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Previous: >>14725015
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First for Jeff Bezos
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>>14729734
Welcome to the club
>>
If Starship actually works, the USA will have such an advantage in space technology. One that other countries can't hope to match for decades.
This has both military and commercial benefits that no other country can touch.
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>>14729729
FTS Archive
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1KCJBL632oieD1r6JOh_5Eg9NTcf_-hH8?usp=sharing
>>
What space program would Nazis have had if they'd won?
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>>14729741
It would have looked almost exactly like the Soviet program except with different wallpaper.
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i hate earth
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>>14729740
27 new stamps from 2 countries; 14 from the Soviet Union, 13 from Hungary
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1JnTpiGNU9cnzpYZ_CiAtFVpT_kyexUy-?usp=sharing
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>>14729754
One of the new Hungarian ones, on the exploration of Halley's comet
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>>14729739
Why don't they just make a competing engine to the raptor 2 and also build a large metal silo? Like, why is it so hard to create a raptor 2? how many iq points does it take
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5ovFY175zo

Friday, 1030 am EDT

Mission experts for NASA's #Artemis I mission around the Moon go over the details and mission timeline—from pre-launch to splashdown—of the four-to-six-week flight test that will demonstrate the capabilities of the Space Launch System (SLS) Moon rocket and Orion capsule. Briefing participants:

• Debbie Korth, Orion program deputy manager, NASA Johnson
• Rick LaBrode, lead Artemis I flight director, NASA Johnson
• Judd Frieling, Artemis I ascent/entry flight director, NASA Johnson
• Melissa Jones, Artemis I recovery director, NASA Kennedy
• Reid Wiseman, chief astronaut, NASA Johnson
• Philippe Deloo, Orion European Service Module program manager, ESA (European Space Agency)
>>
>>14729763
full flow staged is basically witchcraft
>>
Reminder that SpaceX built a whole ass Methane Oxygen RCS thruster and then scrapped it immediately after because Elon wanted to use the vents instead.
>>
>>14729763
India doesn't have the technical ability or the budget.

Japan has the ability (maybe) but not the budget.

Europe has the ability and maybe the budget but they're hamstrung by being an inefficient weirdo socialist operation that cares more about jobs distribution than product performance. They'd reject building EuroRaptor if it wasn't a jobs program for half a dozen different countries.

Russia used to have the technical ability but they lost that when they spent three decades coasting on inertia left over from the old soviet glories and all of their good engineering talent emigrated or died.

China pretends that it has the technical ability but i really doesn't. You only need to look at how they've kept revising down their expectations for the CZ-9 main engines to see that.

The UAE is rich enough to hire the talent they'd need, but instead they're playing it smart by sticking to making payloads and leaving launch and propulsion to other groups.

Other corporate players would like to and they've got enough talent to at least try but don't have near enough cash flow to make the attempt. Most of them are looking bankruptcy in the face just trying to keep their current SLV operations going.
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>>14729793
best part is no part
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>>14729806
He's not figured out the part yet where they should have built a stupid simple gg methalox engine instead of raptor.
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>>14729822
What is a "gg" engine?
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>>14729829
Gas generator cycle
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>>14729838
Ah k, so venting the pre-burner overboard.
>>
Will deorbiting space debris ever actually kill anyone or destroy anything?
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>>14729843
Yeah it's what Merlin is, it'll also be what Neutron and Terran R are.
It's the obvious choice and there's an argument to be made that in the name of rapidly deploying Starlink and proving out the heat shield reusability, it would have been the objectively better choice for Starship at least initially.
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>>14729847
There's only been one injury from natural space debris, ever.

The universe is dumping metric tons of material down on earth every minute. The likelihood of artificial debris hitting anything is extremely remote.
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>>14729838
Why heat exchanger?
Where heat go?
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>>14729855
It's cooling the nozzle you very very gay man
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>>14729855
fuel
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>>14729791
>>14729822
A better question is why didn't Blue Origin make their engine a gas generator? Bite the bullet on reduced efficiency if it means you can actually deliver a reliable engine on time.
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>>14729896
Getting a Trumpet Fight guy vibe from that face
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>>14729896
BO had no idea how to make a proper orbital engine.
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>>14729538
you probably know this but just in case it's only going to work in principia
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How long until the Space Force is fielding Starships?

I want to be the Admiral of the 1st Star Fleet
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I was on /t/ looking for audiobooks and i found this space stuff megatorrent, so if anyone wants to download or sneed here it is

>>>/t/1073266
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>>14729942
The hell is a station tumbler
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>>14729952
It's used for mixing drinks aboard a space station.
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Neutron update next month
Any chance of significant engine development by then, or are they just gonna change the design again?
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>>14729739
Yeah right. Still waiting for FSD now running 5 years late
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>>14729975
>Starship is starting to become mainstream
It begins
>>
It's hard to comprehend the significance of SpaceX. It really is crazy to think about just how much of an impact they will have on history. They'll completely reshape the future of geopolitics and shape effectively all human colonization of space.
>>14729763
No one else has the ability to build a Raptor equivalent. They'd have to settle for something quite a bit worse.
>>
Apparently china has the ability to move satellites in GEO. Damn good jump in tech.
https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4431/1
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>>14729970
If it inst a confirmed launch in January of 2024 it better be equally good news.
>>
>>14729795
This really shows how ridiculous nation states can be. Only china is taking this stuff as serious as the US. How can India / EU not respond to falcon9, SJ-21, and MEV-1 in any meaningful way? CN/US can turn off your nations ability to function for funzies.
>>
>>14730009
Nuclear weapons used to be the nation saver, but with spooky space lasers on the way. Going to make ICBMs less of a deterrent.
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>>14730009
Their response might be just be forcing their countries to only use their rockets through protectionism.
>>
>>14729987
>>14729795
>>14729763
>>14729739
The base state of individuals/teams/companies/countries is mediocrity. If they're not driven, they become like the DMV, or any other monopoly-- ho-hum.

SpaceX is REVOLUTIONARY and special in 3 ways:
1.) Mission. They actively work towards their goal: They want to make humans a multiplanetary species. This needs kilotons of mass delivered to Mars. So make a cheap, reusable rocket! And use that rocket's capacity to make money to pay for all the stuff you'll deliver to Mars.
2.) Iterative design. Lots of companies SAY they're agile, but SpaceX really IS. In the time it took oldspace to rebuild a Frankenstein shuttle using 50 year old tech, SpaceX will have built a totally new engine, spaceship, and factory.
3.) People. SpaceX is the best place to work if you're a smart, motivated engineer. If you're 22 and go to Boeing, you'll do menial shit under someone as old as your parents (or grandparents!), for years or decades before you do meaningful engineering work. At SpaceX, your boss might only be a couple years older than you. You'll probably work on interesting things quickly, and actually contribute to your project.
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>>14730042
They're also special in that you-work-80-hour-weeks kind of way
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>>14730042
>>14730051
I wanna work at SpaceX so bad bros
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>>14730051
Sweet, double the earnings.
>>
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Reminder that China is going to go on the offensive soon as a direct result of the inevitability of Starship resulting in their irrelevance on a military level.
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>>14729975
FOR THE GLORY OF NORTH KOREA
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>>14730079
>meeting between top government and military officials
>"How do we counter Starship?"
>"We don't."
I think it really sank in for them when they realized that Starship not only wasn't just some lofty dream but was going to be here by the middle of this decade and that they wouldn't have anything remotely comparable until the middle of the next decade at the absolute earliest in the best case scenario.
>>
>>14730042
>>14730051
right, it is a lot of hours, but they're productive hours. It's not just ass-in-seat time, or making a nice powerpoint for some executive. It's getting real stuff done. If you're in your 20's and haven't started a family yet it seems like a great place to work. It's like 1 year at SpaceX you might learn more stuff than 10 at Boeing, and your SpaceX skills/experiences will translate to you being very productive wherever you land after SpaceX (when you have a family, for example).

I think this stuff is actually one of the reasons they're successful -- they filter out anyone who just wants a paycheck. They filter out anyone who has significant non-work commitments. They only get enthusiastic people. It's night-and-day to work with lifers (just there to collect a paycheck) vs believers.

>>14730070
I kinda do too. I spent my 20's in consulting, so I worked crazy hours but my work didn't really have the same impact as making humans multiplanetary. And at the time I didn't have the skills they needed. Now I have the skills but I'm married with kids so work-life balance matters a lot more to me now. I still dream about it but know it's not really an option for me anymore.

