[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/tg/ - Traditional Games


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.



File: 617M2uggIXL._AC_SL1197_.jpg (99 KB, 1021x1197)
99 KB
99 KB JPG
What is your favorite board game?

Pic related is my new favorite board game. I've been playing a digital version and having a blast. I haven't even played with any of the expansions yet. Super fun.

I don't know what to say other than this game is amazing. Several games I've been one hex away from losing but I've managed to trap my opponents pieces at every turn and eventually claim victory.

I really have a thing for games that are simple but good. I have yet to try Azul but I hear it's amazing. Not much of a theme though...
>>
>>73486470
Looks interesting, is it possible to play solo?
>>
>>73486470
Call me basic, but Pandemic.
>>
File: og mousetrap.jpg (28 KB, 400x400)
28 KB
28 KB JPG
>>
>>73486589
There's a free version on Android and you can play against AI. It's called "Hive with AI" on the google play store. You have to pay for the expansions (Mosquito, Ladybug, Isopod), but the base game is heaps of fun already. Highly recommend. The rules will take you only a few minutes to learn.

It's kind of like chess. But with bugs. And there is no board.

I'm not the kind of guy that would usually play 50 rounds of a digitized board game, but I find Hive really entertaining.
>>
>>73486470
Very fun game, enjoy playing it with my wife.
The mosquito and ladybug tiles are worth adding, if you can find them.

My favorite board game is probably Summoner Wars. But Spirit Island is a pretty fun time too.
>>
>>73487199
Both those games look cool but look extremely in depth.

I guess I grew up playing Checkers, Chess, Sorry, Chinese Checkers, etc. Later on my friends and I discovered Catan, Carcassone, Ticket to Ride, and other games like that.

To me, that's the sweet spot. I want the game to be pretty simple - but hard to master. When I see pictures of super highly rated games on Board Game Geek that have an enormous board, 5 sub boards, 250 counters of various colors, 6 score tracks, etc etc, it just makes me feel like I should be playing a computer game.

To me simple board games have an honesty about them. Nine Men's Morris and The Royal Game of Ur and Backgammon were played during the beginning of human civilization and they're really quite simple - but they're not easy.

That's what I love about Hive. It is absolutely simple. And yet in that simplicity there is great strategy and great fun. To me that is the absolute essence of what a board game should be. There's an elegance and beauty in a game like Hive that I just don't find in really big complex fiddly games - even if they are amazing, and I do play games like that with my friends, but they tend to have to walk me through all the fiddly rules and I never really bond with the game.
>>
>>73486470
Call me basic, but I really love Agricola. The hand of cards is what makes it special to me, because I much prefer when games force you to play differently each time.
>>
File: Root-Cover-1-1000x675.png (1.23 MB, 1000x675)
1.23 MB
1.23 MB PNG
>>73486470
I love hive, I have all the extra tiles you can get. very well designed game. My personal favorite is Root, I like everything about it. Cute art, nice theme, fun mechanics and interaction, lots of variety, very nice components.
>>
I just can't stop wasting all my mental energy on go.

If I have to chose a modern boardgame, it's Terra Mystica.
>>
>>73486589
Yes, there's no hidden information, the challenge would be trying to come up with strategy and counter-strategy.
>>
>>73486470
Hive is great, I find it much easier to convince people to play it as well
My favourite simple modern games are Cockroach Poker, Avalon , 7 Wonders Duel (which also got a solo mode recently) Codenames, Whitehall Mystery, Jaipur and Hanabi
My favourite modern board games overall though are probably Kemet, Chicago Express, Spirit Island and Keyflower
>>
>>73488925
i want to play it a lot, ill never get my friends to sit and try it though. they hate long complex games.
>>
I think my favorite is Sagrada. I have never done it, but I believe I could play like five games in a row and not get tired.
>>
>>73486470
Depends. If I only have a little while? Carcassone. Fun, deep, setup is part of play, pack up is like 2 minutes. If I have all afternoon? Battlestar Galactica. Fucking incredible gaming experience and we have all the expansions.
I so wish they'd re-print BSG as "Spaceship Andromeda" or something to get around the license.
>>
>>73490884
Have faith anon.
If they can bring back Dune after 40 years, someone out there can bring back BSG
>>
>>73486470
Arkham horror 2nd edition. its kind of bloated and the rules could be better but IMO EH and AH 3rd edition changed too much
>>
File: CB05120-4.jpg (157 KB, 800x448)
157 KB
157 KB JPG
>>73486470
I really like both normal and hexagonal. I can't find a physical hexagonal board, unfortunately.
>>
>>73486592
okay
you're basic
>>
>>73488925
i love it too, but our group is not big on area control games. it's a shame that we played it only 3 times
>>
Are there any good digital versions of good modern board games?

I live by myself and don't have a lot of IRL friends. I love board games but I just don't have anyone to play with. Hive has digital versions on the Google Play store and Steam so I've been playing that against AI and that's been a lot of fun.

