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/jsa/ general

Japanese Sword Arts (JSA) General. A thread to discuss Kendo/jutsu and Iaido/jutsu. OP post is tailored towards Kendo since it is the most commonly practiced JSA.

>What is Kendo?
Kendo is a modern Japanese martial art which descends from Japanese swordsmanship (Kenjutsu), namely the Hokushin Itto-ryu school. It is practiced with shinai (bamboo swords) and armor. The philosophy of modern Kendo is based off of Budo concepts and aims to develop the self through practice.

>How is Kendo scored?
There are four valid target areas in Kendo: the top and sides of the head, the wrists, the torso, and the neck. Strikes made to these areas must contain correct footwork, posture/body movement, cutting path, use the correct part of the blade, a display of high spirits (through shouting), and zanshin; or the continuation of mental and physical readiness to attack again.

In competition, the match is judged by 3 referees who will raise flags corresponding to the color of the ribbon worn by the competitors. At least 2 referees need to agree to award a point. Match duration is best out of 3 points.

>Where can I find a Kendo club or dojo?
https://www.kendo-fik.org/organization/affiliate

Start with the International Kendo Federation (FIK) and navigate to your country or region. If you live in a particularly large country, your country’s federation will most likely consist of regional federations. Some federations also include Iaido clubs.
>>
>>45111
Its a pity this thread isn't more lively. I think most sword people here are into HEMA
>>
>>45111
What is in the kenjutsu arts that was lost from kendo?
I've heard that they train to walk so smoothly that you can't see them move.
>>
>>46019
What do you mean lost? I'd argue that kendo hasn't really lost anything(other than, maybe, mune tsuki and grappling), as it hasn't had those things to begin with. If you are looking for things that kendo and kenjutsu do differently, then you have to be specific. Even between kenjutsu styles there are huge differences in how they do some things.

>I've heard that they train to walk so smoothly that you can't see them move.
Some kenjutsu styles place a big emphasis on eliminating vertical movement, which makes it more difficult to see them coming closer. Of course, you shouldn't have much vertical movement in kendo either.
If you mean stuff like namba walking, then that's just some modern, inefficient bullshit, that people are trying to peddle off as ancient

>>46005
Yeah, I'd say that's the case everywhere online. HEMA has a far bigger online presence.
>>
>>46046
I think many people conflate modern kendo with the gekken of the Edo and Meiji era.

I don't know if any use namba aruki specifically, but I do know there are styles that put a big emphasis on exactly how you walk or lunge which can be rather specific.
>>
>>46046
>mune tsuki
I wish they brought this back. If you can't get past someone's kamae and stab yourself in the neck or chest then it should be counted against you.
>>
>>45111
I have some experience in kendō and iaidō. Hopefully once travel restrictions end I could take my examinations abroad.

>mune tsuki
>I wish they brought this back
Absolutely. I wouldn't mind a heavier and more complex bōgu if it means more datotsu-bui. Kesa would be lovely~.
>>
>>46098
Ironically most early Bogu provided much less protection than the modern gear.
>>
>>45111
based and comfy kendo thread. I just got my bogu this month and getting my ass kicked every practice is awesome.
>>46098
>mune tsuki
That sounds really neat, and we probably wouldn't honestly need much alteration to current bogu assuming it were treated like the tsuki we have now and only really introduced once you know what you're doing
>>
>>46103
I've seen in person two old kendō bōgu (one from late 19th century in Japan, and other from around 1910 in Brazil), and although they looked almost the same, I noticed:
- Kote were way smaller
- Tare was more narrow
- Dō-mune was a little bit higher
- Tsuki-dare was shorter
- The whole bōgu looked flimsier

I can only imagine the pain of receiving a strong kote with a kotō type shinai.

>>46105
>I just got my bogu this month
Congratulations! Is everything back to normal in your country?
>>
>>46106
Thanks! It's not back to normal per se, but my uni club in southern California is allowed to practice in person on a basketball court outside.