[in 1000 years, people will still remember the first SpaceX Starship that lands men on Mars like we all remember the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. Literally no one will care that I helped Y company increase their profitability by Z% in 2022Q2]
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>>14729741
One of Von Brauns stories about why he was arrested by the Gestapo and ultimately blackmailed into the SS was that he had claimed at the party that the future of Rocketry was in Florida and that he would leave for the US as soon as the war was over for their huge budget potential. So it might not look so different but that story did vary fairly widely over the years.
The main positive would be he and the American Peenemünde boys wouldn’t be locked in Redstone being ignored and sidelined at all costs by competing military RnD teams for 15 years.
There would be no Russian Space Program and no Cold War to drive the objectively ridiculous 1962 to 1968 budget however but that might be mitigated by the lack of Foreign Aid nation bankrupting after that date.
>>
What will sex on Mars be like?
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>>14730103
If you watched the currently airing tv show, you wouldn't have to wonder

It is only right now that I realized the position they used was possible because of Mars gravity
>>
straight-wing shuttle report: after spending 0 hours on aesthetics and 6 hours on reentry i think i finally got something that can hold the 60 degree angle of attack proto-bellyflop until it's subsonic. you have to keep the center of lift really close to the center of mass.
it's really pretty stable once it gets down into the thicker atmosphere past 75 km if you just fiddle with the slider for the tail elevators to try to keep pitch meter centered.
switching from the flop into level flight is still a problem but i think it's just a matter of figuring out what order to press buttons in and probably getting some bigger jet engines. on the tries where i successfully recovered from a stall it flew just fine.
payload bay is tentatively 9.5m diameter and 20m long, which should be enough for about 100 tons of LH2. only problem is i'm not sure how to open it. i'm probably gonna have to pop the nose open uragan-style with some robotics parts.
>>
>>14730079
What can China do? They're stuck. Their economy is too closely coupled with the West. We can always find another poor country to do our manufacturing (which would suck for a while), but there ISN'T another rich world to buy their goods. China is sitting on a demographic timebomb-- people are just now realizing that the one child policy will be FAR more damaging to them than the Great Leap Forward.
>>14730092
I think their best bet is to fast-follow Starship, especially once it's more mature/actually working. But even copying it is going to be very hard. China still hasn't figured out how to make jet engines as good as the West or even Russia, and they've been trying to reverse engineer those for decades. Rocket engines are probably even harder than jet engines, so thats a big problem. Probably using a simpler/less efficient engine is their best bet, like gas generator anon suggests.
>>14729822
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>>14730108
Very cool. Does RO actually simulate aerosurfaces accurately for the different wing shape to matter?
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>>14730110
Raptor's made out of monocrystalline inconel, and we know China's shit at metallurgy for some reason
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>>14730141
ferram aerospace which is included in RO does. if you try doing hypersonic flight with straight wings you'll lose control pretty easily, which is why i had to spam all those RCS quads while working out stability issues.
>>
>no closures for this week and the next week
NOTHING. EVER. HAPPENS.
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>>14730157
So, closure in 2 weeks?
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>>14730170
2 weeks' notice to airmen
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>>14730105
>You will never have a Cuban and a Russian smirking while you smash forbidden pussy next door
The kid deserved better...but damn.
>>
>>14729975
wtf is this
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>>14730184
alt-history Starship with NTP thrusters
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>nobody has posted the new JWST image
fucking
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Someone needs to do this for starship orbital flight.
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what the fuck is this show
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>>14730261
Garbage
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>>14730194
Looks like every image is gonna be a deepfield now
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>>14730189
>alt-history
What's the source? Some random artist?
>>
starship will never get to orbit
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>>14730575
What makes you think so?
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>>14730580
There's been no real progress for months, this thing is just a money pit. Who thought it'd be a good idea to make a reusable rocket with a highly complex stage zero and an engine you can't trust to relight in time to save your life…
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>>14730586
Everything Elon has set out to do in rocketry he has eventually succeeded in. Later than he hoped, and not fully realizing the initial promise.
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>>14730606
So far I haven't died therefore I'm immortal.
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>>14730610
So do you want to bet 10K on starship never getting to orbit in the next 10 years?
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>>14730586
Yeah, another retarded ignorant.
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Reminder that PROCSIMA beaming isn't necessary, laser electric propulsion is still OP. 1/2
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>>14730622
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>>14729950
We saw this last year already anon
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ABL is set to launch NET 8/29 according to the range calendar
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>>14730351
>Deepfields only take a couple hours to do now
Why the hell not.
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>>14730610
we're all gonna be immortal bro, don't worry
>>
If Elon Musk doesn't, the fraud who's not a rocket engineer, doesn't deliver on a ground breaking rocket technology that the world hasn't ever seen today, then he's a fraud.
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>>14730746
are they Ey Bee El or Able?
>>
>>14729975
Ion fusion drive?
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>>14729985
this was possibly the most cringe moment I have ever witnessed
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>>14730916
You misspelled based, and ofcourse its based on Starship
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>>14730570
For all Mankind
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>>14730261
Lesbians and minorities, sometimes spaceflight briefly.
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>>14730261
This is what an astronaut looks like
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>>14730261
For All Personkind
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>>14730261
7 women
3 men

This is the ideal world, 2 women per male, along with gays, which reduce the number of competing men for right to mate with women
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>>14730992
For All Sѹkind
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This is what a REAL crew looks like.
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>>14730105
>Only possible by using Martian gravity
You have me curious. I have to watch again. That would be some attention to detail unusual for current day TV.
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>>14730908
The only person I ever heard it call Able is Hullo, but then he called it Ey Bee El in a later video
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>>14730570
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>>14730746
How many fucking rocket startups can the market handle?
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>>14729972
Don't be surprised if Musk ends up exiting Tesla and putting his resources and attention fully into SpaceX.
>>
>>14731134
less than there are https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4PuCdtPEBc
>>
>>14730174
we shot our wad yesterday for space launches.

There are many upcoming launches already on the books though:

7 SSLV - maiden launch from India (all solids)
9 Soyuz-2b - Khayyam Iranian milsat
9 Falcon 9 - Starlink 4-26 (and three more in August)
and maybe Ceres-1 from China also on the 9th
>>
>>14729972
It was considered impossible 5 years ago, its still considered impossible today. Hence any day he delivers on it, will become a miraculous day since everything already thinks its impossible. Yet once its released, Musk is not an engineer, he's a cheer leader, he's just a sales man, he doesn't deserve credit, etc.
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>>14731142
>maiden launch from India (all solids)
OOPS, All Solids?
I didn't know that, cool.
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China has just launched an spaceplane

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPgsR1hwktk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl_FIMCgO78

Thanks based Xi, leading China to conquer space.
>>
>>14731177
It is like the Minotaur/Taurus series, based on their ICBM industry.
>>
>>14731184
NOT pic related. What they launched is closer to the X-37B
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>>14731184
Even if they just stole the Boing design it would look more implessive than that render
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>>14731184
Pic more accurate, probably.
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>>14731163
No one thinks it is fundamentally impossible. The current architectures and methods won't get us there no matter how many petabytes of data you throw at it.
Tesla isn't even close to any "exciting" problems of whose life to prioritize when some kind of collision is evitable. It's at: Tesla keeps rear ending emergency vehicles because it hasn't seen enough of them pulled over in the training set. Partly Musk's insistence on keeping it vision only is to blame.
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>>14731232
>No one thinks it is fundamentally impossible
Just like no one thought reusable rockets were impossible and private space rocket was impossible. Yeah right.

Debbie doubters always rewrite history to fit undermine the winners. "Nobody thought we couldn't make evs" blah blah blah.
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>>14730261
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>>14731232
You're also wrong on your rationals as well.

Tesla autopilot rear ends emergency vehicles because the autopilot ignores those, not because its a limit of vision but because its a limit of the old software they were using. There's two different software at play. One for autopilot (old software) and one for FSD (new software). Autopilot is rudimentary lane keeping with some avoidance and some lane changing. It ignores complex dynamic aspects because on highways those are extremely rare. Meanwhile on FSD (new software), the car keeps track of EVERYTHING. Which requires a more robust software and is more prone to erratic behaviors due to sensititive to data, thats why they're testing it out on the city streets with this. The reason the they aren't using their new software on highway is because autopilot still does the job 99% of the time, but the new software is getting there to replace the old software soon. Not because its impossible for vision to drive the car, we've already established that cars can drive on cameras alone. FSD drives cars on city streets all the time now, there's thousands of videos online. Just sort by latest monthly videos. Its a matter of time when emergency vehicles are displayed, not that Musk's vision only is impossible as you claim it is.
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>>14731232
>Tesla isn't even close to any "exciting" problems of whose life to prioritize when some kind of collision is evitable
>Partly Musk's insistence on keeping it vision only is to blame.
LMAO you should kys
>>
>>14731242
Nothing SpaceX did with Falcon 9 required a fundamental breakthrough. What he is trying with FSD does. It is obvious that he is completely oblivious to the difficulties when he has promised that robotaxis roam the streets years ago.
>>
>>14731264
>not that Musk's vision only is impossible as you claim it is
Vision only is a fool's dream for now. A sufficiently advanced system should be able to drive with hearing only. That doesn't mean such a system is feasible now.
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>>14731270
No the problem isn't him, who works with industry leaders, works in the field, knows thousands of actual engineers working on the problem, etc.

