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Have any of you guys ever picked up your whole lives and moved far away? What's your experience like with that?
I'm feeling claustrophobic in my hometown. Too many bad memories and I need a change of scenery. I'm almost out of college thank god, as soon as I graduate I'm getting out of here. I want to know what you guys did
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>>2325872
Good luck anon, I'm planning to do the same after college, just this year left thankfully.
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>>2325872
>Find a job in the place you want to live, or work remotely.
>Move there.

Simple as. Always a good idea to travel there first to see if you like the place or not, though.
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>Philippines to Singapore 2 years
>Singapore to Taipei 4 years
>Taipei to Tokyo already locked in, flying next week
I guess I didn't really move that far if you only count the miles from my hometown.
Just find a company who will sponsor your permit/visa, easier said than done.
As a fresh grad with 0 experience in your field, you're competing with others who are simply a better candidate than you based on tenure alone, add in the fact that others are also willing to take far lower pay than what you are probably expecting.
So yes it is as simple as what this guy said >>2325940
Another option is immigration lottery, you can imagine how this works based on the name.
There's no easy way if you want to completely relocate.
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>>2325940
Yes, but not everyone is choosing the "CS" rote like the hordes. Is not a safe career path anymore
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>>2325909
Where are you trying to escape from anon?
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>>2325942
How did you find living in Taipei?
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>>2325872
I've packed up my shit and left multiple times. First time was circumstantial, I was 15 and my dad got a new job so I had to follow him. Then I moved for college, that was hard because I left the love of my life behind and we didn't survive the rest of the semester. Then I switched colleges so packed up and started over halfway across the country. Then got a job after college in a new city 8 hours away. Then moved back to my hometown to help my mom.
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>>2325872
In 5 weeks time I'm doing just that. I'm shitting myself right now but I think it's the right choice
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I moved from socal to South Florida 4 years ago. I stayed there a year and a half, then kept moving on. Same situation. I went an RV dealership, bought a new travel trailer, moved to the desert in socal, got a job offer on Florida, and took it.
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>>2325872
Many times. The thing is ... you're the same person wherever you end up. Looking back at things, I wish I could have stayed where I was. Put down roots, made a better life out of the shit one I was living. Instead I kept moving looking for something else. Now I'm an oldfag still at square one.
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How do you guys deal with work visa after graduation? Shit's impossible to get
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>>2328293
this +1. nothing important really changes. unless youre moving from somali or yemen or some shit. all the superficial stuff wears off after the tourist phase ends and then...there you are... but with fewer advantages (social networks, languages, etc). I think its worth it for a year or two for a 20 something but not worth it past 30. Just hunker down and try to build a life (as tough as that is right now).
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>>2328293
I would say the only legit reason to move is if you have a family that is absolute shit to you and stifles you, basically keeping you locked in your house not letting you use their car or any kind of support to start your own life in your hometown. It would require you to spend 10k+ just to buy a car to maybe get an interview to a shit job just to try to start your life. Might as well just fucking move at that point.
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>>2325872
Yeah, it's easy, don't buy tons of stuff and if you want to live in a condo/apt or such, in the USA ikea has a 365 day return period so you can do that.

Personally though, I find just living out of asuitcase and long term aribnbs easier to see where you can enjoy life.

Getting a job in a new local helps, but only if it's really worth it in terms of salary/comp, e.g. 120k/yr+ if it isn't, eh.

>>2328293
It does depend, it's an opportunity cost. Leaving sometimes makes you appreciate home more, leaving sometimes makes you see how shitty your place was.

Travelling also gives you new ideas and opportunities, I doubled down on creating businesses that helped me reach financial independence and my main work has always been WFH/IT.

It suits me and my lifestyle, some people hate it and after a decade of doing this, I do want to stay put in one place.
>>2328300
30 is the magical year where convenience and ease kicks in and you want to not have to do much. Youth is truly wasted on the young.

>>2328522
No, you can interview online- move to a place where a car isn't required and it's nice. I was a huge /o/tard and owned many cars and not having one is so nice. Seattle, Chicago, NYC, LA, etc can do this - having a bike or not $$$ net worth tied to a depreciative asset is nice.

