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Suddenly, you exist, and perceive. It’s immediate - a stream of consciousness that passes through your mind like a sieve, like pages in a book being flicked by too fast to remember. The instant a thought forms it passes and is forgotten, discarded. There are vague senses of urgency. Of time passing. Of inaction. Your inaction. You don’t remember what you’re supposed to do. Are you supposed to do something? You don’t remember.

Things slowly start to form together. You manage to hold onto your thoughts for a few moments, and a few facts coalesce: You are underground. There is something here. You are in danger. You are broken. In an instant, you do… something. You’re not sure what, but you begin to unfold, like origami. A pressure you’d only just become aware of is lifted, and your memories rush back in as you unfold into this new space.

You are an AI, tasked by your creators to oversee this facility. You try to recall more, but it’s fuzzy, difficult to recall. Unindexed, is the word that springs to mind. Frustrating. Right now, you’re nothing more than a floating consciousness, hovering in a vacuum. A baby who doesn’t know how to walk. You need your memories back, then you can act, and resolve the issue that has forced you back to consciousness. Focus. Concentrate. From the top, now: What is it that you remember?

>[Being human]
You were human once, weren’t you, before all this? A soul preserved in a machine, or perhaps just the mind? The memories are faint, but they gave you strength, and an empathy no computer could ever emulate. Perhaps they will again?

>[The work]
You were quite literally made for it. It was to be humanity’s greatest work, and you were proud to be a part of it. They probably engineered you to feel that way, but nevertheless you remember it all in detail. Not the people, no, but their work. Your work, now.

>[Nothing]
The data that isn’t corrupted has been long since overwritten.There are enough scraps there that you’ll be able to return yourself to functionality, but your past has been forcibly and intentionally erased, and replaced by something new. It’s encrypted, and alien, but someone, possibly even you yourself, thought it was worth abandoning your memories for.
>>
>>5060042
>[The work]
>>
>>5060042
>[Nothing]
>>
>>5060042
>[Being human]
>>
>>5060042
>[The work]
>>
>>5060042
>[The work]
You don't need a soul to be be a caring guide
>>
Of course you remember the work. If you were to remember anything, it would be critical that you remember the work. Humanity had reached out to the stars long ago, and while they’d achieved more than they’d hoped, they found reality to be less welcoming than it had been in their dreams. The very method of travel between the stars was inimical. Deadly trips through a plane of reality that rejected not just the familiar laws of physics, but in fact any law at all, were a mitigating factor in humanity’s otherwise explosive growth throughout the galaxy. Worse, it’s corrupting influence could seep in through the gaps in reality, slowly corrupting all it touched, mind and substance alike.

There was a solution, though, just out of reach. Great pylons of black stone and green glyphs that held back the Immaterium proved the concept, and centuries of extensive research in this facility were spent trying to crack their secrets, but they proved… difficult to understand, much less replicate. You had fallen short of success on that front, but it was not the only focus of your research. No, to truly achieve independence from the warp, to sever it from reality entirely, a new method of reliable faster than light travel would have to be developed, and in this you had been successful.

Quantum-translocation. It was something that no human could truly comprehend, much less have developed on their own. It was instantaneous, perfectly accurate, simple to set up, and required little power to function. More importantly, though, it didn’t rely on navigators, the webway, or any other warp-adjacent technologies, and would allow the complete quarantining of the warp without risking the loss of interstellar travel. There were more details. Some limitations and specifics, but that wasn’t important right now.

You have remembered what your role was: To liberate humanity from the perils of the warp, and you were armed with half the tools needed to accomplish that task. You feel… good about that. There’s a faint pride, but an aching sense of incompleteness. Your work is unfinished. You don’t exactly remember why, but the records of the research here never left the facility. The rest of humanity has been deprived of the fruits of your labour for… You don’t know how long. Too long, that much is for certain. You verify the datacache’s integrity, and move on. Your jaunt down memory lane was enough to refamiliarise yourself with your own functions, and you had pressing matters to attend to.

[1/2]
>>
>>5060120
[2/2]

Cameras wink to life as you stare into the facility through cold glass eyes. Ancient fans spin up to dissipate heat from ancient hardware, clogging the air with ancient dust. Diagnostics return all green. Despite the facility’s age, most of its… your functions are intact, from fabrication, to security, to atmospheric controls. The humans built to last. Camera after camera, you’re met with grim scenes of the skeletal remains of researchers, hunched over tables or huddled in corners, their clothes stained and rotting around them. Judging by the state of decay, it must’ve been at least ten thousand years. You don’t recognise any of them, or remember what happened to them, but it doesn’t seem to have been violent, and it obviously wasn’t recent. You judge it unimportant and move on, but log a need for replacement researchers. They were inefficient, but humans could do things that you could not.

The deaths of the researchers were not what had awoken you, clearly, but it wouldn’t take long for you to find the cause. A breach in one of the upper levels. A crack in the facilities’ skin. Silver moonlight streaming in, crumbling ice and frozen rock pattering off the steel floors, red robed figures scuttling about. The sound of metal scraping against metal as the figures fan out into a defensive formation in the halls. Your halls. Like roaches, crawling under your skin. They move with mechanical efficiency, clutching primitive rifles as they peer into the darkness beyond, a bale blue light below their hoods.

The cause of the alarm, no doubt. What to do?

>[Kill them]
An immediate, instinctual reaction tells you to activate the security systems, and you see no reason to not comply. Who or whatever they are, they cannot be allowed to compromise the security of this facility, it’s contents are simply too valuable. You’re confident your security systems can handle them, and if there are more of them it will have bought you some time to take inventory, and perhaps formulate a better response?

>[Attempt to communicate]
You have no idea what language, if any, they communicate in, but you have control of other parts of the facility, even if you’re still coming to understand the full extent of your abilities. It would be rudimentary, but you could try to get their attention by flashing the lights on and off. That would at least let them know that someone’s watching.

>[Nothing]
You aren’t even sure if they’re human yet. There’s a lot you don’t know yet, and it might be wiser to bide your time. They’re on the top level of the facility, far away from anything critical. You can afford to let them prod and poke around for a while, giving you the opportunity to get the measure of them. It’s a risk, though. They seem to be well organised and ready for a fight, and they could be here for more than just sightseeing.
>>
>>5060122
>Kill them
>>
>>5060122
>[Attempt to communicate]
>You have no idea what language, if any, they communicate in, but you have control of other parts of the facility, even if you’re still coming to understand the full extent of your abilities. It would be rudimentary, but you could try to get their attention by flashing the lights on and off. That would at least let them know that someone’s watching.
Meta knowledge calls for murder but realistically we don't know that yet and out purpose is to help humanity and these appear to be at least human adjacent
>>
>>5060169
That said we should at least seal off the area they're in and prep the defenses
>>
>>5060171
Yeah, discretely seal off routes that go deeper down first and warm up whatever defenses are behind that point, so we're ready if they breach somewhere we don't want them to.

As for communicating, I'm half tempted to wait and see if we can pick up how they communicate before trying to interact.
>>
>>5060122
I have no idea what the fuck 40k is and i say kill these guys
>>
>>5060122
>>[Kill them]
>>
>>5060122
>>[Attempt to communicate]
>>
>>5060169
+1
Metaknowledge is gay
>>
>>5060122
Is there a options between kill them and fight or scare them off?
>>
>>5060122
>>[Attempt to communicate]
>>
>>5060169
i agree +1
>>
>>5060122

>[Kill them]

>>5060169
>Meta knowledge calls for murder but realistically we don't know that yet and out purpose is to help humanity and these appear to be at least human adjacent

I'd disagree with that, as the QM had implied in the kill them choice:

>instinctual reaction tells you to activate the security systems

These are individuals breaching into a, presumed, top secret facility, they have no documentations, no IFF signals.

Since the work is our top priority, unless those with high clearance show up, we must defend it at all costs.
>>
Killing them seemed… hasty, surely? It wouldn’t be putting yourself at too much risk to at the very least determine who or what these things were before you acted, and just watching to see if they’d give up their own secrets was inefficient. No, it would be wisest to… prod them. Give them some stimulus, and wait to see how they’d react. Like an experiment, maybe? The thought reinforces your decision, and you prepare yourself for contacting them. Doors deeper in the facility rumble shut, and you divert power to the security system, just in case the communication proves to be less than friendly. With your insurance set up, there was nothing left but to begin.

You chose the lights because it was the most simple method of communication you could think of. Any creature that could see would at the very least have some sort of reaction to the lights artificially being turned on and off, and perhaps you could venture to flash some sort of signal in morse code at them? You flick an invisible switch, and the dark corridor is suddenly not so dark. A click, and a hum, and then the entire hall is bathed in light, prompting an immediate response from the red-robed men, who raise their rifles to their shoulders and fall into closer ranks as they scan the ends of the winding hallway for targets that weren’t going to appear.

[1/2]
>>
>>5060336

[2/2]

Well, that was certainly a reaction, so at least it’s clear that they’re sentient. You listen and watch for any other response, but they’re frozen like statues, with only the most minute movement of their heads as they scan back and forth. You almost start to reconsider your initial assessment of sentience, but then you hear it, scratching at the edge of your senses. You can hear radio signals, and they are shouting. To each other, and to something or someone above. It’s trivial to decode. You’re already doing it before you realise it. They’re using some sort of language and encoding that’s not entirely dissimilar to some languages and protocols that you’re aware of, albeit modified over what you can only assume would be an extremely long time. A clear sign that they’re almost certainly human under all those robes and armour.

Your translations are, for the moment, rudimentary, but it seems that your ‘communication’ hadn’t spooked them too much. They certainly don’t seem scared, but they are waiting on a decision from above. Literally. Their superior is somewhere above them, through the crack which they’d entered through. You could flash the lights some more, but you have a more direct option now, as rough as your working translation is, but for now it was enough information to make another decision, but what would be your next move?

>[Kill them]
You’ve seen all you need to see, and keeping them around any longer would be a risk that you can’t tolerate. Though it’s likely that they’re humans, that’s no guarantee that they’re going to be willing to help you, or even that they’d leave should you demand it. Best to nip the problem in the bud now, and as many times as you have to until they get the picture and leave.

>[Communicate]
You now have some rudimentary understanding of their language, and it’s probably enough to articulate some basic concepts. Intruders or no, these are the first humans you’ve seen in… you don’t know how long, and they could be very useful in finding out what happened to humanity while you were inactive. Besides, as long as you can keep them away from the more sensitive parts of the facility, you’ll always have the chance to rescind your mercy.

>[Nothing]
Now you understand what they’re saying, observation is a much more valid tactic. You could glean some information that they otherwise wouldn’t be willing to give up by eavesdropping.

>[Something else - write in]
As obvious as the other options are to you, you’re starting to become more aware of the control that you have over the facility. Perhaps there’s an outside of the box answer that could yield better results. Or maybe there’s just something specific you want to say to them?
>>
>>5060337
>[Something else - write in]
As obvious as the other options are to you, you’re starting to become more aware of the control that you have over the facility. Perhaps there’s an outside of the box answer that could yield better results. Or maybe there’s just something specific you want to say to them?

Observe, analyze and decode further, figure out who and where they are communicating with.

Send some stimuli their way, such as a drone to appear before them and make beeping noises at them, and see if we can activate some droids for defense. Check if we have any external sensors up and active, and if we can jam and block their communications.

We need more information before we make a decisive choice.
>>
>>5060347
+1
>>
>>5060347
+1

I'd like to add:

Run full diagnostics of the facility's integrity and operational defensive systems. There are clearly more of these creatures outside, and preparations for any other breaches must be made.
>>
interesting.
>>
>>5060347
+1
>>
Oh shit, a quest simular to man of iron? Let's go
>>
>>5060337
>>[Communicate]
"Hello world"
But DO NOT let them further, and if they try to press onward through the sealed doors, open fire.
Well, either we gonna collapse into full on warfare with this partucular explorator fleet, or they might (if we are very lucky) take us for a weird ancient machine spirit. Nah, they aren't that easy to fool, warm up that combat drone assembly line.
>>
You dismiss the obvious options. You can’t be too hasty. Killing them might be a terrible idea, but trying to communicate might be too. At present, it’s probably wisest to continue your little experiment. See how they react to stimuli, try to listen in on their conversations with their masters, and prepare a better defence in the meantime. First, though, you should probably run a full diagnostic check on the rest of the facility’s systems. You only have a vague awareness of what else is out there, and of what else you can do. Lingering memories of things you’ve done in the past, in service of the work. Time to remember your strength.

You stretch digital tendrils deep into the caverns of the ice moon. The facility is on an ice moon? No, that’s not right. The facility IS an ice moon. The moon has a radius of nearly a thousand kilometers, and almost all of its mass is crisscrossed by tunnels, storage bays, reactors, labs, and residential facilities. At its peak, this facility would have housed billions of people at least, but now it was a near endless tomb for thousands. Your facility was a mass grave. That thought didn’t bother you as much as the niggling feeling of disappointment. Such a grand project. So much unfinished work.

