hear thai do flow sparring/light sparring in trainging, but do a lot of real fights. What are your guys experience with this stuff? Do you or anyone at your gyms have noticeable lasting effects?
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>>99004
cte is not only reallly cool everybody has it, don't be afraid come join us in the brain damaged crew and be blissful
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https://youtu.be/9cu50XJ8f-I?t=19203
Ah man, Tawanchai lit Larson up in this fight. Wasn't even close desu Tawanchai was just on a completely different level from him.
Tawanchai throws his teeps like all the jocky gym guys with the back foot propelling the rest of the body forward. Ajarn Pipa teaches the teep like this. Silapathai, Lerdsila, Saenchai, and Skarbowski all throw a teep like it, it's cool to see the technique get passed down through the generations lol.
https://youtu.be/kfQn4U7HMto
Silapathai demonstrates it with a step through your stance but you can do it off the lead teep too, you just lift then kind of hop with your back leg.
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>>99004
Well, CTE isn't really fully understood yet. Obviously getting hit in the head isn't good for your brain, and if you do muay Thai getting hit in the head is inevitable. But CTE can affect any two individuals in different ways and we don't know much about the exact mechanisms behind it. Some rare lucky people don't even experience any side effects, people like Sugar Ray Leonard, but we don't know why.
To be honest if you're worried about your brain health I wouldn't recommend a striking sport. It's not guaranteed you get concussions or brain damage but it's a real possibility. The goal is to hit and not get hit, fwiw, but getting hit is inevitable. And the longer you do it the more it'll add up, even the little hits can add to CTE.
And it's true that Thais tend to spar more playfully but you're probably not in Thailand so odds are you'll get a regular gym doing regular sparring. Sparring in the west is still different from how they do it in 90% of cases, even when we're sparring "light" here in the west we tend to deck each other on occasion. Even playful sparring can add up, too.
As far as my experience with it, I don't really get clocked that often and I already had an awful memory before I ever started so I can't say I've felt any real CTE effects lol. CTE takes time to manifest, who knows I might be in a wheelchair when I'm 72.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt6t7VJBtuU
Here's Karuhat and Hippy having an exhibition match earlier this year. One was born in 1968, the other was borin in 1967. So these are two dudes in their 50s who grew up doing muay Thai (literally started as toddlers) and they're still chillin. Cognitively they're both still all there as well. Hippy fought like an animal back in the day and Karuhat was always fighting up in weight fighting guys bigger than him. CTE doesn't seem to be hitting them too hard, but again everyone's different.
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this will be a really cool show June 20th. a lot of good fighters on this one. kind of like a super event for muay thai, lot of "hot" names with win streaks going.
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>>96460
I'm from Belarus, I heard we have very strong muay thai, is it true?
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>>99321
i dont know buddy probably not, why the hell would an oriental striking art be taught there? mt is not exactly niche but i doubt you'd find good quality gyms for it. maybe Sambo or kickboxing
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>>99321
Belarus produces tough kickboxers some of whom move onto mt
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>>99260
thanks. Gonna set a reminder, cant wait to see this Batman guy fight lmao
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>>99321
andrei kulebin won a MAX tournament like 10 years ago. MAX isn't super prestigious or anything, it's a thai vs farang specific promotion but it is pretty popular. there's a few Belarusian athletes that pop up here and there in muay thai circuits. i wouldn't say they're well known for their muay thai like the french or the dutch but yeah there's definitely some. i think like a lot of countries the average belarusian is too big for serious stadium muay thai so you guys tend to do kickboxing with thai stylists like ignashov the red scorpion or national belarusian muay thai circuits
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Here's one for you all, how to train ruup?
that mental toughness and composure in a ring, not showing that tiredness, being weary or hurt.
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>>95622
Hey anon
Thanks for this thread
It is awesome
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>>99409
muay thai is awesome isn't it
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>>99384
lots of running. in thailand running isn't just for cardio, they do it for mental toughness too. that's why a lot of them run without music, it's about building the toughness
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>>99338
>>99346
>>99382
Thanks, our local guy like to say they are best in the world and regularly beat the shit out of strongest muay thai fighters in the world
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>>99414
makes sense, I tried running a few hours after the gym and I'm hurting haha sore all over, gotta built that toughness and quick healing.
Any tips for recovery/better recovery and healing?
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>>99472
Prioritize sleep
Get your proteins in
Lots of water
Again, sleep
(addtl. foam rolling, stretching, cold showers)
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>>99411
I appreciate your knowledge and passion for the sport, i thank you for this thread also
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>>99472
like the other dude said good quality rest. full night of sleep, enough water, quality food, stretching and massaging the hotspots. the important part is actually giving your body time to recover. a lot of people work their bodies to dust then get right back into the gym the next day and go just as hard then wonder why they burn out in a month. you have to give your body time to rest sometimes, just how it is. especially true the older you are, the longer it'll take to recover
if you can i recommend getting deep tissue massages. works wonders for those sore bits. if you can't get a massage, at least try to stretch it out. get a foam roller if you can and just roll the shit out of it. get the built-up fluids all spread out instead of concentrated into whatever the hotspot is. stretching helps me recover way faster
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>>99477
for sure. i just think muay thai is great and criminally underappreciated in the west. most familiarity with it comes from MMA and MMA muay thai is completely different from traditional stadium muay thai. i could go on for ages about the differences between muay thai in thailand and muay thai everywhere else, and i'm still finding new stuff myself every day and i don't even speak thai.
that's one of the main things, it's hard to follow the sport if you can't at least read the language. takes a while to start to recognize them otherwise lol
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>>95622
Appreciate all the content and knowledge, OP. Do you compete yourself? I did a couple amateur kickboxing fights, but I need to level up my game.
