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What's even the point of space travel?

The nearest planet that MIGHT even be remotely habitable is trillions of miles away, and we struggle to get back to our moon. And Mars? Oh wow, we send a handful of people to a rocky desert to die after a year, if they're lucky
>>
>>13746936
>What's even the point of space travel?
Present or past tense? If past tense, the space race was a way for the US to triumph over USSR without going nuclear. And that is really nice since I like my country non-radioactive.
>>
>>13746936
We choose to go to the Moon. We choose to go to the Moon...We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win, and the others, too

Humanity never had it easy. Life never had it easy. Challenge remains at every corner. Its only after facing those challenge faceforward die we accomplish great things. When the ancestors of humans came down the trees to explore the grasslands, it was a hard ting to do but a necessary one. When the cavemens had to leave their comfortable caves, it was not a hard choice, but it was a neccessary one. When European migrants chose to leave Europe for the promise of a land far away, it wasn't an easy decision. It was a hard one. Death and hardship follows those who venture out into the nothingness in hopes of a better future for their children.
>>
>>13746936
We should go to space because its profitable. If you can get to space resources like the lunar surface or asteroid, you should be able to stake a claim of ownership and exploit the resources.
>>
>>13746936
its the key to assuming greater ecological control over earth. the idea is, export all the dangerous or polluting industrial production into space and engage in geo engineering efforts to turn all of earth into a garden. our entire solar system is our space ship and its celestial bodies are just different compartments.
>>
Why do you care once it all becomes funded by private money?
>>
Look at CRT monitors, they've only been discontinued a few years ago and we can't make them anymore because of lost tech and industry secrets.
>>
>>13747530
If the supply becomes infinite then they'll sell you a planet or two for a penny. There are an almost infinite number of star systems in the galaxy and almost an infinite number of galaxies.
>>
>>13747547 this.
the methods and ways of producing them simply do not exist any more. there is no one insane enough to build a production line and tooling to make obsolete technology like crt´s and saturn v´s. and new technology requires new production methods, even more complex tooling and machines to scale up processes which do not exist yet. we essentially do not have the technology and supply chain yet around building a moon rocket . elon musk said that they do not essentially build a star ship, but the factory and methods meant to build them efficient and in large quantities.
>>
>>13746936
Only dimwits don't understand the point of space travel.
>>
>>13747547
Is this even true? Source?
>>
>>13747737
what do you think happened to the machinery making them? that stuff isnt kept in some storage, they scrapped it and used the space for newer production lines. crt´s used an awful amount of energy to make, melting glass, blowing tubes. tft´s use a fraction of the energy to make them and run them. no one would even want to make crt´s anymore , its not profitable. thats how technology gets lost.
>>
>>13746936
>And Mars? Oh wow, we send a handful of people
Not in this century
>>
>>13747280
>and do the other things
What did he mean by this?
>>
>>13747819
Going to Mars, establishing a colony, Mars independence, Mars solar power, subjugation of Earth, Human solar empire, regional galactic empire, galactic empire, multigalactic empire, etc
>>
>>13747819
well, doing the other things, playing golf on the moon, riding a car on the moon, all the "we did it first" other things. america was still super butthurt about the soviets "other things"
>>
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>>13747702
>you don't agree with me because ur dumb!
you're not capable of putting your defense of space travel into a reasonable, arguable format because your arguments are based entirely on emotional attachment to your transhumanist hollywood marvel comix, anime or video game fantasy life.
use of epithets in lieu of rational arguments is evidence of emotional distress caused by cognitive dissonance and cognitive dissonance in turn is cause by clinging to a belief system which does not dovetail with observed reality.
>>
>>13747812
He's a time traveler, come to warn us about not investing enough money into bombing third-worlders.
>>
>>13747933
I made a perfectly rational argument that anyone with a brain can understand. If you do not understand the importance of space travel its because you are a nowit loser with an IQ below laundry detergent. People like you should neck them selves and save earths precious resources for those who actually do understand its importance. If you are calling for us to abandon space travel then you are calling for us to go extinct. Well show everyone just how passionate you are about the subject and anhero faggot.
>>
>>13746936
>>13746936
why the fuck not, nigger
fucking mongoloid settled madagascar at
350 BCE while nigger like you only brought there as a slave 1000 years later
>>
>>13747280
>When European migrants chose to leave Europe for the promise of a land far away, it wasn't an easy decision. It was a hard one.
No President today would dare to say this.
>>
>>13747755
Yeah but not wanting to do it for the bottom line doesn't mean we couldn't if we wanted to
>>
I don't think Americans went to the moon because they can't do it now
>>
>>13748104
If they'd commit to a Boots-on-the-moon program it could easily happen within a decade
>>
>>13748095
Maybe they tossed the notebooks where they kept all the important details as well, and they deleted the files to save 16 Kilobytes of space. You think they're gonna waste 16 Kilobytes on plans for obsolete tech? I don't think so.
>>
>>13748125
Someone tell them there's some muslims living up there, will be back to fuck them up within the year.
>>
>>13746936
Anon, nothing has a purpose. Once we get our survival needs met we can spend all economic surplus on random things.
>>
>>13747547
Because they are obsolete, like greek fire or damascus steel. No one cares.
>>
>>13746936
>What's even the point of space travel?
If we ever want even the potential of being a post-scarcity society, we need to pursue the resources available in space.
>>
>>13748095
If we really wanted yes, but that involves paying some labs some hundreds of millions to redevelop them.
>>
>>13748156
There's no way to retrieve enough resources to make it worth it. You would have to bring back entire asteroids worth of iron/aluminum/gold to even make a dent.