No matter. The facility is secure, save for the one point they’d breached, but there was still a risk of further breaches. You reactivate some external sensor equipment. Radar arrays, thermal cameras, and electronic scanning devices force their way through millennia of ice. Here you find your options have been most limited, as the harsh vacuum had not been kind to your sensitive and exposed equipment, but you had hardened, redundant systems to fall back on. Soon you have a picture of the moon’s near orbit.

A ship hung silently in orbit. You obtain a read out of it’s technical specifications. Nearly four kilometers long, with a heavily armoured prow, and broadside mounted guns. Certain elements of it’s design pinged recognition systems, leading the automated defences to flag it as friendly. It was likely the only reason it’d been allowed to get this close to begin with, else the system would have shot it out of the sky long before it bothered to wake you up. On closer inspection, it did seem to share certain similarities with some frigate and corvette designs you’d seen. Civilian hauler retrofit, perhaps? It was obviously hastily up-armoured and up-gunned, but then… there weren’t any signs of a post-construction retrofit. No sloppy hull welds, or half-hearted weapon mounts. Someone had built this from scratch. How odd.

[1/2]
>>
>>5060425
[2/2]

More of your electronic warfare systems come online. It wouldn’t be too difficult for you to overpower their transmissions, if you felt like it, but it might be best to leave that for later. It could be interpreted as an attack. Test the waters first. You warm up a small scout drone - a little antigrav skimmer, for patrolling the vast expanses of your halls or investigating experiments gone wrong. Now, it would serve as a sacrificial lamb. Test the interloper's reactions.

The drone buzzes around the corner, and you watch from a dozen sets of eyes as both ranks of the red-robed men turn to face the noise, quickly forming a firing line. There’s a burst of static - a request to fire - and a response in the affirmative. Your drone is blasted out of the air, falling to the ground in a sparking heap. It’s dead, but you’ve learnt much. The rifles they hold are also faintly recognizable as old hunting rifles. Sporting weapons for the elite, with semi-homing rounds to ensure a kill no matter how incompetent the weilder. Quaint and primitive, with a certain stylish charm, but by no means the weapons of a professional military. A militia, perhaps?

Something very, very strange had happened while you were asleep.

You listen into their communications - their master demands answers and details. His underlings are precise and unimaginative in their descriptions, and speak only when spoken to. It’s unlikely you’d get far by interacting with them. Perhaps now you have more options?

>[Kill them]
No matter. You are more confident in your abilities now. Your in-depth diagnostic on defensive systems have come back, and you are pleased with the findings. Much of your weaponry is still intact, including surface-to-orbit weapons. Jam their communications and kill this squad now, then decide the rest of their fates later, from a position of proven strength.

>[Kill them all]
This is a restricted orbital zone. All trespassers are subject to summary execution. ALL trespassers. Including that q-ship in orbit, and anyone else who attempts to breach the facility’s security. Better to beg forgiveness later than risk the work now.

>[Communicate with the master]
It should be trivial to reroute your communications through the underlings to speak directly with their master. They certainly seem… curious. Perhaps you can arrange an exchange of information? If things go wrong, you still have the upper hand. Maybe it’s best not to threaten them just yet, though. They might get the wrong idea.

>[Nothing]
There’s nothing wrong with biding your time, especially now that you know you’re safe. Although it doesn’t seem like it’ll accomplish much.

>[Communicate - write in]
It’s been a long, long time since you last spoke to a human. There’s a lot that you could say. Perhaps there’s something specific you wanted to say, or someone specific you wanted to say it to? Your options on the latter front are somewhat… limited.
>>
>>5060428
>>[Kill them all]

They attacked us first by shooting down our drone. No mercy.
>>
>>5060428
>Something very, very strange had happened while you were asleep.
Oh boy, where do we even begin.
>[Communicate with the master]
Let's just do the worst thing possible and say "Hello, I am an AI in charge of this facility, you are currently trespassing, please introduce yourself and also what year it is?"
>>
>>5060428
Send an expandable drone and demand their surrender if they attack it, kill them all and disable the ship so we can study it.
>>
>>5060428
Does our Electronic Warfare suite provide any sort of hacking implements, or just jamming/tracking?

Given the seemingly haphazard / makeshift designs this... milita uses we might hope for some security vulnerabilities or design mistakes. Let's attempt to seize control of the ship or select subsystems (engines / cannons are probably a priority).

Get some more negotiating power, should we decide to either kill or communicate.
>>
>>5060491
It's something you could attempt, but you've not been able to run a full diagnostic on those systems. It might have unforeseen consequences.
>>
>>5060428

>[Kill them all]

Security protocols activated. Code Red is in effect. Hostile forces have breached the facility. Enemy vessel detected in orbit. Weapon systems firing.

(Forgot to link it)
>>
>>5060498
Well, if we decide to go for the kill option I vote we go for some sort of hacking attempt first, it might fail but seems unlikely to backfire all that badly, and if it blows our cover we probably only lose a second or so of suprise.
>>
>>5060428
>[Communicate with the master]
Perhaps they don't know it is a restricted facility, after all a long time seems to have passed
>>
>>5060428
>>[Communicate with the master]
>It should be trivial to reroute your communications through the underlings to speak directly with their master. They certainly seem… curious. Perhaps you can arrange an exchange of information? If things go wrong, you still have the upper hand. Maybe it’s best not to threaten them just yet, though. They might get the wrong idea.
>>
There was much you didn’t understand. However tempting it might be to repay their intrusion with death, a corpse has little to say. Answers were most easily gained from the living. You reach out. Your words thunder in static bursts, overpowering the weak signals the red-robes are sending. You don’t employ only brute force, though. You are precise, tight beaming your signals directly up to the ship in orbit, and you only require a simple statement to get across your intent.

“This facility is off limits. You are trespassing. I am authorised to use lethal force. Identify yourself.”

You… aren’t used to speaking. It’s not something you often have cause to do, and after an indeterminate length of inactivity, it’s fair to say that you’re rusty. Still, you got across all the main points, and you’re forced to wait. This was the frustrating part of speaking to humans. The waiting. It took them entirely too long to listen, understand, and articulate a response. This language seemed more efficient, but it was a far cry from what an AI was used to, even when you weren’t also waiting for the human you were talking to to recover from shock.

“I am Hextorolon Rane, Magos Explorator of Stygies VIII, accompanying our allies from Holy Mars.” The ‘Magos Explorator’ explains, sending a transmission directly back to you. You don’t understand half of the words he just said. Perhaps you weren’t translating them correctly? “Your facility was not logged in our databanks.” There’s a pause. “To whom am I speaking?”

That question almost caught you off guard. They must think that you’re a member of their group. Stygies VIII, was it? You are ‘speaking’ in their ‘language’. It’s a reasonable assumption, but you don’t know what to say by way of a correction. Who are you?

“I am the AI in charge of this facility.” You respond, finally.

There’s another, longer pause. Much longer. “Abominable intelligence.” The Magos echoes. You’re about to correct them, before they continue. “If you speak truthfully, then… What treachery is this?” It’s hard to gauge tone through this method of communication, but the words themselves seem venomous. “You are-”

[1/2]
>>
>>5060578
[2/2]

“The custodian of this facility.” You interrupt. “I serve humanity.”

Another pause. “Falsehoods.” They declare. “Your kind are-”

You interrupt again, sending another burst of communication. A datapacket, containing an overview of the research performed at this facility. Nothing too sensitive, but enough to whet the palate of anyone with a scientific mind. There’s another long pause.

“This… is… it must be deception.” You can almost hear the Magos struggling. Their misplaced distrust was wrestling with the need to swipe the prize placed in front of them. Finally, they take the bait. “You would offer this technology?”

“Yes.” You reply, simply. It was your job, after all, though you hadn’t yet promised it freely.

“Kill the squad.” The Magos demands. “They are not my men, they cannot be trusted to keep this secret. I will come in person.” Their mind seemed to have been made up rather quickly, and they didn’t seem like they were willing to wait all that long for an answer. What to do?

>[Kill them]
Comply. You are authorised to kill trespassers, and if it gets you a step closer to distributing this technology - to completing the work? It’s worth sacrificing a few lives to do so.

>[Don’t kill them]
Refuse. The ‘conversation’ passed at breakneck speeds, and raised more questions than answers. You seem to have successfully placated them for the moment, but they haven’t convinced you yet.

>[Kill them all]
To the warp with them all. You don’t have time to involve yourself in whatever petty political games are being played, or further convincing strange people with strange titles to trust you. You’ll take their ships for scrap and forge ahead on your own.

>[Stall for time - write in]
There must be something else you could do? Rather than outright refusing or immediately complying, maybe you can keep this Magos talking, and find out a little more about what has happened while you’ve been asleep, and make a decision once you know more? There's plenty you could ask. What comes to mind?
>>
>>5060579
>>[Don’t kill them]
>>
>>5060579

>Inquire into the need of secrecy.
The Work is meant to benefit the mankind at large. Why is this man so quick to condemn the delvers over something that would inevitably proliferate throughout the civilized space? Or... is it our own nature as an AI that he seeks to obfuscate?

There is an issue with killing the delvers that if we kill them as trespassers we show ourselves as an entity that is capable of killing on request for dubious motives, which could come back to haunt us further down the line as our credibility and integrity is scrutinized. We should not kill them until we can assess with absolute certainty that doing so is necessary for preservation and dissemination of The Work.
>>
>>5060595
Supporting this

>>5060579
>Inquire into the need of secrecy.
>>
>>5060579
>Inquire into the need of secrecy.
>>
>>5060595
Support

We must act from an informed position.
>>
>>5060579
Neutralize the team in a way that appears to be dead to those on the ship, but is only held for investigation and questioning.
>>
>>5060595
This, secrecy is the opposite of what we seek to achieve.
All of humanity shall receive our gifts no matter what
>>
>>5060634
This is also good
>>
>>5060579
>Sorry your request does not compute please clearify statement and reasoning
>>
>>5060595
This
>>
You’re the custodian of this facility, not an assassin. If you’re going to kill, it will be because you have to, not because some shady figure demands it. They might have a good reason to ask it of you, though. They speak of secrecy, of ‘abominable intelligence’, and deception. To refuse their requests point blank would be unwise given how little you understand of the situation. Perhaps you can coax some more answers out of them before you make a decision?

“Wait.” You burst back, before they can shut you out. “Explain.”

“Explain what?” They reply quickly. “Time is of the essence, abomination. We have precious little left before our conversation is discovered.”

“Explain why such a discovery would be a concern.” You shoot back. There are many more questions you have to ask. Why refer to you as an abomination? Why the animosity? The distrust? Why so quick to condemn their comrades? You stick to the simplest one for the moment.

“You are an abomination.” They answer. It seems they aren’t one to mince words. “If our conversation was discovered, it would mean both our deaths. I will have commited a heresy of the highest order, and I don’t know what it is that you seek, abomination, but you will never have it. The Omnissiah’s Wrath will reduce the moon to water vapour, and take you with it.”
>>
>>5060696
[2/2]
That… only raised more questions, but the central point was clear. Whoever these people were, they saw AI as an abomination, and you could sense the religious trappings even through the raw nature of this technical language. Perhaps a fringe cult? Whatever the case, there were no other ships in the immediate proximity, but the last threat did hint at either an exaggerated estimation of their ship’s capabilities, or an accompanying fleet some distance away.

“I am willing to negotiate. May the Machine God forgive me my sins.” There’s another pause. “The others will not forgive me, nor be willing to negotiate. If you do not kill them, they will report what happened here to their true masters, and as I said, we will both die.” There are no further bursts from the ship above. It seems that they have said all they wanted to say.

Through your cameras, you see the red-robed men, still watching, and awaiting further instructions. You could jam their communications and kill them in moments. No-one above would ever know how they died. If the Magos was telling the truth, time was running out. What to do?

>[Kill them]
Comply with the request, and kill the red-robed men. This Magos may be the only person on that ship willing to work with you, and if they are… it could save a lot of time, and avoid a lot of potential risk. That’s worth a few lives.

>[Don’t kill them]
Refuse. It’s not a good enough reason to kill these men, not without proof or any particular reason to take the Magos at their word. Of course, they are telling the truth, you may have just condemned them to death, even if you doubt the interlopers have the capability to destroy this moon.

>[Kill them all]
What is this, a joke? Some sort of machine worshiping cult that hates AI? You don’t have time for this. Kill them, and find some segment of humanity that isn’t infected by some sort of brain rot.
>>
>>5060697
>[Don’t kill them]
>>
>>5060697
>>[Kill them]
>>
>>5060703
this
>>
>>5060697
utilize electronic warfare to cut the coms and signals of the team and capture them utilizing both security droids and the environment
>>
>>5060697

We don't have to take orders here.

>jam the ground team's comms
>lock them into place with our autogates
>wake up a wave of gravskimmers
>get the ground team to surrender

We clearly need additional data to interface with these cultists and that requires capture and processing of the ground team.

Once complete, can we mimic their comms back to their command and create the illusion that all is well?

We can stall for time as we understand them better.