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>>99595
What's to look for in a gym? The gyms around me all look too good, too clean, too many women on posters, not that I'm sexist but that screams cardio kickboxing. SHould I look for something that look simple and gritty?
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Anyone like Namsaknoi? He's my favourite.
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>>99597
not actively. i'm not a professional or anything, it's hard to make a living off muay thai in thailand let alone anywhere else. i just like fighting and muay thai is as good as striking gets imo
>>99623
just make sure they spar. that's the important bit if you're interested in learning how to fight or actually do muay thai. if there's no sparring you're at a cardio kickboxing gym.
there's a lot of women in muay thai though. lots of women at a gym shouldn't be a red flag, surprising amount of them take it very seriously. muay thai is more friendly to smaller people anyways, considering thais are kind of small on average. women like muay thai lol
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>>99729
namsaknoi is one of the goats. crazy technical but when he fought other femeu like saenchai he'd switch to clinching and kneeing. saenchai hates clinching, that's the secret to beating him apparently lmao and namsaknoi beat him twice
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>>99902
https://www.youtube.com/c/NamsaknoiMuayThai/videos
he has a youtube channel. hasn't uploaded since covid started but there's a ton of cool stuff on there
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Hello anons, does this sound like a mcDojo? I’ve found a MMA/MT gym near me and attended a trial, they only allowed for one trial day. After which you pick a bronze/silver/gold membership which binds you for 3 months.
Around 20-25 minutes was warm up and shadow boxing after which I was dead, especially in the shoulders, to the point I couldn’t hold my hands up in a guard position for anything over a few seconds. I suppose this is a good thing though because this will improve endurance. After this all we did was kick pads (with partner) for the remainder of the hour. After this there was sparring but they only allow you to practice if you know the fundamentals, so after 2-3 months they said.
The instructors sound good on the website but the Algerian guy does not exist online, even though he’s supposedly earned championship titles and whatnot. The white guy has some boxing fights online but he loses pretty much all of them. There is also some asian guy, looks Filipino, who idk but he works with beginners. During the kicking session he didn’t give much feedback to anyone at all and I couldn’t hear him during group explanations due to the other, advanced group, drowning him out. Though it seems like they had more feedback given.
The gym itself is quite large and well taken care of, the people there are cool, they have sparring etc. but in terms of instructors and teaching things I’ve been to much much better gyms (though not MT) and I worry it might be a mcDojo. Any advice?
https://www.thegauntletfightacademy.com/team
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>first day at the gym
>footwork not that bad
>punches not that bad
>kicks were bad
>I threw kicks for 2h
>my left knee hurts because I was not rotating my left foot and I was forcing my knee
>my right foot hurts because some of my kicks were from too far and I was hitting with my foot
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>>99914
wouldn't say it's necessarily a mcdojo. they spar and the coaches have experience even if they're not world champs (some people make better coaches than they do fighters). it sounds pretty typical honestly. that'll probably be about standard wherever you go unless you go to thailand specifically. if you want to progress fast consider getting private sessions so they can actually give you personal feedback. a lot of the time coaches are more concerned with training up people they know are going to fight so they can be ready. new people aren't even in shape to start fighting yet so it's best to let them follow along and get their body used to the sport, you probably won't get a ton of personal feedback unless you ask for it.
>>99936
takes a while to get used to kicking. punches are kind of intuitive for a lot of people. kicking always feels weird until you get tuned up for it. i highly recommend adding a stretching set to your routine, you'll progress much more quickly with your kicks if you work on flexibility too
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chalermdet knows trijak is going to throw another knee so he just sweeps his standing leg. surprised you don't see that more often really
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just got me a pair of these bad boys for $60. usually going for 90-120$+. Superexportshop is doing a Topking sale, 20% off all their Topking gear.
https://superexportshop.org/
It's a muay thai outlet in Thailand. I think they sponsor Superbon too, I see him wearing SXS gear in his videos sometimes.
These shinguards are top tier. Idk about other Topking stuff but the shinguards are about as good as it gets. This shop ships from Thailand though so you'll have to pay shipping. Even with shipping to US my order was cheaper than most other shops lol and it got here in 5 days, was expecting to wait at least a week or more.
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>>98284
Yea it really depends on technical abilities
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How much would muay thai change if low blows were legal and groin protection was not allowed?

Seems like inside leg kicks would be brutal as groin kicks. Would it just result in a contest of who could kick the ither guy in the balls first?