Top two answers on the board: we asked 30 kenshi to name one way to deal with practicing outdoors
>kendo in shoes
feels weird, makes it easy to scuff up your hakama on the concrete by catching it under your shoes
>barefoot suri-ashi on hot concrete
pain
>survey says...
It's a lose-lose tradeoff but most of our club has chosen shoes. I'm just grateful to be back
>>
>>46109
Congrats on your bogu, and it's good that you're back to practicing. We'll be back to normal practice in a few weeks (midwest), right now we're doing virtual practice

>>46019
>What is in the kenjutsu arts that was lost from kendo?
This question doesn't make sense. Kendo is its own thing. Nothing was "lost".
>>
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>>46109
>feels weird, makes it easy to scuff up your hakama on the concrete by catching it under your shoes
There are toed shoes that allow for more natural flexibility with the foot. I imagine with normal shoes the extent in which you can flex each individual toe is pretty limited, making for some uncomfortable footwork (and creating bad habits). Only downside is that they're like $80-120.
>>
>>46163
>>46109
I was going to recommend jika-tabi, but honestly, these look much better. Still, you can get jika-tabi for 30usd, but the fit is probably gonna be much worse.
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>>46164
>Still, you can get jika-tabi for 30usd
These would probably be better considering practicing outside is only a temporary circumstance.
>>
Why do threads suddenly become excessively pedantic when they are centered around japanese stuff?
>>
>>46163
>he took the bait

countless research papers published into how these do immense damage to your feet.

>b-b-b-ut muh natural feet

yeah humans weren't walking on concrete 20000 years ago fuckhead
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>>46219
Not sure what you mean, are you talking about the Japanese terminology? The reason is that they are Japanese arts, the same way some HEMA guys use German words for certain techniques and the CMA people occasionally use Chinese words.
>>
>>46256
>>What is in the kenjutsu arts that was lost from kendo?
>This question doesn't make sense. Kendo is its own thing. Nothing was "lost".

>What do you mean lost? I'd argue that kendo hasn't really lost anything(other than, maybe, mune tsuki and grappling), as it hasn't had those things to begin with.

this is beyond normal conversational levels of pedantry. This is like writing a school paper.
>>
>>46220
>countless research papers published into how these do immense damage to your feet.
Sauce? By my understanding the risk is only present if you overuse them right away with your broken garbage feet used to being in braces all day or do something stupid that would have a high risk of injury in standard athletic shoes. Barefoot running and minimalist shoes have saved me from needing knee surgeries.
>>
>>46274
Ehh, I always write like that. I blame going to Uni for ESL.
To be fair though, it's a question we hear all time, and we hear answered, very badly, by people who don't know what they're talking about.
I asked him to be more specific. It's a very broad question. For everything kendo does or doesn't do I can think of a kenjutsu style that does the same. It's not a case of loss, it's a case of different approaches. I can't really explain all the differences in single post here.
Besides, if you go into the oly fencing thread and ask them about what is in HEMA that was lost in oly fencing, you'd probably get a pretty similar answer.
>>
>>46274
>>46304
Everything in Kendo can be found in some school of Kenjutsu, mainly Hokushin Itto-Ryu. Through gekiken and the environment in which Kenjutsu was practiced, some techniques proved more effective than others and those are the techniques that are more commonly trained.

If there was an alternate timeline where the common venue for gekiken was not a flat/wooden floor with a single opponent (like on uneven, grassy ground with one team versus another for example), then Kendo would look quite different.

And on top of that, the techniques that are in Kendo were adapted to the use of the shinai. Although small cutting technique does exist in Kenjutsu (and it does cut), you wouldn't want to use small cutting technique with a real sword.

As >>46046 stated, the differences between the Kenjutsu schools are just as different as Kendo is to Kenjutsu. Once again, Kendo is its own thing.
>>
>>46337
I definitely think hokushin itto ryu had a big influence but not the only one. the earliest standards were put in place by a committee of people from various styles. Itto ryu in general was probably the biggest influence, but the list is pretty diverse.I sometimes think the people from other really popular gekken styles like shindo munen ryu got shortchanged. Many of them helped lay the groundwork for the revival of the Japanese sword arts, but the end product doesn't seem to reflect them much.