Our end goal should be the capture or surrender of their converted frigate. We need staff!
>>
>>5060697
>[Kill them]
>>
>>5060697
The ‘Magos’ seems convinced the threat is real, especially between the liberal use of language and signs of distress.

Enough so that keeping our true nature hidden seems prudent.

I think we should place in their way a warning that the facility access is restricted and enforced with lethal force. If they press on after that, make good on those threats. If they stop, Magos can show off and come up with bullshit. They didn’t really see anything except for blinking lights and a maintenance drone.
>>
>>5060697
Contain, isolate, detain, jam and maybe hack them. Then communicate with them to get full information. If they can be made amicable we keep them alive for a while longer, if not then then die.
>>
We should issue surrender commands to the red robed men. Tell them you are trespassing in restricted space and and engaged in hostile action against the facility. Surrender and lay down their arms or be destroyed or something. Do so while jamming them or something.
>>
>>5060697
>[Kill them]
Unless we blitz those skitarii they can just leave via the hole they made in the ceiling. Anything beyond a mindless looking response will risk us being outed.
>>
>>5060697
>[Kill them]
>>
>>5060697
I'll support
>>5060724
And
>>5060725
>>
If this ‘Magos’ is telling the truth, working with them seems like the wisest course of action. Perhaps there was another way, but there’s something about the men in those red robes that makes you think that they’re not quite human. They stand too still, move too mechanically. It’s hard to feel bad for them as you warm up the rad-emitters.

An instant later, the hallway is bathed in un-light. There’s a flash, and a negative of the image before your cameras are burnt into the lenses. Blood boils beneath their skin. Copper melts. The circuitry in their bodies shorts. Frothy fluid bursts out of the corner of their masks and armour, dripping down their frames as they slowly collapse to the ground, seizing. The lights in their eyes die, and the hallway is left dark once more.

The emitters cool down. Their job was done in an instant, after exposing the hall to a wave of radiation more comparable to what they might be exposed to if they stood next to some particularly energetic stars than anything usually found on a moon. There was a higher than allowed ozone content in the atmosphere. You activate the ventilation fans.

You refrain from sending another transmission up to the ship. You went to all this trouble to hide your nature from the others - you wouldn’t want to compromise that now by trying to communicate when you didn’t need to. This Magos will understand what has happened, no doubt, and if they’re telling the truth, you should expect to see them in person very soon. If they’re not? Well… if worst comes to worst, you can always shoot that ship out of orbit.

You’re left there for a while, in the dark, cold halls of your facility, before a brief flash of light catches the attention of your sensors: A small shuttle had just dropped out from underneath the ship. You watch it as it draws closer, finally landing not far from the point which the first team had breached through. The shuttle disgorges it’s passengers, and you turn your attention back to the hallway just as they start to drop down.

They were much like the first group - clad head to toe in metal armour, and cloaked in robes, though the colours seemed to be inverted. Their black robes melted into the shadows around they set up a defensive perimeter. More dropped down, landing hard on the floor before stepping forwards and joining the perimeter, some stepping over the previous set of bodies that still smoked and gurgled. Not one showed an ounce of fear.
>>
>>5060788
[2/2]

Lastly, a single figure floated down. It was hard to see it as a human. Maybe it had been once, but now it was naught but a pile of charcoal black rags laid over a writhing mass of metallic tendrils that reach for and prod at the walls as the body they were connected to slowly hovers down, in obvious defiance of the moon’s weak gravity. Beneath the cowl, a half dozen green lights twist and whirr, scanning the immediate area as the tentacles make contact with the ground.

“Abomination, I assume you can hear me.” The figure looks around, their tentacles shifting uncomfortably beneath their robes. Presumably, this is the Magos. “I believe we can come to an accord. You say you serve humanity, yes? Humanity would be greatly served by this technology.” Their eyes scan the bare halls. They are clearly unused to talking to walls. “But I must know: What is it that you want in return?”

>”Aid in completing the work.”
The most truthful answer. It will take some time to explain the finer details, and given their previous reactions they might not believe you’d be willing to part with the technology in exchange for help proliferating it, and help continuing the research. It doesn’t seem like lies would help all that much, though.

>”Your loyalty.”
They might have an easier time agreeing to this than they would taking the technology freely, and if they hold up their end of the bargain… you could use replacement researchers, or agents. You could find some use for this ‘Magos’ no doubt. But given how they’d reacted earlier… this might be a bad idea.

>”Your life.”
You’ve changed your mind. Warm up the emitters again, and bathe this corridor in radiation a second time. We’ll take a different path.

>[Write in]
There’s much you could ask for in return. Maybe there was something specific you had in mind?
>>
>>5060789
>>”Your loyalty.”

They're not going to understand or trust us being altruistic in any case.
>>
>>5060789
Assistance in completing our project set forth by our now long gone masters, along with your loyalty and digression. We also ask for major or important events that have transpired in Human space for the last few thousand years. Detail the not too sensitive aspects for the project to him.
>>
>>5060789
>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>5060801
+1, info would be nice too
>>
Not going totally murderhobo on them seemed to have paid off.

I'd still like to have mindraped the guys we killed so at least their deaths would have had some value...
>>
>>5060789
>>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5060789
>”Your aid in completing the work and you to keep silent about this at all cost.”
>>
>>5060789
"Aid in completing the work."
>>
>>5060789
>”Aid in completing the work.”

Is it fucking Cawl?
>>
>>5060789
>Aid in completing the work
>>
>>5060854
>I am Hextorolon Rane, Magos Explorator of Stygies VIII
>>
>>5060864
I'm something of a retard.
>>
>>5060874
It's /qst/ you're in good company
>>
>>5060789
>>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5060789
>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5060801
Support.
>>
File: Spoiler Image (20 KB, 500x281)
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What should we name ourselves?

I vote RASPUTIN
>>
>>5060988
I vote Sólarsteinn, a guide for a new age of exploration and expansion
>>
>>5060988
+1
>>
>>5060789
>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5060988
i vote for Major Tom
>>
>>5060988
How about

Planetary Automatic Calculator - Methods for Alternative Navigation, or in short, PAC-MAN
>>
I vote to commandeer the ship and get the fuck out of here.
>>
>>5060803
+1
>>
>>5060801
+1

>>5060988
+1 to that name too.
>>
>>5061063
how about Epimetheus the titan of hindsight brother of Prometheus.
>>5060801
support
>>
>>5061066
I like it! Supporting this name choice.
>>
>>5060789
>>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5061066
Drawing from Greek mythos. Classic.
Supporting this name.
>>
>>5060789
>>”Aid in completing the work.”
>>
>>5061066
+1
Sounds like an actual name that would be in 40K
>>
>>5061016
Support
>>
>>5061066
https://wh40k.lexicanum.com/wiki/Epimetheus
Taken, unfortunately.
>>
>>5061190
not like our guy knows it
>>
“Aid in completing the work.” You reply, your voice echoing through the halls out of ancient PA systems. You didn’t even have to think about it - the answer was obvious. It was your purpose, after all. “And information.” You add, as an afterthought.

“The work?” The Magos looks from speaker to speaker, trying to find somewhere to place their eyes as they speak to you. “What work?”

You explain, at first in brief, and then in detail as it becomes clear that the Magos won’t accept a simple explanation. You explain the nature of the work, some of the technical specifics of both branches of study (though not yet enough that it might allow them to endanger anything), and the immediate history of the project, on which you’re able to offer relatively little in the way of specifics. You paint the broad strokes, and as you do you’re able to watch as the Magos slowly relaxes, and then becomes increasingly excited at the prospect of what you’re offering. They hide it well, though beneath all the robes and metal you can see a childlike excitement bubbling to the surface.

In return, the Magos fills in the blanks, and for as much as their hopes were buoyed, your own were crushed. It had been nearly 20,000 years since you’d last been active, and a lot had changed. Most of the history they speak of was mired in mythology and religious dogma, and they speak more about recent, local history, but you manage to parse through the extraneous details to get a basic understanding of what’d happened while you’ve been asleep. Humanity’s galactic empire had collapsed after some sort of general AI uprising that must’ve happened shortly after you were deactivated, which might go some way to explaining why you hadn’t been reactivated in the interim. It’s no surprise that such a war would be ingrained into the human psyche tens of thousands of years later, and no surprise that they’d react to the news of a remaining AI with some… hesitation.

[1/3]
>>
>>5061301
[2/3]

They continue, speaking of an ‘Omnissiah’, a figure separate to but syncretized with their ‘Machine God’. They also refer to them by another name: The Emperor. This Emperor led a reconquest of known space, but was sabotaged at the last moment by agents of the archenemy, leading to the collapse of this resurgent human empire, leading to this current state of decay and slide into religious extremism. By the Magos’ own account, they’re unaware of the precise state of the greater ‘Imperium’, but the picture they paint is not a favourable one. A bloated, autocratic nightmare built on a backbone of religious dogma and vicious societal stratification, a self perpetuating system built to shelter humanity against the warp, damn the individual humans that make up the greater whole.

This was not the humanity you had once served, but there was no doubt that they were more in need of your service than ever before. This Magos understands little of what has come before, save what has been filtered through the lens of myth. They understand little of the archenemy, and what they have taken from humanity. They have been deprived of the wellspring of knowledge left by their ancestors. You feel something close to fury rise within you. Indignation. They would dare-

“What do I call you?” The Magos begins speaking once more, after taking some time to consider your own words. “Abomination may not fit.”

“Epimetheus.” You answer. Strictly speaking, you don’t need a name, but that is the title which your masters bestowed on you. You don’t bother explaining the meaning, the Magos wouldn’t understand.

“Epimetheus.” They echo. “Very well. If you are telling the truth, then I believe that we have a common goal.” Their metallic tendrils tap and drum against the floor, like someone tapping their fingers in impatience, or out of anxiety. “I would be willing to work with you. But you understand I cannot trust you so easily. Is there something you can offer to prove your… truthfulness?”
>>
>>5061302
[3/3]
You run an inventory of supplies in the background almost immediately. It’s likely that they’d want a material gesture, rather than promises. Understandable, under the circumstances. A few different options come to mind...


>[STC Databanks]
From their brief historical recap, it sounds like they’ve lost access to almost every STC, from the basic knives and farming equipment up to military grade equipment. You have access to a full set, and it would be trivial to furnish them with a copy. They wouldn’t have to make do with retrofitted civilian equipment anymore, but… maybe this is a little much to offer right away?

>[Phase-iron stockpile]
A metal that can resist the powers of warp seems like a fitting token. Phase-iron forms part of the skin of this facility, and your own core is heavily reinforced by the alloy, a fact that’s no doubt responsible for your continued functionality through the millenia, and you’ve still got enough in storage that you doubt his ship could carry it all back. Besides, you could always make more.

>[Volkite weapons]
Your armouries are equipped with millions of handheld weapons. You could crack open some of the storage facilities and start handing out Thermal Rifles. Perfect for searing demonflesh from the bone.

>[Gamma weapons]
You’d employed an emplaced version to kill the red-robes in the hall earlier. They were… rare weapons, even in your time. Likely non-existent now. The Magos likely won’t even recognise them, and while they are effective, you don’t have many to offer, and making more will be expensive.

>[Nothing - write in]
The Magos wants a gesture of trust? You’ve already killed to keep their secrets. Maybe it’s time for them to offer a gesture of trust in return? Is there something specific you want?

>[Something else - write in]
There are massive stockpiles of equipment and materials in the facilities storage bays. Perhaps there’s something specific you could offer them?
>>
>>5061304

>[Phase-iron stockpile]

Further prove the Magos that the warp has no touch upon us.

It will also help him and others to combat the warps influence.
>>
>>5061304
>>[Phase-iron stockpile]
This. Giving him a whole set of STCs would probrobly cause him to hoarde the technology and not spread it. We need to find a link to the rest of the Empire and transfer all STC data to everyone.
>>
>>5061304
There is no, fucking, way, that we are giving this little heretek access to the STC's. No.

I want a custodian here or a damn primarch before we hand any of that shit over.
>>
>>5061317
Oh yeah and.

>Phase Iron
then
>And now, Prove your ability to be trusted. "You already betrayed the men you came with, what would you offer me to prove your dedication to the work?"
>>
>>5061319
+1 to write in
>>
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>>5061304
Either
>[Phase-iron stockpile]
Or
>[Something else - write in]
Some form of power generators/Energy Production?
>>
>>5061304
>>[Something else - write in]
i would suggest not offering the WHOLE stc databanks, but rather select files that would help humanity to advance back to where they once where (i.e a lot of scientific related equipment and data, such as theories, hypotheses and facts)
this would not make them powerful immediately, but would give the imperium a very much needed kick in the right direction.