I feel like the digital version of a game could be even more fun than a real life version. There are lots of heavy board games that are extremely complex and with a proper digital version that only allows you to make legal moves I feel like the whole thing is streamlined and made more accessible.

I think I might enjoy playing the digital version of all sorts of board games. Five Tribes, Wingspan, Azul, who knows. Most popular games don't seem to have digital versions though.

The best you might get is the game might be in Tabletop Simulator on Steam, but Tabletop Simulator really just simulates the physical board game. You can still make illegal moves, you can place pieces in the wrong spots, you can forget to take your cards, there is no AI, etc. What I mean is a proper digital version of the game with an AI, not just a simulated physical board game.
>>
>>73496740
A lot of digital versions of games are decent as mobile ports but kind of crap as pc ports
I'd suggest checking out BoardGameArena
Sagrada, Flashpoint and Ticket to Ride are decent versions, and the upcoming Wingspan looks pretty good
>>
>>73496875
BoardGameArena looks awesome. Does it have AI though? Or do I have to play against real human players? Not that there's anything wrong with that. I guess I prefer playing against the computer though because I can up the difficulty in increments to find the right level for me.
>>
>>73497285
As far as I know it's only multiplayer, but most games are generally pretty populated
>>
>>73486598
Nobody ever wanted to play Mousetrap, the only fun was in setting it up.
>>
Terra Mystica
>>
>>73486470
i like Risk.
still havnt found a decent digial version that isnt fluff.
>>
>>73486470
Hive is lit
>>
>>73487650

I can broadly agree that simplicity and elegance of design does make a game better, but there's space for more... simulationist? Maximalist? -games out there. With complexity of parts can come a more crafted, specific play experience. The classic games are very abstract, to the point they are purely games and not experiences. Sometimes, I want to play out what amounts to a storytime, and you need a lot more play infrastructure to do that. Playing a round of Mansions of Madness generates a story, even a particularly compelling one if you get a good game in. No game of chess ever generates a story, except about how you played chess once.

Sometimes more parts and pieces is also useful to generate the atmosphere a game does best in. Mysterium has many, many components it doesn't strictly need at all, some as simple play reminders, some existing solely so that the entire round system can be resolved in a few seconds with a few knocks. In this case they improve play, because the reminders mean fewer times you have to ask questions about the play state and be brought out of the mood, and having all the planning and guessing be resolved quickly with a series of knocks adds the main source of tension.

There are definitely games that have lots of pieces seemingly just to say so. Crowdfunding has done a lot to democratise board game dev, and it turns out a lot of people want pretty bad games. Gloomhaven is a good example; it's a bafflingly complex game whose ultimate outcome is to use a vast and self-defeating web of rules to effectively be a mediocre pen-and-paper RPG without need for a GM. Computer-aided play allows for some games to really shine, but it also allows inefficient games to paper over their cracks. But if a game really does have just the pieces it reasonably needs, if each piece serves a clear purpose the game would be slightly lesser without, it doesn't have too many pieces. Just like with rules, excess is a matter of efficiency, not raw number.
>>
>>73504610
I can certainly agree that some complex heavy games absolutely require the complexity to pull off what they're trying to accomplish.

I guess sometimes though I'm investigating a game, watching reviews of it, reading the rules to see if I'd like it, and it just seems a little directionless. "Point Salad" games often feel this way to me. I haven't played Wingspan, and one day I would like to because I have friends that think it's the greatest game ever, but at the same time, I've watched reviews and read the rules and it seems like a point salad game with almost zero (actually zero?) player interaction where the overall strategy is just to sorta wing it with no overarching strategy at all. It seems like in some games the complexity and the sheer amount of ways to earn victory points is covering up for a core gameplay engine that just isn't that exciting.
>>
File: TheAmazeingLabyrinth.jpg (15 KB, 350x289)
15 KB
15 KB JPG
>>
Solo, Marvel Legendary with custom rules.
Two people, Stratego
Group, Seven Wonders

I've been wanting to try Murder in Hong Kong but for obvious reasons haven't been able to get a big group together for a while
>>
>>73504864

That can be the case. It's harder to evaluate most-points-wins games because the points system often obfuscates the actual mechanisms of play. It's a real weakness if a game is put together such that you don't know if the intended bets route is to trade actions for points efficiently, or use actions to set up point engines, or use actions to deny points to your opponents, until you have played many times. You should understand how you are meant to play any game the first time you play by halfway into it, so that even when it is obvious you are losing you can enjoy finding the clever interactions and thinking about how you'll do so much better next time. It's a massive weakness of any game if you can finish it and have no idea if you did well.