I could be wrong on this but I don't think any of the kendo kata are directly taken from Itto ryu
>>
Has anyone here been to Kitamoto Seminar?
>>
I'm looking for some frames / lenses that will help with my vision while wearing the men. Contacts are out of the question for now. Anyone have any recommendations?
>>
>>46603
Anyone familiar with the articles on budojapan? some of them are really good. Here is one on Ono ha Itto ryu. A look at their fundamental technique and the first few kata.

https://budojapan.com/feature-articles/ono-ha-itto-ryu-yuji-yabuki-kiriotoshi/
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>>46005
I wish to combine HEMA and koryu kenjutsu into a hybrid system that can defeat automatic rifles.
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>>46106
I remember reading a few discriptions of taryu jiai (matches between different kenjutsu styles) using bogu and shinai. Despite the safety gear they could get rather brutal, thrusts especially could result in the other guy on the ground with some bad injuries.
>>
>>47423
They also had no judging system, match outcomes were subjective at best, and the best way to decisively "win" a match was to beat the other guy down.
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>>47530
My understanding is some cultural rules developed over time, like not hitting people where there was no protection. Another common rule in the later period was the best of three bouts.

Its also worth remembering that unlike sparring in your own dojo a taryu jiai was not necessarily a friendly match, the reputation of the school was often seen as riding on the result. Issuing a challenge was often seen as implicitly stating "I'm better than you," So there was not the same incentive to hold back like in a modern setting.
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>>47606
>the reputation of the school was often seen as riding on the result
There was also financial involvement as well, since kenjutsu became commercialized when commoners were allowed to train in what were traditionally reserved for the samurai class. They were literally fighting for their livelihoods in some cases.

Also found a playlist of a bunch of waza, looks pretty neat:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhLjXk9FIlJFLRBPlNu2X5RfkuCMHAjRj
>>
>>47642
Commercialization and the possibility of official patronage. Being incorporated into the official training regime of a major domain was a big source of clout, and income.
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>>47642
The playlist is interesting, according to the poster they are a group of kendoka reconstructing the fifty techniques of Takano Sasaburo's Kendo Kyohan, pretty much the definitive book on the subject during his lifetime.

https://kenshi247.net/blog/2011/05/25/takano-sasaburo-1862-1950/

And here are the descriptions of the techniques in Japanese and English

https://kenshi247.net/blog/2014/04/21/takano-sasaburos-kendo-kyohon-pre-war-kendo-waza/
According to the article his fifty techniques were a reworking of a 68 technique list by Chiba Shusaku, the founder of Hokushin itto ryu, but Ive never managed to track down this list.
>>
Whats the most anime teleports behind you 1000 cut style I could train in? Are Ittō-ryū styles still a thing, that an ameripleb would be able to find? Thanks.
>>
>>47891
>Whats the most anime teleports behind you 1000 cut style I could train in?
Find a ninjutsu mcdojo and get your money taken from you.

If you're American, any kenjutsu school is going to be hard to find. You'd be better off training in Kendo.
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>>47893
figured thatd be the case
Would probably have to move states to find a legit school or learn Japanese
Kendos everywhere but seems meh
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>>47896
>Kendos everywhere but seems meh

It really depends on what you want to get out of it. If you want to do samurai larp, then kenjutsu is the best place for it.

That said, you'd learn more applicable swordsmanship from kendo than you will from kenjutsu. Most (if not all) of kenjutsu schools do not spar and spend their time doing kata. Where as in Kendo, everything taught is found in Kenjutsu but the breadth of techniques is limited in scope.
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>>47901
This is good info
I'll reevaluate my goals then, thanks
>>
>>47902
Sure thing. Just as an overview:

Kenjutsu - Mostly kata, as to what they focus on varies from school to school. No sparring. Lots of techniques to learn but no real way to "test" them. (Wide but shallow skillset)
Kendo - Commonly available, lots of sparring, competitions/tournaments. Skillset is limited in scope, but you'll be able to perform under pressure (Narrow but deep skillset)
Iaido/jutsu - Art of drawing and cutting with the sword. No sparring, lots of kata. Eventually you'll use a real sword.
>>
>>47901
I won't defend all koryu, because they are very diverse, but I heavily disagree that you will learn more applicable swordsmanship in kendo. All the pieces of kendo can be found in various kenjutsu schools but the way they are strung together doesn't always make sense from a practical standpoint.