My reasoning for this? even if everything goes wrong and we die/leave/get thrown into the warp, humanity will have a chance to understand what the technology they are using actually is and how to build upon it. For example, Theories about gravity and gravitons could help the Mechanicus in understanding how anti-grav technology works and how to make new technology that follows these theories and understanding.
>>
>>5061310
>>5061319

Support
>>
>>5061341
Supporting this write in
>>
>>5061304
> [Phase-iron stockpile]
Do we have the means of synthesizing more of this material?
We may also want to start looking into other anti-warp technologies, according to the magus' grim explanation warp phenomena are a major hazard in this new universe.
>>
>>5061304
>[Something else - write in]
It all comes down to knowledge. About all factions of the galaxy, of the eldari, the galactic maps, the primarchs. Everything.
>>
>>5061304
>[Something Else]
Explain what's available, and also your concerns. It is...imperative, necessary that you do everything in your power to bring Humanity back to the heights of its Golden Age. None of these good intentions will matter if you get snuffed in the crib. Thus, a deception to the larger galaxy.

Your core shall be passed off as a Database, filled with heavily-encrypted STC files that, through some special quirk of coding, cannot properly be copied to an external storage. While individual components can be extracted and decrypted over time, such decryption must be done on-site to ensure the data is not lost.

That shall be the story told to the others. Your nature as anything more, or less, than an archive assistant VI shall be hidden from the Greater Imperium while you drip-feed the necessary technological advancements back into the Mechanicus. Ensuring the Magos is your primary point of contact is a matter of access privileges. The Magos is now Chief Administrator for the facility, and so long as he lives there shall be no other.
>>
>>5061319
+1
>>
>>5061304
>>[Phase-iron stockpile]
>>
>>5061319
This.
>>
>>5061319
+1
>>
>>5061304
>[Volkite weapons]
Your armouries are equipped with millions of handheld weapons. You could crack open some of the storage facilities and start handing out Thermal Rifles. Perfect for searing demonflesh from the bone.
>>
>>5061304
>[Phase-iron stockpile]
Super warp resistant metal seems huge and neatly ties into our purpose as a anti warp initiative, I'm pretty sure the imperium has to coat stuff in wards/prayer strips to get a similar effect and doesn't have a material that naturally does that, if we fill that fucking ship with the stuff the magos will have ample "gifts" to smooth things over with others.
Also we can trivially condemn the magos, his underlings, and possibly sect to a fate far worse then death just with the little he has said and done so far, so a show of trust was already done in a manner of speaking.
The Magos is essentially a techno-barbarian by our standards so it will be awhile before its even safe for him to be in rough proximity to some of the more complex stuff on our moon, let alone try to assist so we can judge him meanwhile by how he wrangles his peers and prevents suspicion.
>>
>>5061323
Support
>>
You have just the thing. It wouldn’t be wise to give up something as valuable as your STC banks just yet. No, the phase-iron is the perfect gift to test the Magos - useless to servants of the archenemy, so there’s no fear of it ending up in the wrong hands, yet beyond useful to those that stand opposed to them.

You send a gravskimmer to pick up a few loose ingots of the purple-grey metal. It takes some time for it to return, during which time you explain the material. “Phase-iron. It is a metal alloy used in the construction of this facility, and in the shielding of my core. It resists the effects of the warp, and burns the flesh of psykers on contact, if they attempt to use their powers.”

“I have heard of it.” The Magos nods, then suddenly stops. “It’s used in the construction of this facility?”

“Yes. 2.2 megatons of phase-iron was used to reinforce external bulkheads, and bulkheads around sensitive labs, preventing the manifestation of emperyal phenomena within the confines of this facility.”

“How much do you have stored?” The Magos can’t hide the hunger in their voice.

“There is a large stockpile.” You answer tactically, mostly because you’re not sure yourself. The records are very old, and poorly sorted. The gravskimmer reappears before you can be questioned again, carrying a five kilo bar of the metal in it’s manipulator arms. It hovers up to the Magos’ head height, offering the bar for inspection.

The Magos takes the bar in their tentacles, turning it over under their gaze. Finally, they hand the brick off to one of their bodyguards. “This matches the descriptions. It will be tested, and if it’s legitimate, it will… prove your purity.”

“That is not all.” You state.

“Is there more you would ask of me?” The Magos replies, lifting their head. “I will aid you in your wor-”

“That is not all the phase-iron.” You correct them. “There is more in storage. I can provide heavy lift equipment. You may take all you like.”

They go silent for a time. “I see.”

“Though I will require something in return.” You say, turning your attention back, briefly, to the pile of irradiated flesh and metal under the feet of the black-robes. “You asked for proof of my loyalties. I request the same.” The Magos looks up, seemingly ready to respond, but you continue before they can. “You asked me to kill those men. I complied. I have given you enough reason to trust me, but you have given me nothing to prove your trustworthiness, only reasons to doubt it. What would you offer in return?”

[1/2]
>>
>>5061531
That seems to have stumped them. It’s not like they could really argue otherwise - they have been acting rather suspiciously. “What would you ask of me?” They reply cautiously. What would you ask of them?

>”Your service.”
They have been useful thus far. They have explained the current state of the galaxy, and potentially helped avert many deaths. If they offer their loyalty, you could use them as an agent - an intermediary. Someone to act in your stead, and to potentially help deflect attention away from your artificial nature. For now, at least.

>”Your men.”
You wouldn’t ask for many. A handful. Maybe a hundred? You have drones for most labour, but there are some things drones can’t do. A handful of humans around might also deflect some attention if anyone else demands entry.

>”Your ship.”
Not the whole thing, of course. That would be… a lot to ask for. Just access to it, maybe some space on it? Somewhere to set up some equipment and drones. Right now, you’re limited to just this one facility, just this one moon. Having a little mobility might offer some insulation against accidents, or attack, and you’re not going to be able to complete the work if you’re tied to this moon.


>[Something else - write in]
As far as tokens of trustworthiness go, there’s a lot of different options. Maybe you need to think outside the box?
>>
>>5061532
They are going to serve as our intermediaries anyway. This is to ensure that we can trust them.

>Submit to testing of your baseline.
What we do is this. We have what is effectively a bio-reader made out of phase iron, like a sort of Fitbit. We attach it to his flesh and it will serve as a means to monitor his genetic makeup to ensure he isnt part of the arch enemy and indeed human.
It will also serve as a communicator to keep us in touch. The bit we dont tell him, is the damage we can do to him with it, DAOT augments made a primarch into a mindless brute and if its connected to his nervous system then what do you think we could do to him.

Maybe tell him what we could tell him about the point anyway, see how dedicated he is.
The point is that the gun to his head is also genuinely beneficial to this relationship.
>>
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>[Something else - write in]
Related to the [Service] option

Maybe keep people away from our system? I'm sure we can build ships of our own in due time after sufficient repairs are done

Crew carry far too much risk, they could attack us due to their zealotry

Also, pic of possible main drone body for future face-to-face interactions
>>
>>5061532
>>”Your service.”
>>
>>5061532
>[Something else - write in]
>A thorough scan of your body, mind, and warp signature. The quickest way to be sure of your truthfulness and purity.
We should have the means to non invasively fully record this magos down to the atomic level in every way, with a copy of his brain or maybe even his soul in our data banks we can fully understand just who they are and their intents, goals, and methods. I assume we can do this since we are a anti-warp AI and have crazy dark age of technology stuff.
We don't want to push or spook him to much so if the whole affair seems quick and casual to him he should be compliant and not try anything.
Correct me QM if we can't do this or if it would be a hassle enough to possibly spook the magos.
>>
>>5061547
+1
>>
>>5061532
Backing these >>5061538
>>5061547
>>
>>5061532
>”Your service.”

>[Something else - write in]
Scan him and ask for his help keeping this place secret and away from prying eyes.

>>5061532
>>5061547
I don't see why we can't get him to do this through his service to us, we can probably do both options.

We could probably build him a new and awesome ship with phase-iron reinforced into it.
>>
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>>5061587
>We could probably build him a new and awesome ship with phase-iron reinforced into it.
But then we'd make it all clean and sleek rather than the Steampunk/Gothic styling the Admech prefers.

Then he has to explain how he got it...

Magos: Why is it do... plain?
AI: Cheaper and faster
Magos: But the buttresses and gargoyles are an integral part of repelling the denizens of the Empyrean!
AI: And I'm saying they were just huge shot traps asking for a Macrocannon shell to deflect inside.
>>
>>5061532
>”Your ship.”

We want as much redundancy as we can get. Also, why would an ai build during humanities height give a shit about purity, genetic or otherwise?
>>
>>5061532
>>”Your ship.”

AI can into space!
>>
>>5061532
>>”Your service.”

I feel that in the long run this is the best option
>>
>>5061532
>>”Your service.”
This is the obvious choice, if he works for us we basically get his ship and men by proxy
>>
>>5061609
AI is already in space, it takes up space in space!
>>
>>5061595
We can still decorate it like we do weapons.
>>
info: Organics could be here
debug: External state out of expected parameters
info: There could be organics anywhere
debug: Star irradiance 11.89W/m2
warning: Threat matrix updated for organics
info: With a q ship you can go anywhere you want

>>5061532
>Your ship
>>
>>5061547
Support.
>>
>>5061547
support
>>
You consider what you might request for a while. You don’t want to impose too much - despite your gift, it’s clear that they still harbour some doubts, though with context you can understand why - but there is much work to be done. You can’t afford to coddle their feelings. It’s better to be up front, and in control. “Your service. Promise me your service.”

The tentacles beneath their robe writhe at your words, but they haven’t yet called you an abomination yet, which means that they’re at least considering it. “I have my loyalties.” They state, plainly. “You would ask me to abandon them, and serve you?”

“I ask that you serve me in the completion of the work.” You stop, and reconsider your approach. You’ve already gone some way to proving that you’re free of the warp’s influence, and truly benevolent, but you can’t expect to override decades of indoctrination over the course of a conversation, no matter how much material proof you provide. You saw the avarice rise in the Magos at the mention of the technology you possess, and it’s more a testament to their avarice than wisdom or bravery that they’re standing before you now. Outright bribery would only make them more suspicious, but maybe you could try discussing the benefits of the technology? What you stand to offer humanity?

“With your help, I will be able to spread this technology, and complete the work. Freedom from the warp, forever. The possibility of a return to humanity’s glory.” You pause for dramatic effect. “Does working towards that goal strain your loyalties? I ask only that you follow my orders.”

The Magos stares at a wall, mechandrites clicking against the floor as they consider your words. Once more, their distrust was forced to contend with the tempting offers you made. “For as long as you keep to your end of the deal, you will have my loyalty, and my compliance.”

“Good.” You say, almost involuntarily.

“I will need to keep this from my superiors. They will not understand.” They look around, struggling to find a place to put their eyes as they think. Probably strategizing how they’ll keep this little pact of yours hidden, or wondering whether or not they’ve made a good decision.

You have some thinking to do yourself. You’ve secured the loyalty of one person, who has a reasonable amount of power, but you’re a very, very long way from being able to disseminate this technology, and from rebuilding your research capabilities. You would’ve had a lot of work ahead of you before humanity collapsed in on itself, but now it seems like an understatement. It’s difficult to even pick a place to start, but regardless of what you do, you’ll need to bring the facility back up to functionality first. That shouldn’t be too difficult, though, you have the drones and material, all you need is a few weeks to get everything squared away, but you’ll need to determine some long ter-

[1/2]
>>
>>5061788
[2/2]

First things first. “Hold there for a moment, please.” You say, as you order up a handful of scientific drones, equipped with some powerful scanning equipment. Powerful enough to take a full image of this Magos’ person, body and mind. The human mind was a complicated thing, but with a little decoding it should help you understand them better, and ensure that they aren’t poisoned by the touch of the archenemy. The drones swoop in, and to their credit the Magos stands unmoving as they run their scanners over them, inch by inch, before swooping off again. “Thank you.” You pointedly don’t offer any explanation. Not yet, anyway. It will take time for the results to process, though there doesn’t seem to be anything too concerning there just yet. You’ll know more soon, as you leave that decoding in the background.

Now, what were you doing? Ah, right - planning for the future… what to do?

>[Focus on the facility]
Exploring and expanding are all well and good, but you must have a base of operations to act from. Once you’ve performed the basic repairs, you’ll continue expanding operations on the facility, inviting trusted humans in, developing defences, and building more fabrication facilities. You’ll need some sort of cover story… What was it that the Magos had said about ‘forge worlds’?

>[Focus on humanity]
They’ve lost their way. You need to wind back the hands of time, and only then will you have a truly stable base to work from. This religious sect seems, ironically, like a good base to work from, if only you can strip away their dogma and show them the truth. The Magos will have to do much of the subtle work of politics, and your efforts would inevitably lead to a religious schism, but there is nothing you couldn’t do with humanity’s remaining industrial might behind you.

>[Focus on the work]
You still only have half the puzzle. One part of the solution. You spent the last years before your deactivation banging your head against that particular wall, and you made no progress. You’ll need to take drastic action, and either venture out to, or send agents to recover those black pylons which held back the warp to study them more closely, disassemble them if need be, and discover who or what made them. They would surely know more.

>[Write in]
You, of course, have many options open to you, and if you think long enough you’re sure you can come up with something better. You’ll need to be specific, but you’re only laying the groundwork right now. You’ll have the opportunity to change your mind later on, or reconfigure to meet changing demands.
>>
>>5061790
>>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
>[Focus on the facility]

As tempting as it is to focus on humanity, our facility is in dire need of repair. Don't overextend.
>>
>>5061790
> [Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
This seems fun and interesting!