The problem is english language graduates who write write media articles about the software and claim that Musk is fake. The problem is you bought into the Musk fake narrative they're trying to sell you. Its not that Musk and all the hundreds/thousands of people working to make it happen are retards as you're led to believe, its that you're a retard for believing the media's lies.
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i don't think we've had a LIDAR shill in /sfg/ yet
KEK
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>>14731281
I agree on some aspects. Good processing power + good sonar/radar should be able to process close enough to vision, but that would mainly be for object detection, but for reading signs/colors/etc. I suppose those may not be fundamentally needed for driving if automation becomes a thing tho.
>>
>>14731293
Its not a lidar shill, its just the standard "Musk fake" argument. Whatever that entails, if Musk promotes eating meat, they'll go vegan argument. If he promotes Mars, they'll argue for Earth. If Musk promotes sex with hot girls, they'll argue for sex with ugly girls. Its just reactionary.
>>
>>14731297
>Good processing power + good sonar/radar
bro the radar currently in cars can't tell a manhole cover from an overpass from a braking lead.
the 50 dollar camera currently in cars can do it 100% of the time.
take your delusions to /n/
>>
>>14731306
Would be detected by an overhead radar bouncing signals at an angle from a top down approach.
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>>14731317
>just add more shitty radar to make it better
>just train a neural network to extract useful data from the garbled reflected shart
there's a reason humans see in the wavelengths they do, it's optimal
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>>14731327
I don't disagree cameras are better. Just saying others can do it, its just they're missing the crucial color information and the minute accurate regarding humans signs.
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>>14731136
What is gonna happen to neuralink and boring then? I always supposed it was Tesla who was providing the money for Musk's other enterprises.
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>>14731333
Its not. They're independently funded with tiny amount of money from Musk and other investors joining in.
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>>14731258
But the show is American.
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>>14730103
Jamie is hot
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>best free satellite imagery is 10m per pixel
:(
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>>14731359
Free comes at a cost
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>>14731327
>there's a reason humans see in the wavelengths they do, it's optimal
the reason is we don't have high frequency electronics
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>>14731364
Passive light detector is more efficient active detectors. Light already comes from the sun, so why bother sending out another source of energy and then getting it back? Its a waste
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>>14730145
Raptor's made out of "an" inconel-like alloy, but it's a custom formulation. Any off-the-shelf superalloy couldn't withstand >800 bar 400 celsius oxygen rich gas without igniting.
Which is to say China is even further behind SpaceX than you suggest.
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>>14730194
I don't care much about JWST images to be honest, I only care about exoplanet atmosphere spectrographic analysis (aka, real shit)
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>>14731327
>there's a reason humans see in the wavelengths they do, it's optimal
active sensing like sonar is metabolically expensive for organisms, robots have no such constraints
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>>14731411
>sonar
show me the sonar that has the same information content as a camera image, costs less than 100 dollars per sensor and doesn't interfere when there's 20 cars with them in the same place.
you're coping
>>
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>>14731431
millimeter radar will give you velocity data that vision wont and its a tiny part of a robot cars energy budget
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>>14731446
>millimeter radar
it also requires a disgusting amount of post-processing and guesswork when there's metallic objects like, i don't know, CARS involved
refer to this >>14731306
you'll have to do false positive rejection using vision anyway, shitting up your whole stack and making it less reliable than not having radar in the first place
>>
>>14731411
Sure they do, battery power is a great constraint on EVs. On top of that, LIDAR is extremely power hungry. You can put 100 cameras on a car for the same power consumption as a lidar.
>>
>>14731305
>Its just reactionary
Contrarianism, not reactionary. Reactionary is the opposive of progressive, ie if you are comfortable with your live and don't want to fuck around with reinventing social concepts and constructs all the time, you're reactionary.
>>
>>14731471
Don't @me bro. I dont give a shit about your hijacking of language. Reactionary = reactive to others, not conformist.
>>
Self driving cars already exist, it's called having a chauffeur.
>>
>>14731481
That's just the way it is. For the record, I absolutely am reactionary, because I react against progressives actively trying to destroy western civilization and social norms (which are the reason we achieved such heights over the past 150 years in the first place).
>>
>>14731483
This. Any solution needs to be less expensive and less dangerous than that to have a chance.
>>
>>14731471
>>14731486
You need to go back.
>>
>>14731491
We are discussing spaceflight
>>
>>14731483
Auto-mobile = Self-driving
>>
Why don’t people know about SLS and Artemis?

Most people I talk to have no idea it exists. Why isn’t Artemis as much of a household name like Apollo? Will that change with the first launch this month?
>>
>Spaceflight?
>>
>>14731504
$40 billion down the drain to make this single thing fly, when the second one flies, it would be $50+ billion. Before the end of this decade, it would be $90B.
>>
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>>14731508
And likely less than a handful will fly this decade, if that.
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>>14731504
Give up on people, they're retarded faggots with rare exception.
>>
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>>14730663
Im surprised how fast are some niche generals compared to entire boards, like /f1/ and /sfg/
>>
>>14731504
Getting people to care about the space program has been one of NASA's biggest problems since the 70s

Every single mission NASA approves has to have a significant Education and Public Outreach (EPO) component to get ordinary people involved
>>
>>14729729
hey guys
i know who is going to be picked for first female on artemis mission
if you spend 38 seconds looking you could know too
>>
>>14731514
very sex
>>
>>14731542
Good luck to her on the Apollo 8 re-enactment
>>
>>14730079
FINALLY someone saying the obvious
>>
>>14731516
I doubt an SLS will ever fly outside of the 2020s
>>
>>14731557
Dont underestimate the capacity for political corruption
>>
>>14730103
holy shit what a cunt
>>
>>14731535
The power of gatekeeping is that it allows communities to exist
>>14731550
Maybe it'll be more of an Apollo 1 reenactment
>>
>>14731542
thankfully they picked a hotty
>>
>>14731504
>SLS is a garbage, expensive rocket.
Unless a better rocket shows up, the "we are going to stay" Artemis slogan is gonna age like milk.
Apollo only happened at that time because of the political circunstancies, no one would keep sending expensive rockets unless there was some big money to be made on the moon.
A cheap rocket is the only way Artemis could be saved, and that's why I'm crossing my fingers for Starship.

>You didn't even mention Gateway, which only exists for political purposes of course.
>>
>>14731558
Don't discard the capacity for some politicians to stab others in the back and take their toys away. All the SLS funding dries up as soon as a group of politicians in high places start pointing at pictures of Starship on the Moon and asking hard questions.
>>
>>14731504
1. Nothing has actually flown yet and the actual landing may not even happen this decade.
2. It's been done before
3. It's a Trump admin program so the media doesn't like talking about it.
4. It's goals are boring compared to SpaceX's goals
>>
>>14731550
>>14731550
it's this one
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1stIxjQV-Q
> wow how do you know?
well thanks for asking
>>
>>14731567
No one cares about hard questions about Moon/space. They care about hard questions about jobs in their district and the money they get paid by Boeing/Lockheed
>>
>we hope to attempt an orbital launch within a month or two, depending on how testing goes
>>
>>14731569
> but anon how can you know the future
you can know the future too with 38 seconds of thinking
>>
>>14731570
That's what I'm saying.
Politician A argues that Politician B is stealing money to fund pet district jobs when those jobs offer nothing.
>>
>>14731564
I'll start to consider believing 'we are going to stay' once they keep a few people on the surface constantly and not just for a few weeks or months a year.
>>
>>14731572
Have you guys bought something nice to drink for when the first orbital flight happens?
>>
>>14730105
Sauce
>>
>>14730079
Literally just shoot it with an AK-47 during the bellow flop.
>>
>>14731575
Politician B: "I bring jobs to our community, you want to give jobs to some south african billionaire!"
>>
>>14731582
Something that goes good with a highball

