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What toylines are hit by aging the worst?
Nicher examples are appreciated
>>
old blow/brown/dark red lego and now even the new gold color pieces snap apart like dead leaves, but the best example of poor aging will always be Randy.
https://youtu.be/qcjAUN5Ssj8
Randy's got a spring loaded gimmick, too. Meaning he'll sometimes quiet literally explode when removed from his packaging.
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>>9954374
>5POA
>HOMER SIMPSON BARF .JPG
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>>9954374
Anything with old school GPS (gold plastic syndrome). Yellowing and worn out plastic bands suck, but plastic shattering at a touch hurts the soul.
>>
Late G1 Bionicle figures have infamously brittle joints especially those in lime green
You know how MotU figures started decaying on cue fairly recently?
It's gonna happen to Bionicle one day
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>>9954478
>"on cue"
that's just how plastics work. Kenner Star wars is only going to get stickier and all plastic will erode away. Lego at least is a little bit higher quality crap, but that's a moot point when all the bionicle fans will transition and neck themselves in a rather timely manner.
>>
G.I. Joe, fans refuse to let it evolve and just want the same stuff regurgitated for the rest of time. I will never not be pissed Hasbro scrapped the modern articulation for o-rings.
>>
From what I can tell comparing older reviews to newer, Inhumanoids have aged especially bad even for 80's toy standards
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I heard Xevoz was a great, underrated toyline that unfortunately degraded fast because of their joints
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>>9954499
Howso?

But that reminds me of the infaceables or whatever they were called, the rubber faces have just permanently become stuck to the sculpted ones underneath.
>>
>>9954478
Dark red bonkle joints are also starting to snap, happened to me with my Icarax.
Also those translucent CCBS joints have already stress marks.
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>>9955091
Loose joints with D'Cpmpose having problems standing up and Metlar becoming increasingly fragile IIRC
>>
>>9955743
*D'compose
>>
>>9954486
None of my Kenner saw figures are sticky
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>>9954374
Dino riders is one of the worst for me. The rubber bands for them already all dry rotted 20 years ago even in ideal conditions, but the plastic used on the armor was already brittle in the 80s. If you actually swivel the cannons on them now they will usually snap off, try put a frame together now and it will crumble to dust.
>>
On the girls' side of the toy aisle, regrind is the curse of cheap mid to late 80s toys. Hasbro and Mattel reused old plastic in new toys without grinding it up finely enough, so it didn't take the dye as well as the newer plastic it was mixed wtih. This leads to small 80s pastel equines with hideous neon or off colored spots on their pastel bodies, and Barbies amd Kens with awful yellow spots on their tan bendable legs. Also, She-Ra figures with gold paint (like original Bow) get sticky and awful there. Back to boys toys, Mego action figures made in 1979-80 get gray "zombie heads" because Mego was having financial problems, and the oil crisis of 1979 jacked up the price of oil and oil derived products like vinyl. They had to buy low qulaity vinyl, which lost color quickly. Also, Mattel's Big Jim from the 70s had bendable arms that could flex to show a muscle, and leak plasticizer like mad now, to the point that they must be covered to avoid damaging the rest of the body.
>>
There's plenty more toy fail where that came from. 60s Barbies came with earrings that were made of base metal that caused rusting in the head, known as "green ear". Talking Barbies from 1968-1972 had little records inside their chest cavity that played a record when you pulled a string. Too bad the records took up so much room that the limb pins couldn't securely attach, and fell off easily even back then. 1959 Barbie was released as a tan doll, but quickly faded down to ghostly white when exposed to light. Late 60s Barbies just had their faces go white. Livng Barbie fron 1970-1972 had articulation all ovee her body, while sucessfully hiding it with vinyl. Too bad the joints were way too fragile for a child's toy, and left her with floppy Gumby limbs when they broke (like my poor old girl on the shelf).
Dusty dolls from the 70s had gliue holding their hips together, that leaks out like mad now and melts the plastic.
Many dolls and action figures from the 70s had joints held together with string, which can age and break (and is a pain to fix).
Japanese dolls with wire and vinyl bodies, like Jenny and Licca, are screwed if the wire inside breaks.
>>
>>9956350
>>9956385
Neat
>>
>>9954487
Aren't vintage GI Joe toys among the easiest to restore?
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>>9954487
Buddy just collect fortnite.
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>>9954374
>What toylines are hit by aging the worst?
The oldest ones
>>
>>9959979
Maybe if has to was capable of doing something new with the franchise that didn’t fail colossally they would be able to do something other than 80s pandering, but they have proven several times now they cannot. If kids don’t want it because the new shit suck, boomers are your only audience and they want nostalgia.
>>
>>9955817
This. Many child tears were shed because of that shitty plastic
>>
>>9960003
Easier said than done for hasbro apparently. I don’t really know how they keep fucking it up so hard but they do.
>>
>>9959979
I'm too young for the 80s G.I. Joe but I did dip my toes in Classified for the first wave. I will say without a doubt they're way too overdone, I'm looking at G.I. Joe as a psuedo-military toyline not a sci-fi toyline and most of the original figures are way too sci-fi for me. I've only paid attention to the Gung Ho re-release and I can say it's much more what I expect for a military figure and if his colors weren't so cartoony I'd probably dip back into the line for the other retro figures soley because they have actual guns it looks like.
>>
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>>9960163
Yeah basically every version of the series except the original figures, the comics, movies, later cartoons. So much is just laser sci-fi guns!