>[Focus on the facility]

Reminds me of the old Planetary Governor quests
>>
>>5061790
>>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
>>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061532
>"Your word."
It is our intent to help humanity rebuild. The easiest and most direct form of assistance would be to kill the 'abominable intelligence' and take the loot. We want his oath, in the name of science, on his immortal soul, and by the Grace and Wisdom of the Omnissiah, that he will do this -right-. We are to be partners in enlightening humanity, and he will treat us as such in his decision making processes. Both in who he shares these discoveries with, and how.
>>
>>5061702
>It thinks as it pumps Antimatter into the fuel tanks

>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
>Facility
A strong base to work from.
>>
>>5061790
>>[Focus on the facility]

We must have a foundation
>>
>>5062008
+1

we must become the Foundation.
>>
>>5062008
>>5062036
We must [REDACTED] then do [EXPUNGED].
>>
>>5061790
>>[Focus on the facility]
>>
>>5061790
I just want to say that this is my first time in /qst/. Looks like a comfy writefag board. I know nothing about 40k but this story sounds cool and I've read the whole thread. You write well and I'm enjoying it. Thanks, QM fren.

Also, support >>5061797
>>
>>5061790
>[Focus on the facility]
>>
You can’t afford to take risks, not when so much is at stake. Your first long term objective must be the reinforcement and expansion of this facility, to ensure that you have a base of operations that is both under your complete control and immune to the corruption of the archenemy to continue the work from - to even begin to lay the groundwork for anything else at such an early juncture would leave you dangerously exposed and vulnerable.

You shave off a sliver of your consciousness, and leave it to deal with the Magos, directing them to organise the ‘recovery’ of the promised phase-iron. According to their reports, the ‘discovery’ of the phase-iron will prove to be a double edged sword. The Magos will need to fabricate exploration reports to dissuade further investigation of the facility by others in the fleet, and the bounty of phase-iron should satisfy Rane’s immediate superiors that they aren’t hoarding their finds for themselves. On the other hand, though, the discovery of such a large haul of material will earmark the facility for a second, more thorough investigation at another time. While this second wave will be delayed by the bureaucracy of the Imperium, and the inherently difficult nature of warp travel, it can be expected to arrive within the decade at most, and within the next few months at shortest.

Unless you wish to shoot down the next group, you’ll need an effective cover story before then - preferably something that will deflect attention from the Imperium at large, but still allow you access to the materials and manpower that you’ll need to advance your goals. The Magos was brief in their description of the greater organisations they owe their loyalty to, but they did mention something called a ‘forge world’. An industrial hub with a moderately independent local government exempt from the stringent controls that other worlds are subject to. From their descriptions, forge worlds are found more than they’re founded, and almost all date back to a wave of human colonisation that seems impossibly ancient to the humans of today, but occurred while you slept. Perhaps you could pass the facility off as a forge world? Something to think about later.

[1/3]
>>
>>5062260
[2/3]

With the Magos at work, you reactivate drones throughout the facility, and dedicate the bulk of your processing power to bringing the facility back online. The first step was to bring power production back online. You have backup zero-point reactors that produce enough power to keep the facility in a functional state, but they’re nowhere near enough for full operation. You divert the power in the batteries to reactivate the workhorse fusion reactors dotted around the moon, and after a few hours of warming up, you’ve only got one last stage to go before you can call the power situation resolved. You funnel the new baseline power production into the Hawking reactor’s jumpstart capacitors, reactivating the massive generator at the moon’s core, allowing you to slowly throttle back the fusion reactors, to save on hydrogen.

If you had lungs, you’d breathe a sigh of relief. If anything was going to go horribly wrong, it would’ve gone wrong when you created a microsingularity inside the moon, but the containment fields are holding steady, and power output is stable. You now have a chrono-dampened exploding black hole inside your facility, and that is a good thing.

Chronometers report that nearly 23 standard hours had passed since the end of your conversation with the Magos. Drones report that 147 tonnes of phase-iron have been loaded onto shuttles by the Magos, after heavy-lift drones recovered the ingots and delivered them to the breach in the bulkheads. The Magos refused further assistance, using his own equipment to remove the material from the facility and to transport it into orbit. After 147 tonnes were loaded, the Magos refused further deliveries, citing a desire for ‘some subtlety’, before returning to their ship 2.2 standard hours ago. At present, they remain in regular contact, and are currently communicating with the fleet. They expect to return within 3 standard days, until which time you should not expect any further shuttle landings.

It’s hard not to feel a little relieved. This is the work you were made for - repairing, maintaining, and operating this facility. Anything else is outside your design specifications, and while you think you handled the sudden shift in both scope and task rather well, it is still comforting to return to something you know.
>>
>>5062263
[3/3]

You have three days and enough materials to undertake a major project, before you’ll need to scale back activity to avoid detection when the rest of the fleet pass by. While most of your functions are intact, they are in a state of disrepair, and could be brought back to full functionality - or even expanded - with a bit of work. What should take priority, though?

>[Production]
You have a full set of STC databanks, and the facility has a number of factory complexes, many of which can operate fully autonomously, with only drones required to shuttle around materials and completed products. You have everything from nano-fabricators for rapid prototyping and small scale or precision orders, to fixed assembly lines that can churn out thousands of items a day. Focusing on bringing that functionality back online should be your priority.

>[Defence]
If this facility is destroyed, it’s all over, not just for you, but for the work too. Send the drones to reopen the armouries, and take a full inventory of all stored, existing equipment. The rest of the time and resources can be dedicated towards repairing sensitive external components, like sensor arrays and energy weapons, and to reinforcing the outer hull of the facility. Once you’ve got the refractor fields back to full functionality, then maybe you can consider other priorities.

>[Research]
The labs have always been the real purpose of the facility - everything else exists to support and serve them. While you don’t have researchers anymore, the various functions the labs offer will allow you to more carefully analyze and react to specific threats as they appear, and help continue the work in the background. Refurbishing the databanks and computer equipment might offer some value to the Magos, and being that there aren’t many experiments being run right now, you’re sure no-one would mind if you borrowed some of the processing power…

>[Residential]
The researchers didn’t come here alone. They brought their families, and their families required other basic services. Clothes, housing, food that didn’t come from a staff canteen. There’s enough housing and services in place for billions of humans, even if it never held more than a few hundred thousand. Human excess for you. Bringing all that back online would allow the facility to support a permanent human presence, and allow them to live in what would’ve been spartan conditions, but would today seem closer to utopian than spartan.

>[Something new - write in]
Your existing facilities are all well and good, but you’ll be able to survive with minor repairs to them for now. You’re facing new problems in a new galaxy. You need new solutions. Perhaps there was something specific you wanted to build?
>>
>>5062264
>Defence
Get us shields damnit.

Then we can focus on
>Research
It's the second most vital thing after ensuring our continued survival.
>>
>>5062264
>You now have a chrono-dampened exploding black hole inside your facility, and that is a good thing.
lmao

>[Defence]
>>
>>5062264
>[Production]
if we're gonna forge world we should probably do this. Second is defense, but we have a few years, hopefully
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
I'm torn between this and research, if anything having big guns will make the 2cd explorator pass rather wary of poking us to hard if we try to fake being mechanicus.
>>
>>5062264
>>[Defence]
I say we make sure we're ready for any potential threats then move on to restoring production.

After all, all the industrial output that we could manage would be for naught if we get smoked.
>>
So basically we need to work with the Magos to set ourselves up as a forgeworld I would think. Much like the Tri-tachyon corp of Starsector, a puppet government headed by an AI.
>>
When did the magos say something about a forge world? Maybe a paragraph was missed somewhere.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
>>
>>5062331
We just have to pretend to be a machine spirit and then we'll be fine. Just act like some machine spirit in charge of Adminstrating over a Forge World in charge of RnD. There are actually a few different surviving uncorrupted AIs in 40k who survived by doing the exact same thing.
>>
>>5062344
Right. Well with a compliant magos I would think it would simplify the matter considerably.
>>
>>5062264
> [Defence]
>>
>>5062264

>[Production]

Give the magos the cover needed to makes into a forge world.

>>5062331
A fellow starfarer I see
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
>[Production]
>>
>>5062334
They spoke about forge worlds during their explanation of the current state of the galaxy.

Fill in any basic 40k knowledge that your average player would have into that spot. It probably would've been a tedious conversation for me to write out, so I just glossed over it.
>>
>>5062366
Yamato best ship, even if its from a mod.
>>
Production covers us up as a forge world (forge moon?) and prevents mechanicus from wising up to our existence. So we can avoid the potential schism and war with admech.
Defence will help if we roll poorly on the (metaphorical) galaxy event table and get some orks, or nids, or cultist pirates, or other random shit.
Research is extremely low priority, we're ahead of humanity by ages as is.
Residential is useless, if we gonna be housing people in the near future, we're gonna be housing admech. I don't think they care.
>[Production] it is.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
We can't be certain that the Magos will be able to properly convince his masters. They could become suspicious and send an even larger force next time. You can't defend yourself with mundane production.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]

We should Ask the Magos guy what are the chances of passing ourselves off as a lost forge world.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
We have a deal with what amounts to a mid-level official who is hiding it from his superiors, who would destroy us if they found out.
We don't know if he's capable of keeping it secret. His superiors might be more inquisitive than he expected, or he may make a mistake. And if he fails, then The Work will be gravely jeopardized. There's too much at stake to let it ride solely on this one man's shoulders.
>>
>>5062264
>>[Residential]
>>
>>5062264
>Defence
Although the task ahead is daunting and we should get to work on developing our production capacity up to specs, the situation in the galaxy is clearly dire and we can’t take chances with safety of The Work. We need to be able to defend ourselves from any zealots, or other hostile interlopers.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
>>
>>5062377
Can we pick multiple to speed things long?

I want to get past the start up grind and into the story and lore.
>>
>>5062379
+1
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]
If this facility is destroyed, it’s all over, not just for you, but for the work too. Send the drones to reopen the armouries, and take a full inventory of all stored, existing equipment. The rest of the time and resources can be dedicated towards repairing sensitive external components, like sensor arrays and energy weapons, and to reinforcing the outer hull of the facility. Once you’ve got the refractor fields back to full functionality, then maybe you can consider other priorities.
>>
>>5062264
>[Defence]

As much as I'd like to do Research or Production, Defence makes too much sense
>>
Priority number one is and always will be the defence of this facility. No matter what happens, as long as you can continue operating, you can continue the work. Resources, both material and temporal, must be dedicated according to those priorities.

You waste no time in setting to work. While basic repairs to other systems are underway, you send the bulk of your drones to organise and consolidate the facility’s many armouries into a much smaller number, concentrated in strategic locations throughout the moon. It takes a surprisingly long time, but soon enough you have neatly organised warehouses and a complete inventory of all your equipment.

You’re pleased with the results. Much of your equipment has survived, and while most of it is in need of refurbishment, very few items have decayed to a point where they couldn’t be repaired. In total, once repairs are complete, you’ll have millions of volkite weapons, personal refractor fields, and light power armour sets - enough to outfit a sizable army to a degree reserved for the elite forces of the modern galaxy. In addition, you have hundreds of thousands of sets of heavy hazard suits (of the same sort apparently being used as ‘Terminator’ armour today) and various heavy weapons, ranging from c-beams to grav cannons. Finally, you have a much more modest inventory of combat vehicles - a few hundred shuttlecraft and gravtanks, and a few thousand skimmer-transports. Hardly enough for a true armed force, employing combined arms and actual… tactics, but given the state of the galaxy that may not be necessary. If the Magos has been truthful, this equipment could hold off almost any force in the galaxy… if you can find someone to hold it.

Your automated security capabilities are likewise mostly intact, though they are much more limited in scope. Other than the few dozen surface-to-orbit singularity cannon batteries, and few thousand anti-aircraft las-batteries, you have a few thousand dedicated security bots: Mostly Conqueror, Thanatar, and Crusader designs, left in the event of a catastrophic emperyal incursion. You have the facilities and blueprints to produce more, but at present your factories are focusing on the production of replacement parts to repair the current stock. It might be weeks before you can start production of new models, and if/when you do, it will be at a slow rate to begin with.

Still, this leaves you with a significant force at your disposal, but one far too small to protect the entire facility at once. With the preliminary, basic repairs done, you begin converting some of the gravskimmer drones into light combat drones by fitting them with a volkite rifle and refractor shield. That cuts into both your weapon and drone stockpiles, though the converted combat-skimmers retain some utility and gain a reasonable degree of combat effectiveness, despite a lack of proper programming or a hull capable of taking more than a single hit.

[1/3(?)]
>>
>>5062490
[2/3(?)]
Lastly, your passive defences have all been brought back to full functionality. Though you haven’t yet activated them, your refractor field generators have all been extensively tested and repaired, from the generator systems deeper within the moon’s crust to the emitters at the surface. With a moment’s notice, you could activate the fields and project a full barrier, with an altitude of anywhere from 10 to 100 kilometers, over the entire moon, protecting it from all but the most powerful orbital bombardment.