I'm thinking a Tom Collins actually
>>
>>14731369
>so why bother sending out another source of energy and then getting it back?
Bats and whales do it. With Radar/microwave it would be even easier to distinguish between an animal and a rock
>>
>>14731599
Bats do it because their evolutionary adaptation works in night, as food is only at night. Whales do it because lights dont reach kms down under the ocean.
>>
>>14731402
>800 bar
technically it's the density that matters in this context
>>14731431
2d vs 3d
>>
>>14731504
ever since they did the Apollo landings they kept saying there will be more moon landings, people ain't gonna budge until they see it
>>
I like how musk basically gave up on his job and is now doing what all the other celebs and rich people do. He's socializing and having gfs etc
>>
>>14731580
I don't expect this to be happening any soon even with the best odds. I'll be happy If we get the start of a surface outpost in the next decade. (not an orbital station like Gateway)
>>
>>14731649
how new are you?
>>
>>14731608
It's been theorized that whales originally evolved echolocation in order to hunt more effectively in turbid waters, "seeing" fish and other prey hundreds of meters away in water that has a visibility range of no more than twenty feet.
>>
>>14731613
Yeah, and how do you make a hot gas more dense? You pressurize it. Unhelpful pedantry, especially when you consider that the huge pressures result in a fast flow rate past the turbine while still at high density, which effectively acts like a pressure washer trying to rip the oxide layers off of the metal components.
>>
>>14731649
He dated grimes during the entire early period stainless steel renaissance era of Starship development.
>>
>>14729763
>how many iq points does it take
more than anyone else has. raptor engine is HARD
>>
>>14731649
I think you're reading too much into the news. Musk is at job all the time. Even during sleep, as thats what on-call is. Two its his money, his company, his dream/goal, and his ambition driving the work. He wouldn't give it up to chase women. In fact, if you read why his marriages fall apart, its because of his work. His work is his #1 priority to him.
>>
>>14731685
I will also note that some electric eels sense fish in very murky waters by measuring how the resistance of the water changes when a fish passes nearby (eel are passing currents through the water from the mouth to the tail)
>>
>>14731504
Because Elon is telling everyone we're going to Mars. EVERYONE knows about Elon and Mars. Nobody cares about going back to the moon. There's a reason they stopped doing it in the first place.
>>
>>14731711
>if you read why his marriages fall apart, its because of his work.
It's because of the women he chooses
>>
>>14731711
cringe
back tο reddit
>>
>>14731202
If that thing can survive reentry, why does it need fairings?
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXS_gkWAIs0
you're watching this right?
>>
>>14731795
Normalfaggotry jewtubers are cancer
>>
>>14731733
>There's a reason they stopped doing it in the first place.
The reason was not "There's nothing to do or learn here on the Moon, it's useless to us". The reason was "It's going to be too expensive to continue using the Saturn Apollo architecture to do anything on the Moon, so we need a cheaper architecture, a 'space transport system' if you will."
Followed on by decades of corruption and program inertia with no real goals.
>>
>so that rocket in Texas is called Starlink right?
>>
>>14731795
>25:50
>>
>>14731573
it should be christina koch as first woman on moon
sadly it'll be the kew
>>
>>14731820
Yeah and when I think Artemis and SLS, I think efficient and inexpensive
>>
Is starship orbital launch going to be in Texas or Florida? Any idea on when it's going to happen?
>>
>>14731834
Yes, there will be starship launches from texas or florida.
>when
roughly two weeks
>>
>>14731833
Those "decades" I mentioned extend up to the 2020's too, silly. They will only end once private spaceflight has been shown to completely outclass retard oldspace bullshit fag taxpayer rape programs.
>>
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>>14731359
looks free to me
>>
>>14731895
name/link of the program?
>>
>>14731793
Aerodynamic flight on the way up?
Also its shy and doesn't want you looking at it.
>>
>>14729853
qrd?
>>
>>14730079
>>14730092
Red Storm Rising scenario
they wake up one day to suddenly realize they've been backed into a corner and the only way out is to fight.
>>
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>>14731954
>On November 30, 1954, Ann Hodges experienced a rude awakening. As the 34-year-old lay napping cozily under quilts on the sofa in her Alabama home, she awoke with a jolt as she became the only human being known to have suffered an injury after being struck by a meteorite.

>The approximately 8.5-pound, 4.5-billion-year-old interplanetary traveler shot like a bullet through her Sylacauga house’s roof at 2:46 p.m. It banged into her large radio console and bounced onto her body, causing a large bruise on her left side.

>Apparently, a larger meteorite split in two as it fell toward the ground. One piece hit Hodges and the other landed a few miles away. The second meteorite can be found in the collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.
>>
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Why does space delta 18's patch look like this
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>>14731904
it's a piece of shit i just wrote
https://pastebin.com/wzL1LFng
>>
>>14731532
you're not cool tim, stop trying
>>
>>14730928
"For All MILFkind" would be more accurate.
>>
>>14731904
>>14731990
for a better experience use this https://server.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/rest/services/World_Imagery/MapServer?f=jsapi
but they cuck you and don't actually have a 'download' button
>>
>>14731140
>be Launcher
>spend too long designing a needlessly complex kerosene engine
>the small launch market is now oversaturated while you are years from launch
>the methane revolution made your engine a developmental dead end
>rush refocus on a mediocre space tug
>accept that SpaceX will eat the smallsat market while coping that there may be enough scraps left for your rocket
>>
https://www.space.com/14936-spacex-ceo-elon-musk-60-minutes-interview.html

>In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" that will air Sunday (March 18), Musk discusses his ambitious future plans and responds to two high profile critics of commercial spaceflight: Iconic Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Gene Cernan — the first and last men to walk on the moon.

>Moonwalkers Armstrong and Cernan have been vocal critics of the push to commercialize space. The spaceflyers both testified before Congress to protest against government reliance on private space vehicles, saying that the commercialization of space could threaten America's dominance in space exploration.

I love how oldspace was so against commercial space for the dumbest arguements, now commercial spaceflight is the reason why America is so ahead of the world now and will continue to be so
>>
https://www.engadget.com/fcc-in-space-manufacturing-161758456.html

Why the fuck is the FCC the space regulator
I get that orbit activity might be a hazard for comm satellites but come on

>Commissioners have voted in favor of an inquiry that will explore in-space servicing, assembly and manufacturing (ISAM). The move would both help officials understand the demands and risks of current in-space production technology while facilitating new projects. This could help companies build satellites and stations in orbit, for instance, while finding new ways to deal with growing volumes of space debris.
>>
>>14732045
>>I get that orbit activity might be a hazard for comm satellites
If that's the logic, then why not the National Weather Service? lmao what a farce
>>
>>14732026
many such cases.

Honestly why would ANY new space company try to build a rocket engine using anything other than the gas generator cycle? Even Rocketlab has stated that GG is very simple compared to anything.
My guess is that the entrenchment of kerosene fuel is to blame, except if you're building a small rocket you can very feasibly supply a few dozen tons of propane fuel per launch, so really it's more that new guys are afraid to break from the status quo. Looks like moving forward from here though the fact that methalox is becoming the new industry standard will mean that anyone trying to butt into the market is going to have an easier time doing it because they will pick the GG cycle and not need to deal with soot formation at all.
>>
>>14732033
You love to see it
>>
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booster 7 lives once more
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Has NASA ever publicity discussed Starship?
>>
>>14732129
>outer ring of 20 engines
thrust puck is fucked then. it's not flying
>>
>>14732129
delusional
>>
>>14732129
Wednesday-Thursday is my target. Testing will begin the monday after that.
>>
>>14732133
Why would they test it then
>>
>>14732139
SpaceX is a fraud. Starship is fake
>>
>>14732138
Road closures are cancelled for this week and next week
>>
>>14732145
We can apply new road closures with 24 hr notices
>>
>>14732131
Of course.
https://twitter.com/nasa_marshall/status/1535350602041118721?lang=en

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/as-artemis-moves-forward-nasa-picks-spacex-to-land-next-americans-on-moon/
>>
>>14732133
Don't make me pull up that weeks-old tweet where he said they will be testing engines in groups instead of testing the entire engine cluster at once, anon.
>>
>the gateway modules will take a year to arrive in HALO orbit
what the fuck
>>
>the chinese spaceplane launch performed a dogleg
>the spacecraft is transmitting something weird in S-band
i wonder what they're testing with it
>>
>>14732173
weak stability boundary transfers are a scam
>>
>>14732179
anti-sat warfare of some sort I bet
>>
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>We have to wait 17+ years for LUVOIR
>>
>>14732184
build your own then
>>
>>14732184
20 years before they begin construction on a 6m mirror, not and LUVOIR
>>
>>14732188
>>14732184
Astronomers need to crowdfund the project, build a giant telescope, send it on Starship if they are really motivated enough. But they're likely not.
>>
>>14732184
what would be the implications for this design if JWST's primary mirror were to get completely fucked by micrometeorites 100x faster than predicted?
>>
>>14732236
Planet Nine is real
>>
>>14732184
>>14732236
Scientifically, how far overbudget would luvoir become if they needed to add a fold out micrometeorite shield to surrounded the mirror
>>
>>14732144
Ahh shit ok, makes sense.
>>
>>14732033
Armstrong and Cernan are both dead so who got the last laugh
>>
>>14732184
I hope we will get the ability to assemble these telescopes in orbit in the future so no weird foldings and stuff
>>
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>>14732225
astroonomers are too comfy on Earth, they need an incentive
>>
Imagine telling Captain Cook he can only explore Australia for 3 weeks after he spent 9 months getting there & will spend 9 months getting back
>>
>>14732298
Doing Apollo-style missions to mars is a retarded idea.

They should start assembling a research outpost right since the beginning.
>>
>>14732298
Long-Stay Fast Transit is the ONLY acceptable Mars mission architecture and I will commit violence to the families of politicians if NASA is required to use any other method.
>>
>>14732298
Fixed
>>
>>14732298
yeah but there's more to do in australia than there is on mars. he'd have gotten bored after a couple of week if it was just rocks anyway.
>>
>>14732148
>we
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>>14732324
>there's more to do in australia than there is on mars.
doubt
>>
>>14732298
It's more like the North Pole or Mariana Trench than Australia. Any longer stay will need significant pre-built infrastructure the building of which is arguably more of a challenge than actually getting a person there. Honestly I think it depends on whether NASA (read: US politicians) actually want to make the most out of Mars or just the prestige of going there once.
>>
>they're just venting free rocket fuel into the atmosphere

https://apnews.com/article/science-texas-trending-news-climate-and-environment-0eb6880f7c4532a845155a3bd44c2e4b
>>
>>14732298
Here is my proposal for a first mars mission, assuming they're using Starship:

>Choose a safe location with resources like ground water ice;
>Send a dozen Starships with various loads;
>One of them is the crew;
>Some others are hardware like a oxygen factory, a ground ice extractor, a power generator, shelters etc;
>The rest is all supplies of oxygen, water, food so that they won't die if the hardware doesn't work as expected;
>The crew will focus on setting up and testing the hardware for future missions;

Subsequent mission would gradually increase the size of this outpost, initially with pre-built modules, and then using local production for stuff like roads.
Mars would be explored through vehicle voyages starting from this outpost, where every landing and launch would occur.

