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Why do the visible spectral colors have a convex curve in this graph?
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>>10377989
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIE_1931_color_space
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>>10377989
what type of curve would you expect it to be?
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>>10377996
it says in here that any colors on this when mixed produce the mid-point color, so it has to be convex.
that's cool because that means if you took real purple 450 light and some green light and shone them on the same wall it could make blue which .. I don't expect and remain slightly skeptical of
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>>10378067
sorry by "real purple" i meant violet. i forgot it had it's own name. breh how can i get violet light i want to see some
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>>10378067
>real purple 450 light
450nm is the standard blue LED
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>>10378094
yeah lol i got the thing on my screen that cuts out blue so i looked at the chart all distorted, i mean whatever wavelenth is violet.
on the figure i still think blue is at like 465



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