The more feasible option would be to limit breeding here to make our resources go further. And really, it's not like the resources go anywhere. We use them, and they're still here in one form or another.
>>
>>13748169
>You would have to bring back entire asteroids worth of iron/aluminum/gold to even make a dent.
As it happens, space has quite a few asteroids
>>
>>13748180
Sure, it has stars too. Doesn't mean we can move them here, or even build a Dyson sphere
>>
>>13747280
>I'm not that interested in space
- same president in private
Congratulations, you got duped by a lying politician.
>>
>>13748183
Won't know until we try. My momma didn't raise no pussy.
>>
>>13748194
Even assuming by some miracle we're able to tractor beam some significant amount of space resources to earth, in the mean time we should be doing the other.
>>
>>13748183
>thinks moving asteroids is difficult
Jesus Christ why does this board attract so many fucking retards.
>>
>>13748208
>Can't send a few 200lb flesh sacks to a body a few hundred thousand miles away

>Can tow trillion ton chunks of spacerock through the infinite void of space

Ok
>>
>>13748218
>thinks things in space have weight
>thinks just because we can't do something now means we can't do it later
>thinks we never been to the moon
Neck yourself now brainlet.
>>
>>13748226
>Asteroids are perfectly still bodies in space, with zero inertia, just waiting to be moved

Whether we ever went or not, apparently we're unable to go now.
>>
>>13748235
Actually we could if we wanted to. I know you are too fucking brain damaged to keep up with the state of space tech, but the hardest part of relocating an asteroid would be landing on the damn thing, which we have already done.
>>
>>13748235
Oh you were talming about the moon, lmao, may as well tell the whole world you have a single digit IQ. Back to >>>/pol/ faggot
>>
>>13748254
Source on being anywhere close to farming an entire asteroid?
>>
>>13748235
You have to accelerate trillion ton asteroids to speeds around 15 km/s. Pushing them to earth means changing their orbit, that means acceleration since the earth moves much faster. Maybe it could be aided using the famous slingshot maneuver with the sun, where you decelerate the asteoid so that it start falling towards the sun and thus picking up speed. Still its like powering a rocket but with trillion tons of mass.
>>
The lack of vehicles and engineering knowhow is the problem, not some lost scientific knowledge. Do normies and schizos actually think NASA has Apollo hardware and Saturn Vs just laying around? That the manufacturing infrastructure still stands after 50 years? The institutional knowledge eroded away and it takes a while to rebuild.