>Of course, they will need to test all this in a Moon outpost before trying.
>>
>>14732309
>nooooooo MOXIE technology hasn't been proven yet on Mars you can't just leave the astronauts there forever that goes against everything NASA and the international SCIENCE community stands forrrr!!
hahha newspace go brrrrrrrr
>>
>>14732330
>It's more like the North Pole or Mariana Trench than Australia
Terrible comparison; North Pole is just a plain of sea ice thats in darkness for 6 months and the Mariana Trench has 1000 bar pressure and permanent darkness. Mars is far more benign environmentally
>>
>Starship is at least 50 million marginal cost per launch, maybe 100 million
>>
>>14732225
Remember when 1.5 million was pledged on kickstarter for a tiny little space telescope and the projected still collapsed? Just because you can imagine a solution doesn't mean it will actually work. In reality crowdfunding is incredibly limited and unstable. Even if they somehow raised 3+ orders of magnitude more you actually need a plan of how to build it and only a few organisations have the experience. Motivation and hope doesn't really cut it.
>>
>>14732357
Would it be feasible for a corporation to build a private space telescope and charge for the observation time and the data?
>>
b7 is going back to the pad tonight?
>>
>>14732359
They already do that with land telescopes, and the reason there isn't a space one is because adaptive optics have gotten really good over the years
>>
is ewon muspk goina be my frand? :3
>>
>>14732359
Not with the way the field is currently structured no, not at any realistic price point anyway. US astronomers actually get paid for using major space telescopes, to support their research. Most of the time there is no exchange of funds. researchers themselves don't really have that much money, the majority is tied up in facilities at the national level. What astronomers have to potentially buy time with is pennies compared to the facilities budgets of ESO, NSF astro or NASA. So it doesn't really make sense to try and sell time directly.
>>
>>14732359
Yes. SpaceX could build it. Telescope as a service could be sold. So scientists can get copious amount of data for extremely cheap.
>>
>>14732377
Imagine $3,000 per hour worth of giant telescope usage. It would net a treasure trove of specific data a scientist want. SpaceX would make ~$26M per year on it. If it cost SpaceX $20M to build that Telescope, and $20 million to sent it to their orbit, that's $40M total. Or in 2 years, they would make the money back.
>>
>>14732347
Mariana Trench is fair, but comparing the North Pole:
>Oxygen: Mars has less
>Temperature: Mars is colder
>Water: Mars has less
>Naturally occurring food: Mars has less
>Distance from safety/civilization: Mars is farther
>Radiation: Mars has 50 times as much
Darkness is a terrible argument since you should be going to the North Pole in the summer anyway, and even then it does not somehow make up for lack of a breathable atmosphere.
>>
>>14732384
Some large group could also reserve the Telescope for a year or so, and it would only cost $26M a year. Or 10 years for only $260 million. That's extremely cheap. Compared to $10 billion dollar cost of the JWST itself, excluding all the maintenance/servicing/etc of the vehicle.
>>
>>14732391
SpaceX could also cheap and launch 3-5 of them at a time and rent out all those capabilities by placing them in different orbits with Starship's large capability.
>>
>>14732398
Imagine 9 meter diameter telescopes, launched like Starlink flat panel discs.
>>
>>14732384
The problem is that you're going to have a customer base made up 100% of astronomers who could get past the selection committee to get free time on Webb or Hubble. A market made up entirely of less prestigious and therefor poorer astronomers is a very hard market to squeeze any profit out of.

It's a product that the market clearly has a need and desire for, but it's also one that's being set up in a way that's incompatible with the way the market is being run.
>>
>>14732408
>The problem is that you're going to have a customer base made up 100% of astronomers who could get past the selection committee to get free time on Webb or Hubble. A market made up entirely of less prestigious and therefor poorer astronomers is a very hard market to squeeze any profit out of.
this is obviously solved if your telescope is better than webb and hubble
>>
you can get paid for telescopes, if they are looking at earth
>>
>>14732408
Poorer astronomers could source $3000 in grants for an hour of the time. Heck, bunch of poor astronomers could utilize the hour together. If there were multiple instruments on board, each could utilize individual instruments as well for their own specific needs. Timeshare or instrument share or both.

10 astronomers chipping in $300 grant each could rent out one.
>>
>>14732426
>>14732408
I'm sure there are more well supported astronomers who have been outcasted by the comittee as well so they could also seek to reserve time, maybe even exclusive usage for x amount of days/weeks/months period for their own dissertion.
>>
>spacex can only build 3 ships per year
>>
why wont cameron county update their fucking website cert
>>
>>14732442
who are you quoting?
>>
>>14732386
>Temperature: Mars is colder
the thin atmosphere of Mars makes heat loss far less of an issue than in the thick and windy air of the high Arctic. in fact you'll need some radiators just as in a spacecraft
>>
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>>14732325
>>
>>14732479
This. The temperature of Mars doesn't matter.
>>
b7 is moving?
>>
>>14732479
>radiators on the surface
will it warm the local atmosphere enough that you can walk around with just a breather?
>>
>>14732525
yeah, parents kicked it out
>>
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>>14732527
No, atmosphere is too thin to give you any heat
>>
>>14731202
seems perfect for a single man to orbit and back
>>
>>14732527
at that pressure I think liquid in your body would be boiling so going outside without some sort of pressure suit wouldn't be a great idea regardless
>>
>>14732479
>>14732554
I'm wondering if this means passive insulation is all thats needed to keep the heat inside a domed structure from escaping.
>>
>>14732527
No, the warm air would blow away or at least rise relative to the colder air.
>>
>>14732586
It means most habitats will require active cooling, not heating, which is exactly what >>14732479
said.
>>
>>14732605
So geothermal heating system is needed. Just push the heat into the ground and take the cold out or vice versa when needed. Should be fairly simple. Especially if they use water underground source as a means of heating/cooling the Domed structures, that would melt the ice as well as provide water, while keeping dome structure cool, recirculating air, etc Solves multiple issues.
>>
b7 is definitely being moved around but its still inside the bay. 80 minutes until 9pm.
>>
where are the JWST jup pics
>>
>>14732613
Or use a radiator. Dumbass.
>>
>>14732298
There is a lot of shit in Australia that will kill you but it isn't a radioactive barren wasteland with no food or water besides what you brought with you.
>>
>>14730105
>If you watched the currently airing tv show, you wouldn't have to wonder
kill yourself, unironically and not in minecraft
>>
>>14732653
Mars isn't radioactive, food is easy to produce, water is fucking everywhere as ice (no, digging up ice is not so hard that it makes civilization impossible), basically fuck you you're wrong.
>>
>>14732660
why you mad though
>>
>>14732663
>Mars isn't radioactive

Anon please don't speak if you don't know what you are talking about.
>>
>>14732668
There's about as much cosmic ray bombardment activation products in the soil as there is in the air on Earth. Which is to say, it doesn't fuuuuuucking maaaatter. All other sources of radiation are trivial to block completely.
>>
>>14732668
Its not radioactive. There's cosmic radiation and such but those can be mitigated within a controlled environment/dome/lava tube/underground/etc.
>>
>>14732671
Anon I asked you to not speak when you have no idea what you are talking about.
>>
>>14732664
I'm not mad. Telling you to kill yourself takes almost no effort and makes it (perhaps only slightly) more likely that you'll do it. I prefer a world without you in it. I'm simply acting in my own interests.
>>
>>14732679
Maybe try taking your own advice?
>>
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>>14732653
its worse because its got Australians in it
>>
>>14732663
>Mars isn't radioactive
Technically no, but it experiences radiation levels 15 times higher than the limit for radiation workers.
>food is easy to produce
Is it? I really doubt that Martian regolith can support plants. Even with imported soil you'd need a fairly major operation to actually sustain a colony, and it would also require large amounts of oxygen and water, both of which would be in short supply.
>water is fucking everywhere as ice (no, digging up ice is not so hard that it makes civilization impossible)
Almost all of that are in the polar regions, and would almost certainly be toxic if ingested directly. Mining ice and purifying it into drinkable water on a large scale would require serious machinery.
>>
>>14732685
>15x higher than the limit
Not when you are indoors on Mars, which is 99.99% of the time.
>is it?
yes. You don't need to import soil, you don't even need soil to start with. You grow food in water, via hydroponics and aquaponics, to start off. Afterwards, as you build up an inventory of plant biomass, you can make your own soils in situ if you want, by mixing decaying plant matter with regolith you brought inside and washed. To wash regolith you mix it with water to make a slurry then agitate the slurry for a few hours then let the sediments settle and send the water over to be filtered (removes salts and metals). You repeat this several times and you have completely nontoxic sand and silt that forms humus when mixed with organic material.
>polar
Mars' subsurface is loaded with water ice deposits down to the tropics on the planet, it's not confined to the poles.
>mining ice and purifying it would require serious machinery
Mining enough water ice to satisfy the needs of a colony that recycles all of the water it uses in life support would be accomplished by a single skidsteer sized earthmover and a vacuum distillation system, where the little excavator loads busted up permafrost chunks into a vessel which closes a lid then applies a heating element, vaporizing the ice inside and drawing the vapor off to a cold trap in the vessel nextdoor. The result is highly pure water, with a waste product of dessicated regolith.
Also, you may not have noticed, but everything in your life right now takes serious machinery to keep you alive, and everything else involved with getting to Mars and living there would require serious machinery, so your point is pretty meaningless in my opinion.
>>
>>14732703
>To wash regolith you mix it with water to make a slurry then agitate the slurry for a few hours then let the sediments settle and send the water over to be filtered (removes salts and metals).
I'm sure you've tried this, huh
>everything else involved with getting to Mars and living there would require serious machinery, so your point is pretty meaningless in my opinion.
The point is that you're acting like all of this can be done with little prior preparation and on the very first manned landing. No one was ever arging that Mars can't be inhabited for extended periods, we were arguing with your absurd comparison to Australia despite it being inhospitable to life in almost every possible way.
>>
>>14732720
>despite it being inhospitable to life in almost every possible way
despite it being inhospitable to life in almost every possible way, Australia is nowhere near as bad as Mars**
>>
>>14732685
>Technically no, but it experiences radiation levels 15 times higher than the limit for radiation workers.
Unprotected by anything, the daily avg is 0.7 milliSieverts. A stomach cat scan gives you ~10 millisieverts. That's 14x the radiation you get per day on mars. So 14 days of unprotected radiation on mars = 1 cat scan.

