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File: TwoAfricas.jpg (345 KB, 1060x861)
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You can draw a straight line below the Sahara to separate desert Africa from lush Africa. Why is it so dry above the line and not so dry below it? Why only Africa? On the same longitude in other parts of the world it is not so night and day.
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"What are Hadley cells, and the differential warming of land and sea over a day/night cycle?", zombie Alex
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>arabs live in hot desert shitholes and somehow get by
>africans live in forests and jungles and are starving
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>>13744062
Proper political reforms. Islam is the earliest version of republic ideals, barring slavery and fixing taxes, along with islamic law against corruption and tyranny. Obviously it's not perfect, but it was good for the time. Most african shitholes are failed socialist states.
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How do flat earthers explain climate zones?
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>>13744074
>Islam is the earliest version of republic ideals
What?
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>>13744079
You don't even know the five pillars of islam?
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>>13744082
nothing in islam bars slavery don't pretend to be a know-it-all if you don't even know the term "that which the right hand posses" i.e. slave girls and chattel slavery
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>>13744076
Flat earthers can't explain shit, they can only point at things they don't understand.
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>>13744062
>somehow get by
They don't at all.Egypt is legit one bad day from collapsing.
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>>13744074
>Most african shitholes are failed socialist states.
That is so bullshit. The vast majority of the "socialist" states were only such on paper and that also applies to the "capitalist" states.
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>>13744164
Goy, did you forget that eternal anglo was actually a commie?
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>>13744164
Is this a joke

Help me understand the true socialism meme. Are you telling me that communal ownership is what makes up true socialism? What karl marx envisioned? Because this doesn't work without a governing entity.

State controlled capitalism, or fascism is what every variant of socialism turns to.>>13744170
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>>13743837
Your line isn't very good. There's desert to the south of it and vegetation to the north of it.
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>>13744062
Algeria and Morocco have enough water and land to be self sufficient. Many arab countries have tons of ressources. With great policies, you get Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE...

Look at Israel. It has less space, less fertile lands, less water, a lot less gas and oil than Algeria. Algeria is still a shithole while Israel is a low tier developed country, still a developed one.
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>>13743837
Too many mountains from which sand can come into existence.
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>>13744062
You do know Americans and Brazil had cause deforestation for agriculture? I expected more from /sci/.
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>>13744214
>It has less space, less fertile lands, less water, a lot less gas and oil than Algeria
It also had mass migration of skilled Jews, a lot of outside support that is not US and other benefits.
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>>13744190
How do you even not get it?
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>>13744214
Hitler was set up as a project by the financiers to coerce european jews to go to israel and develop it for some purpose and then destroyed. Israel was a shithole so most preferred to go to anywhere else like america.
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>>13744190
Not sure if this is the one I want
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>>13743837
They have been planting trees and shit to block the sahara from spreading and reverse it
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>>13744280
>black people are never allowed to be held responsible for anything

lol you cucks are amazing
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>>13744670
I'm confused, why are you taking about responsibility?
You made the claim that a rain forest give you an ubundance of food, dude.
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>>13744214
Israel gets insane amounts of exterior resources showered on it. You can turn a barren lot in the middle of the desert into paradise with enough resources.
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>cool, what's going on in this thread?
oh shi
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Can /sci/ explain why Africa is full of niggers
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>>13744779
>>13744779
OP here from another PC. No kidding. It says /sci/ but feels like /pol/.
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>>13745015
because /sci/ proves /pol/ right about race.
it disproves /pol/ on vaccines and the moon landing, but Vox Day cannot have everything
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>>13745092
Do you think God did it to contain the negroes but then the short sighted Europeans built ships to import them for cheap labor?
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>>13744157
No we are not.