Also koryu kenjutsu schools are easier to find than ever. Its worth looking into if your interested in Japanese swordsmanship.
>>
>>47903
I know this is just an overview but I would not describe koryu skill sets as shallow. Nor do I agree with the idea that techniques are never tested.

For starters many schools test their techniques. Ellis Amdur has written extensively about this, but he is not the only one. Several schools have testified that at high levels the techniques are pressure tested or sparred with. In some instances they have been adjusted based on the new information from these tests. Now these schools might be a minority, but they are also schools you are more likely to find in the west due to various historical reasons I will not go into.

Second is worth pointing out kenjutsu kata can be a lot more demanding than most people think. they can get rather dangerous at higher levels due to the speed, intent and variation that can be added in. Rory Miller for example describes experiencing tachypsychia: the sensation that everything is going in slow motion due to extreme stress.
>>
>>47891
Itto ryu is still alive with several offshoots in the states and Europe. That said most koryu, and especially Itto ryu tend not to be very flashy. Flashy tends not to work very well under stress.

Koryu also tend to expect a strong commitment. They want people who will stick around for life, not one or two years, so if your interested you need to approach them seriously and ready to contribute to the organization.
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>>47891
The flashiest, most "anime" style I can think of is Tenshinryu hyoho.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvUm4uZ-Lys&t
One of their head teachers also likes to cross-dress as a maid, for demonstrations. That's gotta count for some extra anime points.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qrcm1nfNKnE

I don't think the style exists outside of Japan though.

As for Itto-ryu, I don't know about its state in America, but I'm sure you can find it. Anything is possible, if you are rich enough.
>>
>>47906
>>47909
>>47912
Thats i'll look into these further
My main hold up is the whole life commitment part for the more hardcore styles
>>47920
was more a joke, but thats hilarious
Hopefully rich neet soon
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>>47920
Ok i cant tell if this has serious use cases or is just next level larping lol, very flashy
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>>47937
>>47920
Tenshin Ryu isnt really koryu kenjutsu. My understanding is the head is a fight choreographer who bought the scrolls and "rights" to a style from the family that owned it, and is now promoting the hell out of it.
While some of them are very athletically impressive I'm not sure its functional as a fighting system, even an anachronistic one.
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>>47948
Makes sense, who knew you could just buy a lineage
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>>47949
Its not that uncommon, but for the most part the people who do it are shunned by the rest of the community.

There are also a number of individuals who make a living finding elderly people in charge of a school with no students or successor, train with them for a very short time and "inherent" the style. Often they claim headship of a number of schools acquired this way. Again, this is looked down upon and such people are usually shunned, but they have the scrolls and all the paperwork which says they are in charge of the style, or what's left of it at any rate.

It all goes back to the system that turns traditional arts dated back to the Tokugawa period as a kind of intellectual property. Its mostly meaningless in terms of actual skill and ethical legitimacy, but it can cause problems on occasion. At best it can clarify who the senior official of a style is based on direct succession.
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>>47909
>Several schools have testified that at high levels the techniques are pressure tested or sparred with. In some instances they have been adjusted based on the new information from these tests
Yeah, but how are they tested? Gekken?
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>>48145
Well that also depends. Methods vary as the true test (shinken shobu) is no longer possible. Amdur has written about his interactions both in his own style and without, including friendly matches with bokken or shinai. Amoung the schools h e has mentioned doing this with include Maniwa nen ryu and katori shinto ryu. He's also done extensive cross training in modern grappling styles, instructors in the internal arts and police combatives, Other styles benefit from having members who are already highly skilled in other weapon and grappling based martial arts: other ryuha, kendo, fencing, judo, etc, who are capable of directly challenging what they are being taught. Some make use of furoku shinai, some do gekken like you mentioned. Several ryuha remove certain safety features from kata as they go along until kata becomes a type of free flow drill or limited sparring. Some use many of these methods at once. Some of this training is geared towards improving the kata; eliminating or adjusting techniques that do not produce consistent results. In other cases the testing is simply geared to allow practitioners to develop practical skills and interpretations of the kata, while treating the kata themselves as antiques not to be changed.