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>>100144
probably wouldn't change that much. low blows aren't technically "legal" in muay thai but they're usually not a big deal either. fights rarely get paused for groin strikes. now they do wear steel protectors, and you said no protection allowed, but it still probably wouldn't make much of a difference. they'd just train to block their sack too. it's actually kind of difficult to kick someone in the sack if they know you're trying to, it's a relatively small target.
i remember some high profile fighters talking about how mma would change if groin strikes were legal and their conclusion was not much would change. wish i could remember what video it was because they made good points but the gist of it is they'd just train to protect their nuts too
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>>100138
hand manipulation is so underrated by casual viewers. i guess because it's hard to see in real time but you always hear people talking about footwork and head movement but relatively little talk about handwork. samkor stuffed the left and parried the right in this exchange, took basically 0 damage. a lot of the time you don't need risky head movements or room for lateral movement, even in western boxing high level boxers are constantly touching each other's hands when they're inside fighting. deserves more attention imo
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>knee all fucked up from taking low kicks
>now i have to do boxing until it gets better

Fuck me.
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>>100146
Oh. I thought stuff like inside leg kicks would make it hard to block since theyd just be able to raise the kick to the groin instead of hitting the leg
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>>95631
Probably the most legit school you will find in your province
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>>100208
the leg is a big target and it's a "predictable" target, it's extended forward and you learn when people are going to put their weight on it. the nuts are more like a bullseye compared to a leg kick and it's deeper inside their box so you have to step in closer so more chance to get countered.
not that groin shots wouldn't be effective but i think it'd be more like a liver shot than a new meta for kickboxing. sometimes it'd end a fight if someone tapped it right but most of the time you're probably not going to get at it enough to get a stoppage unless you're some kind of nutkicking specialist kek
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Love this thread, hey op do you have any go to conditioning exercises/drills/programs? I urgently need to improve my stamina
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>>100299
I'm another anon but maybe you guys can recommend me some rope skipping routine that I can do 2-3 times per week?
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>>98303
Ur toe and eye muscles must be jacked
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Hey anons, Just had my first muay Thai class yesterday. Holy smokes the conditioning is no joke, I couldn't keep up.
Question regarding striking. They were saying that for jabs, weights on your back foot and you should be able to practice it with pickup up your front one, and with crosses, weights on the front and you could pick up your back(not in a fight but to train the skill).
How the heck do you shift weights without them 1-pinching the knees( especially for the back felt like I was leaning back from my jabs) and 2 without lifting the feet, I definitely lean forward and heel raise some on the cross.
Any help appreciated (I come from a light boxing background)
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>>100299
for stamina it's not one thing in particular really. you could have great conditioning and still gas out in a fight. make sure you're breathing properly and try to stay relaxed as possible. being tense will use more energy.
a lot of people think running = cardio, and it is, but it's not the ONLY cardio. if you want to run marathons, train to run. if you want to fight, train to fight. running X amount of miles every day will only take you so far; mix intervals of sprints into your runs. do rounds of shadowboxing, rounds of bagwork. don't just mindlessly hit the bag or shadowbox, set a timer. if you're going to be fighting 5 rounds of 3 minutes with 2 minutes of rest in between, set a timer and shadowbox for 8 rounds of 5 minutes with 1 minute of rest in between. get your body used to the movements. those 100 kicks each leg drills aren't just for form, they're also for conditioning.
basically my advice is do more of what you would be doing in a match. sprint more to simulate those bursty exchanges of energy, high intensity shadowboxing and practice breathing and relaxing, high rep drills to get your muscles conditioned to the movements. also diet can make a big difference in your performance. when i eat like shit i feel like shit, when i eat clean i feel good and have more energy. and make sure you're getting enough carbs to keep your body functioning, i know a lot of people are on this keto shit but for me that diet makes me feel terrible. carbs are energy, keto is fine for office workers but people who do high intensity exercise like muay thai need some. they eat a lot of rice in thailand.
>>100321
https://youtu.be/V6dVRUzvA9Q
these aren't bad. for me skipping is more of a warmup, i like to start with skipping to get my blood flowing. these are some good exercises, if you're new to jumping rope it'll take some practice at first to stop hitting your toes all the time. start with what you're capable of then add more or longer sets as you progress
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>>100336
with a jab you're kind of dropping your weight down into the jab. you generally step with your jab and that's when your weight's planted on your back foot. that's what they mean by picking up your front foot. you pick it up, and as you step and as it's coming down your jab is coming forward with it. maybe you've heard of a step jab or a dropstep jab or some nerds even call it a "jolt" instead of a jab because that's what jack dempsey used to call it. sounds like that's what they're trying to teach you to do with your jab. it's more powerful than just throwing it from the shoulder. your feet should be active when you throw a punch. not dramatically, but your feet move with your punch.
in the webm i attached it's very subtle but you can see Veeraphol (blue shorts) slightly lift his lead leg when he throws the jab. it's a small movement but his feet are moving forward with his jab, almost like he's bouncing
a cross comes from the hip. your back leg pushes off the ground, the ground "pushes" back because that's how physics work, that energy from the ground moves up through your body and if you want it to come out of your hand you rotate the hip. so you push with your back foot, the heel rotates like you said, your weight comes forward onto the front leg from there, and you twist from the hip to "whip" your arm out from the shoulder. but it's all in one motion, almost all at the same time. you're not just dropping your weight onto your front leg, you're pushing it there off your foot. when your punch is fully extended you should have a "runner's" foot, your back leg should be in a position to start a sprint, because you're pushing off of it to push your weight forward. hope this helps in some way for you
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>>100353
much appreciated anon. I was a bit surprised at the stance differences and I do tend to over pivot on my feet. the explanation you gave is helped, thanks for the detail!