>>13748125
Artemis 3 is scheduled for 2025 and that program was started in 2017 so you're not wrong.
>>
>>13748264
Funny how
>Can tow trillion ton chunks of spacerock through the infinite void of space
Became
>Source on being anywhere close to farming an entire asteroid?
You should get a refund from the people you got to move your goal posts. They were way to obvious about it.
>>13748267
You are making it sound way more complex then it is. Redirecting an asteroid could be as simple as funding one already heading in our general direction and giving it a little nudge to the side.
>>
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>>13748273
well. technically. one is literally just laying around
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>>13748299
It didn't become anything, that's the same point.

We're nowhere in the neighborhood of being able to bring an asteroid to earth OR travel to one and bring back any meaningful amount of resources.
>>
>>13748299
>one already heading in our general direction and giving it a little nudge to the side.

Yeah but when people forget to take into account that someone was retarded, we'll have to rely on Bruce Willis and Steve Buscemi to save us.
>>
>>13748142
>You think they're gonna waste 16 Kilobytes on plans for obsolete tech?

They should, because at some point in the future CRT tech may become useful for some new application currently unbeknownst to us.

>but it's not in the short term interest of a business to spend any amount of time or effort preserving now obsolete systems and technologies

I understand that, but they should create archives of "obsolete" technologies anyways for the reason I described above. And if private business is unwilling or unable to do it, then some government body should do it, by funding technology archives at universities or something like that.
>>
>>13748299
I think those asteroids close to earth tend to be going pretty fast, probably accelerating towards the sun and picking up speed, or coming fast from the sun aa they do their elliptical or hyperbolic orbit. I dont know if there are already asteroids on a stable orbit close to earth's. If not, you need to change their orbits. You dont want to crash them right? So you have to get them to specific speeds
>>
>>13748313
>We're nowhere in the neighborhood of being able to bring an asteroid to earth
Except we are, and its pretty obvious to anyone who isn't mentally retarded. Again, the hardest thing about bringing back an asteroid would be landing on the god damn thing. Which we have already done.

If we really wanted to redirect an asteroid into earths orbit or the moon all we would have to do is land on one again and hook a booster up to it.

Getting into space is difficult, landing on something in space if difficult. Moving around in space is not difficult. Now go read a god damn book.
>>
>>13748332
>Source: Trust me bro
>>
>>13747957
>If you do not understand the importance of space travel its because you are a nowit loser with an IQ below laundry detergent.

Star Trek isn't real retard.
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>>13748327
>You dont want to crash them right? So you have to get them to specific speeds
Why not? Just fling them into the god damn moon for future use. Makes >>13748317 this scenario less likely as well
>>
>>13748335
Are you telling me to provide a source of us landing on an asteroid? Or are you literally to stupid to understand how thrust works?
>>
>>13748299
>Redirecting an asteroid could be as simple as funding one already heading in our general direction and giving it a little nudge to the side.
THIS FAGGOT IS GENUINELY SUGGESTING THAT WE SHOULD CRASH ASTEROIDS INTO THE FUCKING EARTH.
>>
>>13748340
Yes, destabilize the body that controls our tides
>>13748344
Source for being able to redirect it towards earth.

Coming from the guy literally too stupid to understand that the point is overcoming the asteroid's inertia. Sure all it takes is an absolutely assload of brute force at the proper points, but we're not capable of that kind of force.
>>
>>13748351
The moon actually dimwit >>13748340
>>
>>13748332
>If we really wanted to redirect an asteroid into earths orbit or the moon all we would have to do is land on one again and hook a booster up to it.
How big is this rocket booster you're imagining, and how big is the rocket booster pushing this rocket booster to the asteroid you are imagining?
>>
>>13748356
>thinks crashing some small asteroids into the moon is going to destabilize it
Retarded as fuck.
>still too stupid to understand the concept of nudging one already heading our direction.

As for a source, NASA would have already done it if they had the funding. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid_Redirect_Mission

Now fuck off to >>>/pol/ or >>>/x/ with the other retards to dumb to understand basic science
>>
>>13748382
Why do you talk about size like that's got anything to do with it? Liquid fuel boosters are a hell of a lot bigger then ion. Either would work depending on how far away the asteroid is and how far it needs to br shifted.

