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How many holes does a straw have, /sci/?
>>
one hole through the straw
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One
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>>13263966
Right, so if I BREAK you I’m fucking the same hole as your mouth?
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>>13263967
OK, fine so how many holes are in a pair of pants?
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>>13263975
One
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>>13263975
Three
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>>13263991
What about the piss hole and the multiple holes from me ripping massive farts?
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>>13263985
>>13263967
How many holes are in a balloon?
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>>13263998
Two
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>>13263998
Zero
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>>13263985
>>13263991
If we’re doing topology, it’s two and the straw is one. If we’re doing English 3 and 2
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i really dont like topologists
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Hahahahahahahaha How The Fuck Is Topology Real Hahahaha Nigga Just Count The Number Of Holes Like Nigga A Donut Isnt A Mug Haha
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>>13264018
It's definitely easy to buck-break bottomologists.
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>>13263961
If it's an atom made straw, many.
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>>13264169
So, too a bottomologist it’s a hole even if you can’t see it or pass anything through it.
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>>13264025
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>>13264025
Nothing in math is real.
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>>13263991
redpilled
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You dont want to know about the holes.
Holes are one of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The second greatest is shadows.
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Is this the hole thread?
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/holes/
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>>13263975
>>13263991
Yeah, pretty sure it's 3.
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Can computer scientists participate in this thread too? here is a hole

fib :: Int -> Int
fib 0 = 1
fib x = _
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>>13263961
I place the upper bound at two holes.

If you tilt the straw to the right while positioning your gaze at an angle to the fold, a ring-like aperture (or something resembling this) should be plainly visible to the naked eye.

Now, realign your cartesian chakra so that its coordinate basis intersect at the ajna chakra, and configure these such that all three coordinate axis are shooting forth outward through the tip of your nose like a geyser.

Pick any of the three coordinate axis, reach out and grab it like a pole. Grasping it firmly, pivot the entire space so that this axis falls neatly onto the ray which intersects the origin and converges to the unique point on the distant horizon that bisects the isosceles triangle whose legs meet squarely at your left and right and third eyeballs (angled normally to the tangent planes of each respective eyeball as your gaze remains fixated on the distant vertex). This will be a handy visual aid.

From this vantage point, pick a point along the ring-like aperture fold of the straw (without moving the object yet). Now, a precise set of delicate freeform maneuvers is to be performed without hesitation--- making sure to never lose sight of the elliptical ring, carefully reconfigure the straw by pivoting it into each coordinate axis about this point, and passing it positionally to and fro along each coordinate axis, until the ring-like aperture forms a circle centered at the origin.
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>>13263961
>>13264819
From here, execute novel translations unto the straw, under which the aforementioned circle is completely preserved (is invariant, remaining fixed before and after), which rotate it about the center of the circle, until the straw is symmetrical across one of the axis with respect to its reflection. As with the circle, preserve this symmetry--- and now, execute a deformation unto the straw without tearing it or intersecting it with itself, and while still preserving the circle in the way that it should go. Do this, and keep doing this, and eventually you will deformate the straw to a configuration where an elliptical light emitting surface becomes suddenly visible, embedded deeply, and shining brightly from within the straw. Looking on it, you can actually see through to the other side. This is the first hole in the straw.

A slight modification to this procedure--- tilting the straw to the left instead of to the right--- once performed, reveals a second hole. Of late I think of procedures which, once sufficiently developed, promise to reveal the two holes simultaneously, so that both are visible at the same time. This scientific revolution is ongoing--- I've seen glimpses of what this looks like, only brief flashes, in my nightmares, I will sleep now in search of it, but I will not rest. Once I've found it, and performed the steps successfully, I intend to visualize passing a needle thread into one of the two holes--- this will settle the score as to whether the holes are connected, and the entire case will be solved.
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>>13263961
"hole" is simply not a rigorously defined concept. But as a general rule, holes are dimensionless, i.e. they don't have any extension along the depth dimension. They are always a feature of surfaces with significant length/width.
A straw ONLY has depth. It has no extension (besides like half a millimeter, something we don't regard as a salient "surface") in the x and y dimension, therefore it can't meaningfully said to have "a hole" in the common sense.
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>>13263975
2. Same as the number of handles.
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>>13263961
As established in earlier threads bottoms are straws, and from personal research I have concluded that bottoms have 6 holes, so the answer is 6.
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>>13264886
If you analysis fail to identify that a drinking straw has a hole, you analysis is not meaningful or sensible.

