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American mathematics edition
Talk math, formerly >>12931140
>>
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Reminder that it is OK to be an analyst. You are cute and valid.
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R. L. Moore (1882-1974)
[math]\it Racist\ mathematician\ unveiled[/math]
http://math.buffalo.edu/mad/special/RLMoore-racist-math.html
>>
>>12943924
I have so much trouble studying analysis, I just don't like it. I feel like not studying it is holding me back, though.
>>
https://www.strawpoll.me/42913565
>>
Midwest topology seminars tonight lads, who's gonna tune in?
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>>12943938
I didn't like it either. But I got through it. If an idiot like me can do it, then so can you!

>>12943950
Too late for me, so nope.
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>>12943924
>You are valid.
What does this mean?
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>>12943963
The algebraist is just teasing you
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>>12943959
Yeah well I already made it through 2 courses in it, it's just I neglected it for so long now I have to review it for some other stuff and I'm so not motivated.
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>>12943963
I honestly don't know, but I was told I'm valid. Sounds nice, probably means nothing.

>>12943977
Do you have many courses left? Is it measure theory stuff or something like that?
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>>12944060
No courses left, just as I study further in any area it seems the need for analysis somehow creeps in, annoying thing.
>>
>>12943931
Is this news to anyone?
>>
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>>12944065
Are you doing some manifold stuff? I've managed to completely avoid analysis since 2018 by sticking to CW-spaces.
>>
I need the absolute best summary of real analysis that exists. Something super simple and short.
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>>12944118
I'd be surprised if you didn't encounter analysis stuff even with that. You'll definitely have differentiable manifolds. It seems to me that a lot of research/new stuff is done by connecting various areas and using techniques from other areas of mathematics. So knowing a little bit about other fields helps in a lot of cases.
>>
>>12944151
Newton and leibniz and most of the bros you know created calculus with infinitesimals. Those were really hard to axiomatize without fucking up the real numbers' structure. So instead we have the idea of the limit, with the e-d definition due to cauchy. The goal of real analysis is to show that all the nice theorems you get from infinitesimals are valid in limits, and then to create new theorems.
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>>12944151
>reals
>that exist
top jej
>>
>>12944162
Infinitesimals are fine. What was problematic is power series, whose careless manipulation could result in absurdities. "Epsilon-delta" methods were conceived to settle questions such as "are limits of continuous functions continuous", not to "validate" the (obvious and intuitive) results of infinitesimal calculus. Please do not opine on the history of mathematics if your knowledge is at the "anti-infinitesimalist propaganda" level.
>>
>>12944188
justice for cavalieri
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>>12944162
Thanks. Do you have any good sources for this subject to study from? I have an intense course which is a infi/real analysis hybrid.
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>>12944151
Asking questions about basic real analysis textbooks should be banned. There’s at least one every single thread. The answer is always Rudin.
>>
>>12944182
No one cares what you think, so you may as well not exist either.
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>>12944151
I'll give you one: "nigga I wanna move the "lim" symbol around the "integral" symbol. Pls help me justify that."
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>>12944151
Lang
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>>12944160
The attachments prevent them from being manifolds in general. Just think about the wedge of two spheres and consider the common point they have.
>So knowing a little bit about other fields helps in a lot of cases.
This is definitely true.
>It seems to me that a lot of research/new stuff is done by connecting various areas and using techniques from other areas of mathematics
This is most likely true. A lot is also about constructing examples or trying to generalise already known results.
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>>12942841
I don't know why you bring time into it, but essentially this seems correct.

N is a set by Infinity (axiom) and one in which membership is decidable. So the class
X := {5,8,9, 6887}
is a subset of N by Separation (axiom) too, and thus a set (as opposed to a proper class).
The class
S := {x | (x=8 or x=6887) and ((x is prime) or (x is not prime))}
is a subset of X by Separation again, and thus also a set.

Classically S equals {8, 6887} by LEM (axiom), i.e. S={8, 6887}
Constructively, it also equals {8, 6887}! But the proof of that needs more work: You need to find out whether 6887 is prime or not prime while proving S={8, 6887}.

Moving on, to elaborate: For any predicate, the class {x in X| P(x)} is a set by Separation.
So the power of the singleton set X={7} is as rich as the truth values of your theory. Apriori, this class
Ω={s | s is a subset of {7}}
is proper.
If you adopt the Powerset axiom (all powerclasses are sets), then Ω also a set.
If you adopt LEM, then by this act Ω comes to be in bijection with the function space
{7}->{true, false}, which is in bijection with just {true, false}.

You may adopt the axiom that all function spaces X->Y are sets whenever X and Y are. This is weaker than the Powerset axiom and is often done, because it's natural from a type construction perspective (see e.g. typed lambda calculus). But that just essentially means that all subsets given rise to by decidable predicates are sets.

>>12943449
>The classifier was extremely approachable in this case. Nice one.
There's a book fleshing out the sheave topoi for four (iirc) such discrete structures in detail

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333579691_Generic_figures_and_their_glueings_A_constructive_approach_to_functor_categories

Good to get a graphical/finite intuition for some of the objects involved

>>12943345
Accepting LEM just kills off meaningful interpretations, that's why I think it's inevitable to have a logic around that doesn't adopt it.
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>>12944270
PS of course you may cite the simple algorithm that takes a number and by brute force listing eventually returns all its prime factors. This algo thus proves that particular "is prime or is not prime" instance of LEM, so if your logic calculus is not machinized, it's not practically more work to prove
S := {x | (x=8 or x=6887) and ((x is prime) or (x is not prime))}
is a finite set, in this case, at all. Depending on your logic calculus, you don't actually have to factor 6887 but simply provide the factoring algo proving that it has or hasn't factors.
Point is you can't simply cite LEM, you need to cite a reason for why that EM-disjunction happens to be true for these numbers.
>>
>>12944216
I dont want to read a long ass book just for a 3 month course
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>>12944213
Most real analysis books are not bad. I like pugh's book. You can read rudin if you like but he's 100% focused on doing things the most efficient way regardless of clarity
>>
Looking at the set,
S={x in {7} | Continuum hypothesis is true}
we have at least two options:
S={} and thus of size 0
or
S={7} and thus of size 1.
and either way, S is of finite size.
Classically, those are the only options and we know S is finite without even knowing about the Continuum hypothesis.

Basically, this makes use of the classical
"If either P or it's negation leads to Q, then Q is true"
[math] \big((P\implies Q) \lor ( \neg P \implies Q)\big) \implies Q [/math]
which enables us to establish Q on the right hand side, via a proposition on the left hand side that involves P only syntatically, without us having to be interested in the truth of P.
>>
is there a study on functions whose limits at positive and negative inf are equal?
at a glance I think they form a ring
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>>12944270
Thanks! I downloaded that and will take a look at it this weekend or something.
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>>12944360
Sounds like you could broaden. Given a fixed subset [math]S\subset X[/math] and an commutative ring [math]R[/math], the functions
[math]f\colon X\to R[/math]
with
[math]\forall (s,t \in S).\, f(s)=f(t)[/math]
will form a ring that respects this relation.

Don't cite me but on first look that makes sense to me.
>>
>>12944400
Thinking more, we might think of the restrictions [math]f|_{S}[/math] as constants in [math]R[/math]
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>>12944360
these are functions on the circle
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>>12944400
True. Take all the functions [math]X \to R[/math]. Then this set inherits a ring structure from [math]R[/math], and it will be unital whenever [math]R[/math] is ([math](f+g)(x) = f(x) + g(x), (fg)(x)=f(x)g(x)[/math] with operations performed in the ring [math]R[/math]).

>>12944412
Those will give a subring of the function ring [math]A = \text{Hom}(X, R)[/math]. If [math]f, g\in A[/math] are constant functions when restricted to [math]S[/math], then [math](f+g)(s) = (f+g)(t), (fg)(s) = (fg)(t)[/math] for all [math]s, y\in S[/math], and this constant condition is obviously satisfied by the function [math]x \mapsto 1[/math].
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>>12944400
so im assuming X here includes the point at infinity

>>12944428
as in real projective line?
>>
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how do you disprove that math majors are virgins?
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>>12944453
>as in real projective line?
or rather subsets of it
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>>12944457
have sex with all of them
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>>12944453
real projective line is a circle
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>>12944515
so if we extend the codomain to C, and replacing +-inf with |z| -> inf, will this result in functions on the torus?
>>
>>12943931
>>12943931
Is this new? Von Neumann literally blasted Nazi tunes to trigger his Jewish colleagues. Mathematicians were cunts.
>>
Are there any hollow shapes which are manifolds without corners?

Like, why isn't the hollow cylinder one?
>>
>>12944778
further to this, are there two intersecting closed loops on the torus to 'represent' where the real part of z is finite, but imaginary is not and vice versa
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>>12945089
>Like, why isn't the hollow cylinder one?
Why do you think it isn't one?
>>
>>12945100
Oh I'm dumb, I was thinking of "with" instead of "without"

Yeah nevermind
>>
>>12944796
not racis, jus don't like em
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>>12945100
Does the following make sense?

Each section of a hollow cylinder is locally diffeomorphic to either a rectangle or circle, but not both. Hence it is not a manifold with corners.
>>
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the only person with a phd in math that i know personally is a highschool math teacher that clearly doesn't like his job
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>>12945140
whats your point
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>>12945140
100% of maths PhDs hate their jobs CONFIRMED!
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>>12945132
What is this hollow cylinder? I \times S^1 where I = R? (0, 1)? [0, 1]? In the first two cases, it is a manifold without boundaries. In the third case, it is a manifold with boundary and no corners. If by hollow cylinder you mean [0, 1] \times S^1 along with the "caps" at 0 and 1, then I think that would be a manifold with corners
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>>12945140
I don't blame him, 95% of high-school students are passionless mongoloids who will be a forever slave to the intoxicating cycle of consumerist reward
>>
These are the exercises I'm trying to work through
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>>12945166
>then I think that would be a manifold with corners
Actually, thinking again, it probably wouldn't
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>>12945166
>>12945180
It is not really made clear
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>>12945155
Most aren't lucky, I wouldn't want to teach 'college algebra' at some community college. I couldn't get into a good PhD program, so it is not likely I'd get a job I like with it. I'm just too dumb to be hired for actual research.
>>
>just failed another algebra test
I feel worthless. Not only my life is utter shit but I can't even get decent grades. I just want to go to bed one night and never wake up.
>>
>>12945180
>>12945184
These questions are quite unambiguous imo. I'm too lazy to give detailed answers right now though.
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>>12945180
Anyway, the cylinder in the 20.3 can be described as the region in R^3 given by x^2 + y^2 = 1 and 0 <= z <= 1, whereas the cylinder in 20.4 is x^2 + y^2 <= 1 and 0 <= z <= 1. Go over the definition of manifolds with corners again and see why they may or may not fit that definition.
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>>12945208
Thanks anyways for the help. I'll try grind out the definition again
>>
Algebraic category theory when?
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>>12945440
Now? Have you read a book on category theory?
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>>12945440
category theory IS algebra. category theory = theory of partial monoids.
>>
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>>12945201
Yeah well I don't know about the job markets, especially in the US.
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>>12945504
Not all partial monoids are categories.