I'm not saying all schools are like this, but there are plenty of them out there and many are in the west.
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>>47642
>>47800
The same group also tried to recontruct some of the old kumiuchi wasa (grappling) I like their guys experimental spirit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLpA1wP91QU&list=PL4F3B815AFF6CF873

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynl9wnH2pPE&list=PLX7bfPeeaWCDJ1NUFIxaOGnpZw2P9AkxG

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnGoUSQA9WU&list=PLX7bfPeeaWCDnwd3Krx4WBOiZf1olWQWj

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mykBX_HCPgs&list=PLX7bfPeeaWCDbwyJvVqQ3klJhyMQIb96Q
>>
>>47909
>various historical reasons I will not go into
Please do.
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>>49186
OK. Here is a very rough summary. Westerners in koryu essentially started with Donn Draeger. Draeger did judo as a kid then fought in WWII and Korea, he was a big guy and trained in a ton of stuff, Japanese and Chinese, and beyond. By the sixties and seventies his name was pretty well known among American Martial artists in Japan and a lot of younger Americans and Europeans sought him out when they got there.

Dreager's writings often give people the image of a rigid traditionalist who thought sparing was useless but this is not accurate, he was just critical of the emphasis on martial sport that developed after WWII. He in fact felt many koryu schools were dying or on the verge of becoming mere antique curiosities with little martial value, so he directed many of these young people to schools he felt deserved to be preserved, in hopes that fresh blood would strengthen them.

Draeger's evaluations had biases. He very much favored the martial arts of the Sengoku and very early Edo period over later styles that focused on dueling and shinai keiko. Many of his views would be challenged by later martial artists and academics, including some of the people who associated with him, but regardless of the validity of Draeger's judgement in these matters, by the nineties many of these people had returned to their home countries to become teachers. They taught styles that were old and traditional but with masters open enough to accept western students and even grant them authority. A lot of them also knew each other either through Draeger, or through training at the same dojo for a time.

So the foundation of koryu in the west was started by people who from the get go were directed to strong arts, and associated with a no bullshit mentor. Now nearly forty years later some gekken traditions expanding to the west, and there are many many independent branch schools and western teachers.
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>>47920
The guys who organize courses if this style in my country are related to bujinkan
'nuff said
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>>49347
I didn't know they had already spread.
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>>47891
Ittō-ryū is literally the least animu thing you could imagine, did you get your idea of what it is from Blade of the Immortal or something? Actual Ittō-ryū is a source of tons of the concepts and technique in modern kendo, historically they popularized (but didn't invent) shinai, bōgu and gekken in general.
>>
>>49196
Thank you Anon, very cool!
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>>49357
>>47912
>>47891
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndkh8MQw9ZM
For reference this is the oldest surviving branch of Itto ryu. To be glib their solution to almost any scenario is cut straight now and take the center line. This tends to be the case for most of their branch styles historically, though Mizuguchi ha and Kogen itto ryu appear to be a bit different. at least from what I have seen.
>>
Any techniques that involve striking with the tsuba?
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>>49664
You mean like in European swordsmanship where you use your sword as a makeshift mace? Not that I have seen. There are some strikes with the Tsuka, which make much more sense with a tachi if you ask me since their tsuka tend to have a much heavier kojiri
>>
Anyone read Eric Shahan’s books here?
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>>45111
For those doing Kendo, have you noticed differences in focus, or attitude towards Kendo from different nationalities? Say you trained in japan for awhile or had an exchange student at your dojo, do they share the same philosophy about Kendo, its purpose, what constitutes "proper Kendo" or is it all the same?
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>>49913
There are different approaches towards Kendo that I noticed.

Younger Japanese tend to view Kendo more as a competitive sport, which is natural given that Kendo is part of the school curriculum, frequent shiai between schools, and the age bracket. Most Japanese don't continue their Kendo career after highschool or university once they get a job, but for those that do continue practice tend to appreciate more of the martial aspect of Kendo.

In the west, Kendo is started later in life. The average age to get to Shodan is somewhere in the late 20's, early 30's (compared to 12-13 in Japan). Kendo is viewed predominantly as a hobby, and I believe westerners begin their Kendo journey with that appreciation and focus on the martial side of Kendo more than their Japanese counterparts.