>t. egyptian
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>>13744062
Black Africans are not starving and also they have a much bigger population than the arabs. 99% arabs all live on the coast, which is not a desert. Mostly on Egypt and live off gibs from saudi arabia
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>>13745314
You live off gibs from saudi arabia. Dont care about your personal situation. You probably have a baggette in your pants and feel economically satisfied.
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>>13745314
https://carnegieendowment.org/2020/06/09/egypt-looking-elsewhere-to-meet-bottomless-needs-pub-82010
>In 2019, a Gulf newspaper quoted an unnamed official at the Central Bank of Egypt on the astronomical sum of assistance Gulf states had given since 2011: $92 billion. While difficult to verify, the article included some credible details, such as $8 billion in deposits from Saudi Arabia, $6 billion from the UAE, and $4 billion from Kuwait, as well as more than $30 billion in loans to finance petroleum purchase
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I want to see china invade africa
No one would stop them
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>>13745382
The world has a gdp of 80 trillion. 5 trillion is nothing compared to 80 trillion times 60 years.
Plus Africa loses more in capital flight than it ever gets in aid. All the aid is basically stashed in Switzerland.
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>>13745396
It's not 5 trillion compared to 80 trillions times 60 years, it's 5 trillion compounded. And yes, it's a fucking lot of money lost.
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>>13743837
monsoon northernmost point
https://youtu.be/ZQP-7BPvvq0?t=6m
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>>13744076
>How do flat earthers explain climate zones?
the sun, magnetic field, the dome, etc
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>>13744062
Disease and parasites pose a much greater problem to humans. Doesn't matter if you have enough resources to shit out 2x as many kids if most of them don't make it to maturity.
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>>13744082
>You don't even know the five pillars of islam?
lying, raping, murdering, fucking goats and invading?
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>>13746886
80 x 60 =4800 trillón vs 5 trillion.
0.1%.
And its fake aid because its all in Switzerland plus all the African capital that naturally leaves when African millionaires move to europe or USA plus brain drain that means an educated class can never develop, any good engineer just leaves. It cost money to train people
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>>13743837
Basic geography classes should have explained that.
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>>13747324
>indoctrination center books are the truth
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>>13747335
>NOOO YOU CAN’T TRUST A SCIENTIFIC STAPLE
>have I ever been to Africa? wha- no, absolutely not lol. Anyway here’s my opinion on half an continent
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>>13747335
Have some additional propaganda animations
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKFzL2XB9Ow
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>>13743837
Problem is, dessert is expanding.
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>>13747656
But why? Climate change caused by man?
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>>13747656
More like dessert expands me desu
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>>13747706
More because of degradation caused by unsustainable farming methods and population growth but that can happen anywhere, see Ireland. As long as there are still some resources and stability reintroducing old land management together with some modern tricks can help but it takes a while.
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>>13744082
earliest republic,

completely forgets about Rome which predates christianity
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>>13747810
Could you cite any studies?
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>>13744214
I'm sure Israel getting trillions of funds every year from a couple of industrial nations might have something to do with that.
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>>13747656
It's not. Congrats on believing climate propaganda scare from the 80s.
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>>13747324
Why isn't that the case for the Amazon rainforest?
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>>13748029
The amazon rainforest is on the equator. The accompanying american desert zones are around mexico and argentinia.
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>>13747971
For the entire complex?
>https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/54/9/817/252974
might be a good start.
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>>13744354
What a shitty fanfic.
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its almost like the projection of lattitude in your map is a straight line, from elementary geometry
did you know the intensity of the sun directly corresponds to lattitude?
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>>13748029
>American education
The Amazon (blue) is located along the Equator and aligns perfectly with African rainforests, retard.
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>>13744062
Based thread hijacker
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>>13747058
>Disease and parasites pose a much greater problem to humans.

Both of those exist everywhere, didn't stop non-black people from building empires.
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>>13748392
>>13748029
this is where the land/sea differential heating over a day/night cycle comes into effect. the average sea temperature doesn't fluctuate much, but land cools off and warms up much more rapidly. this affects where the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is on average, which affects where the Hadley cells are on average, which affects where dry air is being dumped on average. moreover, the distribution of the land and sea affects how much humidity warm air is able to take up before moving away from moisture sources (aka ocean)
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>>13748597
>Both of those exist everywhere
Quite a lot of parasites and diseases cannot exist in dry climates or mild temperatures, this not only gives you an advantage in terms of survivability. But it also gives a societal (ie. building an empire) advantage, as trading with nearby cities would provide less risk of cold and infection.
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>>13744817
It seems to be their natural habitat, can you explain why america is too?
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africa used to be really nice and not a desert but then the sahara became a desert.
also africa has problems with erosion and not predictable cyclic flooding (while the nile does), also land isn't very flat around the actually fertile places so it's hard to make big fields.
africa kind of sucks for farming. if i were humans and i lived in africa i'd try to go somewhere else to farm, maybe into europe or asia.
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>>13747995
no no that can't be it it's probably something else
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>>13748597
Brah a bunch of Portuguese idiots were making fun of natives not wanting to walk in certain areas by going barefoot. They then proceeded to horribly die from infection and parasites from walking in those parasite rich areas with full skin exposure.
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>>13745092
BASTE
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>>13747297
And many foreign companies abuse because ax loopholes and tax havens alingsude the rampant trade receipt exploit they do to cut taxes. Several companies intentionally perform poorly (on paper) so they can get lower taxes from having a "bad" tax year.
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>>13745382
Thats incredibly tiny on top of that fact that Marshall Aid is extremely do different compared to aid. Marshall Aid wasn't even needed since it was basically money used to prop up Euros so they could counter or not have an incentive to go Soviet.
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The cause was human caused climate change

>Dominating the broad clusters of proximate factors is the combination of agricultural activities, increased aridity, extension of infrastructure, and wood extraction (or related extractional activities), with clear regional variations. In particular, agricultural activities and increased aridity form a robust combination, although one that often occurs with other proximate causes (table 1).