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Want to take up Muay Thai, is 30 too old? I know I won’t be competing at any high levels and yes I have played contact sports before; some rugby, afl, grappling, boxing.
Also, how do you protect against joint damage particularly knees with so much work and strain placed there? And is there some kind of flexibility requirement for kicks prior to starting?
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>>100430
of course it's not. there's people of all ages in any given gym. earlier in the thread i posted an exhibition between two 50 year olds. buakaw is in his 40s and about to have a fight, saenchai is in his 40s and still fights all the time. of course, they've been doing it since they were kids but they're still doing it as older men. kevin ross started when he was like 23, sylvie started when she was 24, cyril gane started at 24. and those are just high-level examples. you don't have to start as a kid to do muay thai, especially if you don't want to fight in stadiums like lumpinee and raja. i've seen coaches as old as 70 still doing live examples and sparring lol. 30 is young still, what you get out of it just depends on how much you put in. it can be a great way to get in shape, give you confidence, teach you how to defend yourself, and give you a competitive outlet. i know guys who didn't sign up for their first fight until their mid 40s. it's never too late to start, really. for martial arts, people tend to hit their primes around 30-34 years old.
as far as protecting against damage, it's all down to technique and recovery. with any physical sport there's going to be some wear and tear, especially in a contact combat sport like muay thai where the goal is to do damage to your opponent. but you're also strengthening and conditioning your body with the sport, so it's a give and take. you have to let your body recover, which a lot of people don't and then they get lasting injuries. remember that in Thailand it's not uncommon for pro fighters to have multiple matches in one month, some people even have multiple fights in one day sometimes. if they were sustaining career-threatening damage all the time they wouldn't be able to make a living. i think some wear and tear over time is inevitable but serious injury isn't a necessity if you take care of your body. and it also depends on how invested you get into the sport.
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>>100430
>>100458
no flexibility requirements. that's what the gym is for, you go there to get in shape. nobody expects you to show up to the gym your first day in fighting shape. you'll gain flexibility as you train, no worries there. i had 0 flexibility when i started, couldn't even touch my toes lol.
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Tip toe or planted feet for body kicks? Planted feels awkward for me as i can’t fully rotate the hip without twisting my knee in
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>>95820
agree 100%
Sylvie is the real world equivalent of the old man in the mountains that teaches martial arts secrets except it's easy to understand and available to everyone and actually fucking works.
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>>100844
depends on the range and setup you're throwing from anon. for long range, either set up with hands then cheat step the supporting foot forward/pointing the toes out, which opens your hips up, then throw the body round. if you can cover range easily you can disguise a ball of foot pivoting round as a long knee/push then angle your chambered leg at the last moment to hit the body. Different from a questionmark kick but similar directional feint.

For close range, step your supporting foot out while you punch/frame then throw the body round. The step is a big tell but doesn't matter if you blend it with other techniques and hide that shit, and throw the kick quickly by engaging your hips and core.

T. wt gyeorugi athlete who expanded into mma since 2016
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>>100844
yeah really depends. balls of your feet obviously offer more height and rotation via pivot but are fractionally slower. some people don't pivot much and instead just plant their foot at an angle and throw the kick from there. it's faster that way but requires a step like mentioned, a lot of dutch stylists throw it this way and cover up the step with boxing and end the combo with a kick.
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>>100940
end of an era. was great seeing superbon get his win but it was bittersweet seeing petrosyan get knocked out cold.
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>>100876
>>100940
I feel like the pivot body kick is akin to a whipping motion and impacts on horizontal plane while in the planted version the leg goes straight from the ground to the body diagonally, correct?

For the head kick I believe the pivot is king
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>>95622
Is kickboxing much worse than muay thai? I thought it is almost the same thing, but whenever I see threads about "recommend me muay thai or kickboxing" people usually say muay thai is better.
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>>101160
better for what? just different rulesets really. muay thai is a kind of kickboxing, you could say. muay thai is kickboxing with a ruleset that allows elbows, clinching and sweeps. there's more nuance to muay thai than that but that's the basic gist. since the muay thai ruleset has more weapons available ("art of 8 limbs") than typical kickboxing rules like those you'd see in K-1 or GLORY people tend to say muay thai is "better" than kickboxing because it's more "well-rounded". although you're unlikely to find a gym that teaches a good clinch outside of thailand
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>>101161
that being said kickboxing and muay thai are both just sports. one's not really 'better' than the other, there are kickboxers who can beat nak muay and vice versa. they're very similar sports and a lot of it is interchangeable. a lot of thai kickboxers start off doing muay thai and transition to kickboxing, like buakaw or petchpanomrung. and even a lot of non-thais use muay thai as a base for their kickboxing, like ernesto hoost and his students like tyrone spong.
whether one is better than the other is up to which ruleset you find more entertaining. muay thai has more nuance and probably isn't as "casual" friendly as kickboxing. the defense and offense are different between the two sports because of the scoring criteria; for example in muay thai, kicking the arm will score. in kickboxing, it's a blocked strike and doesn't score. this creates different incentives for the fighters so they have different philosophies and strategies between the sports, besides the elbows and clinches and sweeps.
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>>101161
>lthough you're unlikely to find a gym that teaches a good clinch outside of thailand
Why so?
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>>101162
Sweeps are allowed in kickboxing too.
