[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vm / vmg / vr / vrpg / vst / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / pw / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / vt / wsg / wsr / x / xs] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/sci/ - Science & Math

[Advertise on 4chan]


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.


[Advertise on 4chan]


File: map-1.jpg (1.46 MB, 2400x2400)
1.46 MB
1.46 MB JPG
Assuming the universe is infinite and you could reach areas beyond the cosmic horizon, how far you'd have to travel before things stop being unique and you began to see repetitions of things you have previously seen, (galaxies, stars, planes). How long before you find a straight copy of Earth?
>>
>>13419377
There is no intrinsic reason why every pattern seen in the observable universe has to repeat.
A number like 0.999... has infinitely many digits but you are not going to see anything other than a pattern of 9s.
For all we know, it could be that somewhere beyond the observable universe the same pattern of space dust starts repeating until infinity.
>>
>>13419377
>How long until repetitions
Like 1 centimeter. Theres empty space then empty space again, the pattern repeats for light years
>>
>>13419377
Infinite like in the asteroids game? It's not like that. More like it's expanding faster than you could ever reach the edge. And there isn't any extra matter being created so you aren't going to encounter any monkey typewriter type scenarios you silly billy.
>>
>>13419377
>>13419444
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GEebx72-qs
>>
>>13419377
It's irrelevant. Even at the speed of light we could only reach about 3% of the galaxies in the observable universe.
>>
>>13421691
>going at the max speed of a horse, it would take months to get from London to Shanghai
>anything else is impossible
>>
>>13419377
Why does it have to repeat? There could just be infinite new permutations, like there are with sets of numbers like the naturals or reals.
>>
>>13419377
Assuming the universe isn't a hypersphere, this is like asking how many digits of pi before it repeats. Well it's never gonna repeat in the same way as a rational number, but there will come a point at which you've seen every single digit, then later, a point at which you've seen every combination of 2 digits, later still 3, you get the picture. Do you consider the fact that everything is made of the same fundamental particles to be repetition? You'd probably say no. Well suppose there were a planet identical to Earth. If you went far enough outward, you could find a difference in its *surroundings* compared to our surroundings, but as a much more rare occurrence, you might find an entire galaxy that is identical. The rarity of repeating sections depends on how complex they are. This is actually what Penrose tilings are like as well. They have sections that repeat, but there is no translational symmetry for the whole thing. If the universe is random, then you will never get full repetition, just like pi never fully repeats in the way a rational number would.
>>
>>13421697
I'm not of the opinion that it's a simple technological limitation. If it were possible we'd have even more reason to believe there would be alien probes around because they could come from so many other galaxies.
>>
>>13421722
>what is bending spacetime
>what is technology we haven’t even thought of yet
>>
>>13422045
Then where are the space empires?
>>
>>13422089
It's not impossible that humanity is one of the very first who passed several of the great filters.
>>
>>13422119
I can buy this in our local group, but once you start saying you can cross the universe easily it becomes less believable.
>>
>>13422129
>but once you start saying you can cross the universe easily
Yeah, that part I don't agree with either. Especially considering that gay expansion.
>>
>>13422135
Inflation is eternal. It actually precedes the big bang. If we know anything, we know this. So there is at least one aspect of existence that we already know to be eternal. The rest is gravy.
>>
>>13422143
>It actually precedes the big bang.
Really.
>>
>>13422143
so my inflation fetish is as justified as the universe itself?
>>
>>13422155
whats normally thought of as the big bang was really just a secondary effect that happened when the expansion rate of the universe dropped below the speed of light. before the expansion rate slowed to c there were no interactions and in the ensuing billions of years the expansion has slowed to roughly 0.00025c
>>
>>13422246
So why is it suddenly accelerating now?
>>
File: tenor.gif (2.64 MB, 240x228)
2.64 MB
2.64 MB GIF
>>13422203
mother of god what is this abomination?
>>
File: 1602586474855.jpg (35 KB, 715x385)
35 KB
35 KB JPG
>>13422266
Yeah, it's as bad as someone putting ketchup on a hotdog.
>>
>>13419430
>A number like 0.999... has infinitely many digits but you are not going to see anything other than a pattern of 9s.
Can't tell if bait or you didn't know .999... equals 1.
>>
>>13422089
Fermi's Paradox and Olber's Paradox have a similar solution: Dark Forest Theory.



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.