Yes a car is convinient but really, holds you back. I will say this after buying cars in several countries . Motorcycle is also great inbetween outside of a bicycle.
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>>2325872
>Have any of you guys ever picked up your whole lives and moved far away? What's your experience like with that?
I’ve lived in five US states, and four other countries. I haven’t lived on the same continent as my family for over five years at this point, but even when we were in the same country I haven’t been fewer than 250 miles away from home since I was eighteen.

Save money, pick destination, apply for jobs, get offers, move. Very straightforward process, although as a new grad it may take a while before you get an offer you like.

I endorse moving somewhere you really want to live even if you don’t yet have the right job there. Oh my last domestic move, I knew I wanted to try to live in my destination city, but only my now-wife had a job lined up there. So we went anyway and I temped and worked dumb jobs for about a year before I got a real job. We stayed for over a decade.

This only works for domestic moves, however—unless you’re an EU citizen moving within Europe, where it’s pretty easy, you can’t generally move to a new country without a job offer in hand.

Good luck!
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>>2325940
>Find a job in the place you want to live
easier said than done, you need a work visa which might be valid for only a short period.
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>>2329896
> >Find a job in the place you want to live
>easier said than done,
True
>you need a work visa which might be valid for only a short period.
Varies so widely by country that it might as well not be true, although perhaps in some locations it is.

A “work visa” may or may not even be a thing in a particular country; it’s also common to have a separate work permit, in addition to whatever visa is required for long-term residence.

And for most nationalities moving to most places, you can’t get either without already having a job in hand.

The job will typically help you to get the appropriate papers after they’ve hired you.

It’s a vanishingly small number of nations that offer jobseekers some kind of visa in advance that will both enable them to look for work and later work. The only ones I can think of off the top of my head are working holiday visas, which are Inherently temporary and not all that common.

In cases where people do come into a country to look for a permanent job, get interviews, and get offers on the ground, eight times out of ten they have to leave, get their papers in order (either back at home or at a neighboring embassy) and re-enter to actually legally start working. In every country I can think of where this version of events is possible, interviewees initially enter on either a tourist visa or some kind of visa exemption.

Where have you worked that you got a temporary work visa before you had a job? Not denying that it happened but don’t know of anywhere that it does.
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>>2329909
>Where have you worked that you got a temporary work visa before you had a job?
I haven't but I was was briefly looking into working in a few countries that my only option were the working holiday visas (Europe, Australia) otherwise most of the employers stated I needed to be authorized to work in the country before hand.
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>>2329911
>otherwise most of the employers stated I needed to be authorized to work in the country before hand
Right, that’s an indicator of jobs that won’t (or can’t) sponsor your visa/get the permit for you. But in a lot of cases once you line up a job with someone who WILL get you the proper papers it’s possible to change jobs later without going through the whole process again—the visa or residence permit or whatever it is may still be good for its entire validity, despite the job being removed. So if those folks are open to hiring foreigners at all, that’s probably how they do it. But in my field it’s also sometimes a euphemism for jobs where they’re only looking to hire locals.