>>12945440
Look up the category of algebras of a monad, algebraic categories, Lawvere theories, algebras of an operad, or varieties of algebras. All category theory and algebra together.
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>>12945201
I feel similarly, math is a trap that I wish I didn't fall into.
In my first year of college I took an intro programming class and was super interested in it. I wish I had turned that into my thing.
But the moment I learned about cardinalities and the proof of the uncountability of the reals I was fucked. I couldn't not dig deeper, and CS felt so lame in comparison.

Now I'm just NEET, counting down my days, so I have nothing better to do than just learn more mathematics.
>>
I'm going to finish my math degree next year and I can't decide which of the following topics to address in my bachelor thesis:
-Functional Analysis
-Analytical Number Theory
-Algebraic Number Theory

I'd appreciate it if you could offer your opinions and recommend me some books for each of those topics.
>>
>>12943963
This. It means nothing and just makes you sound like a tranny.
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>>12945914
The algebraist is a tranny so I guess she was parodying that useless phrase.
>>
>>12945818
Any bachelor thesis is just going to be a routine, unoriginal examination of some topic for which 1000s of introductory expositions already exist.
Undergrads aren't expected to produce anything novel on their own, so pretty much the only requirement is that you don't literally copy and paste someone else's work. You don't even need to know mathematics to write these kinds of things.
Don't over think it. Just pick any topic that is interesting enough for you to voluntarily read about.
>>
>>12945818
Can you explain your preferences and what led to this shortlist of topics? I could offer an answer right now and just say "None of them, write your thesis in Algebraic Geometry instead" but that wouldn't be a good answer. Are you looking to specialize into one of these area with a view to a PhD? Are they just interesting to you?
>>
>>12945993
I was also considering writing about Commutative or Non-commutative algebra, but I found those 3 topics to be far more interesting.
>>
Holy fucking shit, Experimental Physics is utter trash, this shit's so boring. Why would a mathematician need to learn this shit?
>>
>>12946119
What do you find attractive about Algebraic number theory?
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>>12946119
Pick a topic related to constructivism and dab on the cl*ssicalists
>>
Where can I learn more about complex fourier series?
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>>12946144
Wild does not believe in constructivism. Actual constructivists know that given a natural number n, there exists a natural number n, because they know how to construct it. Wildberger says that they are WRONG. His opinion is that there exist numbers so large that you can no longer add to them (you may torture him savagely, but he will never tell you what these numbers are).
>>
British anons answer pls.

In linear / convex optimization, do Brits call it a "linear program" or a "linear programme"? Google gives conflicting results.
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>>12946265
Yeah I know, but they at least share similar objections to classical mathematics.
>>
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>>12946265
>>12946355
He rejects provability of some common math statements, but not because of lack of axioms in ones framework, but because of the rejection of formalism itself.

His "at one point, well-typed arithmetic expressions stop being numbers" is not something you'd usually encounter in the academic field of constructivism.

I tried to engage with him at one point and figure out where the edge is between a formal logic and his ideas, but his "physicalism" is not very appealing to me to consider it further.
There will be some well defined fast growing functions (let's say [math]f(n):=n^{n^n}[/math] or wilder) such that you can inspect the properties of [math]n[/math] but not those of the number [math]f(n)[/math], but keeping the bound up in the air ruins the universal quantifier [math]\forall n[/math].
If we don't do Euclidean geometry, I can't tell what the Burger would consider true or not provable anymore, especially if we compare numbers [math]n[/math] and non-numbers [math]f(n)[/math] in one expression.
>>
>>12946485
>tried to engage with him at one point and figure out where the edge is between a formal logic and his ideas
It seems pretty clear to me. Formal logic is about dispensing with semantics and only caring about syntactic manipulations, while Wildberger cares about what we actually mean by the things we talk about.
>His "at one point, well-typed arithmetic expressions stop being numbers"
Did he state such a view? I could not find it in the image he posted.
He remarked that by the same term "numbers" we could have in mind different things that behave very differently computationally. I.e. we could have strokes on a blackboard, or allow more general abstract expressions with exponentiations. But as our notion of a number changes, so do the things we can do with them. While we can easily compare strokes on a blackboard, it may not be possible when we're talking about more general expressions.
>but keeping the bound up in the air ruins the universal quantifier ∀n.
Can you explain what you mean by this?
>If we don't do Euclidean geometry, I can't tell what the Burger would consider true or not provable anymore
It seems pretty clear to me. Something is true provided the terms used are clearly, and then the thing that is asserted is true if it correctly describes the (possible) reality.
>>
>>12946556
>Can you explain what you mean by this?
There's numbers n which can be physically represented, but n^n is too big to be a number in that sense.
Is this statement true?:
>for all k, if k>2, then k^k > k
It's a logical tautology by form, but the comparison > becomes infeasible at one point, when k^k "is not a number"
>>
>>12946598
>There's numbers n which can be physically represented, but n^n is too big to be a number in that sense.
This seems to be true, given that your choice of physical representation is wasteful for this purpose. But then you can look at n symbolically.
>Is this statement true?:
>>for all k, if k>2, then k^k > k
Yes, it's true. If you take any natural number k, succeed in raising it to k'th power and in comparing it to k, you will find that k^k is bigger.
>>
Can anyone learn mathematics? I mean, can a sub-100 IQ person learn real maths? When I say real maths I don't mean stuff like calculus or analysis or basic abstract algebra. I mean stuff like in those posts >>12944270 >>12944448

If it's impossible just be honest so I can move on quickly.
>>
>>12946647
>Yes, it's true. If you take any natural number k, succeed in raising it to k'th power
The issue is that "IF you succeed in raising it to k'th power" is not formalized in the language.
That leads to a lot of implicit if-statements that need to hold to even make the formally Boolean statement that follows decidable

Propositions
>forall k. P(k)
implicitly become
>for all k (if everything expressed in the P that follows can be computed) then P(k)

And to say it's true does not anymore mean that there's infinitely many k for which P(k)
>>
>>12946742
>Yes
>No
>Maybe
>>
>>12946742
There's nothing scary about those posts, you're just not familiar with the vocabulary.
If you say a sentence to your mother than includes the words "weeb" and "doxxing", then she'll not know what you talk about. If I say a sentence involving "Separation axiom", you don't know what it means in the same sense. It's not hard, you just don't know the word. Something like "Hom(X, R)" looks scary but it's clear once you got context.

So I'd answer with yes.
>>
>>12946742
This is stuff an undergrad math major could easily read anon.
>>
>never took multivariate calc in undergrad
>Researcher in elliptic pdes
>Any time div grad curl stokes and forms enter the discussion my eyes glaze over
Not really sure how I made it lads
>>
>>12947022
Category theory isn't taught in undergrad courses.
>>
>>12947028
I'm in a similar situation dude, I'm almost giving up.
>>
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>>12946742
That post with the diagram and [math]\Omega[/math] may be a bit more difficult to understand, but in my post one only needs to know what functions and rings are. The Hom-thingy is just the set (inb4: what is a set? The Egyptian god, of course!) of functions from the set [math]X[/math] to a ring (also thought of as a set). I can do it, and I'm like max 95 IQ, so you can do it too.

>>12947028
I can understand somehow just ending up as a researcher without knowing precisely what to do, but how on earth did you manage to skip multivariate calculus?!
>>
>>12947028
>Researcher in elliptic pdes
I took a grad class in Finite Element Methods and I wanted to kill myself with boredom.

I don't get what it is about PDEs but I fuck hating that shit.
>>
If a computable subtree of the tree of finite binary sequences has uncountably many paths, must the halting problem be computable from one of its paths?
>>
>>12945818
Functional Analysis has the broadest reach, in particular if you are interested in non-mathematical applications.
OTOH it might seriously kick your ass. It is the most notorious course at my uni.
>>
>>12947256
>max 95 IQ
Missing a "1" there. I think you meant 195IQ.
>>
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I bought those drawing tablets (without screen) so that I can write longer equations on my computer without having to look up and down repeatedly and just read off pdf easier. Did I go full retard?
>>
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>>12947352
Nope. I wish you were correct instead of just being nice. I'm on a 3 week long failure streak. Whatever I try to construct, it is a total failure. I have roughly 10 hours to come up with something before I need to present nothing in my weekly meeting. That doesn't sound like 195 IQ to me. Someone else could be here instead of me, actually being able to get stuff done and not being a total disgrace.
>>
>>12947387
How did you let things come to this? Was it because of procrastination or you not being able to come up with anything despite trying?
>>
>>12947387
I think rather than beating yourself up, you should take a deep breath and calm down. Either that or take a break, it'll probably help you more than whatever you do now, anon. Here's where I would post a cute 2hu encouraging you but I don't want to be confused for someone else.
>>
>>12947270
>I don't get what it is about PDEs but I fuck hating that shit.

It's because the field is motivated towards being actually useful, as opposed to being a beautiful and fantastical game. Go figure.

But kudos to anyone who actually really likes PDEs, especially people who like numerical methods for PDEs.
>>
>>12947420
Lmao rent-free cope seethe cuck.
>>
>>12944304
Rudin is for two semesters, read the first half to cover the material of a 3 month course. It’s also literally the most efficient presentation so stop complaining about the length gay boy and start studying.