This question you posed really goes to show you have no business commenting on this subject.
>>
>>13748384
>Small asteroids

The entire point is to get one big enough to retrieve enough resources to make it worth while.
>>
>>13748394
>size doesn't matter
cope
>>
>>13748401
The moon is fucking big bro, we could send asteroids the size of the twin towers into it all day long and not "destabilize it". Fuck i doubt even a city sized one would do that.
>>
>>13748416
None of which would have enough resources to be worth shit
>>
>>13748406
>oh here let me just thriw down some random numbers for how much thrust an asteroid of unknown mass, traveling at an unknown speed, in an unknown direction, unknown distance away.
I'm starting to think this board has one of the highest percentages of retards on this site.
>>
>>13748422
Lmao it would actually provide a shit load of resources. And we can select ones high in the minerals we need, and they would be ready for us to use.

No matter how fucking retarded you are, you gotta imagine it being a lot easier to redirect a millions of tons of matter into the moon then it would be launching it out of our damn gravity well.
>>
>>13748424
>oh here let me just thriw down some random numbers for how much thrust an asteroid of unknown mass, traveling at an unknown speed, in an unknown direction, unknown distance away.

It's funny, because you think this is a good argument in support of the viability of asteroid mining, and that I'm the one who looks stupid.
>>
>>13748432
>you gotta imagine it being a lot easier to redirect a millions of tons of matter into the moon then it would be launching it out of our damn gravity well.
How do you get the millions of tons of matter required to process the millions of tons of matter you launched at the moon, too the moon, and out of our gravity well?
>>
>>13748435
Thinking someone can tell you how much boost is needed to push an unknown object traveling at unknown speeds in an unknown direction, an unknown distance away, does make you look stupid. Stupid.
>>
>>13748444
>Can't even come up with a hypothetical asteroid to design parameters around.
>Still thinks his pipe dream is viable.
lol
>>
>>13748443
>if asteroids don't come equipped with the tools to process matter then we may as well just ship an extra million tons of matter out of our gravity well with them.
I'm fucking done. If you guy are b8ing then great job. Either way though, if you ever think about killing your self, just remember, the world is much better off without you.
>>
>>13748465
>provided source from NASA claiming its possible
>still won't admit to being retarded
Done with you to moron. Hopefully that means you will fuck off back to /pol/ with the other brainlets.
>>
>>13748478
You've provided zero sources, lol
>>
>>13748467
>mining machinery will magically appear on the moon
>refineries will magically appear on the moon
>spare parts for all this equipment will magically appear on the moon
>none of these things will need to be lifted out of Earth's gravity well and transported to the moon.
>>
>>13748478
>NASA claims it's possible to shift a small asteroid's orbit but never actually does it because no one is willing to pay for it.
>This is evidence that shifting the orbit of large asteroids is economically practical.
>>
>>13748324
And this guys is what autism looks like.
>>
>>13746936
>What's even the point of space travel?
Living in space. Harvesting gorillions of resources.
>>
>>13748095
It kind of does when you've scrapped the equipment and fired the people who know why stuff was done the way it was. Blueprints don't really help that much, they're just a tool to communicate certain things to certain people.
>>
>>13748340
>Why not? Just fling them into the god damn moon for future use.
Why not just grab one of the ones that already landed? There are quite a few craters.
>>
Why don't we have a livestream from the moons surface? They've put several rovers on Mars but it really seems like there is a lack of even robotic missions to the moon.
>>
>>13748675
When I looked up why we don't have cameras on the moon some of the responses are the cost/benefits and the uneventful nature of the moons surface. I disagree, it seems like due to the moons proximity it should be a good place to start when it comes to observation. Would it not be easier to also set up technology for space observation from the moon via robotics?
>>
It's pretty damn pointless at this point. You need ftl to get anywhere at all.
>>
Actually, this is the one video of footage of earth from the moon in recent times I could find:
https://youtu.be/nX0sg1Gp-1w

What do you think? To me I'm very skeptical and can't find proof that this is real footage.
>>
>>13748700
>things people say that shows they have no idea what they are talking about.
The entire galaxy is only 100,000 light years across my guy. We could colonize every bit of it in a million years at only 10% the speed of light.
>>
>>13748712
>at only 10% the speed of light.