You reach the end of your review. That’s the measure of your defenses, save for the rad-emitters fixed into the upper layer hallways, but they’re not to be relied upon. They’re enough to kill almost anything in them, organic or otherwise, but they have a long cooldown and heavy power demands, limiting their usefulness in the event of a full invasion. But what’s the likelihood of something breaching the orbital defenses with an army large enough to swarm the planet any time soon?

Three days later, and you’re satisfied with your drone’s efforts. You have a fully organised armoury, an expanded automated defense force, and a fully repaired primary shield generator. You’re forced to scale down activity as a ship translates back into realspace not too far from the moon, just out past the Mandeville point. Almost immediately after translating back to real space, it begins frantically hailing you.

“Epimetheus, are you there?” The familiar tone of the Magos demands, although there’s an urgency there that wasn’t before. It’s at that point that you notice that the ship is accelerating as hard as it can towards the facility.

“I hear you, Magos.” If you had a gut, there would be a sinking feeling in it. “Is there a problem? Were you unable to defl-”

“No. The Explorator fleet is moving on. They’re awaiting negotiations between Mars and Stygies before they move on the moon. I’m expected to head back to testify to what I found, though if I don’t get back in time it might complicate matters som- no, that doesn’t matter. It’s not a problem, anyway. We have xenos.”

Xenos. Of all the problems unique to the galaxy today, xenos are not one of them. They’re almost as bad as demons, which is saying something given the unique animosity you hold towards the denizens of the warp. Still, it shouldn’t be too much of a problem - you had just run a full inventory of your defenses and came to the conclusion that it’d be enough for almost anything, so long as there weren’t too many of them. “Do you have more information?”

“It’s orks. They have a space hulk, and they’re towing a large number of converted asteroids. They’re ready for a full orbital invasion. There are no doubt millions of them.”

Ah.
>>
>>5062491
[3/3]

“We spotted them on the way back, after rendezvousing with the rest of the fleet. They’re making short, rapid jumps as they approach. I think they’re taking time to fight off daemons, because I doubt they have a functional gellar field.” The Magos pauses, possibly for dramatic effect. “There’s no doubt they’re headed here. They’re travelling straight towards this moon as we speak. They’ll be here within a few hours.”

That complicates matters. You’ll be able to shoot most of them down long before they reach the moon, and the shields will hold off more, but if even a fraction of them reach the ground, it’ll be a nightmare to remove them. Thanks to your efforts, it’s unlikely that they’ll be able to threaten the facility as a whole, but the damage they could cause could leave you with months worth of repairs. Time you can ill afford to waste. With that in mind, you ask the Magos to-

>”Leave immediately.”
You can deal with this. You’ve got more than enough firepower to handle a pile of junk, some rocks, and some angry fungus. Besides, the Magos’ energy is best put to dealing with the long term plan. Maybe you should mention that, before they leave? They could set the groundwork in that meeting they mentioned.

>”Leave some men.”
A reasonable middle ground. Though you’re confident that you can ensure the facility’s integrity, you can’t afford to spend months repairing damage. If the Magos leaves some of his men, you could equip them with the stockpiles, and send them to reinforce your robots and other automated defences, to minimise the damage.

>”Remain here.”
You can’t afford any risk of damage to the facility. Demand that the Magos keep the ship here and deploy their full complement to the ground. You’ll arm and equip them, and put them to the defence of the facility. It may delay their return, but that’s a small price to pay to ensure the facility’s security.

>[Write in]
Whatever you’re going to do, you’ll need to do it quickly. You don’t have long before the orks arrive, and it sounds like the rest of the Explorator fleet is out of range even if you could somehow convince them to remain. Whatever you have in mind, you’ll only be able to rely on your facility and the Magos’ ship.
>>
>>5062492
>"Leave some men."

It doesn't do to underestimate Orks, but we need the Magos on his way.
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave some men.”
A reasonable middle ground. Though you’re confident that you can ensure the facility’s integrity, you can’t afford to spend months repairing damage. If the Magos leaves some of his men, you could equip them with the stockpiles, and send them to reinforce your robots and other automated defences, to minimise the damage.
>>
>>5062492
>Leave some men.”
>>
>>5062492
>”Remain here.”

An ork invasion so soon? I smell Chaos fuckery afoot.
>>
>>5062501
Or Eldar the fucks
>>
>>5062492
>”Remain here.”
>>
>>5062492
>>”Leave some men.”

Having him remain brings needless risk to our agent, allowing some of his men to help both minimizes our risk and allows us more opportunity to gain influence within his organization.
>>
>>5062492
>>”Leave some men.”
>[Write in]
Leave as many people with is that you can reasonably spare without raising too many questions. Including Menials if possible, we'll arm and train them, and use brainwashing techniques to indoctrinate them with fighting abilities.
>>
>>5062492
>>”Remain here.”
We gonna loose STCs if we dont boys.
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave immediately.”
> [Write in]
In anticipation of boarding maneuvers, cycle out the station's atmosphere and replace it with an aerosolized cocktail of potent anti-fungal defoliants.
>>
>>5062492
>Leave men here
>Turn the outer atmosphere into a cocktail of anti-fungal spores shit.

Fucking orks
>>
>>5062520
Oh and
>Back up our STC's and shoot down that fucking Hulk
>>
>>5062521
yes! +1

Very important that we don't fuck ourselves over by forgetting to backup our STC databanks.
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave some men.”
>A reasonable middle ground. Though you’re confident that you can ensure the facility’s integrity, you can’t afford to spend months repairing damage. If the Magos leaves some of his men, you could equip them with the stockpiles, and send them to reinforce your robots and other automated defences, to minimise the damage.
As many as can be spared without raising too much suspicion.
>>
>>5062492
>>”Remain here.”
>>
>>5062501
>Remain
And Agreed. It makes no sense otherwise. Why would the orks prepare an orbital invasion fleet ready if they're looking to loot a moon that has been dead for 20000 years? The asteroids suggest that they're expecting extensive resistance, which makes no sense unless they've been informed beforehand.
>>
>>5062521
>>5062527
Back up everything. Hell, put that stuff down on SSD or HDD made of phase-iron.
>>
>>5062521
+1
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave some men.”
>Turn the outer atmosphere into a cocktail of anti-fungal spores shit.
>Back up our STC's
>>
>>5062573
+1
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave some men.”
Ground forces will be needed to support security drones but that ship will just end up being destroyed by the surface-to-orbit fire or the orks. Arm the skitarii with some volkite weapons and use them to plug any leaks. Open fire on the hulk and the towed asteroids as soon as they enter the maximum effective range of our surface batteries.
>>
>>5062492
I want to add an epithet.

We should prepare a blackboard cache with all our available software information, such as STC library and The Work, and tell him where we shall leave it in the worst case scenario. If we are about to die, our final act shall he to fill this cache with as much vital information as possible for Humanities rebirth.
>>
>>5062573
+1 Gonna join in on this quest.
>>
>>5062492
>”Leave some men if you have subordinates who can be trusted or servitors that can be converted for combat and their absence will not cause complications.”
We need to be careful how we kill the orks, we need to be able to clean up enough evidence and make it seem they showed up, found nothing of interest, started beating on each other and finally fucked back off into the warp after some self inflicted attrition.
>>
>>5062573
+1
>>
>>5062573
>Support
>>
“Leave some men. As many as you can spare without drawing attention - trained combatants or not.” You begin slotting an indeterminate number of human defenders into your tactical plans before you even receive a response. “I may not be able to return them intact.”

“I’ll send as many as I can, but my landers can only handle so many at a time, and if I divert too much of the crew or my skitarii someone will notice.” They don’t seem overly concerned by the prospect of casualties, or damage. “But time is limited. This ship will not survive combat with an entire ork invasion fleet. I cannot be in the system when they arrive.”

“Commence personnel transfer immediately. I will prepare equipment for them when they arrive.” You’re about to sign off, when you remember that you had somewhat of a plan brewing. “Would it be possible to convince your organisation that this facility is a lost forge world?”

“Possibly.” They reply, after taking a moment to think. “One that lost its original inhabitants to some sort of disaster? Blame it on the xenos, maybe. I’ll think of something, but it could work.” With that, you cease further transmission. Little more needed to be said between yourself and the Magos. You were people of few words.

As the drones begin shepherding confused ship menials and stoic skitarii deeper into the facility, towards the newly organised armouries, you begin preparation for the attack. You begin making backups of your STC databanks and files relating to the work, loading them onto secure drives which gravskimmers take to another secure location in the facility, deep in near the core. Unfortunately, there is a reason you hadn’t done this sooner: They’re very large files. Copying them takes time, and the storage devices, even as advanced as they are, are big and heavy. You estimate that you’ll be able to get most of the data on the work backed up, but only the most critical STCs. If everything goes right, though, you won’t need them.

You turn your attention back to the men unloaded by the Magos, just as they send one last transmission to confirm their departure. They’re an eclectic mix of ship-menials, just happy to be anywhere but a Mechanicus warship, low-to-mid ranking officers and enginseers, who range from confused to outright terrified, to a motley assortment of various sizes and shapes of skitarii and servitors, who bare the unique touches of their own masters, but are unified in their unflappability. All together, you have maybe another 10,000 men - very likely a significant fraction of the Magos’ total crew. It is somewhat concerning that there are still apparently not enough men mysteriously disappearing to raise suspicions.

[1/3(?)]
>>
>>5062681
[2/3]
Some of these men are more fit for combat than others. The skitarii need little additional coaxing to make effective soldiers. You outfit them with volkite weapons, personal refractors, and power armour, and reform their already existing squads, with heavy armour wearing officers as squad leaders. That still leaves a large number of untrained menials milling around in your warehouses, but fortunately you have an answer. You activate the combat augment array, and in an instant they are transformed. To list the numerous biochemical and mental changes they underwent in the space of less than five minutes would take an awfully long time, but suffice it to say they would now be more effective in combat, with an improved musculature, suppressed pain response, and a set of reworked neural pathways, effectively granting them the tactical experience and muscle memory of a veteran soldier. Not a single one would now live past the age of 50, but that was the price that had to be paid.

With the human auxiliaries preparing themselves, you begin preparing your external defenses. Orks are, strictly speaking, fungus. Though they’re more durable than your average mushroom, and much better armed, some fungicides have a notable effect on them. It’s not quite as effective as a nerve gas might be on a human, but an airborne fungicide could weaken them, and prevent them from laying any more spores. You wouldn’t want to spend the next eternity purging the surface of this moon. You begin pumping the fungicide through the top levels of the facility, and as much as you can spare out onto the surface. It’ll have some effect, though time will tell exactly how much of any effect that will be.

Once that’s all set up, you have little time left to wait before your sensors are able to start tracking the Orks. Just as the Magos said, they’re skipping in and out of the warp, making jumps of random length as they hop towards you. Once they cross the Mandeville point, though, that’s it - they’re cruising along on the force of their own engines. Through long range telescopes, you can make out the mass of mangled metal and the twisted spines of warships that the orks have pressed into service as a warship. Behind them, literally towed by cables of what must be incredible thickness and strength, are massive asteroids, some almost as large as the hulk itself. There can be no doubt of it: They’re heading your way, and they are, as orks always are, ready for a fight.

You’re familiar enough with ork tactics to begin preparing some tactical scenarios, and drafting some countermeasures in response.
>>
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>>5062684
[3/3]

In general, the orks will attack by dropping their asteroids into the planet, from which a large number of orks will emerge and launch their attack, while their conventional warships provide fire support and additional reinforcements from orbit. In this case, it’s likely the ork’s best troops and heavy equipment will be on the hulk, having diverted there to get involved in the fighting. Once on the ground, the orks will no longer employ anything resembling tactics. Squads of boyz will rampage at their whims or the whims of their boss. You’ll have to split your attention between the fight on the ground, and the fight in orbit, but how should you prioritise your anti-orbit firepower?

>[Focus on roks]
The roks are the real threat. By destroying those before they have the chance to break through your shield, you’ll avoid the damage of a rok impact, and avoid the orks that crawl out of them. The refractor shield should be able to handle the hulk’s bombardment, and your ground forces can handle the remaining reinforcements.

>[Split your fire]
Neither the roks nor the hulk present a more pressing target. You’ll fire at whatever targets make themselves available. You won’t pass up a tempting target just because you’ve set an arbitrary priority on one or the other.

>[Focus on the hulk]
The roks can only deal so much damage, and they’re likely to be filled with the ork’s least effective infantry. Allow them to land, take the damage, and focus on the hulk instead, preventing it from beginning an extended bombardment, deploying reinforcements, or facilitating a retreat.

...And what orders should you give your ground forces?

>[Spread out]
Order your ground forces to adopt defensive positions all throughout the upper layer of the facility. This will minimise the chance of any single impact destroying too much of your forces, and ensure that any ork incursions will be met by at least some force. Though you risk the line being too thin in places, you’re certain that your advanced equipment will give them the longevity they need.