>>12945797
>>12945201
You can always go into industry after a PhD at a lower tier program. Just make sure to know basic statistics and programming.
>>
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>>12947454
Don't say those words anon, I'll pull your cheeks.
>>
>>12947028
How the fuck did you read Evans without knowing this stuff lol. IIRC like 25% of the book is tedious calculus.
>>
>>12947435
No, I'm actually an applied mathematician and I actually do care a lot about real world applications.
I just hate working with PDEs. Just super tedious work and I don't find anything interesting in it. FEM was supposed to be interesting but even that I found exceedingly tedious.

And then, on top of that it is one of the least prestigious fields. And even worse, it does not even pay well. I actually took FEMs cause at first I thought I might find a cool job writing FEM software. Turns out the pay is shit. That really made me hate the rest of the course.
>>
>>12947455
>You can always go into industry after a PhD
I literally can't. No one would hire me when they could hire an engineer or a statistician. Besides, there aren't many jobs in the industry for a PhD in mathematics anyway.
>>
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>>12947410
I haven't actually even been procrastinating. Sure, I did post all night last night, but at the same time I was processing different ways to get stuff done. It's probably just a mixture of being unable to sleep, dumb worries and Weltschmerz in general making me incapable of pretty much anything.

>>12947420
Thanks for your kind words. It just feels so stupid to be unable to construct something as easy as a chain complex satisfying some very easy properties.

But actually now that I was a stupid crybaby bitch... I think I may have it. Sorry for a moment of weakness. It will happen again, but hopefully not too soon. I think I'll start doing spamming /s4s/ whenever hopelessness hits.

>>12947455
>You can always go into industry after a PhD at a lower tier program. Just make sure to know basic statistics and programming.
What if you haven't studied statistics after HS and are too dumb for programming?
>>
10 days to learn the first three chapters of Do Carmo's Differential Geometry. Can it be done?
>>
>>12947256
This was my chain of course selections in undergrad. I placed out of calc I and II. | means concurrent enrollment
Linear Algebra|ODEs>Topology|Abstract Algebra>Real Analysis|Combinatorics|Numerical Analysis>Abstract II | Real II (professor had a heart attack 2 weeks into the term, and it was a reading course....) > PDEs | Differential Geometry
The requirement to graduate was one of ODEs and Multivariable and I just kinda never got around to taking them both...
>>
>>12947474
Are we going to be in the same class? Are you doing Differential Geometry next semester?

Yes it can be done. But of course the problems are the important part that would take longer.
>>
>>12947473
Sleep well, take supplements, go outside for walks every day to get sunlight.
Many people have no idea how much doing these things improves everything.
>>
>>12947483
I'm doing it right now. Actually, I meant the first 2 chapters.
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>>12947455
>go into industry after a PhD

what a total meme, there are very few jobs for mathematicians in industry, it used to be like that but these days, everything has a tailored piece of software already written for it, so they need less of us

realistically the only real option outside of academia is:
1. corporate finance&management, it's not math and they train you further but they recruit a lot of us
2. programmer

I know of some people who got hired doing actual math, usually some kind of modeling or simulation work, but these jobs are relatively rare.
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>>12947482
Did your real analysis stuff even cover measure theory? I can see why you would skip multivariate stuff after having so much analysis already, but I still think it's a bit funny to not have it as compulsory. What is a reading course btw? Do you just get assigned some book to read and then get questioned somehow?

>>12947486
Sleep well is something I've been trying. Supplements are taken other than iron which I haven't been able to find anywhere (and now I'm pale enough to scare kids when I go outside), walks have been skipped lately because I've just wanted to hide from the cruel world under the blanket. I'll go after I'm done with my meeting, though. Snow after Easter is nice, but also an unexpected thing. Do you have snow over there?
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>>12947510
Where are you from?
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Only just now am I finding out that "one to one" is not the same as "one to one correspondence".
Who is responsible for this?
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>>12947534
Germany.
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>>12947536
In all likelihood, the french.
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>>12947384
I had this genuine "dinosaur" moment a few years ago. At a family gathering a little while ago a cousin of mine was working on her homework for some freshman physics course and she was using a fucking tablet and stylus for all her notes and problem solving.
She wanted some help with a problem, so I attempted to write some stuff using the tablet and I just couldn't write anything legible.
What's wrong with good old pen and paper. Paper is awesome. Man it felt weird seeing the next generation not using paper.

But at the same time, I'm sure there's an advantage to going full digital. So good for you I guess.
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>>12947536
This is why people should just use "injective", "surjective" and "bijective" instead of "one to one", "onto" and "one to one correspondence". A lot less confusing, I think. Especially if you think about the names. INjective because the domain fits INside the codomain, then surjective functions have the domain cast an all-encompassing shadow on the codomain, and bijectives go in two ways. I remember wondering onto a lot. At first I thought it was injection because you can just put a thing on a table without covering the whole table (for example a pen or a glass).

>>12947550
Actually, probably not. The "sur" in "surjective" would fit French quite well.
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>>12947540
Liar. You're probably from South America. There are plenty of industry jobs for mathematicians in Europe.
>>
>>12947536
What's the difference?
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>>12945180
What book is this?
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>>12947557
I literally just had this conversation with my mentor this afternoon.
He made it clear the jobs are rare.
If you know better please enlighten me.
I need a fucking job.
>>
>>12947568
You literally can't stay jobless in Germany dude, just tell the government that you need something and they'll give it to you. Try living in my shithole and you'll understand what jobless really means.
>>
>>12947384

I have one of these and I love it. I use it to teach and take notes. I turn it sideways so it's portrait size. like a sheet of paper, the tablet software allows you to do that. This keeps my wrist from falling off the edge, which is really annoying when writing in landscape. It was $50 on Amazon.

I use Xournal++ for the note-taking and annotating pdfs. It's free and awesome. The combination makes Smart Boards seem terribly clunky.
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>>12947580
I didn't say I was going to be jobless.
I said positions in industry where you are tasked with doing anything remotely related to math are relatively rare.
You can very easily get a programming job.
>>
>>12947524
The department was too small to have a regular second course in analysis, so we would do reading courses. Prof would give you a book, problem sets, and took responsibility for helping you with whatever problems you had getting the material. That second course in real analysis was meant to be the last half of baby rudin+the first few chapters of papa, but it all fell apart due to the prof's heart attack.
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>>12947587
>positions in industry where you are tasked with doing anything remotely related to math
Oh, so you want to be a reseacher in the industry? What in the actual fuck haha
>>
>>12947156
It isn't taught directly as a course where I was, I had several courses that used it heavily like algebraic topology and I only have an undergraduate degree. I had to print out notes on it and go to lots of office hours to learn it. Universal properties for example came up in lots of my algebra courses as well.
>>
>>12947595
no, not a researcher, that is even rarer, my ideal position would be modeling and simulation, where you need advanced math+physics (or other domain knowledge) to guide the development of special simulation software
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>>12947611
You should have pursued engineering then instead of mathematics, fool.
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>>12947455
>You can always go into industry after a PhD at a lower tier program. Just make sure to know basic statistics and programming.
My point was there is literally no reason to get a PhD if I can't get into a good school. I'll probably be as well off outside of mathematics with just my current degree. The only math related job I could get would work you to death teaching and demoralize you with the student types they get at community colleges (not actually interested in the mathematics).
If I plan on getting a job like you suggest I'd prepare for that directly.
>>
>>12947471
>>12947473
>>12947510
You can absolutely get a job in data science / ML with a math PhD. You need to know stats and basic programming but these should be easy unless you’re a complete moron. There are a ton of jobs in tech / finance that make use of this background.
>>
>>12947551

I'm old. But I've switched to digital over the past year, and it's great. You can erase easily, write on pdfs, move chunks around, copy lines around, etc. When you look up a formula or other info on line, you can just screen shot it and paste it in. Add hyperlinks, figures, graphs, etc.

I've switched my kids over too. My eldest does her Algebra homework using Kami to annotate assignments of pdfs. It's the future.
>>
>bwaaaaah im not getting accepted to do my phd at harvard then i wont do a phd at all bwaaaaah
Retards, I would glad being accepted to do a PhD even if it was at Zimbabwe University.
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>>12947556
>Actually, probably not. The "sur" in "surjective" would fit French quite well.
Yes, this is due to Bourbaki.
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>>12947632
>basic programming
What is basic programming? I know how to conditionals in Python, how advanced am I?
>>
>>12947640
>Bourbaki
Not a person.
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>>12947637
Less funding, don't get grants, go into debt, learn less because the professors are overworked and have no time for you. No chance of a postdoc afterwards. Sounds like a brilliant life plan.
>>
>>12947626
yeah I know, I realized too late, but also undergrad engineering was too boring for me
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>>12947646
Well I don't keep track of the exact authors of the books, it appeared in a "Bourbaki Book" there are you happy? Everyone knows Bourbaki isn't a person. This is just how people talk about it because it came from a book by the Bourbaki group.
>>
I fucking hate Europe.
>>
>>12947646
>>12947659
Is there a good term to describe this type of exchange?
"Bourbaki isn't a person, didn't you know that?!?!"
"Yes, we know"
"Then why do you cite 'Bourbaki'?"
"Because everyone understands that citing 'Bourbaki' means you are citing a publication due to the group"

Wrongly inferring that a recently corrected misconception of your own is also a misconception that everyone else has, only to then realize that you're a whole level behind everyone else.
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>>12947698
LMAO, you're butthurted.
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>>12947703
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>>12947698
It's only here anyone has ever objected to me using Bourbaki the way I did. It first appears in Théorie des ensembles, Éléments de mathématique Première Partie, Livre I, Chapitres I, II (1954).
R.O. Gandy reviewed it and wrote (and I'm sure he knows Bourbaki isn't a person):
Another useful function of Bourbaki’s treatise has been to standardise notation and terminology… Standard terms are badly needed for “one-to-one,” “onto” and “one-to-one onto”; will Bourbaki’s “injection,” “surjection” and “bijection” prove acceptable?
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>>12947591
I see. That probably saves some money for the department. I haven't read either of the Rudins, sorry, but I take that as a "no". Did the prof survive? Heart problems aren't fun.

>>12947632
So you think programming is a must?