Mitigations include staying indoors, wearing anti-radiation suits, etc. We can also augment the vehicles with small magnetic shield to deflect the radiations as well, so that exposure time for those inside vehicles are reduced to a fraction of radiation. Portable radiation for vehicles/human suits could be had with little powerpacks.
>>
>>14732703
based autistic pragmatist
>>
>>14732720
>I'm sure you've tried this, huh
This is how I wash wood ashes to get the lye out, and yes, it does work. The principal toxin in martian soil is perchlorate, which is very water soluble, so even simply rinsing the soil twice would remove the supermajority of the toxin.
>The point is that you're acting like all of this can be done with little prior preparation and on the very first manned landing.
Not what I said, retard.
>your absurd comparison to Australia
It wasn't my comparison. I'm a different anon here to point out that living on Mars is not that hard. It's far easier to live long term on Mars than it is to live long term on the Moon or the ISS.
>>
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>>14732735
>We can also augment the vehicles with small magnetic shield to deflect the radiations
No we cannot, but it doesn't matter because you can easily just wrap your vehicle in a 6 inch thick layer of water or an 8 inch thick layer of sandbags to achieve good shielding. Yes this adds weight and reduces mileage from a single charge in your vehicle, but it's not a big deal. Future land vehicles designed and built on Mars could more resemble ships than cars, and in that case a 12 inch thick layer of external shielding wouldn't even add 1% to the total mass of the thing. Plus, at that scale a 50 megawatt nuclear power source that lest you drive for years straight would be easy to implement.
>>
>>14732742
>cosine losses on the boosters
why
>>
>>14732685
>>14732735
A smoking a pack of cigarettes per day give you the same amount of radiation as going naked on Mars for a day.

>>14732743
>No we cannot
Sure we can. Magnetic shields are what protects Earth from radiation in the first place. It can protect our vehicles as well. Unless you're suggesting our physics is wrong because your insight came to you in a dream by your god or something.
>>
>>14732746
why not?
>>
>>14732746
It point the thrust through the rocket's center of mass
>>
>>14731134
Less than ten.
>>
>>14732749
>Sure we can. Magnetic shields are what protects Earth from radiation in the first place. It can protect our vehicles as well. Unless you're suggesting our physics is wrong because your insight came to you in a dream by your god or something.
When will this meme die?
Earth's magnetosphere does NOT protect us from radiation. Earth's atmosphere does that. This is why the radiation environment on an airplane is significantly higher than on the surface of the Earth, and it's why standing at the north or south pole, where the magnetosphere actively INCREASES the amount of radiation raining down toward your head, does NOT dose you like crazy.
What Earth's magnetosphere does is prevent one of several atmosphere-stripping mechanisms by deflecting solar wind. It does nothing to stop cosmic rays and it doesn't protect the Earth from getting blasted by radiation. All it does is prevent the solar wind from ionizing the thermosphere and leading to significantly higher rates of gas losses to space. On geologic timescales, this has meant out atmosphere has remained thicker than it otherwise would, although Earth's high gravity is actually doing most of the work there too.
In short, would a personal electromagnetic field help protect you from radiation on Mars? Absolutely not. I'm not suggesting physics is wrong, I'm saying you are wrong in your understanding of physics, and that's because of extremely poor quality science communication to the public.
>>
>>14732754
A gimbal would do that, and wouldn't result in cosine losses (because there's no reason to do that, it offers no advantage unless your booster engines can't thrust-balance effectively).
If China's booster engines cannot thrust balance, then they are even more laughable than I thought.
>>
>>14732756
Shotwell reference?
>>
>>14732743
>Future land vehicles designed and built on Mars could more resemble ships than cars
Notably, Mars has no seas to navigate neither roads for a conventional car, then how would it move on rough terrain? Tall wheels like the rovers or tank tracks?
>>
>>14732766
China's space program hasn't really caught up to where the US and Russia were during the Cold War.
>>
>>14732766
>A gimbal would do that, and wouldn't result in cosine losses
how would a nozzle gimbaling through the center of mass not result in cosine losses?
>>
>>14732772
Tracks are cool but require a lot of maintenance. My guess for very large vehicles is many large wheels. Think self propelled modular transporter scaled up to have ten foot tall wheels.
>>
>>14732765
>would a personal electromagnetic field help protect you from radiation on Mars? Absolutely not.
That's odd, I recall reading multiple times that a self generated magnetic field on a spacecraft is an option to help deflect radiation during deep space voyages.
>>
>>14732466
elon musk
>>
>>14732765
>This is why the radiation environment on an airplane is significantly higher than on the surface of the Earth

Because magnetic field weakens with distance dumb ass.

>it's why standing at the north or south pole
Because the north pole get more direct sun radiation than at equator

Are you retarded?
>>
>>14732777
It wouldn't result in as much cosine losses because it can thrust along the center of mass most of the time and then correct where needed. Where are you on the spectrum?
>>
>>14732780
Those talk about using a superconducting magnet loop to generate a field strong enough to deflect solar wind. On Mars' surface, you're dealing with cosmic rays, which ignore magnetic fields due to being so high energy.
>>
>>14732783
Earth's magnetic field is generated at its core. It's not appreciably weaker 1000km above the surface than it is at sea level.
>Because the north pole get more direct sun radiation than at equator
What do you think causes aurorae, niggerfaggot? Go look it up, I'll wait.
>>
>>14732789
>Earth's magnetic field is generated at its core. It's not appreciably weaker 1000km above the surface than it is at sea level.
Sure it is. Humans only live on the flat surface of earth. Thats what matters. If you increase or decrease some other factors by 1-2%, that is enough to kill human and all life on earth. On overall grand scheme of things, the variable doesn't matter, but because humans are adjusted only for certain elevations, the field strength matters.
>>
>>14732797
I hate trolls that shit up the thread so much it's unreal
>>
https://youtu.be/mhJRzQsLZGg
Booster Rollout tonight
>>
>>14732802
but they told me the booster is fake!
>>
>>14732797
I don't think you know what you're talking about.
>>
>>14732813
I do though. Most humans get sick at high altitudes. Literally blood cells dont get enough oxygen to the brain/body and pass out/die. Thats why most cant climb Everest. Meanwhile, Tibetan people/Tibetan-subgroup people can do just fine as they have evolved and adapted to the high altitude conditions such that oxygen flows at a faster rate.
>>
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chinese space plane spotted
https://twitter.com/Marco_Langbroek/status/1555667810419986432
>>
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>>14732826
>>
>>14732813
He's trolling
>>
>>14732831
I think so too. For shame.
>>
>>14732802
>with 20 engines removed
yikes
>>
>>14732826
Was this space plane ever public before?
I recall no one talking about it.
>>
>>14732835
we talked about it 2 years ago when it last launched
>>
>>14732834
thrust outputs of Raptor 2 have improved
>>
>>14732838
the integrity of musk has deteriorated
>>
>>14732835
it caused a bit of a controversy last year when some analysts decided it must have been a test of a hypersonic boost-glide vehicle https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/42772/china-tested-a-fractional-orbital-bombardment-system-that-uses-a-hypersonic-glide-vehicle-report
>>
>>14732826
can't see shit captain
>>
>>14732878
That was a completely different test.
>>
>>14732905
now that it's been spotted, it's only a matter of time before someone gets a better picture of it
>>
>>14732912
Hit it with an ASAT for fun
>>
>>14732912
not how it works retard
>>
https://youtu.be/G88b6mzmCuI
GET THE FUCK IN HERE
>>
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Rollout in progress
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>>14732936
thats exactly how it works
>>
>>14732950
this is so fuckin fake it's unreal
>>
>>14732960
There's more proof of this station existing than there is of you
>>
>>14732939
WTF I thought it was over for B7. WTF happened to SpaceX source?
>>
>>14732960
there's no reason to think that's fake
>>
/sfg/ is chink-compromised
>>
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>/sfg/ is chink-compromised
>>
>>14732969
the ccp will have collapsed by 2030, but in the mean time their little station and their useless toy spaceplane do exist
>>
>>14732974
no one said they didn't exist
>>
>>14732298
Everyone is focuses on Mars because it's a milestone but honestly I would much rather see a spinning LEO station and a lunar base over sending 3 missions to mars and then never leaving LEO for another 50 years.
Going manned interplanetary before we have lunar construction is just skipping steps for glory instead of building a sustainable space economy.
>>
>>14732980
Don't be a space-cuck.
>>
>>14732980
Well I think they should skip even more steps and send the first manned starship to mars to titan instead and only tell the world at the last minute. To really maximize the amount of seething from NASA

Space stations are another excuse for humanity to sit around on our asses staying in one spot and spending millions on bloated expansion projects. I hate it. Let's get the fuck out of relying on this rock FIRST, THEN we can make stupid spinning station shit.
>>
>>14732980
Spinning LEO station does nothing except become a tourist trap.