Westerners also are better at doing the kata than Japanese because the Japanese are so focused on the shiai element of Kendo.
>>
>>49960
The sport vs martial kendo is a common response, though I was thinking a little deeper. For instance my interactions on line suggest many kendo people in the west are interested in the historical elements of kendo, not necessarily cross training in koryu or iaido but just how kendo came to be what it is and an interest in JSA in general. I would guess the average Japanese kendoka might not be as interested in these aspects?
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>>45111
Otake Risuke recently passed away. For those who don't know he was a sihan of Katori Shinto Ryu, one of the oldest verifiable styles of Japanese swordsmanship, and through Draeger's books and TV specials like the Way of the Warrior was the first view many westerners got of koryu.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBX0qS-DLNE

He was already in his late fifties when this was filmed but you can still see he was amazingly fast and strong for his age.
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>>50976
RIP
>>
https://youtu.be/ZAqL3SC-lGw?t=77
is this legit?
>>
>>52074
it's very codified and study-like (like aikido in general), but it's indeed based on the practical curriculum that a japanese foot soldier received while preparing for war. in fact, not only tachidori studies how to try to deal with an armed opponent while unarmed, but you could easily see normal aikido techniques as dealing with an unarmed opponent while being armed yourself. a prime example is the study of wrist grabs (aihanmi and gyakuhanmi). nowadays people rule them off as abstract preparation for shomenuchi/yokomenuchi, which in turn prepare for gedantsuki and jodantsuki; however, a more appropiate interpretation would be an opponent stopping you from sheathing your sword, which really justifies the way in which the uke tries hard to maintain contact with the wrist
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>>52074
Weapons disarms are a thing in koryu jujutsu styles but against someone who knows what they are doing I would say its a pretty far fetched proposition. One of the Yagyu was said to be particularly good at it, but still only gave your best chances as one in three. Not great odds to bet your life on.

As for the ones in aikido, the guy in the video Saito was better than most, but his weapons work was extremely questionable. He learned from watching and copying Ueshiba, who himself didn't really formally study swordsmanship for very long, but more copied and experimented on his own. While the strikes in this video appear to be on target, they are strikes, not cuts, and it looks like Uke is badly compromising his own posture in the process.

I couldn't find the quote source, but I remember reading that at a shihan meeting in Japan someone stood up and said they should stop doing these weapon disarms because people who train in weapons know they are impossible and are laughing at us.
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>>47891
>Whats the most anime teleports behind you 1000 cut style I could train in?
I heard the anime Toji no Miko had a sword fighting consultant.

Kanami = Chidori/Yagyu Shinkage-Ryu
Hiyori = Kogarasumaru/Kashima Shinto-Ryu
Mai = Magoroku Kanemoto/Hokushin Itto-Ryu
Sayaka = Myoho Muramasa/Onoha Itto-Ryu
Kaoru = Nenekirimaru/Yakumaru Jigen-Ryu
Ellen = Echizen Yasutsugu/Taisha-Ryu
Yukari = Okanehira and Dojigiri Yasutsuna/Niten Ichi-Ryu
Maki = Usumidori (Hoemaru)/Shindo Munen-Ryu
Suzuka = Kujikanesada/Kurama-Ryu
Yomi = Suijingiri Kanemitsu/Shinjin-Ryu
Yume = Nikkari Ao'e/Ten'nen Rishin-Ryu
>>
Any good YouTube channels that talk about Japanese swordmanship?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_ZtgMnPsvw
>>
>>52201
Kendo has Andy Fisher's "The Kendo Show"
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt9ijyEJRrvIOFu-N3urSJw
Honestly, I just think that it's a marketing gimmick for his shop, Kendostar, but it works on me. His videos are also really beginner friendly, he explains everything very clearly and simply, even someone who doesn't do Kendo would understand it. He is also very "by the book". His opinion is basically what the ZNKR says it should be, for him Kendo is Kendo and nothing more or less.

For Kenjutsu any channel that is decent and comes to mind just puts out videos of their kata, or their practice, with no, or very little narration. Instead of following a channel, you are better off joining a Koryu group on facebook, that has its members post cool Kenjutsu videos they find or make.
Kenjutsu doesn't really have anyone like Matt Easton, who is both knowledgeable and is okay at presenting videos.