>>12947640
Bourbaki was a cool guy. He killed intuition and didn't afraid of anything.

>>12947661
Why? Why won't you join me on my trip to Wallachia after kung flu is over? Let's go see Dracula's castle and stuff. And then continue from there to Čachtice. You, me, warm summer days. Then we can go have a picnic on the puszta. Wouldn't that sound nice?
>>
>>12947716
Get fucked frog motherfucker, next time don't mention Bourbaki without knowing what it actually is.
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>>12947722
To be clearer surjective in particular and the set of terms is what is introduced. I think injection had been used previous to this.
>>
I just found this guy randomly on youtube. His videos are pretty comfy.

https://youtu.be/Pkfu_hecrA8
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>>12947726
>Why?
Because I'll never be able to live there. I wasted all my chance to have a successful academic career in mathematics. Now I'm doomed to live in this third world shithole called Brazil forever. I bet you look down on me, european.
>>
Would I be accepted to a top PhD program if I changed my name to Nicolas Bourbaki?
>>
>>12947741
Why not just move?
>>
>>12947755
People can't just move into other countries like that. Europe only accepts qualified people that stand out.
>>
>>12947759
Then stand out? Start publishing research and see if it's of anyone's interest. Apply for positions in Europe, North America, etc.
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>>12947741
Funny you say that cause all the Brazilians I know are mathematicians who came here through school.
But they are all pretty talented.

But actually you can get a code monkey job and if you prove yourself good enough you can get a job here that way. Lots of Latinos are doing it now.
>>
>>12947738
Comfy indeed. Thanks!

>>12947741
I am literally in no position to look down on anyone, buddy. I knew you would not accept my invitation, but if you did I would have gone to Romania with you. How did you waste your chances? Are you that netorare addict?

>>12947764
>Start publishing research
How does one actually do this?
>>
>>12947783
Are you in undergrad? Talk to your professor and you can do whatever you want. Even I've done research and I'm also in undergrad.
>>
>>12947783
>How does one actually do this?
You literally just submit your paper to a journal. You can only submit the paper to one journal at a time and it can take months to hear back, though.
>>
>>12947722
The Chad combination is to use one-to-one, onto, and bijective
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>>12947783
>Are you that netorare addict?
I can't believe someone remembers that. Is it the thread of fate connecting us?
>How did you waste your chances?
I think I'm pretty much finished, too much procrastination, but I don't mind these days. My only objective in life now is to be able to read Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard before dying and becoming a better person.
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>>12947795
Nope. Second year postgrad.

>>12947796
That sounds awfully stressful. Then it gets rejected and all those months of waiting lead only to disappointment.

>>12947805
Non-surjective one to one correspondence, surjection, set isomorphism.
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>>12947816
Seriously, just apply mate. Try to get an internship in the US or Europe and you can work things out from there. Talk to your peers about publishing. Surely you've written some decent papers by now?
>>
>>12947816
>Second year postgrad
You haven't worked on research yet? You should be getting your name onto some papers soon, shouldn't you?
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>>12947815
>I can't believe someone remembers that. Is it the thread of fate connecting us?
Sorry, I remember weird things and forget important ones. Imagine having trouble connecting names to actions or faces but remembering that detail.
>I think I'm pretty much finished, too much procrastination, but I don't mind these days. My only objective in life now is to be able to read Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard
Are you then also the one who was never to come back?
>before dying and becoming a better person.
Is this like "reading those before dying. oh and becoming a better person", or do you intend to die in order to become better?

>>12947830
Apply where? I already have a position. I haven't written any papers. I have a few continuation results for stuff my supervisor did, but that will not take me too far.

>>12947836
I've been doing research for almost 2 years now.
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>>12947842
>I've been doing research for almost 2 years now.
And you haven't published anything? How old are you?
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>>12947842
>Are you then also the one who was never to come back?
Yeah. I feel so ashamed now. I failed everyone, I couldn't leave...
>Is this like
The former.
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>>12947842
>I've been doing research for almost 2 years now.
Well then you shouldn't be asking people here for advice on publishing. I'm sure your advisor/supervisor can help best.
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>>12947556
>Actually, probably not. The "sur" in "surjective" would fit French quite well.
I've studied at a french and at an english uni, french use surjective etc, english used onto. That transition to english sucked lol
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What happens to "researchers" who make minimal contributions to group collaborations just to get their name on the paper?
Collaboration in general seems like a difficult societal problem since its almost a guarantee that the "credit" (be it pay or recognition) for a collaborative work won't be distributed fairly in proportion to how much work each contributor did (either one person steals the show, or bums get more credit than they deserve, etc).
I'm just wondering to what extent this problem is actually tackled in the real world of math research.
If a person for example collaborated with a colleague, but was of basically no help (did almost no work), what happens next? Do they just never get asked to collaborate again? What if they make use of their name on the publication to find new collaboration opportunities, do nothing, and just continue the cycle? How do they get exposed?
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>>12947892
>What happens to "researchers" who make minimal contributions to group collaborations just to get their name on the paper?
They get praised as generational geniuses and win fields medals. See Terence Tao.
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>>12947854
28

>>12947855
Don't worry, anon. We can be the token failures together. I'll come to visit you and we'll go to the pampas for a picnic, and then an Eastern Europe tour.

>>12947864
He's pushing out a paper every two months. It's too much of a routine for him to actually remember how it works in the beginning. Besides he hasn't mentioned me publishing anything for over a year now. He's probably lost hope already.

>>12947872
Yeah, the English translations suck more than the "what is a set" anon's mom for living.
>>
Commutative diagrams look so fucking cool.
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>>12947901
>He's pushing out a paper every two months.
And you've never gotten on as a co-author? You need to be more proactive. Go in there, say you've not had your name on a paper yet and you need to start publishing things. Or look for a new advisor! I'm scared to ask about your thesis.
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>>12947896
Haha very funny.
But clearly Tao has enough repeat collaborations with other researchers to prove he's not just leeching. And he has solo publications.
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>>12947901
>We can be the token failures together.
I guess so...

Until you actually succeed and leave me behind, then I'll be all alone again.
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>>12947903
Yes, especially if done by hand. Then you can make nice arrows and use colours and stuff to describe the properties, for example green or squiggly arrows are injective etc.

>>12947915
He has a million projects going on. None of them is related to me, so there is no point for me to even suggest anything like that. I have 16 months or something left of my funding. Maybe I'll get a thesis done by then, maybe not. I haven't paid anything, so there isn't anything to lose.

>>12947933
No. That will not happen. I may get a fancy hat and a piece of paper, but that's a good point to retire.
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>>12947726
Yeah, he lived, only because it happened while he was running in the college gym.
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>>12947954
You're really just going to let your funding run out? Why aren't you doing everything you can? Can't you meet with him? Just keep talking and try to explain your issues. Can you really not find a different advisor?
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>>12947954
>but that's a good point to retire.
Great. I mean, Academia isn't even that good when you think about it. It's nothing compared to living your life together with your failurebro in the european countryside.
>>
Today I learned hilbert's basis theorem. Later I will prove that artinian rings are exactly noetherian and krill dimension 0.
How long must I play this game until I am no longer a shitter lads
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>>12947999
Krull dimension.
>mobile posting
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>>12947959
Unlucky in a lucky way. Was he old or fat or something when that happened?

>>12947972
I am doing the best I can. My best isn't much, though. Besides, I'm not even after an academic career. I'm just a hobbyist trying to see how far I can get. My advisor is nice. I don't want another.

>>12947973
How about the area around the French and Belgian border? Let's get a farm there and a nice car and drive around the countryside. Maybe a few cows. Or combine Europe with South America and turn it into a capybara farms.

>>12947999
Do you know how the spectrum of a ring works yet? Can you localise? Can you apply Nakayama?
>>
>>12948012
What do you plan on doing for a career then?
>>
>>12947999
Are you studying algebra for algebra's sake or are you going to jump into algebraic geometry?
>>
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>>12948026
ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY. GEOMETLETS GET OUT REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
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>>12948017
No plans. I just know I'm not good suitable for a career in academia. Maybe be a neet and write bad novels to be published by some shady company, maybe return to warehouses to work as an incoming goods inspector. There are lots of options to choose from.

>>12948030
Classic.
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>>12948030
Cope, just use their weapons for your own gain. I really like arithmetic geometry.
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>>12948030
Cope cope cope
Math begins and ends with geometry
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>>12948047
As Bourbaki once said: Structures are the weapons of the mathematician.
>>
>>12948036
Dumb tranny. You have passion. Why not do what you truly want instead of hiding behind excuses like not being suitable for a career in academia? The fuck does that even mean? We all know you want to be create things and share them with others. You are just having a bad day and trying to pretend you don't care. You do. We all know it.
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>>12948012
>How about the area around the French and Belgian border?
Anywhere is fine, as long as it's not too hot. I'll do just like you and continue to see how far I'll get, although I'm pretty sure it won't be very far, at least I'll be able to say in the future that I tried my best at some point. And you know what? These last few days I have really enjoyed studying maths even though I couldn't do a lot of problems, mathematics is really fun even if I know I'll never amount to anything in it, so just learning for fun is fine by me. Let's just live life with no regrets.
>>
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>tfw you realize combinatorics is based
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>>12948079
Never studied it, outside of a few undergrad CS algorithms courses that involved graphs.
What's a good graduate level introduction to the field?
>>
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>>12948069
Fine. I admit I am full of self-hatred. A part of it comes from the fact that I am not good enough to succeed as a mathematician. It's the only thing I have ever been even decent on. No matter how hard I try, I will only be slightly above average. I am a failure and wouldn't be able to work as a real researcher without someone constantly telling me what to do. I'm just a mentally ill freak wasting the oxygen belonging to people worth more than me. Happy now?

>>12948075
That was a sweet post, the ending and you finding a hint of joy in life again. Maths should be done out of one's own volition like that. What have you been studying?
>>
>>12948115
Sounds more like imposter syndrome than anything. You said yourself you'll probably graduate. Then you'll probably find a job as a researcher. Whereas someone like me never even got to graduate school, is too far gone to ever go back and will never even do 2 years of real research in my entire life. Best I can do is just read other people's shit.
>>
>>12947256
Theorem. When a person leaning towards the pessimistic side estimates her own IQ, flip it around the average 100IQ and exchange "at most" for "at least.
You're at least 115IQ.
>>
>>12948115
>What have you been studying?
Galois Theory and Differential Geometry. It's been really fun even though I think I'll fail in at least one of them.
>>
Why is ahlfors so comfy bros
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>>12948126
I wish you could replace me. You may have your vices and you may have done your share of mistakes, but surely you aren't rotten to the core like me. But no one promised life would be fair.