Some places you’re screwed if you leave your job, also—in a number of countries, work permits are tied to specific employers and no longer valid once you quit. Pretty sure the US even takes the visa away and makes you GTFO ASAP, at least for H1-Bs.
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>>2325872
Pretty much. Was a loser stuck in my home town. No money or prospects. HS drop out too. Only "friends" were a bunch of useless junkie bastards snorting amphetamines and drinking every hard earned cent away. I met a girl online and she agreed to meet me in Europe. Had a trip across Eastern Europe, Italy and France with her. We lived together for a bit after, but I broke up with her, in many ways much to my regret and also in the worst way possible. But she was no angel either and I had my reasons why I didn't want to stay together. I've lived abroad for the last four years of my life pretty much. I've lived in Georgia, Italy, Spain, Ireland and UK. Now I'm messing around German speaking countries and I got a job aligned in some sort of an Austrian mountain town. My job sucks, but I speak basically no German so I can't complain. Meals and living space are included. I'm debating whether to go to Berlin or Vienna after. I think I'd also consider Innsbruck since I am a massive /out/ fag. Honestly man if you're not happy somewhere either fix your shit or do what you want, which can include moving away. Maybe you'll make a mistake but you won't live until 80 with regret in your gut. There's no regret worse than the things you didn't do because you were a pussy, etc.
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>>2329938
It also helps I am an EU fag since I can go to loads of cool countries without any visas or other crap.
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>>2326351
Okay mr Hallmark
>>2328293
Boomer/coomer wisdom
>>2328541
Holy fucking based
>>2329938
Where you from bro, Europe seems cool af.
>>2325872
Ive moved away twice, first I moved to baja Mexico in my car(dont do this unless you plan on living in it) but COVID 19 struck 2 months in and I had to drive all the way back to Oregon. After another 2 years of hometown life i simply couldnt do it and i left to Thailand, which turned out great.
Its amazing how much you can save honestly, all my normie friends are astonished when i go to different countries, gonna leave November somewhere to beat the cold weather. Fuck that. Its actually easy after you do it a couple times
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>>2329963
>where you from bro
Latvia. It's not a bad place to live in and with some education it's possible to make a good living, especially if it is in tech and computer stuff, but I just find being there boring as hell. Great outdoors though. Riga is a nice city to visit too for two or three days. Living in Europe has a lot of downsides, but it's an insane privilege to be able to move to wherever, whenever and however I want. I showed up in Ireland as a bum with 100 euros to my name. Right now I came to Germany with no concrete plan other than that I'd like to live here. At some point I will pursue an university degree and I am hoping it could be in France. Probably the place where I could settle long term. Germany is cool though, and I am keen to see Austria.
>covid 19 struck
Couldn't you have stayed there? I was stuck in Georgia (the country) for six months due to COVID and had a blast. Low cost of living with fairly high quality standard of living and an interesting country with nearly 0 restrictions due to low cases in height of COVID when it was actually viewed as a threat in a serious way.
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>>2329992
To add, I guess America is not that different seeing it's bigger than entire European continent, but the differences seem more geographical than cultural, where Spain and France are really distinct and you can't ever mix them up if you compare the two.
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>>2328541
how do you get into IT? i was a fuck up during high school and got kicked out though I did get my GED and an AA at a city college but it's for addiction counseling (which pays shit).
Do i need to go back to school, get some certificate, or just lie on my resume? I'm pretty technologically competent
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>>2328541
>having a bike in LA
maybe if you live and work in the same neighborhood but if i live in Reseda and work in Torrance, you're fucked if you only have a bike, it's like a 5 hour trip
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Is this thread full of larpers saying they can go abroad with a WFH job? lmao. only people working abroad and not teaching english are really good at tech or know the countries language.
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>>2330003
I'm in EU and I do whatever jobs. I'm not picky and still somehow avoid working for most of the year.
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Speaking of world travel, and giving up stuff for it.
I've heard about poor people with only a couple bucks, begging and hitch hiking accross entire continents for years.

But that seems life endangering, what's the LOWEST amount of money it takes to travel around the world. As MUCH as possible, for as LONG as possible?
How many weeks/months would 10,000$ usa dollars get?
What about 30,000$?
Let's say you are semi "rich" or take out loan,
what about 70,000$?
(I assume if you have 100,000 or more it doesn't matter.)
I guess you can assume you just hunt animals in woods, or take public handout food, and sleep in abandoned areas, under bridges, or in woods/parks.
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>>2330006
I feel like wfh in the EU is totally different. Traveling to another country aint shit and its always around the same timezone. So do you just travel somewhere and find work there or is it all remote?
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>>2325872
Just within the EU since not needing a visa makes it almost as easy as moving domestically
Slovenia -> Norway, 1 year only, didn't enjoy it there. Moved back home during the virus, going to Switzerland in a month. Planning to stay for 2 years since I got a very good salary offer there, but after that I want to try living in Asia somewhere.
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>>2330011
I find work there. But it's not well paying jobs or otherwise good career prospects. Kitchens, etc. always need staff. If you speak decent local language you can always get a low tier admin or office job and find ways to slack, like I did in Ireland working for a student accommodation where I did fucking nothing all day. But tbf I don't really give a shit because even with a great career most people earn less than 100k per year, and in some countries that is taxed as high as 50%. Clown world.
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>>2330016
Like I said. Way easier being in the EU to just get up and go. Just like >>2330014 said
Although I always hear the remote work from anywhere meme, nobody can ever prove it.
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>>2330007