Mars is the right goal to pursue and the only relevant goal for that matter for the next 100 years or so.
>>
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>>14732960
its just telescopes. governments have way better ones too, but we probably wont get those pictures.
>>
>>14732980
space "infrastructure" is a meme, we don't need it.
>>
>>14733006
>Let's get the fuck out of relying on this rock FIRST, THEN we can make stupid spinning station shit.
This. It will be a billion times faster and easier to colonize Mars and use its moons as a proving ground and pile of natural resources to build large rotating space habitats, or colonize the Moon and use its mass as feedstock for large rotating habitats, or both at once, than it would be to do it from Earth first.
>>
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>>14733008
>Spinning LEO station does nothing except become a tourist trap.
What is the minimum gravity needed to keep people healthy? How long can people stay on the moon before low G fucks them up? Is Mars gravity high enough for permanent colonies? What happens to kids conceived and born in low G?
We can find there things our after blowing trillions or we can find out in LEO.
>>
>>14733036
Humans survive on 0g for a year or so. We can likely survive 0..4G on Mars for indefinite period.
>>
>>14733043
Those people ended up all kinds of fucked.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effect_of_spaceflight_on_the_human_body
>>
>>14733054
Those people in 0g due to the unique weightlessness and no grounding of the physical body, its supposed to fuck up the body in weird way.

For 0.4G, the effects would be minimal.
>>
>>14733059
You are asserting that with zero data to back it up.
>>
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>>14733064
The data comes from my intuition
>>
>>14733064
Watch this: You're a retard
>>
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Stop being faggots and enjoy some rocket kino
>>
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Why is blue origin making all this progress yet spacex can seem to even make orbit? picrel
>>
>>14733089
Bazedos launching 100 New Glenns everyday.
>>
Something on the chopsticks broke and started leaking hydraulic fluid just as B7 was approaching... poor thing just can't catch a break.
>>
holy fuck
ITS OVER
>>
>>14733089
>Blue Origin
>Progress
>>
the chopsticks are failing
can see them twisting
might be permanently damaged
>>
>>14733036
>we can find out in LEO
question is, why aren't we already doing it?
it's such a critical question to find out but shit keeps falling through
there were plans amde, there were hardware built, all canceled for some reason
>>
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muskbros... we... we're not going to make it...
>>
>>14733098
yes, that was established in my post. so why is spacex taking so long compared to them?
>>
>>14733108
Nice photoshop
>>
>>14733108
its actually
genuinely
100%
completely and utterly
OVER
>>
>>14733112
You see that dot where it says New Glenn?

They aren't even there yet.
>>
>>14733115
https://twitter.com/nextspaceflight/status/1555791260098498560
>>
>>14733119
Finally this circus can end
>>
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how mad is elon right now?
is he headbutting the chopsticks?
>>
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>>14733101
Jared should be doing spin-hab experiments in LEO, not dicking around doing "muh first commercial EVA". He needs to be making actual progress in human spaceflight, not gunning for achievements.
>>
>>14733117
ever heard of what is called parallel development?
>>
>>14733126
So they can get lots of no progress happening at the same time?
>>
>>14733128
oh you're a wise guy too huh. nevermind
>>
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>>14733119
>Starship coming in to land
>Chopsticks fail
>Launch pad and tank farm fucking obliterated
>Pic related
What a shit design.
>>
>>14733119
Holy shit, Jeff won
>>
>>14733139
well spaceX has to always be ahead of NASA
instead of killing 7 at a time it will be 500 or so
>>
>>14733122
>>14733139
>>14733143
>>14733140
Fret not, White Man. The solution for rocket catching is here!

https://youtu.be/A0M-XYMVxiE
>>
>>14733147
>not rapid
>>
>>14732766
Gimbals would add more weight than you lose thrust in angling the booster nozzles.
>>
Any good news?
>>
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>>14733140
>>
>>14733155
none
>>
>>14733132
I'm just giving you shit, I'm no tankwatcher

The last progress Blue Origin made in public on New Glenn was a press release in 2020 with a Kansas fabrication company https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pryer-aerospace-signs-long-term-agreement-with-blue-origin-to-support-new-glenn-heavy-lift-launch-vehicle-301058644.html but there have been sightings of things moving around, I think last week someone posted a photo of a New Glenn boilerplate booster

Yes they're ready to ship a BE-4 to ULA for Vulcan after a very public display of impatience by a Space Force official https://spacenews.com/space-force-acquisition-chief-to-meet-with-ula-and-blue-origin-expects-vulcan-to-launch-in-december/

That's it, that's literally everything I've seen, so if you're privy to more do share
>>
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>>14733155
lots
>>
>>14733155
elon loves the smell of hydraulic fluid in the morning
>>
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>>14733119
Haha
>>
>>14733167
New jarvis
>>
>>14733119
Hydraulics cylinder brust. Replacing it with another tomorrow.
>>
>>14733181
you can't sugarcoat this
>>
straight-wing shuttle report: payload bay is kinda working but the infernal robotics hinge refuses to lock when i hit launch no matter how many times i tell it to lock in the VAB, which leads to the nose cone drooping down inside the bay and sometimes causing the stack to start wobbling and mildly explode.
in theory the booster's a simple problem compared to the orbiter but the lack of relightable ground engines in the game makes doing a boostback a lot less feasible than i'd hoped. i had to go to 6 F-1As to get the stack off the ground and for now i'm trying to squeeze an E-1 in the middle for boostback but that's more dead weight to carry around and i'm not sure it can do the burn fast enough. it might end up being easier to go with the 1970 plan of doing a backflip into the atmosphere and flying the thing back to the cape, but that would probably mean going with the heavier spaceplane tankage to keep it from burning up.
>>
>>14733168
First rule of hydraulics. They will always fail and at the most inopportune moment.