>>101174
Climbing is hard to learn and hard to teach. The clinch has postural dominance, arm position fighting, a particular position’s gimmicks, trips, knees, etc all at once. Only Thais who fight from 9 with hundreds of fights have enough experience to teach you
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Going from kickboxing to Muay Thai in my next fight. What do I need to work on within the next two months? I've thrown knees in sparring and elbows only in the bag, and I need more clinchwork practice. Anything else to be mindful of?
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>>101190
depends on the ruleset. sweeps are allowed but i've seen some orgs not give points for them. also more kinds of sweeps are allowed in muay thai, in kickboxing it's generally only ankle sweeps i believe. i've also seen kickboxing rulesets with elbows, was just watching a kickboxing fight the other day and they started throwing elbows. that was a new one lol
>>101174
clinching is hard and nobody really does it at the level that Thais do. it's not something you can really learn from an instructional, you have to spar to learn it. it's like wrestling, some countries have no good wrestling programs and it's almost impossible to learn it to a high level on your own. no other sport really has clinching mechanics like muay thai, i guess MMA would allow it but i don't know any mma fighters that are purely clinch fighters like you'll find in muay thai. since no sport really has a clinch game like muay thai you're just going to be hard pressed to find instructors that are elite at clinching outside of Thailand. not that they don't exist, you just have to get lucky and odds are if they're good at clinching they lived and/or trained in Thailand for a period lol.
>>101196
just be familiar with the scoring criteria. you don't want to be the guy who throws a hundred head punches only to lose because the dude kicked your arm more. know the basics of clinching but if you're fighting a clinch fighter you're not going to learn enough in two months to stop him; learn how to neutralize it instead and keep the fight where you're more comfortable. and fix your guard. that "11" guard that everyone does in kickboxing will get your head smashed with elbows. really your coach should cover all this, ask him
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does conditioning just get easier with time? I feel I'm on a path to getting burnt out, trouble keeping up. should I be doing HITT on my off days or long easy runs?
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>>101254
it does get easier as your body adjusts. that's the conditioning lol. push yourself, but don't break yourself. if you're having trouble keeping up in the gym that's normal. keep in mind how much longer some people may have been doing this than you. rome wasn't built in a day, getting your body into fight condition takes time and muay thai is really hard on your endurance. the most important thing is consistency, just keep showing up. not every day is going to be 100%, some days you'll just be slower and struggle to keep up. it happens.
as far as HITT versus casual exercise, it depends on you. neither one are "necessary". valentina shevchenko doesn't run, joe valtellini doesn't run. but they go hard in the gym to get their body conditioned. whatever works best for you, but i'd say if you're getting burned out in the gym you should take it easy outside.
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know this is more of a boxing/striking question but any tips for learning the boxer skip? struggle with the rhythm when jumping rope- conditioning portion has a lot of jump rope patterns I'm still learning
also any tips with hooks?- place I go to says to keep elbows high but I keep dragging mine and find it hard to bring them back in time to protect a side of my face (especially with a 3-4)
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>>101464
https://youtu.be/HdIJHc3u1Ws
decent tutorial on skipping.
for outside hooks (as opposed to shovel hooks) you want to keep your powerline intact. arms straight, elbow parallel to the knuckles.
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https://youtu.be/E_6xEuSQ93A
cool video from superbon breaking down his KO of petrosyan. some basic stuff, some advanced stuff. the right straight-headkick setup to catch a counter off a backwards lean is dope, but like he says petrosyan never did it in this fight
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>>101726
kind of the same concept for the KO kick too. he threw the hook to bait a reactive movement for a cross that usually follows a left hook and threw the headkick instead because it has way more range on it. petrosyan reacted to the hook, went to step out of range of the straight he thought was coming next and instead got kicked in the head
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from THE MATCH 2022 earlier/yesterday. every time kongnapa KOs somebody it looks like they were shot
muay thai numba one
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big big muay thai event in TWO HOURS from this post (5pm Thai time)
be there or be square
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>>101830
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>>101847
>>101830
https://youtu.be/X9i3KhKJ_5Y
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>>101848
cheers
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>>101848
petchsila is a favorite of mine right now but i feel petchsommai really handled him well. neutralized a good majority of his game. good win for him
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>>101857
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>>101848
I just wish the UI were in English
Is there a list of whose fighting?
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>>101860
>>101830
current fight is ronachai vs yothin
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>>101861
yothin in blue, ronachai in red
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At what point do you all think someone should start looking at joining in with sparring sessions? I've been training for a few weeks and obviously aren't expecting to start soon, but it would be nice to know how long it normally takes someone to reach that level of competence
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>>102017
depends on you really. i've seen gyms where people spar their first week (not recommended lol) and i've seen gyms where you don't spar until you're in the advanced class. generally people stat sparring a month or two in if they're comfortable. most coaches won't have you sparring until you have the basics down, like the stance, how to throw punches and kicks, how to throw a combo or two, and the basics of how to defend yourself. once you feel comfortable enough doing the basic stuff you can start to learn how to apply it all via sparring. usually your coach will have a feel for if you're ready to spar or not, can always ask him when you feel comfortable. or if they ask you to spar and you're NOT comfortable you can tell them that too, nobody will force you in the ring.
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https://youtu.be/kBzPFjr7JhU
there was a youth tournament earlier today in case anyone is curious. everyone talks about how young they start in thailand but not a lot of people see it with their own eyes because a lot of it isn't usually televised.