>A straw ONLY has depth.
Nope it also has a radius that can define length and width which will be uniform if it is a typical circular drinking straw hole, but could be varied for an oval shaped drinking straw.
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>>13264457
Oddly based
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>>13264901
>Nope it also has a radius that can define length and width which will be uniform if it is a typical circular drinking straw hole, but could be varied for an oval shaped drinking straw.
Yes of course, I expressed myself badly. I meant depth is not an inherent feature of holes. A purely 2D surface of course can have a hole -- no depth required. It therefore follows holes do not depend on something having it. More than that, a hole is "parasitic" to such a surface, which must stand in a "dominating" relation to the hole. Sufficiently absurd, it otherwise becomes a ring with an arbitrarily close to 0 thickness.

But the "essence" of a straw, as a general idea, is almost wholly reduced to its depth aspect. It's therefore as bad as talking about the "height" of a single sheet of paper -- of course it exists because we live in a material universe, but it's never regarded as a salient, characteristic attribute.

As you may see, I approach this more from the philosophical/linguistic angle, I am not well versed in topology (for which my answer of course would also have been 1, but this I don't find this an interesting angle compared to the former one).
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>>13264915
>I meant depth is not an inherent feature of holes.
It is an inherent feature or real holes such as a drinking straw hole since in reality everything is a 3D surface nothing is purely 2D.

>the "height" of a single sheet of paper -- of course it exists because we live in a material universe, but it's never regarded as a salient, characteristic attribute.
Its not called height or depth by paper manufacturers, it is called thickness and along with weight is a strong selling point among various types of paper.
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My old teacher used to say a net was just a load of holes tied together with string. Is this topologically valid?
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>>13263961
Zero
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>>13264886
Homology defines holes well enough to make them countable. Fuck off.
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>>13263975
>pair of pants
I'm pretty sure it's a 2-torus, but I'm not sure
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>>13265465
It's homotopy equivalent to a wedge of two circles.
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straw is literally the inner space of a torus.
prove me wrong. Hint: You can't.
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Infinite
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define hole
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>>13265721
wtf I literally can't
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>>13264025
kek
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>>13263961
infinite
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bout tree fiddy
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>>13263961
Several bilions. It's porous material on an atomic level
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>>13263961
1

>>13263975
3
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>>13263975
2/3
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Someone post the what hole meme.
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>>13265783
its not even solid on a subatomic level
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>>13263961
also a straw as a topology has 1 hole through it
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>>13265953
Right. So the actual question we should ask: is a hole the only thing that factually exists in a straw?
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>>13263975
>>13265465
A pair of pants is an actual thing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pair_of_pants_(mathematics)
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>>13263961
Wait, what about a hole in the ground: how many holes does it have?
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Damn I came here to check out what science is about and you retards are arguing about straw holes.
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>>13266253
You didn't have to click on the thread, you know.
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>>13266253
>Damn I came here to check out what science is about
Your first mistake.
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>>13264784
A pair of pants is homeomorphic to a disk with two smaller disks removed from it. Although that is also homeomorphic to a sphere that has been punctured three times. So, really, we're back at square one.
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>>13266097
Neat
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>>13264025
based and reallifepilled
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>>13263975
two converging foramens
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>>13266097
>Moduli space of hyperbolic pants
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>>13266097
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pair_of_pants_(mathematics)
The absolute fucking state of mathematics
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>>13263975
Two
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>>13264263
Nothing is real
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>>13264819
>>13264823



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