>Agricultural activities or agrarian land uses are the leading proximate cause associated with nearly all cases of desertification (95%). They include extensive grazing, nomadic grazing (pastoralism), and annual cropping (table 2). Extensive livestock production, carried out under the mode of either sedentary or transhumant (seasonal nomadic) husbandry, displays low geographical variation as a cause of desertification.

/thread

For example, starting from the East, the Mesopotamian river valley (now Baghdad) used to be called the cradle of civilization. The beginnings of intensive crop some eight thousand years ago and spread outward. The Sahara desert was much smaller, the landscape's albedo was lower, it was a good place to moisture farm with your uncle Owen and aunt Beru, etc.
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>>13745382
>Comparing 1945 dollars with 2021 dollars
I'll take "What's inflation?" for $5000, Alex
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>>13748988
>The cause was human caused climate change
>Agricultural activities or agrarian land uses are the leading proximate cause associated with nearly all cases of desertification (95%)
Eh?
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>>13749143
>Eh?

More soil disturbance led to soil exposure and faster erosion of soil. The leading edge of farming/civilization pattern spread outwards. Storing grain meant larger and larger herds of domestic animals. As they went they depleted the soil. Grazers like sheep and goats cleared jungles to the sea. The advancing humans burned the savanna before them.

The situation was, the organic matter that had accumulated over millions of years was destroyed and the climate influence of all that breathing plant life went away.

The Sahara expanded, aridity increased. humans proved to be able to massively affect the landbase, its capacity to support people, and led to the establishment of the Egyptians on the Nile river delta.

Continuous habitation over 10,000 years of cultures of modern humans practicing this kind of agriculture changed around the entire Mediterranean.
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>>13748666
Libya had some kind of inland sea at one point.

The area reminds me of many other weird biomes of Africa like the niger river delta, inland in Mali, at a place called Timbuktu, which was goes back about 6000 years ago

>Timbuktu settled 1500 years ago, was a regional trade center in medieval times, where caravans met to exchange salt from the Sahara Desert for gold, ivory, and slaves from the Sahel, which could be reached via the nearby Niger River.
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>>13748029
>Like other important Medieval West African towns such as Djenné, Gao, and Dia, Iron Age settlements have been discovered near Timbuktu that predate the traditional foundation date of the town.

Erosion:
>Although the accumulation of thick layers of sand has thwarted archaeological excavations in the town itself

Erosion:
>some of the surrounding landscape is deflating and exposing pottery shards on the surface.

For thousands of years there was a fucking civilization here, and it partied, hard. But it faded out. Why? Islam? I'm guessing goat herding got out of hand. Look, even today, this is what it comes down to.
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>>13749279
>Why? Islam? I'm guessing goat herding got out of hand. Look, even today, this is what it comes down to.
That's not even a reason.
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>>13749482
>https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/116/video

>"People learned to build houses from mud from the niger river, fermented for a month with RICE HUSKS and STRAW

You can see how intensive the agriculture is in this aerial some distance from Djenne

>>13749482
>That's not even a reason.

This is what a reason sounds like. See
>>13748988
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>The Garamantes emerged as a major regional power in the mid-second century AD, establishing a kingdom that spanned roughly 180,000 km2 (70,000 sq mi) in the Fezzan region of southern Libya. Their growth and expansion rested on a complex and extensive qanat irrigation system (known as foggaras in Berber), which supported a strong agricultural economy and large population. They subsequently developed the first urban society in a major desert that was not centered on a river system; their largest town, Garama, had a population of around four thousand, with an additional six thousand living in surrounding suburban areas.[1]