t. former North Sea rig worker.
>>
>>14733168
Elon gets to pay the price for cheaping out
>>
>>14733187
You're not as smart as you think you are.
>>
>>14733202
>namefag
>>
>>14733202
ok fatty
>>
>>14733204
>>14733207
Post spaceflight news or get out of my thread. Simple as.
>>
>>14733215
ok fatty mcfatfat
>>
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>>14733215
>Post spaceflight news or get out of my thread. Simple as.
>>
>>14733155
The LR11000 is being used to do the job instead.
>>
>>14733147
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAsTYmnst_g
>>
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who the fuck is this guy
>>
I rest my case.
>>
ISRO's SSLV has 4x better $/kg than Electron.
USA's entire small launch fleet has been obliterated.
>>
>>14733389
it's over
Indian century
>>
Blue Origin Century
>>
>>14733101
it would have taken a lot of money, and those shekels are better off embezzled
>>
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>>14729850
Goes against his philosophy of paying only for propellant. If you're loading gallons and gallons of the stuff, every drop better be worth it. Get REALLY good at making FFSC engines and economy of scale will drive the costs down. Also pushes Starship's capabilities, especially in orbit, much more than GG engines could.
>>
\Literally every mission of Virgin Orbit is government payload. They can't survive commercially.
>>
>>14733389
>SSLV-D2
>Q4 2022
>Customer: Spaceflight Industries
>Spaceflight Industries, Inc. is an American private aerospace company based out of Herndon, Virginia that specializes in geospatial intelligence services
ALL these small sat rockets are a glowop
>>
29 August
Elon on suicide watch
>>
>>14732018
Makes the world seem very small desu
also found my house
>>
>>14732384
It's a bit too easy to invent an incredible business case when you can make up the costs. The real question is not whether or not there would be a market, it's can you actually build a useful large space telescope for <100 million. That is not clear.
>>
>>14733418
Just two more moon cycles bro
>>
An issue with the hydrolligs is probably no big deal in the short-term. I doubt Elon gives a shit about making sure that the system works hundreds of times currently.
>>
>>14732384
The bad PR isnt worth it. Youd never hear the end of it. Better to let some other company bear that cost and charge them for launching.
>>
>>14732018
When are these pictures from?
>>
EARTHER (derogatory)
>>
>>14731895
Yeah, I can access the same map too. The thing is, it's at least a few years old. I can tell by the look of my neighbourhood. You also can see that in your picture. There is no Starship, nor visible construction works.
>>
>>14733589
>>14733601
It's from just after they added the fifth tower section down at Boca Chica.
>>
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>>14733601
Forgot to paste the link.
soar.earth
It has free access to NASA satellites (30m per pixel) and Sentinel (10m per pixel). There are also paid options with better resolution, up to 50 cm per pixel.
This picture is two days old.
>>
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>>14733622
For comparison, here is high-res photo of Giga Berlin, but quite old and a low-res one but more recent.
>>
>>14733629
>Giga Berlin
How's that coming along anyhow?
>>
>>14733633
I don't keep up with Tesla stuff, but have just googled it and it seems okay. Few things:
>Tesla is now the biggest employer in the region
>Paused production in Berlion and Shanghai to upgrade lines
>3 shifts, working 24 hours a day
Apparently, Tesla has the same fanbase of "tankwatchers" who observe and report what happens at those factories.
>>
>>14733036
>What is the minimum gravity needed to keep people healthy?
We literally don't know because we've only had people on the moon for a few days total, and nobody has made a rotating space station. The most we can do to simulate lower gravity is a minute or two at a time on the vomit comet etc.
>>
>>14733089
I raffed, but seriously, they're only at the fourth dot so far. If it wasn't so early in the morning, I'd shop up a "WE ARE HERE" arrow on it.
>>
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>>14733180
more like New Jar-Jar
>>
Late panic. I was sleeping:
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
>>
>>14733633
Berlin and Texas will produce close to ~100K each this year prob. Berlin's weekly car production is set to increase to ~3000/wk in Oct. Texas is currently at ~1000/wk. By next year, they're set to produce ~250K each roughly maybe more.
>>
>>14733683
That's why I'm shilling for a small rotating hab, it only needs to be big enough for 2 years to be tolerable to be extremely useful and able to handle up to 1 G so re can see if people recover from issues quickly without bringing them home.
>>
>>14733862
Why would people on Mars consider Earth as their home? Collaborators will be ejected via airlock
>>
>>14733883
Only those who were born there, and that won't happen in the nearest future.
>>
>>14733888
Only those who still want to waste resources of Mars and don't have the interest of Mars at heart. Hence, those collaborators will be sent back to Earth via a body bag.
>>
>>14733898
Cool story, but it's not going to happen that way.
>>
>>14733903
Its going to happen that way. The only reason to return back to Earth is to treat some life threatning injury thats worthwhile, atleast for the early martians. Otherwise, they'd waste a year or two's worth of entire methane/oxygen production just to send people back, leaving Mars with 0 usable resources to expand. Only a politically retarded person would consider this type of plan good.

Mars will be populated by people who are going on a one way journey. There will be plenty of resources ahead of the times such that living quarters, foods, power, communications system, supplies will have already been established. Willing able bodied and capable individuals will pay to become the first Martian citizens. They will tend to their medical needs, their technological needs and their comfort. The only reason to go back would be some extreme life threatning reasons for which it would be worthwhile to waste a year worth of entire Martian resources to send back one or two people. If they're of old age, they'll die on Mars. If they have some uncurable conditions, they'll die on Mars. Resources will not be wasted, only people willing to sacrifice for Mars will go to Mars. Atleast for a SpaceX colonization plan.

For American Gov to contract SpaceX, they would do an alternative pathing where nothing gets done by NASA and no growth trajectory is charted.
>>
>>14733919
>For American Gov to contract SpaceX, they would do an alternative pathing where nothing gets done by NASA and no growth trajectory is charted.
The likely argument supporting this will be that humans are aliens on Mars and should not colonize Mars and that its a threat to Mars ecosystem.
>>
>>14733919
Dude. Mars is a shithole. It wont be anything other than a military and science base like how antarctica is today.
>>
>>14733958
Everything is a shithole before people lived there. You think America was a paradise for early settlers? LMAO. Vikings didn't survive and returned home. The English were nearly wiped out. more than quarter of a million died in the early settlements, nearly 80% or more.

It doesn't matter tho. Where there is freedom, humans will go there. Mars is freedom. Freedom to the Nth degree. Every land piece on Earth is government owned. In mars, thats not the case. Its every land for himself. If he can maintain it.
>>
>>14733919
They have to send the starships back to earth anyway.
As musk has said, if you want to go back there will be plenty of return seats.
>>
>>14733970
America was a literal paradise for humans. Wypipo just had to learn how to live there from the natives. Mars has 0.3 gravity, 0.01 atmosphere, and -50 degree average temperature.
>>
>>14734024
Early starships will become permanant structures

Starships will be available for ride back, but doesn't mean they have to for the first decade or so
>>
Would mars be a good place to do computation?
>>
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>>14734031
>throwing away a Boeing 747 every flight.
>>
So chopstick lift today?
>>
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>>14734059
chopsticks are out of order
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrc632oilWo
>>
>>14734076
No, we can't.
>>
inb4 elon wants to make the chopsticks electromechanically actuated
>>
>>14734136
That is the superior choice. The drawback of extra weight is meaningless for a static structure.
>>
>>14732053
>Reminder NOAA requires permission to broadcast images of earth from space
>>
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>>14734144
They don't want us to see how flat it is.

(for real though, what is the most charitable justification for this rule?)
>>
>>14734152
>*screeeeee* *bubub bubub*
>>
>>14734142
Old space would switch to an electro-hydraulic actuator.
>>
>>14734209
What do you think *is* hydraulics? Hello.
>>
Upcoming crewed spacecraft :
Next Gen Crewed Spacecraft (Chinese), Lunar capablity, 2025
Orel (Russian), Lunar capablity, 2025
Orion, Lunar, May 2024
Gaganyaan, 2024
Starliner, 2023
>>
>>14734152
>Furthermore, D. B. Driskill is so confident in this amazing system he'll build it right next to someones fucking house.
>>
>>14734221
It refers to a system with self contained hydraulic actuators that are powered with electricity. Traditional hydraulics have a central pump(s) and hydraulic wires going to the actuators.
>>
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>>14734229
> doesn't want to live next to an awesome rocket catcher on giant rail tracks
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What are some good books about history of spaceflight? I would like to learn about its beginnings.
>>
>>14734222
>Orion, Lunar, May 2024
But it's going to launch this month.
>Starliner, 2023
It has already launched.
>>
>>14734250
It'd be fun to watch but hell to live next to. Or do you trust Douglas-Convair to hit the landing pussy dead on every time?
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>>14734256
you're not old enough to be caring about history yet
>>
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>>14734267
You're never too young for history, anon!
>>
>A Long March rocket carrying the Intelsat 708 Satellite veered off course immediately after launch, crashing in the nearby village 22 seconds later, destroying 80 houses. According to official Chinese reports there were 6 fatalities and 57 injuries resulting from the incident, but other accounts estimated 100 fatalities.[106]
How did I not know of this before?
>>
>>14734306
It happened over 26 years ago?
>>
>>14734306
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZTFgZ9zl74
>>14734315
cope chinkbot
>>
>>14734306
Because you're new here
>>
>>14734318
>why did I never hear about this
>it happened before most people in this thread were born
>cope chinkbot

what did he mean by this?
>>
>>14734351
challenger happened b4 i was born but i still heard of it
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>>14734354
Did you hear about Chandrayana-3 explosion that killed 5 rocket engineers in India? It happened in 2008.
>>
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>>14734351
>>14734359
>>
>>14734359
2004? Yes I did, in the same article.
But this is 100+ dead.
Btw did you hear about the spacex engineer who died in the texas engine testing facility?
>>
Did you hear about one German guy who killed 14 members of anon's family?
>>
>>14734354
Challenger happened on live television back when that meant something. Intelsat 708 crashed into a village in nation famous for soviet-style media control and cover ups. The biggest news in the west that came from the crash were some congressional hearings that killed commercial space launch for China because of ITAR violations.
>>
Launch of new thread: >>14734386
>>
>>14734389
kys
>>
>>14734389
early and gay edition
>>
>>14734394
>>14734396
please be nice, it's probably his first time
>>
>Bump limit reached
Seriously folks, your page ten autism doesn't make you special for having a "tradition" different than the rest of the board and the rest of the site.
>>
you have to go back
>>
>>14734387
but i wasn't born when challenger was happened so don't matter if it was on tv because I could see no tv
>>
>>14734049
starships are metal tubes with life support and engines
early habs need to be metal tubes with life support
unbolt the engines and ship them back, they are the the most expensive part if you want them back
chances are, by that time the colony can produce enough prepellents, they will be a generation or two behind the production model and fit as museum display or scrap metal anyway
might as well recycle them on Mars

I mean eventually they should be sending rhe Starships back, but the first ones would be not only impractical, but impossible to ship back
>>
>>14734443
If you are making 2 engines everyday doesn't make sense to ship them back.
Reuse tanker starships. But expend the main one.
>>
>>14734076
It's funny how the shilling makes Spinlaunch look worse
>>
>>14733036
>What is the minimum gravity needed to keep people healthy?
4 gees
>>
>>14734546
>>14734546
New
>>
>>14734076
>all that effort
and yet it will not beat modern smallsat launch providers on cost.
>>
>>14734167
"muh national security"
>>
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>>14733089
>>
>>14734825
autonomous rendezvous and docking is more or less already a reality, no?



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