But sometimes rules have subtle interactions, where they seem strange in the rulebook but make sense when played out. Like the way Scythe is hard to process reading the rulebook, but when you play you soon realise that it is a game where every turn you are doing a big action, or setting up to do a big action next turn, and the checklist of victory point stuff is over in the corner for you to check one off every few turns. I'm not sure I agree with the premise, but it seems like that game is designed with such complex VP rules on purpose to stop players from overthinking it.

Then there was a game called... Bunny Kingdom, or something someone brought to one of the game days I have. The theming was hardly what I'd usually play, and the scoring mechanisms seemed arbitrary and niche, but I played along and it actually turned out to be really well put together, with some of the more 'pointless' rules being there to allow players to swap their points-gathering strategies late in the game to take advantage of other player's actions or mistakes.

Some rules make sense only when you play them out. It's better when you can understand a game just from the rulebook, but requiring that would be very limiting to game design.
>>
>>73505746

I can give it a very strong recommendation. It has all the advantages of regular hidden information games, with the benefit that the actual core play is strong enough nobody cares much about the secret roles, and because any one individual can solve the case it avoids the major hang-up of these games in groups where people care different amounts. That also means it works fine sober and on purpose or drunk at games night.

Having the role of FI be in the game but out of the conversation is also good, because it means the person teaching the game can be in the game and know every secret role to help them without having to hold yourself back to be fair. It also allows you to balance the players - my strategy for my 30 seconds is to use it not to play out a theory but to stare at the other players in sequence until one gives something away, then name cards in front of them until they give away more. It's shockingly effective, and I guess the killer first round most games, and their combo first or second round. This is shitty for the game, though, so if I take FI unless I'm drunk, it means I don't have to hold back to avoid disrupting the game. It also means I can have a bit of fun doing the HK crime drama character style and giving all the players ridiculous nicknames.

The expansion is good of more players, and the recommendations of which secret roles for which difficulty is fine. My one suggestion for the 'event' cards is that you take out the one that is 'solve this turn or lose' because it can spoil the fun.
>>
>>73505671
I have heard MANY people praise this game, but it doesn't get very good reviews on Board Game Geek (6 out of 10). But that could simply mean it's fairly simple without a lot of depth. Ratings on BGG can be quite odd.

Can you explain what you like about the game?
>>
>>73507725
i honestly just think its easy to pick up, classic art, and tactics are as deep as you wish them to be.

Last time i played was drunk with 3 friends, it was mind melting to try to plan out routes and then watch the map completely morph and twist , thwarting your plans as soon as you make them.

it's a light and fun game to play with friends for 30 minutes to an hour
>>
>>73507725

Not that guy, but yeah. BGG ratings get strange. I think there's a pretty large and somewhat vocal contingent of people on there who don't actually play the games they're rating, they just vote up games they think are made the 'right way'.

You can see how moderately popular games, and games that can be purchased at a price you can take a risk on, get reasonably accurate ratings. Lots of people buy both of those games and so the loud weirdos get drowned out. Games that are popular and cheap get drowned in people who have rated only that game and don't play that many, so the ratings are inflated.

But amid expensive and complex games, the sort you need a committed group and a committed play session regularly to play, have extremely swingy ratings. Most are ignored, but there's a kind of piling on effect for the most and least popular of them, and from very similar usernames, many of them rating each other up. I don't spend any time on their forums but I wouldn't be surprised to find a small kind of game design... cult, if you like, at work there.
>>
>>73507785
I think it's cool that Labyrinth is still in production. It's from 1986. There are very few board games that last that long. I really hope to play it sometime. There's something special about a board game that has been spreading joy for so long.
>>
File: Rftg_cover.jpg (23 KB, 263x378)
23 KB
23 KB JPG
Always on the top of my list
>>
>>73510184
closely followed by.

isn't so easy to get either in Europe. You Americunts have all the good shit right at your fingertips and choose to play inferior games.
>>
I'm very fond of twilight imperium
it basically is exactly everything I want a board game to be
>>
File: 1543608961111.jpg (73 KB, 1033x679)
73 KB
73 KB JPG
>>73510184
>>73510199
Excuisite taste
Innovation is one of my favorite two player card games, and RftG has the tightest app I've seen yet developed for a board game. The hard AI will fuck you up, eat your lunch money, and run off with your mother and dog.

Hey OP, for more simple as lean game that still have fun moments and arcs, look into air land and sea as well as the fox in the forest (my mom likes playing this one with me)
>>
File: 1592811842607.gif (39 KB, 225x534)
39 KB
39 KB GIF
>>73486470
The battlestar galactica board game is really nice but the quality of the whole experience depends on the players. Also Junta, really nice to make new enemies.
Hive is really good and very cerebral- i didn't even know there were expansions, i'm gonna look into it, thanks!
Oh and i was lucky enough to get my hands on an original Thud! game, which is really really nice if you like chess or similar games.
>>
>>73514392
>Hive is really good and very cerebral- i didn't even know there were expansions, i'm gonna look into it, thanks!
You can start with just the mosquito.



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.