>>12948158
Please don't dualise me! That was a nice theorem, though. Thanks.

>>12948180
Have you gotten past the culture shock of absolutely inhumane notation in diff geo already? It really made me bang my head against a wall just trying to decipher the linear maps between tangent spaces.
>>
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>>12948193
>It really made me bang my head against a wall just trying to decipher the linear maps between tangent spaces.
Yes, that's exactly what's giving me the most trouble right now and the reason why I think I might fail this course. To make things worse, all my friends seem to get those things easily.
>>
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Does anyone have a proof for this? I'm studying group theory on hyperoperations (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperoperation and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperstructure) and I'm looking for a proof that shows that properties are lost as you increase the "level" of your hyperoperation. Kind of like how inverting tetration is difficult.
>>
>>12947855
Hah, I knew you wouldn't stay off here (well, who didn't?). I didn't expect "the other anime poster that isn't that gay math-physicist" to also be huezillian.
By the way, you aren't going to be a better person just by learning what those philosophers have to say, you must fight back procrastination and find a enjoyable practice that can feed you challenging worthy goals.
>>
>>12948209
>worthy goals
Not the person you're replying to, obviously, but what's a worthy goal for a failure that didn't make it and is relegated to being a hobbyist? It feels hopeless to me. I am blessed with lots of free time though.
>>
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>>12948209
I am already a better person just from reading Wittgenstein's biography. He's probably the greatest human being who ever lived.
>must fight back procrastination
I was able to study all day in the last few days, the secret is not turning on the PC or the smartphone first thing in the morning. Pretty simple, but hard to execute.
>>
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>>12948203
You should try them out in some very simple situations probably. Try [math]\mathbb{R}^2, S^2[/math] as your manifolds for starters. That should make things more concrete, and hopefully the low hanging fruits will give you enough sugary power to climb the tree higher. Comparing yourself to others is something that should never be done, but oh boy is it easy... Maybe they get the notation, but you will outsmart them when it comes to de Rham cohomology. Believe in me believing in you.

>>12948218
It may sound new agey and cringey and stuff, but I don't care. I think a worthy goal is for example to simply expand one's understanding on things. It is a consequence of commercialisation that we easily think that studying things is worth it only when it leads to a certificate of some sort that will then open doors to better paying jobs. Sure, the piece of paper helps and is a good motivator for many, but it is not the only reason to keep going. Let brain be your muscle and your favourite chair your gym. Become the Kyriakos Grizzly of soul.
>>
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>>12948095
'enumerative combinatorics' by stanley for general combinatorics (or if you get filtered by that, go to 'a walk through combinatorics' by bona) and 'modern graph theory' by bollobas (go to diestal if you get filtered by bollobas). I'm currently working through pic rel. rn
>>
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>>12948238
Let me rephrase it, you can find value on those books I assume, but it's not going to give you life fulfilment by itself (just reading and understanding). At best, you have to get your hands dirty, apply and keep on going back to what you learned so you can apply better. But anyway, I'm taking your "I just want to" too seriously like an autist.

>the secret is not turning on the PC or the smartphone first thing in the morning
Nice. I've heard specialists talking about the importance of having a "download" free-time right after you wake up, since our brains sort of spends the sleep time cleaning the room from what isn't important etc. Some people meditate first thing in the morning, like for 20 minutes, right after splashing their faces on some water. (I don't meditate but maybe one day...)
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>>12948115
>"I'll admit I am full of self-hatred"
>one sentence later: "I'm not good enough enough to succeed as a mathematician"
Haha, you never change.
What is to succeed as a mathematician, though? Does that mean not being able to add a net positive contribution?
>>
>>12948258
>consequence of commercialisation
It's not the paper or the jobs, I just would like to interact with others in the field rather than working away in isolation. I just would feel better I guess having something published or out there for posterity. Though, I guess there's so much of that already that it's an unrealistic goal. How many PhD theses and papers go unread?
>>
>>12948323
Is there speech to text program/so that can render latex? So say out loud "And we can see MATH integral from x to x to the eight of sin x bar see x bar equals g of x MATH is a function defined in terms of an integration" and then it does it's best to turn the stuff between the MATHs into latex
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>>12948218
Do you want to be a researcher?
Honestly, at this point I think I'd better enjoy doing something like the 3blue1brown guy does.
But if so, I think that trying to do everything as an outsider and remotely is nearly impossible. You have to have a reasonable amount of obsession and passion, intelligence (overrated factor though) and discipline. There are rare cases of people who manage to do it like that.
But it's better to go back to academia in some way, even if you don't get funding. Having in person contact with professsors and colleagues makes too much of a difference. If you talk to a professor and show potential (like doing well on courses or solving entry research level problems).
Just my two cents, though.
>>
>>12948364
I did want to be a researcher. I'm far too old now for that pipe dream. The school I graduated from will let me take graduate courses with permission from the professor. But they wouldn't have time to mentor my research or anything. Also I can attend colloquiums any time I want, and I do already know some of the people that would be there. However, these days I've been thinking of moving out of the city, and that would isolate me more.
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>>12948265
Thanks dude.
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>>12948315
>Haha, you never change.
When you go low enough, you stop devolving.
>What is to succeed as a mathematician, though? Does that mean not being able to add a net positive contribution?
I don't know. I don't care if my name will be carried by any result ever or if I get any prizes or fancy sounding titles. If I just could use my head for producing something that would further the collective understanding of things, and use my hands for sharing those ideas. I'm OK with being just a cog in the big machine, but I fear I have no place in the system. Maybe I'm too small to actually move the bigger cogs, or maybe there is simply no need for any extra piece in the machinery anywhere.

>>12948323
What if you tried independent research on something and then published it on your own webpage? Sharing the link would then spread your result. Of course, one's own homepage is far from a journal, but you would still share your results that way.
>How many PhD theses and papers go unread?
Way too many, thanks to turning academia into a publication factory.
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>>12948384
It's possible. If you show value, a professor will invest even if informally.
Are you past your 40s? 30s?
But do you really want to invest so much time and effort in math? You may have better things to do with your life, something else may catch your interest and bring better opportunities.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amhINnExdJE
>>
>>12948422
>published it on your own webpage
I'll just wind up being the next Tooker, right?
I guess I have the same problem most amateurs have, it's hard to find a problem that's fruitful.
>>12948438
I'm certain it's my main interest, at least being old gives you some wisdom. Anyway, I'm pretty settled and have the time to study on my own. I just have a slight feeling of it being pointless sometimes.
>>
Topological bases arent unique, are minimal bases?
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>>12948472
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRsrDLkACTs

>>12948513
Alternatively, you could try to have someone authenticate you on arxiv, and then you could upload your stuff there. With a suitable choice of genres, it would even show up in my daily email! One problem type an amateur can try to tackle is some explicit computation of something that has not yet been done (but is shown to be computable).
>>
>>12948555
I thought of computational sutff, even contributing to packages that people use with mathematics. It's something I'm considering. I have a friend that has a job outside mathematics and just contributes to the OEIS a lot.
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>>12948555
Ive been spat out of the universe before. Like on a bus in 2018, in upstate new york.
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>>12948422
>When you go low enough, you stop devolving
Underrated style.
It's kinda funny how you go harder on that regard than me and yet you seem to be putting way more good hours than myself lately.
>I'm OK with being just a cog in the big machine
In retorspect, I think we talked about it. I think the same, though I think I can (and, with even more reason, you too) contribute a bit to the big math machine, paying back all the investment with small interest.

>>12948564
How? He generates sequences or what?
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>>12948517
If such a base exists, then you can write every other base as unions of the sets in the minimal one. Suppose you have two minimal bases for a space. Then you can show that they are refinements of one another, and this should prove uniqueness. The big question is existence. That's not guaranteed.

>>12948564
Yes. Computational stuff is also an option. Or both at the same time. By computations, I was thinking about things like (co)homology or homotopy of some space, some group theoretic invariants in some special case etc. There is a program being developed by Chris Parker, a MAGMA code thingy, that computes fusion systems of finite groups. Maybe (if you know programming) try to develop an extension to that, or use it for some explicit computations of saturated fusion systems of some really nasty but important groups. That could be an example of a thing an amateur could very well do.
>>
>>12948596
Just stop being ashamed and embarrased. The past doesnt matter anymore.
>>
>>12948597
>The big question is existence. That's not guaranteed.
Wut? Why not? How about for subbases?
>>
Btw anitranni, you could be a better mathematician if you embraced your schzo side more. Trust me :p>>12948115
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>>12948180
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>>12948608

>fomenko

basiert
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>>12948596
>How?
Well you can contribute in many ways, submitting sequences. Editing existing sequences. It can be as simple as adding code for generating the sequence in a particular language. He's significantly older than me and actually quite good at mathematics despite not being in the field currently (does software stuff). I'm not going to go into his accomplishments but I'm lucky to have had someone like that to talk to.
>>
>>12948597
>existence
Oh I think I haev an exmple. A chain topology on Z, where each int is a section.
>>
>>12948204
Try universal algebra. It's basically what you want. There is a dedicated field of study of hypergroups but they're basically complex algebras in universal algebra and the latter theory is way more mature. Tetration isn't multivalued anyway.
>>
>>12948629
Wait, maybe Im retarded because it morphs with the discrete topo and it is its own minimal basis innit
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>>12948595
I'm not actually even surprised by the uni thing, but why the bus scenario? That's not a place where I would expect too much elitism.

>>12948596
>It's kinda funny how you go harder on that regard than me and yet you seem to be putting way more good hours than myself lately.
A good number of hours, perhaps, but hardly efficient.
>In retorspect, I think we talked about it. I think the same, though I think I can (and, with even more reason, you too) contribute a bit to the big math machine, paying back all the investment with small interest.
Let's make it happen, shall we? Let each of us create a successful version of ourselves as a tulpa, and then have the tulpa replace the original one.

