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Starting from ground up, what engine and/or code language should i learn to make a turn-based strategy game and how much processing power do i need? (Let's say it is sprite/2d but fairly complex in scale)
Purelly as a hobby btw
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>>576399
You should start with something that is not complex in scale. As for the engine, use Unity.
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Godot
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>>576420
being a stupidly complex game where you must manage many bases, troops and fleets at every turn is the main gimmick of the game.
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>>576448
Is you giving up on it after 7 years of development a gimmick as well?
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>>576457
lmao
you're right
Making a game solely from the one-planet dynamic and then scaling up later is a better choice
>>
You have a very, very low chance of your first "big" program becoming the game you have envisioned. Start with something simple to test the waters, so to speak. If you end up with something playable then you can try to scale it up and learn from this experience about avoiding some of the pitfalls in the future.

>>576420
>Unity
Are there examples of strategy games with large enough scale built upon Unity that are also working well?
>>
>>576623
theres no reason you couldnt use unity
i wouldnt want to because i hate unity but it is good advice for a first project to use something pre-existing so you actually end up with any sort of finished product
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>>576623
Interstellar Space: Genesis
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>>576432
please listen to this anon. unless you are actively seeking to learn how to make an engine, then you should use godot.
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>>576399
>how much processing power do i need?
as much as your target computer. if you want the game to be able to run on a laptop. you develop on a laptop
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>>576634
Looked at a video and it seems to be the usual laggy and "floaty" kind of a Unity game. I think Mindustry would have been a better example as it runs a bit smoother.
>>
>>576655
>>576432
Didnt it run like shit even with gdnative?
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>>576623
>Are there examples of strategy games with large enough scale built upon Unity that are also working well?
Endless Legend and Endless Space games.

>>576629
Why do you hate Unity?
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>>576399
your own, and do start out with a smaller projects otherwise you will be burnt out.
now go learn C and SDL
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>>576697
Mindustry is made in Java though. It uses the LibGDX framework.
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>>576399
I'm an actual TBS game dev, and our game has a publisher, so I have some perspective here.

My advice is: don't start learning with a TBS game.
Turn-based games are incredibly difficult to program because you have to account for millions of edge cases from the start, otherwise you can easily find yourself re-writing your game multiple times. Even high-profile TBS games like Overland made by a seasoned dev team were rebuilt from scratch 3 years into development. Having the foresight to know how to properly architect a TBS game is not something you'll have at step 1, so if you do embark on this do it knowing that you're on a 5 year journey.

All that said, I use Unity, but probably wouldn't do it again for a 2D game (we're 2D sprites). IMO I'd look at stuff like Monogame or HaxeFlixel for a simple 2D game, mainly because 2D games don't need lots of what Unity offers. I'm actually making a new C# 2D engine that tries to solve a lot of the problems I see with 2D/C# game development, but it's not out yet, otherwise I'd recommend that.

So just getting started, I'd say look at C# + Monogame. OR look at Haxe + HaxeFlixel.
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>>576623
Old World is Unity
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>>576399
Make a tabletop/pen and paper game. You will literally never finish a video game.
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>>577312
It was originally supposed to be a board game, but there's no way to conceal things between players that way, and no reasonable space to put on all the pieces.

I thought that maybe making some ugly piece of playable software that looks like a radar screen from the 1940's would be easy enough. I wish there was a middle ground between pen-and-paper and full blown vydia.
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>>577322
bro. you can do this. be tenacious, be self forgiving and work hard. YOU GOT THIS. i honestly believe in you, in you want you got it.
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>>577322
Captain Sonar and Fury of Dracula are two successful boardgames with hidden movement mechanics.

You ought to make a simplified boardgame version of your idea if at all possible, it'll let you figure out any edge cases or more overarching problems with the game design much more quickly than you would if you're also learning the tools and technologies needed to gamedev.

>>577039
>>576629
Unity is a one-size-fits-all workflow that will require customisation once you start doing much outside the narrow range of games it's primarily designed to make. It's true you get started maeking gaem faster but you're just postponing the eventual deepdive into learning about how game engines work.
As a hobby either approach is fine, just pick what interests you most
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If you're starting i'd strongly advise you learn web development. So HTML+JS+JQuery. Don't even bother with a game engine, learn to work with just HTML+JS.
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>>577863
hmm interesting.
Honestly, as i said before: what i envision is more alike a web-boardgame. I'm not interested in stuff like animations and AI, so... is it feasible to make something like a pen-and-paper game that runs itself with just knowledge of web development?
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>>577300
Can kind of echo this. Just learning with Unity for a 2d sprite tactics game and Unity is kind of annoying to use.
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>>578176
Yeah, he is probably right with your clarified goals in mind. It's inherently an MP game so webshit is the way.
Although you might also want to try to find existing FOSS client-server solutions which can be easily enough married to a backend and UI of your choice and probably of your make as well.
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>>578373
What's a "MP game"?
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>>576399
X86 assembly
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>>578386
Multi-player.
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>>578176
Yip! Lowkey the web stack is the most accessible system to build turn based games with, and u get to learn an in demand trade skill :)

The thing you're going to realize in game dev very quickly is how much of a pain in the ass graphics management is. in the world of gui development, there really is only 2 options...
- Web Stack
- Every Else

Literally nothing is simpler than HTML + JS for interactivity, and once u get comfortable enough to learn CSS you'll see why it'll be tempting use the web stack for any serious project ambitions.

And if performance is an issue, you have NodeJS and other similar alternatives to run JS "unsandboxed".

JS already has a number of game engines in active development, many of them free to use, from engine-frameworks to full on Unity-like editors, including support for TypeScript if you feel like untyped JS isn't to your liking.

But for just starting out, learn how to spin up a basic web server and localhost your way to success :)
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>>578675
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>>578675
>JS already has a number of game engines
For your own sanity I'd advise getting one with typescript support or any other kind of static typing. JS scales like absolute dogshit
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>>578984
my guy lets not do this shit here. i'll just say this now... you're not as good as you think u are...

But since we're here... do tell me more about the scaling issues Lisp or Scheme has?





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