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How come pigeons and dogs aren't afraid of humans?
Is there a lack of fear of human gene?
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>>11855842
kys
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>>11855842
Pigeons are afraid of humans all the time, what are you talking about.
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>>11855846
I've had pigeons walk around me like it was nothing. Can't say the same about other birds.
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>>11855851
They're used to being fed by humans then
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>>11855855
What do you mean "used to"? I thought Non-human animals can't change their behavior and whatever they get out of their genes is set in stone?
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>>11855842
I think this is the dumbest thread on the board right now.

FWIW I'll try to track the dumbest thread on this board forever and bump only those. I encourage anyone reading this to do the same.
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>>11855873
>Non-human animals can't change their behavior
They can absolutely change their behavior. A bird that spends its life associating those weird featherless bipeds with free breadcrumbs is going to be a lot friendlier with humans than one from the wild.
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>>11855873
Are you retarded.
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why dont you just ask one of the pidgeons?, they can talk you know, im sure one would be happy to tell you.
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>>11855851
The crows in the park near me do that too. Birds are smart and learn these things. It's not innate.
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>>11855842
>dogs
Dogs grew up among humans.
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Now to be fair, it is possible for genetic traits to have a strong influence on how friendly an animal is around people. The Russian fox domestication experiment would be big example of this; through selective breeding researchers created foxes that are predisposed to be friendly to people. There is also a similar selection pressure occurring to urban pigeons & dogs, though not as rigorously of course. The animals own ability to learn how to interact with people also plays a role; this ability to learn that is also being selected for in animals that live around humans.
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>>11855873
literally every single animal can be domesticated if you raise it since its breath or feed it and establish a friendly relationship later on
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>>11855842
City pigeons were originally domesticated birds that became feral. It shouldn't be too hard to tame them.
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>>11859250
>snakes
>honey badgers
>insects
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>>11855846
Compare them with crows. At least in my town, crows fly away if you stare at them from 10 meters far
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>>11855842
Dogs because they're specifically bred to be able to bond with humans. Pigeons because they live in cities and being conditioned to a city environment makes them grow accustomed to being around humans. Comparing a species that's common in both the city and the country like squirrels is a huge difference. Squirrels from my homeland will run when you get within 10-20 feet of them, whereas squirrels in the city will almost let you touch them.
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pigeons are simply too fucking stupid and they still are afraid of humans

woofers have been selected for treating humans as basically members of their own species for thousands of years
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>>11859549
reptiles are retarded (you can still kinda bond with them, but not on the level of a dog)
There are videos with people with honey badgers as pets and they don't harm or are afraid of them even though they still dont give a fuck
Insects don't count brah



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