>>12948603
Think about the real line and use open intervals as a base. We can keep removing useless intervals infinitely long without losing the fact that it is still a base for the usual topology. I think the existence of a minimal subbase would imply the existence of a minimal base, so they shouldn't always exist. But this is a bit shaky. I'll outsource checking these to you:
>minimal subbase generates minimal base
>minimal subbases generate the same base
Probably true both of them, but I'll let you do the work.

>>12948606
I don't want to embrace it too much. It would help think outside the box, but it's scary stuff. You know it's not necessarily the most pleasant thing.

>>12948608
Saved.

>>12948629
That should also work, I think.
>>
>>12948647
>bus scenario
Just imagine being 17 and on drugs on a dark highway in the middle of nowhere, watching the movie Into The Void. Lol.

>R1 order topo
Hmm, if you used the discrete topology it could work, but since its continuums, I can see how theres no minimal. Ill try to check your stuff but I kinda have adhd so dont be harsh

>it's scary stuff. You know it's not necessarily the most pleasant thing.
Its scary but it gets you to accept reality for what it is
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Too lazy to lecture today so I scheduled one on ones with all my students to check their progress before the ap exams next month
pic related
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>>12948647
Ok heres my dariing attempt

>minimal subbase generates minimal base
Min subase means all which isnt intrsct and uniond into. Min bas mean no union makes it . From min subase, get intrsc, nothing could union into it bc its less than anything.

>minimal subbases generate the same base
If min subas uniq, intersection is deterministic
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>>12948704
Damn thats cruel. When will you realize that the teacher is the true student, biatch?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Itt0rALeHE8
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>>12948673
>Just imagine being 17 and on drugs on a dark highway in the middle of nowhere, watching the movie Into The Void. Lol.
Drugs do of course make one more of a target for such treatment. Enter the Void is visually ebin, but I like I Stand Alone the most out of Gaspar Noé's films.
>Hmm, if you used the discrete topology it could work, but since its continuums, I can see how theres no minimal. Ill try to check your stuff but I kinda have adhd so dont be harsh
No hurry. I'm pretty sure they both are true. Then obviously the uncertain existence of a minimal base would make the existence of a minimal subbase also uncertain.
>Its scary but it gets you to accept reality for what it is
It just sucks when the ghosts and other apparitions come. My dad's aunt used to channel the dead and other spirits. She could just start talking to them in the middle of an afternoon coffee. I ended up inheriting that ability.

>>12948704
B A S E D

>>12948718
>From min subase, get intrsc, nothing could union into it bc its less than anything.
>If min subas uniq, intersection is deterministic
I'm not completely sure what these mean...
>>
>>12948738
Woah cool, I can talk to spirits too! I didnt finish Enter The Void cause I didnt like the plot, but it was visually cool for sure. I just clicked the vid cause it had colors and the word void and I was on drugs lol.

>From min subase, get intrsc, nothing could union into it bc its less than anything.
The intersection is a subset of either intersectors. So if the intersector is minimal, then surely the subset is too.

>If min subas uniq, intersection is deterministic
Like, we start with minimal subbases, theyre all the same cause its unique. We perform the same actions on them, and since the action of intersection only has one outcome, then fuck it right?
>>
>>12948764
>>12948738
Ol sonf vorsg goho iadbalt lonsh calz vonpho
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>>12948774
Is that lojban? I didnt learn it yet darling. Fck it Ill try.
>>
>>12948774
Nvm nothings coming up, its probably tongues.

Styver dryha, varo net tek el? Kavo neyy, ha fbor svutr
>>
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>>12948774
Tol Cormpt Norz Norz Norz.

>>12948764
>Woah cool, I can talk to spirits too! I didnt finish Enter The Void cause I didnt like the plot, but it was visually cool for sure. I just clicked the vid cause it had colors and the word void and I was on drugs lol.
Yeah, the movie isn't that good itself. The appeal of its colour scheme and stuff while on drugs is pretty obvious, for sure. I recommend I Stand Alone, though. Rather that than talking to spirits too much...
>The intersection is a subset of either intersectors. So if the intersector is minimal, then surely the subset is too.
Yes yes, I see. I think you can actually do the following: Suppose a minimal subbase exists, so that it gives you some base. If this base is not minimal, the subbase contains sets which we don't need in order to get the topology of our space. Remove those and obtain a subbase smaller than the minimal one, an absurdity. Therefore, a minimal subbase generates a minimal base. Then any two will definitely generate the same base. You can then probably do some proper argument which will show that any two subbases have to be the same because they will give the same intersections.
>>
>>12948832
I feel like youre using exvessivbe logic. It could just befewer stsp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TKb8RCka70
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>>12948633
Yes, thanks anon!
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>>12948673
>Into The Void
Are we talking about the climbing movie? Or Enter the Void?
>>
>>12944360
>>12944400
further thought into this, we require that the limits are finite
consider f = x^2 and g = x^3(x<0), -x(x>0)
then f+g
for -inf, x^3+x^2 -> -inf
for +inf, x^2-x -> +inf
>>
Hebrew Vikings (Tengri)
>>
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>he doesn't have am ex libris in his books
ngmi fampai
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>>12948880
I don't know. Maybe.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtX2HPBMcsQ
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>>12949224
I juss made ramen. So hmm, an anime song?!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdxaNeRn1GA
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>>12949181
that's the lamest exlibris I've seen
you've got some nerve to boast with that
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>>12949266
What kind of Ramen? And what mathematical problems will you do with the energy?
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>>12949340
Fine quality noodles, steak n egg n veg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRzlbh4or3c
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>>12949345
Oh OK, I usually make shio ramen. Probably gonna get a heart attack with the chicken stock/fat/salt. This place is slow today, might actually have to study some mathematics instead.
>>
>>12943915
Is a 1 dimensional change of a variable a line integral?
>>
>>12949377
Nah just exercise. Math problems in between pushups and jumping jax
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>>12949387
I dont really know what this means at all but ti sounds beautiful
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>>12949390
Already do. Got lots of exercise equipment since I stay home all the time now.
It actually helps clear the mind and I feel like I do better with problems somehow.
>>
Sleppy
>>
>>12949387
yes. you can compute [math]\int_a^bf(x) \, \mathrm{d}x[/math] as a line integral of [math]\omega = f(x) \mathrm{d}x[/math]. parametrize [math][a,b][/math] by some [math]x\colon [t_0,t_1] \to [a,b][/math] and then the line integral is by definition [math]\int_{t_0}^{t_1} f(x(t))\frac{\mathrm{d}x}{\mathrm{d}t}\, \mathrm{d}t[/math], which is exactly the original integral by change of variables. note that you can't use this to "prove" the change of variables, because the definition of a line integral already assumes it (you need it to justify independence of parametrization).
>>
>>12949446
Thats barely a line integral though, whats the point?
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>>12949446
So, in a change of variable, the function must be 1 to 1, but with a line integral it doesn't matter. Is a change of variable just a special case of the line integral?
>you need it to justify independence of parametrization
What you mean?
>>
I have no intent to transition but I do consider myself a hellin valid enbie. So you guys shouod stop bullying my friend anitrani
>>
>>12949446
Why do you differentiate it dx/dt? Couldnt you just calculate the new bounds and swap the variable? Makes sense in 1D but is it less straightforward in higher D?
>>
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https://sites.google.com/view/hhs2021-seminar

>>12949266
Did you make good ramen?

>>12949331
This, but unironically. He even has a working class name (literally). Prole af.

>>12949508
<3
>>
>>12949491
there's no point, he asked a question, I answered

>>12949502
the change of variables formula (as a theorem) is a special case of the theorem that a line integral doesn't depend on the parametrization of the oriented curve over which you integrate

>>12949580
>Why do you differentiate it dx/dt?
definition of line integral
>Couldnt you just calculate the new bounds and swap the variable?
no
>Makes sense in 1D but is it less straightforward in higher D?
no
>>
>>12949637
>>Couldnt you just calculate the new bounds and swap the variable?
>no
Why not? Changing variables in r1 at least, just stretches the function in weird ways. But as long as you get the right start and end, summing over t hits all the values. Do nonlinear stretches matter?
>>
>>12949686
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integration_by_substitution
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>>12949712
Nice cop out answer with non symbographic weak arca, nerd
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>>12949749
seething
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>>12949686
The function will sweep every value but the rectangles will be smaller because the width of the variable will be smaller you can easily visulaise this if you imagine a simple substitution of 2x or whatever.
the dx/dt adjusts for the stretching of the line.
>>
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What are some good books typeset like this?
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>>12949904
There are a lot of them, you'll encounter them quite often eventually.
>>
>>12949904
Lots of older books from Springer's Lecture Notes in Mathematics series. The one I liked that used to be typeset this way but got a new edition recently (thankfully) is Number Fields by Marcus.
>>
>>12949947
Marcus who?
>>
>>12949958
Daniel A. Marcus. "Number Fields", it was written in the 70s so used a typewriter typesetting like that, which made it annoying but it was a good book anyway. In 2018 they finally released a new version.
>>
>>12949904
"Lectures on n-dimensional quasiconformal mappings" by Väisälä
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>>12949992
>Springer's Lecture Notes in Mathematics
Haha, I called it. That series has a lot of good books.
>>
>>12949992
basde :DDDDDD
>>
ded discipline = ded thred
>>
>>12950378
We can't be awake 24/7.
>>
>>12950386
what about eurobros? are they too dumb for mathematics?
>>
Can somebody give me a quick example of a differentiable function over R where the derivative is multivalued?
>>
>>12950393
There have been no major mathematical development outside of Europe.
>>
>>12950401
then why aren't they posting? it should be peak shitposting hours in europe right now
>>
I'm in the US and currently enrolled in a CS program and will earn my math minor after this semester. This included calculus, linear algebra and a discrete math course.
I'd really like to pursue an applied math masters. What courses/subjects/texts would prepare me?
>>
>>12950422
What do you want to apply the mathematics to? CS? Or something else?
>>
>>12950410
It's 8am in Europe right now.
>>
>>12950433
based time traveller
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>>12950435
Dumb american.
>>
>>12950400
There are none. The FToC requires the derivative to be injective.
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>>12950438
i'm in europe and it's 5pm right now, what are you on about?
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>>12950444
Just messing with ya, dumb american.
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>>12950452
this is further evidence that only the mentally deranged study mathematics
>>
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>>12950410
I was taking a nap.