Fucking retard.
>>
>>9954374
toybiz early 90s marvel figures, even mint, there are discolored parts, cards are beautiful though
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>>9960316
yeah two of my carded wolverines have legs getting darker colored...
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>>9954374
Nuclear lab kits
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>>9964157
What's the half-life of the stuff in those kits again?
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>>9956350
>>9956385
When did you learn about these issues with so many different old lines?
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>>9954374
Hot Wheels 100% in a box were secured with a band. If you don't take it off it melts and destroys paint underneath.
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>>9956350
>>9956385
This is really interesting. I'd like to see a comprehensive video that goes over stuff like this.
>>
>>9954486
what the fuck do you mean by sticky?
kennershit doesnt leak plasticiser.
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>>9967638
Every plastic will leak plasticizer eventually.

The only plastics you could say don’t are rubber, but that’s because rubber just disintegrates over time.
>>
>>9956350
>>9956385
I started collecting hasbro’s world of love dolls recently and have noticed myself virtually all bodies NRFB or no have the ass parts fused with the legs and clothes. Lucky(?) for me that section comes apart with a sort of wood screw, but still the asses are melted beyond repair seemingly. The legs for now seem to be holding up okay though.
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the potf2 line
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>>9954428
That's 6POA to you, anon!
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>>9971100
They may look silly now but I loved how unapolagetically "action figure" they were. They were not tiny dolls with plastic clothes, they were over the top 90s rock and roll muscle man, like someone's idea of what Star Wars would look like if Frank Frazetta was drawing it.

Sadly, I do agree that as collector's items they don't hold up. If I was gonna go out and get some Star Wars toys, I'd either want something modern and detailed, the vintage stuff, or Black Series. Power of the Force represents such a weird time for the Star Wars IP where there were no movies coming out and they had to compete against 90s superheroes. It doesn't have the historical significance and charm of the 70s and 80s toy, and visually they are a poor representation of the movie characters that have been outdone many times over since then. I still loved them and I kind of miss them, but I don't regret giving them away.
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>>9966758
Years of autism resarching old toys online. I have no life. (And no, I don't have collections of the stuff I mentioned, that's hella expensive). One more bit of fail I found: "Mego molt", where the soft vinyl limbs of 70s Mego action figures react badly with the hard plastic torso, and actually melt at the connection points. It also happens to some vintage Barbies and action figures besides Mego. Plastic is an unstable artificial substance, and toymakers were making toys to play with and toss, not collect back in the day.
>>
More vintage toy fail sperging time, yay.
Hasbro used a shade of light pink hair on its Jem dolls and small equines in the 80s that faded like mad upon contact with sun light. You can redye the pink bit if you're an ace customizer, but I am not. Bonus: They used the fading pink on an equine that had some hair streaks meant to change color in the sun. Brilliant.
Many a young toy nerd would get their small equines wet when styling their hair, or bringing them in the tub (there were even sea equines). The big problem is that Hasbro secured the tails with cheap metal washers, which rusted like mad near water. Nothing like digging out your favorite chidlhood toy and discovering rust throughout. (Removable with oxiclean, but it jacks up the body paint and hiar).There were also "Beddy Bye Eye" baby equines with creepy open and shut eyes that were held in with a metal apparatus. Eye rust, anyone?
Jem is a Hasbro 80s rockstar doll with a not bad toy line and a god-tier cartoon. She also bombed due to being larger and more expensive than Barbie, and her main gimmick failed. She was supposed to have flashing lights in her red "Jemstar" earrings, symbolising her transformation from Jerrica to Jem via hologram. Too bad that even fresh out of the box, the earrings refused to work, angering parents and hampering sales. Hasbro wound up cheaping out by ditching the gimmick and going with regular doll earrings, then cutting costs even more until the doll line tapped out. I am still salty about this.
>>
Random toy oddity found online: Kenner made both Strawberry Shortcake and Star Wars toys in the 80s. Somehow a batch of dark blue blueberry scented plastic got into the wrong place, and some collector online wound up with a Boba Fett that smelled permanently of fake blueberry.
This next one is based off my older brothers' experiences. Stretch Armstrong is a stretchy vinyl figure filled with cooked down corn syrup, that can be stretched to ridiculous lengths. The 70s ones were big ones that could take a lot of abuse, but eventually that vinyl skin would take too much damage and tear. The corn syrup would leak out, the figure would collapse, and then your Mom would pitch it out, Even if you found one mint in box, it would be halfway or mostly disintegrating and leaking. That vinyl skin just doesn't hold up. The website stretcharmstrong.com recommended oiling intact stretch toys in box with silicon oil to try and keep them intact. Mego made knockoffs called "Elastic Heroes" that got them sued by Kenner, so they're even harder to find now. And yes, they ripped out and disintegrated too. Just to rub salt in the wound, the factory in New Jersey where they made the Elastic Heroes got a nasty rat infestation, thanks to all that corn syrup. (No, I never saw a 70s Stretch, he was long gone before I came).
>>
Have you ever seen a Barbie outfit from the 80s made of a pleather-type substance? It looks kind of like a toy version of leather, but whatever Mattel used must have been really cheap. If you stumble on this material now, you'll be able to tell instantly, because it will be peeling and crumbling. Ugh. RIP Barbie and the Rockers white boots and Barbie and the Sensations outfits.
Hasbro used a fabric in its Rose Petal Place doll outfit "Painting Posies" that was actually slightly toxic. They didn't figure it out until they were testing outfits for Jem. Oops. Well, Rose Petal Place (sadly) bombed, so minimal damage.
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>>9954374
ironically I'd argue that most of vintage MOTU has actually aged rather well for the most part
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>>9975488
Nigga, they can't fucking stand
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>>9971100
I was gonna say POTF2 vehicles have aged pretty well, but they're all just vintage vehicles with a new coat of paint anyway
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>>9975492
Just change the leg rubber, negro
>>
>>9976215
Easier said than done



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