>We haven't even been able to travel .01% light speed
>>
>>13748712
>at only
Not even our gravity asist accelerated probes which are the fastest humanity has achieved reached even a fraction of 1 percent
>>
Serious question.
You know how they send a laser up to bounce off the retro-reflectors on the Moon?

Light travels at: 3x10^8 m/s
Distance to the Moon: 4x10^8 m
Average time for a signal to travel there and back: 2.6 seconds

Earth rotational period: 8.6x10^4 s
Radians per second: 7.3x10^-5 rad/s
Radius of Earth: 6.4x10^6 m
Linear displacement in 2.6 seconds is approximated: t*R*theta = 2.6*6.4x10^6*7.3x10^-5
= 1214 meters

So whatever signal bounces back will be displaced by 3/4 of a mile, simply by virtue of the Earth's turning.
You can do a similar calculation for the earth's rotation around the Moon, and it adds another 10 meters or so.

The point is, this is depicted as a precise laser that goes up, hits the retroreflector, and then comes right back down. Intuition should tell you that it's not really possible to engineer a mirrored box that precise to reflect a signal back 400,000 kilometers.

It seems like the signal actually spreads out a lot and impacts a very wide surface on the Moon, and then returns to earth once again impacting a very wide surface. Sort of like sonar. In that case, why do you think the tiny little retroreflector is actually what's involved with returning the signal? Isn't it far more likely the moon itself is reflecting the signal?

Consider, if the retroreflector is 1 meter square, and the laser impacts an area 500 meters wide. Thus, if the Moon's surface returns 1/250,000 as much light as the mirrored box, it will outperform the retroreflector. In other words, the reflectivity of the surface only needs to be very small to make your retroreflector superfluous and meaningless.
>>
>>13749707
Best analogy is probably shining a flashlight at a distant mirror in the dark. The surrounding landscape returns some light, and so does the mirror. You might expect the mirror to return much more light and be glinting in the dark. But what if your mirror was the size of a piece of sand? Would you still see it?
>>
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>>13746936
None besode developing weapons and spying on the enemy.
/thread
>>
>>13747957
>If you do not understand the importance of space travel
If you think that it is so very important yet you can't articulate a single important point about why or how on your own, you are the bandwagonning nowit retard.
>>
>>13748156
If you want to be a post-scarcity society just make better use of resources that aren't scarce, like sun, water, heat, and air.
>>
>>13748169
How much would it cost?
How much would one asteroid of gold weigh and be worth?
>>
>>13748226
>>thinks things in space have weight
Is this your first day learning about science that you don't know pounds is a unit of mass, not just weight?
Also, do you not understand that there is gravity everywhere, even in space, that adds some weight, gravity is just not as quite as strong the further you get from other large bodies of mass?
>>
>>13748254
Sure and I bet you think the hardest part of pushing against a 1 light year stick, making it move faster than the speed of light, is just getting the initial positioning of the stick right.
>>
>>13748299
>Redirecting an asteroid could be as simple as funding one already heading in our general direction and giving it a little nudge to the side.
Ok for this simple thing to happen, given a single trillion ton asteroid, how much energy are you talking about for each meter of nudging and how many meters would you need to nudge it to change the course to the desired outcome?
>>
>>13748332
>If we really wanted to redirect an asteroid into earths orbit or the moon all we would have to do is land on one again and hook a booster up to it.
How big would this booster be for a trillion ton asteroid and how much fuel would it need for each meter it needed to move the asteroid, and how many meters would you have to diverge, and how much energy would you need to stop the asteroid in an orbit or warehouse type facility for processing?
>>
>>13748340
>Just fling them into the god damn moon
Why wouldn't you just put them in orbit or set up a series of mobile outposts to put fuel stations on for rocket fuel and snacks so you make trips to other planets easier and more efficient?
>>
>>13748444
Saying its very simple to do when you haven't even considered how much boost is needed to push an unknown object traveling at unknown speeds in an unknown direction, an unknown distance away, makes you look like the original stupid ITT.
>>
>>13748631
>>13748159
>>13748142
damn I didnt know this board was this retarded
>>
>>13749827
It took you this long to figure out, yet you think you are smarter than them?
>>
>>13749808
Because putting an asteroid in orbit implies changing its orbit, that means changing its speed to the tune of 10-15 km/s of an object of several trillion tons.
The insane idea is to park them by crashing them on the moon as a way to equalize their speeds... Just be careful not to slow down the moon too much, were it to crash on earth.
>>13749827
Kys fag
>>
>>13749885
You still have to change the speed/direction to crash it into the moon, though.
>>
>>13749766 This.
One doesn't need human space travel for mining asteroids and it is possible and needed that we are self-sustainable, using rare minerals efficiently, before mining asteroids which would have a lot of risks.