>>12949992
Ebin :DD
>>
>>12950440
Why?
>>
The next three days will be hell for me. Wish me luck, if I managed to defeated the demons there I might reach Paradise afterwards.
>>
>>12950432
Optimization, linear programming, operations research.
>>
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>>12950529
Make your ancestors proud, anon. Alternatively, fail me and I will make a jacket for myself out of your skin. You can do it!
>>
How do I prove that pic related is differentiable?
>>
What the FUCK does diagonalization mean? It's just a matrix of eigenvalues isn't it
>>
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>>12948608
Can I ask you to do a math edit for this
ODE book by Arnold because he's my favorite onegaishimasu anon
>>
Why do functionals only take the first derivatives? do higher derivatives not conatin information?
>>
>>12950719
Diagonalization is about finding base vectors for which it's extremely easy to describe what your matrix does. If you have a 3 by 3 matrix and you find three independent eigenvectors for it, then you will have a base of eigenvectors for R^3. Every vector in R^3 is thus a linear combination of eigenvectors, and when your matrix acts upon those eigenvectors, it merely scales them. So take any vector, transform it to eigenvector coordinates, then your matrix just scales all of those coordinates (which is multiplication by a diagonal matrix), and finally transform back to your "original" coordinates.
>>
>>12950709
differentiate it!
>>12950719
watch 3 blue 1 brown
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>>12950749
What makes you think finding the min/max of a functional only requires the first derivative?
>>
>>12947632
>Data science/ML
So not math. You're just using the degree to meet the qualifications, then you're just doing computer science.
>>
>>12950759
because the always write them as F(t,f(t),f'(t))
>>
>>12948030
>number theorists continue to seethe
BASED TOPOLOGISTS
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>>12950778
Can you explain what this is about?
>>
>>12950719
expressing a linear map in a basis of eigenvectors
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>>12950760
Depends on what you're doing. I would agree with you for most of those jobs, but ML research in particular can get pretty math heavy. Off the top of my head some popular methods that are math heavy are SVMs, Gaussian processes and Wasserstein GANs.
It's entirely possible to do research with weak math skills (especially if you do deep learning), but it's pretty limiting.
>>
>>12950770
Because you are trying to find solutions to a variational problem so you only need terms upto the first derivative to write the description of the system, ie how the parameters vary. Also remember that once apply something like Euler-Lagrange the solutions will in general be second-order differential equations.
>>
>>12950785
It's about the consistent inferiority complex that makes someone want to enter number theory.
>>
>>12950749
In calculus of variations, the variational derivative is the necessary condition for extrema. The sufficient conditions known for minima and maxima are not determined by variational derivatives. i.e. the second variation does not follow from successive applications of the Euler Operator.
>>
>>12950811
>Because you are trying to find solutions to a variational problem so you only need terms upto the first derivative to write the description of the system
No. You need the first variation for the necessary condition. Then you need higher order variations which are not related to the first variation through consecutive variational derivatives to calculate the sufficient conditions for maxima or minima. You need terms involving at least the second derivatives of the integrand to determine minima or maxima.
>Also remember that once apply something like Euler-Lagrange the solutions will in general be second-order differential equations.
No. See
[math] L = F(x, y, y', y'') dx [/math]
The Euler operator acting on L gives you a fourth order differential equation when restricted to sections. Moreover, the general Lagrangian
[math] L = F\Omega [/math]
when restricted to canonical sections of the respective jet bundle has an order twice the maximum order of the terms found in F. For example on sections the variational derivative of
[math] L = F(x,y,y',...,y^{(n)})dx [/math]
is given by
[math] E(F) = F_y + \Sigma_k^n(-1)^k (D_x)^k F_{y^{(k)}} [/math]
which is an ODE of order 2n in general.
>>
>>12950709
Take an arbitrary curve. Differentiate along the curve and show that the derivative exists. The condition is equivalent to showing that all partial derivatives exist.
>>
new thread?
>>
>>12950983
and yet it's not equivalent to differentiability
>>
>>12950719
For you matrix [math] M\in Mat(n,n) [/math], if you can find a complete eigenbasis, that is you can find exactly n-independent eigenvectors, you write [math] P = ( e_1 ... e_n) [/math] and you calculate [math] D=P^{-1} M P [/math], D is a diagonalization of M. D is a diagonal matrix who's entries are M's eigenvalues.
>>
>>12950997
Differentiability in at a point [math] x \in \mathbb{R}^n [/math] is equivalent to showing that all partials exist in a neighborhood [math] U [/math] of [math] x [/math] and are continuous at [math] x [/math]. So if you want to show differentiability in [math] \mathbb{R}^n [/math], you only need to show that derivatives exist in a neighborhood of an arbitrary point and the derivatives are continuous at the point.
>>
How would I go about finding inflection points of some function (and where it's concave and convex) without calculating the second derivative?
Is there any rigorous way of doing it, or should I do some mumbo-jumbo with asymptotes and guessing the bounds?
>>
>>12951001
this is true, but imo it's not an explanation that's going to help someone who has trouble with the concept of diagonalization out
>>
>>12951028
If your curve is defined between two points and your curve is monotone between those two points, then draw a line from the initial point to the final point. If the line intersects the curve at a point between the two endpoints, then that point is an inflection point. You can test it out. See if it works.
>>
>>12951027
>continuous
that's what you were missing
>>
>>12951039
that's not true
>>
>>12951077
>>12951077
>>12951077
>>
Any grad students with some personal advice about going to grad school? I know there's a few recourses online that I have read that are useful, but I haven't talked to any grad students on the inside.
>>
>>12950760
holy fuck how are the people on this forum so dense.
Of course no one is going to pay you to prove convergence theorems.
>>
>>12951328
Only a first year, so I can't say much to you but I can relay advice I've been given.

> Don't go to a grad school outside of the top 50.

You will at best end up adjuncting or being an internal hire.

> Pass your quals asap

To do this, take qual courses at your current uni so you can pass them in your first semester. This is what I did. You basically buy yourself a couple of years to study whatever you want and make connections throughout the department. If you don't take them in undergrad, then be prepared to ONLY think about algebra and analysis for your first year.
>>
>>12950969
I stand corrected.
>>
>>12951407
I heard similar things. About not going to sub top 50 programs. The only place I have been admitted to was outside of that range. But if my goal isn't really to stay in academia, it should be a fine choice career wise? I know at the very least I want to be at the capacity to do research in math. But I really started to think if mediocre pay would make it worth it. I've really been thinking about switching to finance after the PhD if research doesn't pan out all that well. As for the quals, I've taken AlgTop and DiffTop. But thanks for the advice on passing for the purpose of networking. It seems sensible to do something like that.
>>
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>>12950748
Not the guy you are replying to but something like this? If not, sorry.
>>
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>>12950748
really bad at this but here, another one.
>>
test

[math]\begin{bmatrix} a & b\\c & d \end{bmatrix}[/math]

[math]\begin{matrix} a & b\\c & d \end{matrix}[/math]

[math]\begin{bmatrix}a & b\\c & d\end{bmatrix}[/math]