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>>102079
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>>100795
The refs are next level in muay thai. Catching the knocked out fighter takes some good reactions and bravery. Seen quite a few where they block low kicks that are thrown as the opponent is swept/knocked down. They never seem to penalise, they just casually block the illegal kick themselves and send them to the corner like normal. Seen some enter some pretty wild pockets for one reason or another too. There was also one where the ref lost their temper with one fighter continuing after a bell/stoppage and beating the shit out of the fighter with some great MT skills. The trainer stepped in to save their fighter from the ref lol.
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>>102176
for sure, thai refs are really good. most of them are ex-nak muay themselves so they know what to look for.
i've always thought that in sports with no ground fighting the refs should try to catch fighters that fall, like in boxing, bareknuckle, kickboxing, etc. a lot of the deaths in these sports are from unconscious people bonking their head on the canvas on the way down. fighters pretty much never die in muay thai (i've personally never even heard of any myself though I'm sure it's happened) and i'm sure a lot of it has to do with the high tier reffing
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>>102176
also kicks on the ground/on the way down aren't illegal, that's why they're not penalized. in thailand they fight until the ref intervenes, including on the way down. if you can fit a kick or a knee in with the sweep and before the ref jumps in it's perfectly legal >>95638
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>>102238
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>>102238
on the way down is fine but surely the reason the ref is restraining him as he threw that knee is because it's against the rules for him to throw it?
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>>102291
Ref decided that the falling fighter was not able to defend himself at that moment so he intervened
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>>102291
he's restraining him to pause the fight. it's legal up to that point
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Got a question to those of you who practice Muay Thay. About 6 months ago I joined a local Muay Thay gym. The teacher was pretty succesful when he was younger and some of the participants compete succesfully at amateur fights,so I figured it was the right place for me, even though its pretty expensive. Unfortunatelyevery training at least 30 people show up and after doing cardio for about 45 minutes,the teacher will show one or two combos that we will practice for about 15 minutes each. While we practice,the teacher is only giving advice to the participants who are willing to compete while ignoring the majority of the participants. After that there's some sparring and thats it. The result is that there are 5 or 6 lads who are pretty skilled while most of the others lack even the basics. Still everyone seems to be happy and thankful for having the opportunity to be part of the gym. It's almost like a sect and,as the other anon called it, a cult like atmosphere. Are these kind of gyms standard or is this just a bad exception? Sorry for my english,I'm a Eurofag.
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>>102726
What is the "cardio"?
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>>102726
you should at least be getting corrected when you're doing something wrong. with a group that big it's hard for a coach to focus on every individual and it makes more sense for him to give extra attention to the people he knows need to be ready to fight, but you're also there to learn. it won't be constant but you should be getting personal feedback regularly to let you know what you're doing wrong. if you're not, you can consider doing a private session with your coach. he'll get a better understanding of where you're at in terms of skill and will see everything you're doing right and doing wrong, and taking a private will let him know you're more serious about learning so you might get more attention during regular sessions (i've seen this before)
if the private isn't something you're interested in maybe shop around for a smaller gym. it should be more than calisthenics, a couple drills and a spar at the end. like i said, you're there to learn. if you don't feel like you're learning anything find a new gym
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arms get gassed easily, especially shoulders. Never had good upper body strength(decent lower) but generally decent cardio, but holy smokes even fast 1-2 repeats will wear me out. Any help anons?
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>>103138
Purely speculative but are you trying to generate power with your arms alone instead of the whole body? That could be a major cause for both bad endurance and poor power. I had to relearn my punches once too.

Also check out Gabriel Varga’s YouTube channel, he talked about it before
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>>103138
that's the way she goes. when you first start out your arms are going to get really fucking tired. not much advice other than keep doing what you're doing, it's all about the conditioning.
it's better to train tired anyways. you'll be tired in a fight, but there are no breaks in the middle of a round. get used to pushing through that exhaustion. train hard fight easy
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>>103223
>>103520
thanks for the knowledge anons, this beginner appreciates it.
Side note, how much cardio are you guys doing, whats your routine like? 5k in morning training in evening, every other day?
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>>102726
The work they give yall MIGHT be underdeveloped but light sparring is a good sign at a gym I think. And having a group of 30 different styles to test yourself against is nice too.
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>>101257
Thais are insane man. Dude walked off of those elbows like nothing. And the one throwing them is vicious with it.
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>>103524
i actually don't run that much myself. i live in southern florida and i hate the heat (even though it's good for you). lol. i usually get up around 5 am before the sun comes out and run 10 laps around my neighborhood, which is a quarter mile loop. so about 2 and a half miles (4km) usually 3 or 4 times a week. i mix sprints into the run though, that burst of high intensity makes a big difference imo rather than one-speed maintenance that the body gets used to quickly. the high bursts of intensity are what's more like a fight.
in thailand if you don't run you don't train. it's common for gyms over there to start the day off with a 10k run, train till noon, take an hour or two break, then train some more. five/six days a week, every single day starts with a 10km minimum. they run a lot over there.