I don't do Iaido or Battodo, and I never really cared for them, so I don't know of any good channels for them.
I know that there is a guy called Kaz, that makes Iaido videos. Don't really care for him, something weird about his movement, could just be me not liking Iaido.
I'm also not a big fan of the JSA videos of the guy you posted, his videos seem to gloss over important details, and misrepresent a lot of things, in order to make a concise and presentable video for the average weeb.
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>>52295
>>52201
A few channels like Seido have started to post interviews with practitioners and scholars among other things https://www.youtube.com/user/BudoExport

Kendoworld also posts some stuff, mostly about kendo but sometimes branching out. https://www.youtube.com/user/KendoWorld
The guy who runs kendoworld is a 7th dan and a professor with several good books on the subject of kendo and samurai culture.

They are however mostly demonstrations. There are also a lot of good written articles. Koryu people in particular seem a lot more comfortable with interviews or articles rather than the kind of youtube videos put out by Matt Easton and others.
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Octopuses do not have any bones with the exception of their beaks. So if you are responsible and depraved enough to be literally the life support of your 8 limbed friend, you can debeak it like how you’d declaw a cat and then push your member into its feed chute.

You can then let it subsist on your baby batter.

The Octopus is smart. Very smart. It will learn that without its beak, it cannot feed on anything else but your human seed that has to be milked from you.

Every morning, you will feel your clothes slide off and a damp weight on your lower half.

The sensation creeps up on your body until most of the jiggly mass has enveloped the entire length. It will start pumping as fast as it can for it is hungry.

The animal gyrates its empty stomach and the folds of its brain rubbing on your glands, begging for nutrition.

You climax and give the marine creature’s breakfast. The pumping slows down but doesn’t stop to milk out the last few drops of its meal.

Looking into its yellow animal eyes, it looks back with a thousand-yard stare. This will be routine for all of its meals for the rest of its 3-5 years on this god forsaken planet.
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>>52310
This isn't a flesh sword thread. However, I wonder what kind of diet and routine one would need to produce enough ejaculate to feed an octopus large enough to envelope an adult penis.
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>>52074
https://kogenbudo.org/the-use-of-weapons-in-aikido-training/

Relevant: here is Ellis Amdur: a koryu guy who did a lot of aikido when he was younger going through the problems of typical aikido weapons practice.
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In the old /kendo/ thread we had a guy who practiced Jikishinkage ryu.
Is he still we us?
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>>52916
Yeah, I'm still here. Though it occurs to me that I've not had Jikishinkage-ryu practice for almost a year now. Luckily my local kendo club still managed to keep training, but hopefully kenjutsu will start up again soon as well.
>>52186
>>47920
"Busou Shoujo Machiavellianism" also had some pretty accurate kenjutsu. From what I've heard the mangaka is a martial artist. He wanted to represent the styles as best as he could, so he researched everything pretty thoroughly. The anime is held back by bad animation though. The descriptions of the main girl's techniques were pretty much spot on, it even includes stuff that was supposedly a secret technique, but the animation is so bad that it often doesn't even resemble what it should look like in real life.
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>>53126
>"Busou Shoujo Machiavellianism"
According to this anon it does HEMA pretty well.
https://desuarchive.org/a/thread/176004983/#q176011053
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Apart from the obviously absurd stuff how is Gamaran in terms of Kenjustu?
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I have finally decided to sign up in an iaido dojo! I have no idea what I'm doing, and have no experience in JSA. What should one expect from a first class? Is there any faux-pas to avoid? Anything I should do?
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>>53126
Hey, not the guy who asked for you, but I remember in our conversation that most lines, including seito, do some form of sparing but according to this great article the seito line, or at least this dojo, doesn't practice it.
https://budojapan.com/kenjutsu/ksj20201014/
I was just wondering if I misunderstood or maybe something so guys do on the side. I was also wondering on your thoughts on the article in general.
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>>53232
>Is there any faux-pas to avoid? Anything I should do?
Don't stress out over it to much, keep an open mind, and don't fret over the little stuff. Do your best to learn etiquette and copy what you see.
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>>53280
I was going off of what I was told by my senpai.
There is also this video, which, I believe, is of the Seito-ha:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dg_P3QCaA7I
I don't know how frequently they do it. If they are anything like Makita-ha then it's very rare, done about once a year, and the frequency varies a lot by the dojo. The only line that I know that does frequent shinai-geiko is Naganuma-ha. With the other lines I don't know anything, beyond the fact that they do it sometimes. I think I mentioned this in the other thread as well, sorry if I didn't.

