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I remember world of darkness having an abstract money system where character wealth was a skill and not a number of coins.
Are there any other systems with this feature? What is the best one in your opinion? How would you design such a system?
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Abstract wealth only really works for huge and diverse amounts of funds that can't be easily tracked with a number. It works for a game like Rogue Trader, but for individuals it's just too fiddly in my opinion.
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>>82320873
Fate does it, too.
Hollow Earth Expedition has a very, very weird approach to finances, so I guess it also qualifies as abstract money.
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>>82321128
>Abstract money works only when you are dealing with millions
>But at pocket change, you want to do the bean counting
>t. Spergatron Autismos
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>>82320873
Sword & Scoundrel has a half-and-half sort of approach. Its rules are online:
https://www.notion.so/Sword-Scoundrel-Live-Edition-5972344efab84e1d850ffb60769eacb6
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>>82320873
The Wealth Check
>A Wealth check is a 1d20 roll plus a character's current Wealth bonus. The Wealth bonus is fluid. It in-creases as a character gains Wealth and decreases as the character makes purchases.
>If the character succeeds on the Wealth check, the character gains the object. If the character fails, he or she can't afford the object at the time.
>If the character's current Wealth bonus is equal to or greater than the DC, the character automatically succeeds.
>If the character successfully purchases an object or service with a purchase DC that's higher than his or her current Wealth bonus, the character's Wealth bonus decreases.
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Burning Wheel d6 dice pool resource test for lifestyle and maintenance. Failed test reduces d6 dicepool. Dicepool can be set by lifepath chosen at character creation
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>>82322026
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>>82322026
swag autism?
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>>82322085
Yes it is. Depends what you want from a game - if you are looking to simulate economics or fiscal management of a kingdom this is not autistic enough. If you need to resolve a situation fast in 1 roll "can I buy this castle" then this system will probably work. The useful thing about the resource dicepool is that you can fork in related skills eg if you have estate management skills bureaucracy, haggling skills etc you can add that to your dice pool
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Think the more important design choice in rpgs is not the wealth mechanics but more the sense of scarcity. Probably 90% of the items on the sheet never even get used so why are the players even carrying them. The idea should be to really make every item valuable and precious not just carrying 999 arrows 99 heal potions etc
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>>82321128
FPBP

Under real-life accounting rules, assets are organized into three tiers:
>Level 1: Valued in accordance with readily observable market prices (cash, stocks, precious metals, cryptocurrencies, Pokémon cards, etc.)
>Level 2: Valued in accordance with quotes for similar assets in active markets or identical assets in inactive markets (houses, cars, privately-owned businesses, etc.)
>Level 3: Valued in accordance with models and unobservable inputs (artworks, complex mortgage-backed securities, bad debt, etc.)

Abstract wealth makes sense for modeling the wealth of a millionaire or a billionaire, which is spread out between so many different liquid and illiquid assets that keeping track of it in-game would be an enormous chore. For most TTRPG characters, however, it really isn't necessary.
Heck, how many illiquid assets do YOU own? Maybe you have a house, but that's just a Level 2 asset, and definitely not the most illiquid thing in the world. You probably don't own any Level 3 assets at all, and a random adventurer in a low-tech fantasy world isn't like to do so, either.
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>>82321135
I have never played a game that made sense with low-level abstraction of wealth. It was always fucking nonsensical and resulted in odd situations.
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>>82322268
if you are just buying arrows and torches abstract wealth probably not so good. If you are playing intrigue games negotiating tribute and dowries abstract wealth can help move through the details
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>>82321128
I pretty much view it the same way. Money as a skill only makes sense when you can afford pretty much anything and the real factor is connections and ability to keep lubing the treads until you can get what you want.
>I want a gun
Autosuccess because it has a defined cost and location, go to the store and buy a gun, you have the money

>I want the gun of Duke Sergio the Great which was designed and built personally by the famous gunsmith Musashi Minato
You could fail because even if you can get into contact with the gun’s owner you might not have the money to buy a priceless item or the connections to convince him to sell it
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>>82320873
Iunno maybe exalted.
I get your example, taking high life was pretty sweet for the pay.
In exalted if you have 5 dots in resources you can just freely grab anything that costs 3 for nothing. We always joked it was pocket bits.
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>>82320873
Warhammer 40k RPGs have procurement checks which are one of the main way you obtain gear.

Rogue Trader makes raising your wealth "skill" one of the main point of the game.
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>>82321150
How is that game? I've been thinking of trying it for a Three Musketeers kind of setting.



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