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>>102726
that's the standard my brother in christ, you are being milked for your money
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>>103697
based thai enthusiast
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damn, was just reading about Sor Thanikul gym from back in the day, produced tons of stadium champions and the owner Kleo Thanikul set up the match between Dieselnoi and Samart
fuckin Kleo was assassinated Godfather style. they did him like they did Sonny then blew his ass up with a grenade launcher holy shit RIP lol
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>>103895
fun fact, the gym in the film "Kickboxer" featuring Jean-Claude Van Damme is actually the real Sor Thanikul gym. The guy who plays the trainer in the gym in that movie is a real trainer, Ajarn Peng
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https://youtu.be/ApGSEGBeH6A
"interesting" fight. Kitty Sor Thanikul (was pretty popular outside of thailand; fought in france iirc. one of those thais that fought a lot outside of thailand) fighting what looks to me like a Taekwondo practitioner named Jack Martin (never heard of him). doesn't look like a muay thai fight, no elbows. probably not in Thailand. looks like a generic kickboxing match. hard to know the rules because this fight was in 1984 but there's no elbows so it's definitely just some generic kickboxing set

goes about the way you'd expect it. Jack starts out throwing his spinny kicks, whiffing a ton and getting kicked in the head and ribs for it. what's funny to me is Kitty starts the fight out by emulating Jack's style, like he's mocking him. bladed his stance, he even throws a lot of spinny sidekicks himself. then Jack gasses a bit and can't throw as much spinning shit, has to rely more on his hands which aren't so powerful so Kitty just walks him down for the rest of the fight. I think I saw Jack throw a single leg kick which Kitty checked right on the knee lmao. Jack seems to have been dissuaded from throwing them after that.

naturally the big factors were the efficiency differences and of course the TKD guy got eaten up by the clinch. Kitty didn't even have to box with this guy, every time they got into punching range Kitty put his arms out and just grabbed onto Jack and started kneeing the shit out of him.
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https://youtu.be/06B1LpJ0rfk
another "interesting" one. this one's in Thailand, in Lumpinee i think. channel 7 muay thai. first thing i notice is brian pieters is a dutch guy from the netherlands but fights in american flag shorts. maybe he's part american?
brian starts off pretty well, ripping some mean lowkicks and boxing a lot like dutch dudes like to do. he manages to not get ragdolled in the clinch at first, probably just due to his size advantage, but he's kind of lost there too.

Brian loves to box as is stereotypical of dutch kickboxers. big difference between Petdam and Brian in this fight is the power. Petdam is brushing off pretty much everything Brian throws while Brian goes flying every time he blocks a kick lol. and that's a big factor in scoring in muay thai; it doesn't matter how much you box if it's not doing anything to the opponent. hands don't score well in muay thai because it's the only part of the body that's padded. you have to do damage with punches for it to score, you can punch glove and even face all day but if the other guy walks it off it doesn't matter. rodtang is a popular example of this.
and the more a strike appears to affect your opponent, the more it's worth. if you block a kick with your arm, it's worth a little bit. if you block a kick and it still sends you flying and breaks your posture, it's worth a good amount.

as the fight goes on Petdam really eats away at Brian's base with leg kicks. like he really gets after those legs. Pieters is very bouncy and likes that in-combo-out style early on, smart of Petdam to take them out. and Petdam is so grindy in that clinch, just hanging off Pieters' neck like a monkey, throwing him around and drilling knees to the internal organs. he just absolutely wore him down, it's a very Thai way to fight. basically the whole fight goes like this, just Brian getting kneed over and over in the clinch.
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>>103906
the decision absolutely baffles me. Brian got fucking obliterated, he got grinded to a fucking paste. Petdam had his way with him. This is one of the most blatant robberies of all time. So next time a Dekkers fanboy tells you that Dekkers was robbed all the time in Thailand because the judges are biased towards Thais, look at this fight and know this was in Lumpinee lmao. Thai judges rob based on gamblers not based on race
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damn my man tekin domnez hit that "please don't hit me" pose. both hands, a leg, and he turned away and closed his eyes. man looks like he's getting bullied
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>>103912
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>>103900
it's weird seeing old fights like this knowing above average modern fighters would beat him easily out of the clinch
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>>103947
beat who easily? the thai? idk about all that lol. definitely not "easily". who do you think is teaching modern fighters how to fight? a lot of these guys are still trainers over in thailand and they still throw people around in their 50s.
the only thing that's different is people know more about sport science and nutrition now than they did in the 80s. to be honest with you, golden age fighters were just straight up better than nak muay today. fighters now are probably in better shape but they don't have the same mentality as fighters from back then (strictly speaking muay thai here). the landscape and attitude has changed a lot, muay thai itself has changed a lot and the things trainers can get away with have changed too.
idk if you ask me, prime veeraphol starches prime kompetch for example. prime karuhat beats anybody today in 108-115
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https://youtu.be/-JGzv_nz5f0
superchamp is live right now btw for anybody reading this
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>>103993
Sylvie spoke a little on the topic a couple years ago:
>I'm not an expert in this, but this is what I've come to learn. The Golden Age generally refers to the 1980s to the mid-1990s in Thailand. This was a time when a number of factors came together to create a perfect storm of talent, promotion, and performance greatness. For decades before this there had been a feeder system of Muay Thai talent from the villages and rural areas into the National stadia of Bangkok, but in the Golden Age this accelerated. It wasn't just the fighters. Bangkok experienced a financial boom in the late 1980s, all the way up to the financial crash of 1997, which drew labor from rural Thailand in great numbers. Bangkok national stadiums like Rajadamnern and Lumpinee were brimming with this growing working class, and champions of this era were celebrated like no other. The fighter talent pool had never been stronger with more fighters and diverse styles, and visionary promoters like OneSongChai promotions became expert at making exciting matchups, and drawing out dynamic fight performances.