>>13746936
Space travel is largely a waste of effort, time and resouces. There would be use in SETI observatories on the Moon and things like that but all of that wouldn't require most of what's currently spent money on. In any case I think we neednto rearrange systemic priorities towards efficiently preserving Earth system stability.
>>
>>13748267
Or you just take the stuff you want from the asteroid, then leave with only a million tons of platinum and leave the rest to it's path
>>
>>13748218
>Tow
I mean, it'd probably be more of a controlled push, but sure. Pushing an asteroid remotely doesn't need delicate life support functions or protection from solar radiation. It's just a big dumb rock.
>>
>>13749991
Good idea actually, how come i didnt think of that? Maybe you are smarter than me.
>>
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>>13750017
>>
>>13746936
>diverting large asteroids more efficiently
>asteroid mining
>actually knowing what fucking objects are in out solar system(most of them are too dim to be visible)
>keeping up with chinks and their spacenukes
>keeping up with ET and their plasma nukes
>zeroG experiments
>vacation on other planets because why the fuck not. There's money to be made in eveything
>>
>>13746936
why do you keep shilling this everywhere?
who is paying you to talk shit about space travel?
>>
>>13750593
Based commies. Only retarded capitalist technocattle thinks light pollution is a good idea.
>>
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>>13747819
Alien super carriers in high orbit around the sun beyond Neptune. We've known about them for years. We've been fighting the ayys since the 50's...
>>
>>13747692
Yeah, but it takes like six years to go from an empty lot to an interplanetary civilization if Elon's progress is anything to go by
>>
>>13748310
Yeah, we have what, two Saturn V rockets lying around and a skylab?
>>
>>13748432
Don't hit the moon with it, use three body jank to get it captured around the earth and then use it to build something at one of the Lagrange points
>>
>>13746936
You're absolutely right, and the economy reflects this. There is no money nor advancements to be made in space within a reasonable timeframe.
>>
>>13753017
Why is Elon the richest man in the world?
>>
>>13746936
Cause it's more badass than staying here jerking it to gacha shit, dogerino.
>>
>>13753017
>hi OP, I'm fucking retarded just like you!
>>
>>13746936
The technology was white men, specifically Nazis. That’s lost to the ages now.
>>
>>13753453
If I create shares and put them to market for $1 trillion each I’m now the richest person in the world according to equity ponzi logic
>>
>>13753453
He is rich because he received investor money. As they say in wall street, the real product is not the product made by a company, but the company stock. Elon is a fantastic stock salesman.
>>
>>13753565
>lost
NASA keeps sending these rovers to Mars every few years. Obviously the technology to make rockets as useful as Saturn exists, there's some serious cognitive dissonance going on around.
>>
>>13753573
Manned missions have different requirements and safety standards. You wont put humans on top of of a payload lifter. They are not certified or safe enough for manned missions and have no room for redundancies they require to be manned launch vehicles
>>
>>13747230
>>13746936
Space Travel was never commercially viable outside telecommunication satellites and low orbit tourism. Russia and America just wanted to show off the size of their IBMs and the moon was a conveniently neutral place to point them.
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>>13753641
All of that can be developed. Rockets with humans go to orbit all the time. What you are asking for is a relatively minor amount of research and development compared to actually making a rocket that can carry people and can go as far away as Mars.
The exact specific thing you are looking for (replica of Saturn) doesnt exist because no one cares. If the order to send people to the moon came it could be redeveloped again in a few years. 95% of the work is done already.
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its fun
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>>13746936
>>13754047
As for exploring another planets you gotta remember during the 50 and 60s there was still hope finding at least liquid water on Venus and Mars maybe even life. Not little green men but at green algae at least. Not absolutely nothing.
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>>13747280
Based
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>>13748208
It is
Even with ion drives or other high isp rockets, you end up with the problem of reaction mass running out, or the fact that they take forever to get anywhere
Something might not have weight in space, but it has mass and inertia
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>>13754059
>Replica of Saturn
Would be better than the SLS
Convert the 1st stage to methalox and strengthen it so boosters can be attached
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>>13746936