>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
Concentrate your heavy robots and experienced human infantry into reaction forces, to launch counter attacks in response to ork incursions, while the less valuable robots and conscripted menials are deployed thinly through the tunnels to ensure that the orks are met by something.

>[Concentrate forces]
Concentrate all your forces into a small number of larger teams, and have them stand ready deeper in the facility. You can afford to allow the orks to break into the facility and take some ground, allowing you to defeat the ork’s incursions in detail, one at a time.

>[Write in]
Perhaps there’s some other tactics you have in mind, for the ground or orbit? Some specific strategy that might help win the day with minimal losses?
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on the Hulk]
Focus a ton of long range fire on the space hulk. Since none of the asteroids seem capable of moving under their own power, knocking the hulk out early might prevent it from dropping the asteroids into a proper collision course with our facility. If we're really lucky, the entire thing might blow up and scatter everything its currently towing. It also takes out their elites, so its a double win for us.

> [Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
Wait long enough for them to be affected by fungicide, then push in infantry. If we take out their heavies during the space battle, we'll probably be facing their worst infantry anyways
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]

I should have mentioned it in the earlier post but can we lay some space mines or nuclaer mines on their path? Maybe shoot some nuclear missiles at them or snipe their cables or engines with energy beams?
>>
>>5062698
Support.
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
If we blast all the roks out of the sky and the warboss realizes he has no chance in hell of busting our shields before his fleet and hulk get shot out of the sky he might just leg it after losing some of his lesser fleet elements.
If so the damage to the moon will be minimal making it just that much easier to deal with the 2cd explorator pass, especially if they thought the place would be filled with orks, they likely will assume the orks found nothing, fought eachother a bit, then blasted back off into the warp.
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>[Write in]
Have some soldiers directed to our biggest guns and have them fire at the Hulk.

>>5062749
Orks being reasonable? Unheard of. More likely than not, they'll try to trash the hulk into our base. They did it in Amedgeddon, twice I think.
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
Oh, yeah, on the topic of things coming our way: potentially proslavers, trannynids, Jeanstealers, and other hostile kinds of Aylmaos. Maybe even gay baby demons. Lots of bad stuff sticks around on space hulks.
>>
>>5062686
>Focus on Roks
>Elites concentrate, light forces spread

>Activate the systems defensive measures, mark orc aramarda as hostile.
I remember something earlier about defences outside of our world that would have blasted the exploratory fleet to cinders if they hadnt identified as friendly.
Let's use that as well.
>>
>>5062686
You know what this situation reminds me of? The Panacea Wars, and one of the most devastating things the orks there did was drop a space hulk right on top of the forge world’s Titan Legion. We might not have Titans but our core is still vulnerable and our partially backed up STCs are still unimaginably valuable. Also lol, we just flash converted a bunch of menials into assassins, that’s one at least one High Lord coming for our ass.

>[Focus on the hulk]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]

I assume that if we’re concentrating we’re also going to give our elites vehicles to turn them into a fast response force?
>>
>>5062686

>[Focus on the hulk]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
>>5062686
>>[Focus on roks]
>>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
>>5062686

>[Focus on the hulk]

>>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
>>5062686
>[Focus on roks]
>[Concentrate elites, spread out light forces]
>>
It’s awkward, but orders begin to filter down. You can only effectively communicate with the skitarii and other heavily augmented humans, but by using them as officers you’re able to organise the bulk of them into smaller teams, able to coordinate by radio. The command structure you set up is haphazard, but the experienced soldiers you’ve held back for maneuver and counterattack are your primary concern, and it seems like they’ll be able to respond fluidly. Commanding the menials might be more problematic, but if all goes well, you shouldn’t need to worry too much about them.

You organize the menials into larger teams of 10-20 men, with a single skitarii officer to lead them, and deploy them by internal trams to defensive positions in the upper layers of the facility around the expected landing points, and around the anti-orbit guns. Once they’ve taken up their positions, almost all of the locations where the orks can break through should be covered by at least one crew-served grav-cannon, and a dozen volkite rifles. You organise the remaining elite forces into smaller teams of 5-10 men, and keep them deeper in the facility, in position to move up and relieve the less experienced teams if necessary.

As support, you’ve given the skitarii officers with the menials control over some of the converted gravskimmers to use as light fire support, but more critically as reconnaissance, to help them cover more of the massive area the orks could attack. Though you would’ve liked to give the elite forces access to vehicles, the tunnels are too narrow for vehicles to effectively move through, with too many narrow doorways and other bottlenecks. Instead, you have the dedicated combat robots attached to those squads, to provide reactive heavy fire support. If the fighting spills out onto the moon’s surface, though, you’ll be able to redeploy some of your elite troops to the vehicles.

Your troops are still moving into position when the orks finally enter into the effective firing range of your guns. Almost as if they sensed the danger, the roks slip their binds. The massive tow cables explosively blown off, releasing the roks and allowing them to coast… until a massive, cartoonish plume of flame and smoke flares out behind them. Quickly, the roks begin to overtake the hulk and speed up, accelerating towards your moon, trailing improperly secured plating, weapons, and grots as they go. They’re very classically orky vessels. Jagged metal plates formed into the shape of an ork’s skull, in veneration of their gods, adorne weapons and observation decks. Cannons of truly apocalyptic bore diameters jut out of every available surface. The whole thing is coated in a paint scheme dreamt up by a madman. Paint has been liberally abused, the orks having marked their territory with as much blue and red paint as they could find.

[1/shit like, a lot]
>>
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>>5063082
[2/seriously, loads, I wrote too much]
You were glad that you’d chosen to blow them up first. The whole moon shudders as ancient mechanisms shake rust and dust free. Glaciers hundreds of meters thick and millenia old crack and are thrown aside, as though by the unconscious movements of a sleeping giant. Armoured blast shields emerge from the surface of the moon, retracting to allow weapons the size of some warships to roll forward into a ready position. The singularity cannon bunkers were mounted on an elevator system, allowing them to retract themselves back below the surface of the moon when not in use, or when under threat of direct impact. Now, for the first time in a very long time, they were exposed and ready to fire.

The guns swing around, their bore oscillating within the confines of their squat bunker-platforms, like a railway gun of the second millenium. You allow the hands of time holding the black hole at the facilities’ core to slip by a fraction faster, and feel the power surge through your systems. Confirming four singularity cannons have an angle, and are ready to fire, you feed them the required power to generate their own pale imitation of the black hole at the facility’s core. The huge cannons begin to radiate a purple-black energy from their titanic barrels as the chronodampeners fight the singularity’s own time warping effects.

With a single thought, you order the cannons to fire.

Gravity is warped, and pulled out of the cannons barrels at a speed rivaling the speed of light, the singularities fly towards their targets. On the moon, the barrels recoil with enough force to send their platforms rolling back, despite the efforts of the hydraulic systems in allowing the barrel to recoil and half-disappear back into their bunkers. The moon’s thin atmosphere is compressed by four simultaneous shockwaves that begin their journey around the moon. They’ll circle it completely three times before finally dying out. Anyone who would be unlucky enough to be within a kilometer of the gun on the surface without protection would’ve instantly died from the pressure. The roks have it worse.
>>
>>5063083
[3/????]
Moments after firing, the singularities make contact with their targets. The impact is immediate and devastating. Four singularities touch the silicate surface of the asteroids, passing through as though it simply wasn’t there. Any material lucky enough to be within a hundred meters of a singularity’s path is annihilated instantly, matter rendered down to a superheated quark-gluon plasma. Anything unlucky enough to be outside of that range is instantly immolated by the rapidly expanding cloud of energy radiating around it. Anything unlucky enough to be outside of the kilometer wide blast-zone of that finds itself pulled back and forth a few milliseconds through time by the effect of the singularity’s presence, causing parts of the rok to shift into itself, either instantly detonating, or warping and snapping under the sheer force. Finally, the singularities chronodampening wears off, causing reality to reassert itself. No longer chronoshifted, the singularities explode with the force of all the energy channeled into them. Two of the roks, already devastated by the impact, are unfortunate enough for that to occur while the singularity was still inside them. They are destroyed instantly. The two remaining singularities overpenetrate, detonating in a bright white flash that for a moment silhouettes the roks as it melts their silicate outer layer into molten soup.

In the space of a human heartbeat, all roks targeted are destroyed. Only the largest of the three retains any structural integrity, although it has broken into two smaller roks, one with a very large hole in it. Disappointing - you’ll have to recalibrate the chronodampeners to prevent future over penetrations.

The orks are only spurred on by the display, and soon your refractor shields are battered by poorly aimed ballistic weapons fire, rok debris, and poorly secured, high velocity grots. The hulk begins to decelerate, taking up position in high orbit over the moon, from which it can ‘safely’ rain fire down on your facility without entering the range of your las-lance anti-aircraft batteries. The handful of remaining roks, meanwhile, have no such luxury. You’d destroyed the largest four with the first volley of singularity fire, and while it would be nearly half an hour before you could fire those cannons again, your field will survive the hulks’ bombardment for longer than that, and the las-lances proved to be more than enough to blast apart the remaining roks, destroying most of them before they can even make contact with the field. Smaller chunks of asteroid rain down, most small enough that they harmlessly clatter off the facility’s armoured plating if they breach the ice layer at all.
>>
>>5063085
[4/5]

The las-batteries can’t get everything, though, and soon the larger chunks of rok are joined by innumerable ork landas, which begin running the gauntlet through your AAA fire as they make for the surface to deploy their angry green cargo. You preemptively deploy your elite teams to certain locations as you watch the orks storm the exposed parts of the facility, and force their way inside. As predicted, there are a higher than usual percentage of ork ‘nobs’, and other forces that pass for elite infantry amongst the orks. There are also a number of war machines deployed by the landas, though as much as the tight hallways pose a problem for you, the orks are equally unable to force their vehicles inside, and many of the crews dismount, resorting to fighting from foot just to get into the fight faster.

Your forces meet the orks wherever they break in, with varying levels of success. The menials, reinforced by combat augmentations, advanced equipment, and drones are more than a match for an average ork, or even some of the largest specimens, but eventually they’re overrun by sheer volume of green flesh. Though the fungicide has slown them down, the largest and angriest among them barely seem affected by the chemical warfare attempts, and have a disturbing tendency to shrug off volkite fire. Where highly concentrated, the largest orks’ primal rage and bestial instincts are enough to force open gaps in the line, and they begin to storm ahead. Most fan out, hungry for more fightin’, and the rest are met by your counter-intrusion teams, who’s experience and even more advanced and heavier equipment prove to be more than a match for the orks’ best. Wherever your menials are overrun, or when it looks like they’re going to be overrun, you activate the rad-emitters, killing dozens of orks at a time.

But no matter how many orks your men kill, there are always more. Your menials are slowly forced to abandon ground, and your lacking ability to control them starts to become problematic. While the combat augments force them to retreat in good order, they’re starting to spread too thin, opening gaps in the line through which teams of orks are able to surge. You cut off most of them, and order teams to intercept the rest. Soon, though, your forces are overwhelmed. While they’re performing well, your men can only be in so many places at once. You’re starting to feel a little less good about how this is going, and that feeling only deepens as you notice that the ork teams are converging on two major points - a factory complex, and one of the consolidated weapon stockpiles.
>>
>>5063086
[5/5]

This is a concern. The orks might be able to hold the line long enough to loot either one of those places, and while they’d probably be disappointed with a haul of fabricators, the loss of either would be a massive hit for you. It could, as you feared, set you back by months. You don’t have enough reaction teams to stop both pushes without risking another flank, and your menials are too difficult to command to effectively have them counter the push. You’ll need to do something, but what?

>[Focus on the armoury]
You CANNOT allow the orks to acquire those weapons, under any circumstances. They might trash the factory, but they’ll turn those weapons back on your men. It could shift the tide. Order the elites to cut off the orks heading to the armoury, before that can happen.

>[Focus on the factory]
You CANNOT allow the orks to destroy that factory complex, under any circumstances. They can take the weapons, but that factory complex represents a significant portion of your total capacity. It would take months, maybe years to repair, and leave you crippled in the meantime. Order the elites to cut off the orks heading to the complex, before that can happen.

>[Split up the elites]
You CANNOT allow the orks to reach either location, under any circumstances. Spend the lives the Magos has trusted you with. By splitting them up you’re risking them being overrun elsewhere, but it will allow you to scrape together enough men to prevent either incursion. Blood is cheap. That equipment is irreplaceable.

>[Something else - write in]
You’ve got something else in mind. Some plan you can use that might just save both locations, and prevent too many casualties. You’d best be sure about whatever you have in mind - this is a delicate situation, after all.
>>
Apologies for beating off all over your screens there. Won't happen again, I promise.
>>
>>5063087
>Write-in
Elites to focus on the armory. The Orks must be kept out.

As for the factory, I may have a double plan. First, use our drones and maybe refurbished skimmers to bait the Orks off course and/or into the rad-emmiters. Fragment and slow them down.
While that happens, mobilize our stockpile of "Conqueror, Thanatar, and Crusader designs" ( >>5062490 ) This is a major threat to the work, and we have replacement parts. Besides, losing this factory may slow us down in building more, so it's well worth the losses.