>Today's stadium Muay Thai really does not compare in terms of the talent pool, there are fewer Thais becoming serious fighters, and the fighting styles and techniques of today are thought to be quite diluted from what they once were. Training methods have reportedly changed, and the camp system is perhaps different. Also, financial incentive has dramatically dropped, as taking inflation into consideration fight purses from 25 years ago were about 4x higher than they are today.
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>>103996
>The fighters today, whether technical or clinch fighters, fight with less technique, less variety, are more specialized. I'm not sure though if some of this is just "things were better in the old days" talk, as you will hear in any sport. But, when you watch Golden Age fights you can see real differences. It just looks like a different quality of fighting. What's strange is that when I've interviewed these older fighters and ask them where their style came from they almost all say the same thing. From nobody. No kru, no great teacher taught them. It's almost as if the process made these fighters, and that maybe the process has changed. Some legends have told me that fighters today don't train the same. They don't train as hard, but they may not spar as much. At least some seemed to indicate that they sparred all the time, and their their styles came out of their sparring. Also, the use of shin pads in training is new, I think. Sparring relatively hard without shin pads gives you more control, both offensively and defensively, maybe. Maybe there is greater reliance on pad work these days? The mystery is that something was happening in training back in the day, that isn't happening now. As to who to check out, there are so many it's hard to say. My favorite fighter is Karuhat, here's a great highlight vid of him by MT Scholar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2DSmvomjV4 in it you can see how he moves really like no other contemporary fighter.
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>>102955
Thanks mate. I already considered to take private lessions,but on the other hand the gym is pretty expensive and I'm not willing to pay even more just to get what I think should be part of a normal training. I've trainend Muay Thai years ago at another gym,and my old coach who was a thay was always going around to correct people,no matter if they where advanced or beginners. My new coach just stands in a corner,plays with his phone and occasionally corrects and instructs his fighters. Unfortunately there is no going back because I moved abroad. I will just try to find a new gym. I love this sport as much as you do OP
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>>103993
the 60-70 percentile of Thais pro I meant
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>>104106
yeah m8 probably best to shop around, your current gym sounds pretty dissatisfying. there are plenty of gyms like that where the coaches don't really do much except for the fight team. good thing is most gyms offer a trial period or a free class or two to check em out so there's nothing to lose by looking for another one. good luck

>>104123
i'm sure there are plenty of fighters today that could hang with the top dogs from the golden age but in general i personally think the skill level at the top was way higher back then, like in the 80s and 90s. i think another big difference is back then you had a lot of "super fight" matchups, like all the best fighters were constantly fighting each other. these days you don't get as much of that outside of special events like that big u muay show they just did. there's a lot of promotion meddling like they do in boxing, way more now than there used to be.
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>>
https://youtu.be/gMusY2UxPJA
fighting lerdsila must be pretty frustrating. this is one of the most ridiculous rounds of stadium muay thai i've ever seen lol jaroenchai can't even touch him
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>>104193
round 5 goes exactly the same way, jaroenchai is clearly frustrated and is trying to take lerdsila's head off lmao. kind of like the floyd mayweather of muay thai
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How long does a black eye usually last? I got headbutted 17 days ago and this is how it looks now. Is this normal?
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>>104214
it's normal. i'm the guy who told you to ice it til the swelling goes down then put a warm cloth on it regularly. bruises can last for a while
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>>104179
how did the muay thai industry turned out to be what it is today? Like only few top gyms & promoters remaining. Is it because of the influx of westerners coming to train and some gyms had better marketing and facility n stuff?
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>>104257
eh,from what i understand it's mostly just the general public losing interest in muay thai over there. just fewer people involved overall so less talent and money in the scene so everything becomes more condensed and centralized. there's a little bit of westernization for sure but i don't think it's the main reason muay thai has changed so much
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Is Kun Khmer basically Muay Thai? I'm referring to the Word Fight Kun Khmer series tournament. Punch, kick, knee, elbow, clinch, etc it looks the same to me
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>>104441

Pretty much but don't say that to Thais or Cambodians. There's some technique differences afaik. But all South-East Asian kickboxing is very closely related. There was an effort to unify them but Thailand told the other countries to fuck off.
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kek group of gamblers is mad they got banned from Raja last time they stormed the ring after a decision they didn't like so now they're bitter and looking for a newer, better Raja. good luck
>>104441
pretty much. there's a couple martial arts from that region, the burmese, laos and khmer and thai all argue which came first and whose is the REAL martial art but it's generally agreed they all came from the same shit. thais just get credit for it because they're the best at it and have the biggest scene surrounding the sport.
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always fascinated by the betting in muay thai and how it affects the fights themselves. it's interesting to me because it mostly goes under the radar for spectators, you mostly have to be there or be involved in the scene personally to get into it. but once you know what's going on it's interesting watching how it affects the fighters, since it affects their wallets. you'll see lots of sandbagging in the opening rounds. things like kick rallies or knee rallies too where they both just stand there trading to try and get the advantage or get the bettors on their side. the gambling is often heavily interwoven into the fights themselves



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