what's the point of climbing a mountain anon ?
there is none
people do it because it's fun

now go find something you have fun doing and stop complaining about what other people do with their lives
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>>13747547
>anon brings up CRT monitors in a completely unrelated thread because that's all he thinks about along with which Linux distro is the trendiest.
/g/ seeping into /sci/
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>>13754209
>im a sperg without a counter argument, so I'm just going to project my own retardation onto anon.
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>>13753571
Elon shares the pitfalls of a lot of the billionaire class.
But I'd stop short of calling him a huckster because he makes and sells actual technology and innovations; he doesn't sell hyperloops. All that is PR song and dance, you're right.
I generally like to make an exception for him because at the very least he gets normies interested in things like green energy, AI, and exploration. He may not be honest. But he gets Americans interested in ways that if some eggheaded scientist tried to convince people the importance about govt investment in space travel, a lot of folks would just be like "who's this poindexter? We don't have the cash for that."
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>>13753567
>>13753571
That's because the market believes the products his company make are valuable
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>>13749644
Alright, ten million years. It's still the blink of an eye on a cosmic scale.
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>>13749644
My 20 dollar smartphone is probably 100 times more powerful then a several million dollar super computer from several years ago.
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>>13755797
Filling a big tube full of boom hasn't had as much advancement as computer technology has in the same time frame
It's more comparable to the advances in vehicles
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>>13755580
Right but irl his money comes from selling stock not selling products.
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>>13755821
We've got a billion years left on this planet anon. That's plenty of fucking time. Also, we've had designs for ships that can go 10% since the late 60's. Only issue is no one wants to strap nuclear bombs on to a rocket.
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>>13755830
I think he's valued so highly because he's selling a global telecommunications service but the rockets are a package deal and I think Google at least are in for the Mars thing too
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>>13755580
I mean normally stock prices are correlated with a company profits but this isnt always the case. In boring companies like banks you get what you pay for, but in TECH companies a share can be worth 20 times the company total capital. The market average would be 3 times market cap/book value. Practically speaking Elon can just print shares and sell them for cash with a minimal dillution effect. He can double his working capital by selling 5% of additional shares.
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>>13755839
Cool narrative bro
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>>13755854
Yeah there's a narrative but also there is real products. He has completely disrupted the space launch market and restored American dominance in the commercial sector, which we were losing to the French, India and China
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>>13754078
We might still find interesting chemistries on Ganymede, Callisto, Europa, Titan, Triton, or the temperate zones on Mercury and Venus. I'd love if we ever found something like that—not quite life, but a dynamic carbon-based chemical environment sort of 'grasping' at life. I rarely see anyone talk about it, but I reckon it would be amazing for humanity's stores of knowledge and would lead on to big things.
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>>13746936
The end goal of all breeders (coomers) is to expand infinitely, and produce an infinite number of offspring. They might realize that this is an impossible and retarded goal, but it doesn’t matter. They cannot help themselves.
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>>13746936
>What's even the point of space travel
What's even the point of anything. Every single thing anyone ever does is just filling in time before they expire.
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>>13756125
And that's a good thing
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>>13746936
>What's even the point of space travel.
t. pic related
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>>13759574
But seriously, even if you don't naturally feel drawn to the unknown and to the fantastic or even emboldened by the tremendous uplifting positivity of scientific and technological progress, even NPCs can understand that they benefit from space autists trying to solve space problems because the solutions to space problems are usually inventions that help everyone out. Remember, NPC-anon, that genius is not fungible. Genius is the closest thing a man has to a divine spark, and it does not work unless it is directed on its proper avenue. Here's a NASA infographic with some of the inventions that their space research came up with that are now available to the general public.





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