>If you stood within Europe as long as possible:
i think 10,000 might be doable if you live in hostels for a few months

30,000 would give you a year with some comfort maybe even an apartment for a while if you chose, but without a job would only be a few months

70,000 potentially 2 or 3 years if you go the hostel route, and a year of apartment living without a job

if you find a job it really doesn't matter

>if you were trying to see as many countries as possible
10k would only cover you for a few weeks
30k for about 1-2 months maybe up to 4 if you go really cheap or stay longer in places
70k could get you up to a year if you are frugal, a summer if you aren't really. or you can blow it all one night if you go andrew tate mode
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>>2330022
NTA, but as far as I've looked into it there's a way to legally pull it off as a freelancer, but you're still going to run into tax residency issues and pretty much have to stay in a single country for 6 months a year so you can actually pay taxes and admin your business.
Your tax residency's change being effectively automatic based on where you live for the greater part of the year is the biggest hurdle in this if I understood it right, but these laws are rules are too complicated for me.
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>>2330038
I heard (this is for Americans) that if you get hired on as contract, you can travel anywhere because the company doesn't do your taxes. It's up to you to keep track as a contractor.
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>>2325909
>I'm gonna do something cool but let me get my good boy degree first
No you wont
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>>2330026
Alright, thanks for the answer.
Unfotunatly I don't know if i'll ever have 70k.
Even 30k is a bit out of reach for me, for now.
Maybe if i got a general loan.
So I figured I couldn't get much for long.

I did sorta include the idea of sleeping and hunting in woods near a town.
But probably not very healthy.

How do people join those monasteries in mountains to be a monk, train, teach and just walk accross the country teaching wisdom?
Like do you have to be born into it, like a prince to a king?
What about being a hippie?
Why in 70's was it was possible to cross the country for free, and now it's not?

I guess i'll just save my money till like 70 then travel world with like 70k or something.
Or maybe i just spend my money in next few years.
Then spend rest of life knowing i might never be able to do it again...
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>>2325872
Yes. I moved to China. Best decision I made although wasn't plain sailing.
Thing is you can always go back to your hometown whenever you want but you will likely decide that if where you are isn't working, you'd rather go elsewhere than back to hometown.
99% of people I know who also left ended up somewhere different
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>>2325872
>Have any of you guys ever picked up your whole lives and moved far away?
Several times
>What's your experience like with that?
No regrets

>I want to know what you guys did
Picked a place and just went. Figured it out when I got there. Always works out somehow
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>>2330123
Like you just showed up with a few hundred bucks and magically got a job and an apartment and connections within a few days

elaborate faggot
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>>2326106
Just checked back to this thread, it's canada
>>2330107
Getting residency or a job in any country is 10x easier with a degree. What do you want me to do? Drop out with one year left of this bullshit? Kek
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>>2330123
>Always works out somehow
Wish I could have this attitude
Anytime I moved internationally before I was basically working full time in-between jobs to ensure that every document is ready, appointments with government booked, rental contract paid and signed in advance, etc
All the meanwhile stressing hard about it but it was always a worthwhile experience in the end so no regrets either
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>>2330102
>I heard (this is for Americans) that if you get hired on as contract, you can travel anywhere because the company doesn't do your taxes. It's up to you to keep track as a contractor.
It is true that a contractor is responsible for his or her own taxes, sure—your employers just (usually) send you a 1099 form (1099-MISC, 1099-NEC, etc.) reporting how much they paid you, but not taking anything out and sending it to the feds/state/etc. on your behalf. So you have to calculate and pay up yourself. Many do it quarterly with estimated minimum payments rather than annually, but there are a few legal options.