>At its height, the Garamantian kingdom enjoyed a "standard of living far superior to that of any other ancient Saharan society."[1] The Garamantes annexed and dominated surrounding tribes and relied heavily on enslaved people for their prosperity. The state began to decline in the fifth century as their source of water diminished, causing their kingdom to fragment and ultimately become annexed by surrounding powers.
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>>13744062
The only starving black countries are the ones with civil war shit going on.
Also, mostly black people live in the Sahara desert.
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>>13749232
Liar. The Sahara has a cycle where it goes green and then back to desert and back to green. It has gone through that cycle at least 200 times, going by geological records. Stop lying, liar.
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>>13749576
Plenty of non blacks starve. The ukranians have starved, the irish, Chinese, Indians, Venezuelans, even the dutch. Currently the biggest "foreign aid receiver" in Africa is Egypt.
These starving subsaharan are just the Ethiopians 30 years ago or some Nigerians 60 years ago.
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>>13749589
Yeah?
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>>13745396
>Africa loses more in capital flight
https://youtu.be/uWSxzjyMNpU?t=2m20s
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>>13749624
I thought that trade thing was just a way to avoid taxes in general and not something that specifically benefited rich countries (except Switzerland, Holland and some others in their tax avoidance network). Basically companies split their operations in 2 companies, the good company and the bad company. The bad company sends all profits to the good company so according to the books its actually not making much money, the good company is some paper fiction that does nothing but gets all the money. They are registered in places like panama but really all the behind-the-scenes dealing is done in Switzerland, as the leading world experts and ringleaders.
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>>13749675
Also that specifically the topic of capital flight was not related to tax avoidance, as that affects all countries (except the swiss network). Capital flight happens in all unstable countries with money, like Russia, Venezuela, Nigeria, south Africa or Argentina. Their rich elites stash all their cash in europe and USA, and basically help develop rich countries at the expense of their own. For instance the Venezuelans invested at least a trillion dollars in building up Miami, all thar oil money just stayed in USA.
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>Using a variety of tools and techniques, including high-resolution satellite imagery and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of soils, Cloke, a doctoral student in the Department of Classics at UC, and Cecelia Feldman, classics lecturer at UMass-Amherst, have suggested that extensive terrace farming and dam construction in the region north of the city began around the first century, some 2,000 years ago, not during the Iron Age (c. 1200-300 BC) as had been previously hypothesized. This striking development, it seems, was due to the ingenuity and enterprise of the ancient Nabataeans, whose prosperous kingdom had its capital at Petra until the beginning of the second century.

>The successful terrace farming of wheat, grapes and possibly olives, resulted in a vast, green, agricultural "suburb" to Petra in an otherwise inhospitable, arid landscape. This terrace farming remained extensive and robust through the third century. Based on surface finds and comparative data collected by other researchers in the area, however, it is clear that this type of farming continued to some extent for many centuries, until the end of the first millennium (between A.D. 800 and 1000). That ancient Petra was under extensive cultivation is a testament to past strategies of land management, and is all the more striking in light of the area's dry and dusty environment today.

>Terrace farming unearthed at ancient desert city of Petra
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130102140443.htm

These civilizations lived on knife-edge, and practiced agriculture well enough to last hundreds or thousands of years, but at the same time, they didn't really have the knowledge necessary to make it to the next step, a sustainable system. Either by invasion, collapse of their techniques, exhuastion of resources, acceleration of erosion, or other means, the evidence clearly shows that these areas were once far more capable of sustaining a suitable and arable climate.
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>>13749527
>The Garamantes were probably present as a tribe in the Fezzan by 1000 BC. They appear in the written record for the first time in the 5th century BC: according to Herodotus, they were "a very great nation" who herded cattle, farmed dates, and hunted the Ethiopian cave-dwellers who lived in the desert, from four-horse chariots.

The description implies a vast trade; the herds of cattle were very large. For a nation spanning 70,000 sq.mi., these were probably settlements in between large expanses of only marginal land. As the herds were moved across, they probably ate everything in sight, and trampled what was left.

Desert/arid biomes are particularly sensitive, with lack of water meaning vegetative growth is slower. For the area to have supported all this husbandry, it would have had to have "banked" quite a bit carbon over the eons, just to get to that point, but once established, proved vulnerable.

This is the case today, where you see, for example, in irrigated dry land farming, erosion results in great clouds of dust which is the topsoil having lost its binding properties (humus) and being blown away bit by bit (also commingled with pesticide and fertilizer residues making it particularly toxic mixture to breathe.)

The "tragedy of the commons" type of devolution probably occurred with the occupying culture quickly draining what fossil water reserves existed (recharged over millions of years) and whatever browse was available for the animals (removing binding substrate for soils) leading to rapid acceleration of erosion, and desertification on the way to a ruinous state of complete collapse of the society.
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>>13743837
The American education system is horrible; This is middle school grade level. Most people who slide threads here don't even know how to add, unlike fractions.
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>>13743837
It's like that because of massive deforestation that happened around 5000-7000 years ago around the time the pyramids were built.
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>>13744076
The Seal of Fire, guarded by Efreet, creates a worldwide chain of deserts and volcanoes. The fire crystal is poweful enough to heat up the planet and is kept in check by the opposing forces of Undine, Sylph, Gnome, and Volt.
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>>13744062
No, North Africans get by just the same as arabs. It is niggers who need perpetual foreign aid to mantain their population from collapsing.
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>>13752733
Based Final Fantasy larper
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>>13753310
You have it upside down. Niggers are not starving at all. You think all of Africa is Ethiopia in 1990 or Nigeria in 1960?
The biggest receiver of foreign aid in Africa is Egypt, they got 90 billion in the last 10 years just for wheat and fuel.
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>>13743837
You can see the straight line is far from perfect, with deviations of hundreds of kms, and you are drawing a line on a sphere ignoring the perspective.



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