The article seems good. The writer makes some very minor mistakes, nothing really important.
The end of hojo's spring part symbolizing cutting a head off at a seppuku ritual is not something I've heard before, but that's almost certainly a difference between lineages. The way we finish it looks a bit different and has a different explanation.

It's interesting that he mentions Chinese Neijia. Ogasawara Genshinsai Nagaharu, the 4th soke, came up with "ryubi", one of the techniques discussed in the article, after being inspired by local bare handed martial art styles during his stay in China. He is also said to have reorganized and improved the style.
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>>53311
>It's interesting that he mentions Chinese Neijia. Ogasawara Genshinsai Nagaharu, the 4th soke, came up with "ryubi", one of the techniques discussed in the article, after being inspired by local bare handed martial art styles during his stay in China.

From my own readings he lived in China for a time and studied a local system, possibly of style of spearmanship? In any case most Chinese martial arts at the time did both weapons and empty handed combat.

This was also around the time a number of jujutsu systems with a clear Chinese influence were being established such as Yoshin ryu and Kito ryu, which both originally had weapon curriculum. The topic of Chinese influences on koryu has been a popular subject in the last decade or so. In early Edo such connections were often played up, but in modern times they were often obscured, perhaps due to the rise of nationalism.

On a related subject we argued a bit about kashima shinryu before, and we talked a little about Kunii's involvement in Jikishinkage ryu. I looked back through what I had read and from what I found his relationships were with Shinkage ryu and the Nen ryu, with any Jikishinkage ryu connection being far in his family's past.
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>>53316
>From my own readings he lived in China for a time and studied a local system, possibly of style of spearmanship? In any case most Chinese martial arts at the time did both weapons and empty handed combat.
I mentioned empty handed styles, because empty handed techniques are specifically what ryubi is said to have been inspired by. I suppose, I should have wrote empty handed forms, to be a bit clearer.

>The topic of Chinese influences on koryu has been a popular subject in the last decade or so.
It's an interesting topic, though when people discuss it they seem to have a vested interest in proving it one way or the other.
Dan-Dao FaXuan, for example, in different articles, was said to have both inspired, and been inspired by, Japanese swordsmanship, specifically Shinkage-ryu.

>On a related subject we argued a bit about kashima shinryu before, and we talked a little about Kunii's involvement in Jikishinkage ryu. I looked back through what I had read and from what I found his relationships were with Shinkage ryu and the Nen ryu, with any Jikishinkage ryu connection being far in his family's past.
The writings I have are long due for a re-read as well. Took a quick glance at Kashima Shin Ryu lineage. The 9th generation shihan is the last one I recognise from Jikishinkage-ryu. If this is the latest connection, then it was sometime during the early to late 18th century.
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>>50976
>Otake Risuke
Heard he helped choreograph the fights in Seven Samurai.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GF5U83UIX1o
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>>53361
Yes, and according to them they also had a strong connection with local shinkage ryu swordsmen. They claim the shinkage ryu teacher Kunii trained under had also trained in kashima shinryu for a time. I personally think they look a lot more like shinkage ryu than they do jikishinkage ryu.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrPM9X3mdJE

>>53398
I always thought Kurosawa's main choreographer was Sugino: another Katori shinhan.
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>>53398
this fictional scene is actually based on a far older story, no idea if its true or not, about Yagyu Junbei the sword instructor to the 3rd Shogun.

Like in this version he had a match which apparently ended in aiuchi (mutual striking) but insisted he had won. The loser then insisted they fight with real swords and after trying to get out of it Junbei agreed. This time they challenger died, but only Junbei's kimono was cut by his sword, leaving him unwounded.





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