[math]\begin{matrix}a & b\\c & d\end{matrix}[/math]
>>
>>12951783
>>12951772
BASED, thank you
>>
>>12951884
[math]G_n = \left\{ \begin{matrix}a & b\\c & d\end{matrix} \right[/math]
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>>12951911
[math]G_n = \left\{ \begin{matrix}a & b\\c & d\end{matrix}[/math]
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>>12951918
[math]G_n = \left\{ \begin{matrix}a & b\\c & d\end{matrix} \right\} [/math]
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>>12951929
[math]G_n = \left\{ \begin{matrix} 3\uparrow \uparrow \uparrow \uparrow3, & n=1\\ 3 \uparrow^{G_{n-1}}3, & n\geq2, n\in \mathbb{N} \end{matrix} \right/}[/math]
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>>12951946
[math]G_n = \left\{ \begin{matrix} 3\uparrow \uparrow \uparrow \uparrow3, & n=1\\ 3 \uparrow^{G_{n-1}}3, & n\geq2, n\in \mathbb{N} \end{matrix} \right\}[/math]
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>>12947473
>But actually now that I was a stupid crybaby bitch... I think I may have it
I hope you got it anon! Most of the time the answer comes when you're not actively thinking about it, you may have issues handling burnout. Sometimes you have to walk out, whether or not you want it or not. I genuinely hope you got to take a walk, it's good for the mind even if though the more 'results-oriented' person would call it 'unproductive' and a 'waste of time', arguably hitting at a wall for 6 hours is just as much of a waste of time.
>Sorry for a moment of weakness.
Why apologize? We all have these moments silly.
>It will happen again, but hopefully not too soon.
It will. The only thing you can change is how you approach it, and it seems like you're already planning on just breaking down. To be fair it's hard to not default towards that, I do it all the time, but small steps, right? Next time, go and actually cry and take a break. You deserve it. Even if you probably don't believe you do.
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>>12952318
>I hope you got it anon!
Sadly I did. I wanted to have a inexact chain complex and let that desire guide myself. Then I realised it is actually exact, blew the whole thing up and ended up getting yet another example of a dumb type of homology being trivial. Sure, it worked, but too nicely.
>Most of the time the answer comes when you're not actively thinking about it, you may have issues handling burnout. Sometimes you have to walk out, whether or not you want it or not. I genuinely hope you got to take a walk, it's good for the mind even if though the more 'results-oriented' person would call it 'unproductive' and a 'waste of time', arguably hitting at a wall for 6 hours is just as much of a waste of time.
I actually fell asleep before getting to go to the walk... Then I woke up, got myself a Monster and some sparkling water from the store to get some fresh air. I agree with the walk thing. It is just too easy to condemn it as waste of time and stay home feeling useless. Did you take a walk?
>Why apologize? We all have these moments silly.
Probably upbringing stuff. Never show weakness etc. t. dad
>It will. The only thing you can change is how you approach it, and it seems like you're already planning on just breaking down. To be fair it's hard to not default towards that, I do it all the time, but small steps, right? Next time, go and actually cry and take a break. You deserve it. Even if you probably don't believe you do.
I wish I could cry for myself, but for some reason I can only do that for others or when being touched by some movie or stuff. I'm not choosing to be hopeless. It's just all the negativity radiating from all directions, inside and outside. It's hard to believe there is any point in going on sometimes, but what else can we do? Let us both try to stay even a little bit intact, shall we? No breaking down. Not yet. I actually kept the rest of the evening off by starting a new game in Pokémon.
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>>12952420
>Sure, it worked, but too nicely.
It seems like anon really likes a challenge! Although it does seem like it was a bit disappointing but that's how it is with life right? I think that as long as you made personal progress, be it methodology, a little more intuitive understanding of the process, or whatever it may be, then that'll at least make it somewhat rewarding! When learning and doing problems, don't forget about (You).
>I actually fell asleep before getting to go to the walk... stay home feeling useless.
Cute! I don't think you should feel useless though (or at least feel bad about it), it feels as if you're attributing a lot of blame to yourself, maybe it is, maybe it isn't, but covid certainly played a large part in that.
>Probably upbringing stuff. Never show weakness etc. t. dad
Parents tend to forget that they create many of the issues a child will 'manifest' later down the line, be it indirectly or directly. Anon, promise me you'll get some mental health help yeah? It seems like you're on a pretty sad and lonely path. I hope you didn't get that healthy dose of toxic masculinity growing up where crying and letting your emotions out is a display of weakness :)
>It's just all the negativity radiating from all directions, inside and outside.
Alas, here's where I would tell you to get out, but that's not possible! It's hard to make progress and be more optimistic when the environment around you is always dragging you back. You seem to be holding on though, stay strong anon.
>I actually kept the rest of the evening off by starting a new game in Pokémon.
As long as it makes you happy, I hope you're not doing it just because you had nothing to do.
Stay strong anon! Or complain about it here, at least I'll read it.
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>>12952520
>It seems...
It's not the challenge itself, but, you know, develop a tool to measure deficits and end up having 0 every time you use it... Seems like a broken measuring device in that light (luckily it works at least in one situation for sure). The methods were probably good as a warm up for the next attempts. At least everything was also consistent with my own results. I had the existence condition for a required construction, I knew it was satisfied, and finally I managed to construct it. A disappointment, but no negative surprises.
>Cute...
I don't know about cute, since I tend to drool a lot while sleeping (eww)... Not getting to go to the office where there would be the atmosphere of doing things, but to be stuck home. It really affects my ability to concentrate, and I know I'm not the only one. Then the unproductive periods feel like they last forever, and it hurts.
>Parents...
Yeah, although I can understand why a father would try to raise his son to be a proper man. It's just what this "proper man" means that leads to different results. I get help/"help" already. I did get that kind of toxic masculinity upbringing stuff, yeah. Thanks for your concern.
>Alas...
The only way to survive is to try stay strong. Relying on others is easy, but the others are not necessarily eternal.
>As long...
It's something I wanted to do for ages, but felt like it was wrong to waste time on it. But at the same time it was because I had nothing else to do. You stay strong, too! I hope you drank your milk because life is all about banging your head against the brick wall and hoping it breaks before your skull does.
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>>12952615
>I can understand why a father would try to raise his son to be a proper man
Imagine the disappointment when you try your best and your son thinks he is some anime girl.
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>>12952615
>The only way to survive is to try stay strong. Relying on others is easy, but the others are not necessarily eternal.
Isn't that more reason to rely on others while you still can? There's a difference between getting aid and getting pampered to the point where it leads you down the wrong path, anon.
>Not getting to go to the office where there would be the atmosphere of doing things, but to be stuck home. It really affects my ability to concentrate, and I know I'm not the only one. Then the unproductive periods feel like they last forever, and it hurts.
More reasons you should go outside! Either that or stuff that can help you get 'sharper' other than doing math. But I get it, I get how insufferable it is. Especially when you're at home with family or others who are really distracting. I'm in the same spot and I can only laugh it off but I am at the point of breaking down.
>But at the same time it was because I had nothing else to do.
More reason to find an proper hobby, it's all about discovering and trying new things anon.
>although I can understand why a father would try to raise his son to be a proper man.
There are proper ways of doing so, perhaps his wasn't-- who knows, I'm not you. I hope you talk about it with the "help" though.
>I get help/"help" already.
Keep at it! I hope it's actually useful though, sometimes there's an issue with compatibility.
> drank your milk
lactose intolerant
>I don't know about cute, since I tend to drool a lot while sleeping (eww)...
Cute cute cute!
And also stop with all of these dangerous metaphors! I'm going to throw you in a bed and force you to take a proper rest!
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>>12952656
>Isn't that more reason to rely on others while you still can? There's a difference between getting aid and getting pampered to the point where it leads you down the wrong path, anon.
I don't know. Maybe. Everyone has their own worries, so I don't want to burden them with my nonsense.
>More reasons you should go outside! Either that or stuff that can help you get 'sharper' other than doing math. But I get it, I get how insufferable it is. Especially when you're at home with family or others who are really distracting. I'm in the same spot and I can only laugh it off but I am at the point of breaking down.
Yeah... If you just can. I recommend moving to a place of your own. Much less disturbance that way. It is one of the good things in living alone.
>More reason to find an proper hobby, it's all about discovering and trying new things anon.
If only there was something to be interested in...
>There are proper ways of doing so, perhaps his wasn't-- who knows, I'm not you. I hope you talk about it with the "help" though.
Not too much. But I get my prescriptions and injections and stuff without having to try get them illegally online. High on E, baby...
>Keep at it! I hope it's actually useful though, sometimes there's an issue with compatibility.
I don't know if it is actually a good thing to play along when a mentally ill patient comes in, says factually incorrect stuff he thinks is true, and the doctor then pats his head and says "good girl, I'll sign this paper and you go to the pharmacy after we are done". But it makes life a bit less painful.
>lactose intolerant
Based same.
>Cute cute cute!
Absolutely not... Just imagine the stains on the pillow after falling asleep by accident, drooling all over it and then rubbing your face on it. Then it's full of mixture of saliva and warpaint.
>And also stop with all of these dangerous metaphors! I'm going to throw you in a bed and force you to take a proper rest!
The solace of rest is not for those seeking answers.
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>>12952724
>so I don't want to burden them with my nonsense.
Maybe the first thing you should work on is not trivializing your issues...
>If only there was something to be interested in...
Doesn't sound like you tried... Probably related to the covid where you also can't try out most of the physical things and the feeling of uselessness is overwhelming. Kinda takes someone who's in the right spot to push you out of it during a time like this.
>Not too much. But I get my prescriptions and injections and stuff without having to try get them illegally online. High on E, baby...
W-wait we're both talking about a therapist right?
>the doctor then pats his head and says "good girl, I'll sign this paper and you go to the pharmacy after we are done".
Sounds like a psychiatrist and not a therapist anon. One gives you meds, the other works on (you).
>The solace of rest is not for those seeking answers.
i d i o t
How can you search for answers when you haven't had proper rest? And when you do, would you even be able to catch it if you're in this state?
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>>12952754
>Maybe the first thing you should work on is not trivializing your issues...
Maybe. It's just hard to take them seriously when you constantly read everywhere that you are just a crazy pervert and vain and stuff.
>Doesn't sound like you tried... Probably related to the covid where you also can't try out most of the physical things and the feeling of uselessness is overwhelming. Kinda takes someone who's in the right spot to push you out of it during a time like this.
I actually have. I have tried to draw, learn how to play the recorder, make bad music with FL Studio, read, write, and so on. The next thing on the trying list is to start sewing stuffed animals.
>W-wait we're both talking about a therapist right?
Sort of. I need to go tell them how I hate every single aspect of my existence as a physical entity. At the same time I can tell how I hate this and that in my life. The main thing is to get the meds afterwards.
>Sounds like a psychiatrist and not a therapist anon. One gives you meds, the other works on (you).
I see both.
>How can you search for answers when you haven't had proper rest? And when you do, would you even be able to catch it if you're in this state?
I don't know. I really don't. I appreciate your concerns, but I don't think /mg/ is the right place for this stuff. You are nice, but I'm not in the mood to think about how non-existent my life control is. Sorry.
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>>12952821
you may be amab but you are a real woman to me :)
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>>12952861
Thanks.
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>>12952821
Sorry if I evoked bad feelings/memories anon, wasn't my intention...
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>>12952887
Don't worry, you didn't. They are just things that I don't want to think about right now, and also things that I doubt the fine co-posters of ours couldn't care the less to read about.
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>>12952907
Hmmm? I'm new here!
I've only been here for a week.
yoroshiku onegaishimasu, senpai.
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>>12952911
then you should be told that you have just talked to the anime tranny, our own queen of algebra
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>>12952911
In that case, I bid you welcome. I hope you don't do CT as your specialty, or the big analysis boys will rip you to pieces when they find out.

>>12952947
Anon, please. No cults of personality.
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>>12952947
W-woah algebra? Sasuga...
Also heh, tranny, I live in a city full of trannies so I accept them by default!
>>12952959
Computed Tomography?
I just want to get into real analysis but I'm being FILTERED by LINEAR ALGEBRA REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
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>>12952976
>Computed Tomography?
I mean categories. They are magical things and it is easy to give too much of yourself to dark forces when you use them. Some lose their souls completely.
>I just want to get into real analysis but I'm being FILTERED by LINEAR ALGEBRA REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
Don't get filtered too badly. A lot of analysis requires knowing at least the basics of linear algebra. But you will make it, just work hard!
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>>12952998
>Don't get filtered too badly.
Oh it's just because I didn't open myself up for concepts when I should've. Now I'm suffering it for it.
Alas, c'est la vie, or whatever it's called.
Stay safe anon, please treat me well!
Also, seriously, take a break idiot.
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>>12953036
Lucky for you, it's the early stuff you are suffering with. You can still fix the situation within a reasonable time. You also learned your lesson by seeing in practice what that kind of negligence can do to a student. If I keep my weekend off, will you use it for getting the concepts inside your skull? Hopefully so, since I am definitely going to have a few days of break.



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