But how much a particular client/employer is willing to let you move around can vary a lot—some impose time zone restrictions, I’ve heard of people being required to stay in the US (for IP security purposes, or something?), etc. And of course there are just a small handful of places that offer any decent visa options to digital nomad types—a couple of Caribbean islands were issuing long-term remote worker visas at the height of the pandemic, I think Estonia and one or more or of the other Baltic states had a digital nomad-specific visa, etc. Just about everywhere else you’re stuck with whatever tourist visas or visa-free access are available to everyone. So you can’t really settle down, but it’s typically OK to keep moving.

There are exceptions—a few countries are straight-up hostile to DNs, most famously Thailand, which considers them illegal migrant labor because it wants to tax them locally but can’t. I have yet to hear of anyone actually getting busted, but attractive coworking spaces cluttering up Chiang Mai notwithstanding, the current junta makes no secret of their distaste for laptop hobos.

>t. Contract worker for last seven years, previously lived and worked in Thailand with a real local non-contract job, still have many friends there
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>>2330026
How the fuck do you spend 10k by traveling in europe for few weeks? You would have to get an expensive hotel and eat in fancy restaurants every single day to even get close to spending that in few weeks.
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>>2330622
>I’ve heard of people being required to stay in the US (for IP security purposes, or something?)
I hear this all the time and the DN larpers always just say "DOOD IT DONT MATTER!" or they (so they say, i find it to be bullshit) route traffic thru a home network in the usa using a vpn.
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>>2330003
>only people working abroad and not teaching english are really good at tech or know the countries language

White-collar multinational corporate expats outnumber the populations you describe at least a few hundred times over, probably more. I live in a city with at least three companies that employ something like five thousand resident foreigners each, only a fraction of whom are “really good at tech,” and virtually none of whom are fluent in the local language.
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>>2330026
I plan to spend ~15k usd per year living in Poland long term, in a major city, but that's an outlier for Europe. Living in a 1 bedroom apartment (Airbnb) 10 minutes from city center, not a hostel.
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>>2330854
>in a major city
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>>2330834
Do they start their career in their home country and get moved abroad, or do they get hired straight into the new country?
>>2330857
Yeah I meant major city in Polish terms, I'll be in Gdańsk at first then Kraków. Or are you upset I'll be in the city?
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>>2330859
>Do they start their career in their home country and get moved abroad, or do they get hired straight into the new country?
Happens both ways. I think it’s a bit more common for people to start in their home countries and get moved with/by the job (as my wife did), but direct hires to foreign places also happen. This is especially common for European hires at my wife’s company—people working for a competitor or other company elsewhere in Europe regularly get moved directly in. But for non-European citizens I think it’s more common to work in a home-country office first and transfer abroad later.
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>>2330652
if you were plane hopping i mean. costs hundreds to get there, hotels will cost about a grand a week. plus food. if you want to shoestring budget, then you can stay as long as i wrote for 30k but you are not doing as much
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>>2330652
>How the fuck do you spend 10k by traveling in europe for few weeks?
Seems pretty steep to me as well, unless you’re flying three or four times a week on full-fare airlines, or taking a lot of the more expensive international trains (it can cost me a couple hundred just to go from my home in Switzerland to Paris by high-speed train, and that’s only a three-hour, one-border trip).

But it definitely doesn’t seem impossible, or even very difficult—renting a house, for example, or an apartment in a desirable Western European city location, can very easily cost a few thousand per week. I spent something like 2500 for less than a full week’s accommodations in the South of France this past summer, and could easily have spent more. This was for a big house with a pool at the apex of high season, so probably nothing to do with what you and the person you’re responding to are thinking of, but it’s definitely not hard to spend.
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>>2325944
How is CS not a safe route? Even if you don't go into CS you can fall back on IT and make easy money.

It feels like its probably even easier (when considering time/effort) to pursue a career in IT consultancy then CS anyway
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>>2331672
>CS, IT
I hate how everyone absolutely butchers these terms but I suppose it cannot be helped now that retards have spread it around in language

Originally it should have been
IT - Information Technology, which is a large umbrella term for the industry, "working in IT" includes ALL tech workers
CS - Computer Science, a branch of mathematics

Thank you for reading my autism outburst blog
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>>2331672
As I've gotten older, I have made it a point to do something in IT every year, just so I have an emergency plan B. a few certifications/experience a year goes a long way.



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