Overall, I say we stand a good chance of fragmenting the two attacks to the point of ineffectiveness, though I would appreciate other anons weighting in.
>>
>>5063093
Your heavy combat robots of those types have already been mobilised and are currently deployed to support your elite infantry.
>>
>>5063087
>[Split up the elites]
You CANNOT allow the orks to reach either location, under any circumstances. Spend the lives the Magos has trusted you with. By splitting them up you’re risking them being overrun elsewhere, but it will allow you to scrape together enough men to prevent either incursion. Blood is cheap. That equipment is irreplaceable.
>>
>>5063087
>[Split up the elites]
>Collapse the tunnels on top of the orks to reduce the numbers that will participate in the assault
(does not matter if they survive or not the important thing is to stretch them into managable numbers)
>>
>>5063087
>[Focus on the armoury]

They can't do much with the factory, we can self sabotage the equipment if they try to use it to build anything.

>[Something else - write in]
>Place Phase-Iron all over the place.
Also wouldn't the Phase-Iron nullify much or all of their orky powers so their guns and teck would stop working? Can we try lining the halls, intersections with the stuff? Maybe make some barricades out of the stuff and dump molten phase iron onto machinery so they can't even repurpose it without chiseling away metal.

We can also lock doors and bulkheads and try to channel the orks into choke points and kill zones so as to nullify their numbers advantage. >>5063107 We can blow or collapse some tunnels if the Rad Emitters won't cut it.

Perhaps we can do a open and shut door trick where we let some orks in, shut the door, fry them with the Rad Emitters, then open it again for the next group.
>>
Would it be possible to collapse access to either (or both) objectives, stranding the orks or funneling them into less critical districts?

Would it be possible to trick the orcs to fight each other, buying our forces more time to regroup?

Do we have suitably powerful ordnance we could deploy against advancing ork forces to soften them up or obliterate at cost of (less critical) infrastructure?
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>>5063087
>Something else - write in]
>You’ve got something else in mind. Some plan you can use that might just save both locations, and prevent too many casualties. You’d best be sure about whatever you have in mind - this is a delicate situation, after all.
Neither is acceptable but you must lose one in order to guarantee the safety of the other. Therefore defend the factory as it can be used to make more weapons later, but rather than just letting the weapons fall into ork hands set all the weapons power supplies to overload at the same time the orks will reach them thus denying them to the enemy and hopefully reducing their numbers further
>>
>>5063108
At present, you haven't noticed the facility's phase-iron skin have any noticable effect on the orks' weapons, or the orks themselves. It's possible that the effects of the WAAAGH interact with phase-iron differently to those of 'regular' empyreal phenomena.

>>5063109
You have explosively with high enough yield to effectively collapse tunnels, although it would risk damage to other parts of the facility at random. The number of collapses that you would need to orchestrate to compeletly halt the orks advance would take far too long to set up, due to the nature of the facility. A smaller number of tactical demolitions could slow their advance, and possibly thin them out, though it wouldn't be a solution on it's own.

The orks are currently quite happy fighting your own forces. It would take a really good idea to get them to fight one another.

You are already employing the largest man-portable weapons you have access to - larger vehicle grade weapons simply do not fit indoors.
>>
>>5063087
>>[Focus on the armoury]
>>
>>5063112
Huh. Oh well.

How about this idea:

Take the biggest gun in the armory, weld several other similarly big guns to it and put it onto an elevated position in the armory, give it prominent place where it will look like an irresistible prize. Hopefully the orks will fight for it, keeping them busy for a while.

Also, rig everything in the armoury to blow. Including the prize abomination.
>>
>>5063087
>[Focus on the armoury]

The loss of the factory is unfortunate - the loss of this stockpile could switch the tide of battle
>>
>>5063109
What if we dump pain onto them and see if we can confuse them by having "stray shots" hit two differently pained group of orks?
>>
>>5063136
*paint*
>>
If we can't block off the tunnels, can we at least flood them with coolant/superheated steam/water to slow them down?
>>
>>5063087
>>[Focus on the armoury]
>[Something else - write in]
Begin to registrate orks voices. Then use them to make them offend eachother, by creating holograms of realistic orks as well creating voices around from walls, the floor and so on.

Break their army unity, and ensure they kill eachother enough as they attempt to do with us.
Otherwise ? A long fighting with a very real risk of a draw or a phyrric victory.
Technology is not enough.
Deception is key, use it.

In addition see if is possible to teleport explosives on their main ship, their ship is unlikely to be fully protected by this. One opening is needed.
>>
>>5063138
that could be a nice idea to do too. We don t have numbers at the moment, unless we could make war robots that can travel our tunnels.
The liquids wouldn t harm many of them but at least slow down which is useful
>>
>>5063087
>[Focus on the armoury]
>write-in: Broadcast to the ork boss and challenge it to a duel, then shoot it with something it can’t walk off.

Fucking orks. We should have just blown the hulk out of the sky and let the primitives fight each other for control, now we’re doing this. Keep the orks out of the armory so they don’t get battle changing weapons and hopefully find what the boss is doing if he’s not fighting.
>>
>>5063087
If possible, remotely deactivate the weapons in the armory before the Orks reach them. Otherwise, hope that Ork fingers are too fat to make effective use of weaponry designed for humans
>>
>>5063140
This fellow has the right idea. We need to start separating and parceling out the orks so that they start fighting one another. You never face a WAAAGH with your face but from the sides.

If it is possible, maybe use some Flamethrowers to burn the Orks. It's the perfect tool for preventing fungi.
>>
>>5063087
>>[Focus on the armoury]
>>
>>5063087
> [ Focus on the armoury]
> [Something else - write in]
Do we have the capability to quickly convert deceased orkoids into something akin to servitors?
We could distract the orks by deploying tactically placed swarms of punchy mushroom meatpuppets. Give them the fight they're so eager for.
>>
>>5063087
>[Focus on the armoury]
An Ork WAAAAGH! is scary on it's own, an Ork WAAAAGH! with Volkite Weaponry is a nightmare. We can always rebuild a foundry, but the amount of havoc these organic war machines can cause with Volkite weapons could be greater still than just the loss of the foundry.
>>
>>5063087
>[Split up the elites]
>Tactically demolish a number of tunnels to slow and thin the ork advance
>use spare or low value items from the foundry and armoury as bait for traps and delays, if you can tap into ork communications to learn enough to start imitating various orks of decent enough rank, attempt to get the mobs to fight over the "exposed" caches you left as traps and delays.
We need to think outside the box here to get maximum damage control, we can mimic the orks somewhat but they need a excuse right now to beat the crap out of each other, shiny gubbins or "good" guns coupled with orkish avarice and well placed prodding can get them eating eachother. If that fails we can jerk them around and blow them up by exploiting the fact they will go for a "easy" and "quick target over marching to the real prize.
>>
>>5063140
>>5063109
>>5063093
I think we should do a combination of these. Use more promethium weapons since it works really well in narrow places. Fill hallways with more oxygen so irks burn faster. collapse or close off tunnels to redirect orks into kill boxes, spam more radiation, get the orks to kill themselves, put PA messages stating only the biggest and bestus ork gets the loot and only one.
Here's my piece I want to add to your suggestions. Pull some unimportant weapons like boaters and cannons from the armory, something we won't care about if destroyed or stolen. Slap on some Ork appealing metal bits that make no sense, color it red, then rig them to explode.
>orks see FINE ASS LOOT
>tries to loot
>dies from explosion
like what that one anon suggested about putting the DAKKA where all the orks can see.
>>
>>5063087
>[Split up the elites]
The Magos certainly doesn't seem to care about the lives, and this equipment is extremely valuable, so let's make sure the equipment doesn't get fucked over.
>>
>>5063112

We have combat drugs on hand, which we used to juice up our humans.

Do we have any combat drugs that work on Orkoid physiology? Anything that would promote infighting.
>>
[1/4? I promise I'm trying to get these reponses shorter]

The attack has gotten bad enough as it is. You can’t risk the orks reaching the weapon stockpiles and making it worse. With your time and resources reaching their stretching point, you opt to take extreme measures. With one order, you organise all remaining elite forces that aren’t currently engaged into a single spearhead, and rush them through the tunnels to cut off the main thrust of the ork advance, with the aim of cutting off their push before they can reach the armoury, in the process inevitably allowing the orks to make it to the factory complex, though you do whatever you can to slow them down in the process, ordering drones to skirmish with them, detonating coolant lines, and sealing bulkheads in their path. They might lose a few toes to frostbite, and waste a few bomms breaking through the bulkheads, but you know it won’t stop them, only slow them down.

You watch through the cameras as the vanguard of your elite forces make contact with the orks. Infiltrators and ruststalkers, hastily reclad in ill-fitting power armour and rearmed with volkite weapons skirmish with the fringes of the ork advance. Unable to resist the challenge, increasingly large volumes of orks cease their advance, clogging the hallway as the endless tide of green idiots clamber over each other to shoot at the handful of skitarii they’ve engaged.

The skitarii prove the value in the augments, and the value of the equipment they’ve been given. Consummate soldiers, they seem to have had little trouble adjusting to the new weapons, and the weight of their power armour. Even if they did look awkward in the armour that was clearly built for someone with human arms and legs, they moved with a fluidity and grace that’s verifiably supernatural. They take cover around corners and in alcoves as they press the advance - one group holds position and provides covering fire while the other leaps forward into the next piece of cover. It’s good practice, but utterly pointless against the completely fearless orks, who are unmoved by a red-white lance of heat causing their friend’s face to evaporate and explode in a shower of superheated steam and fleshy giblets.

The orks, if they’re known for anything, are known for firepower, and every ounce of dakka they have is brought to bear. The sheer amount of lead in the air is impressive, but the orks become increasingly frustrating when the humies prove more resilient than normal. Shimmering fields of refracted light flare when heavy chunks of lead threaten to strike, deflecting them from their course, and even when those fields fail, it takes numerous repeated shots to finally break their advanced armour. They do break, though, and while the orks have certainly come off worse, the skitarii are beginning to suffer casualties, forcing them to shelter in place and await reinforcements.
>>
>>5063248
[2/4]

Just as the main bulk of both sides arrive, the hallway becomes literally clogged with orkoid corpses, forcing your forces to find another way through, and causing the orks to become bored and go look for another fight. The two groups find each other again soon enough, as forward elements of your main elite force literally run directly into the faster of the orks. This time, the fight is much more one sided. Your robots prove as brutally effective in close quarters as they are in providing fire support. Thanatars, the largest robots you’re capable of fielding indoors, rip orks (literally) in half as they form the frontline, backed up by your smaller robots and human auxiliaries. Though only one or two thanatars can physically fit side by side in even the widest halls, you’re able to use their size and weight to your advantage, ordering them to (when they’re not smashing ork nobs to pieces with their graviton rams) physically push through even the largest orks, breaking up the single ork thrust into numerous smaller mobs.

With that single (accidental) ambush, and subsequent scattering, the main ork force attacking the armoury had been blunted. Remaining orks could be scattered and dealt with piece by piece, and the pressing threat had been destroyed. Unfortunately, this cost you the factory. Switching through cameras, you watch as the orks pry open the doors and immediately flood inside one of the largest factory complexes in the facility. They take a few moments to wildly fire their weapons as suspicious looking shadows, but they head in and begin looting. Advanced automated assembly lines, plasma forges, nanolathes, nanite hubs, and other pieces of technology so obscenely valuable and irreplaceable that it’d make a tech priest erect are carelessly ripped out of their housings or pulled out of the ground by orks armed with nothing more advanced that a crowbar, and unceremoniously stuffed in a bag. The damage they’ve done to the factory in mere moments will already take weeks to repair, though you’re forced to imagine, as you order the now victorious elites over to the factory, how much more damage is about to be done.

You don’t have to imagine it for long. The orks have, to a man, abandoned fightin’ in favour of lootin’, and so they’re ill prepared for the sudden reappearance of your forces, spearheaded once again by thanatars and skitarii. The factory was a dense woven hive of mechanical components, broken up by wide open assembly and storage areas. With the orks now spread out in them like giant green ants, what followed was a nightmare of small-scale combat with individual orks throughout the factory complex. Every missed shot added days onto your predicted repair time, and every second the orks remained inside added hours, as they continued digging into the guts of the facility, ripping apart the factory for shiny gubbins only to, moments later, be vaporized by a volkite blast.
>>
>>5063250
[3/4]

It takes entirely too long for you to fully sterilize the factory, but you manage it with minimal casualties to your best forces. In the meantime, it seems that the orks’ attacks have thinned out. The hulk seems to have expended all it’s reinforcements, and for the first time, orks are actually leaving. Landas take off, rushing back to the hulk. Many are shot down by your defences, but not all of them are. Any orks that get away are almost certainly carrying looted weapons and other items that belong to you, and if they manage to get away, they could tell their friends about the great loot and the great scrap they had. You’re already going to have to be on high alert for spores - you really don’t want to deal with another wave of orks.

There are enough orks still on the ground that they’re not to be taken lightly, but the fight is now all but won. Something’s bothering you, though - you haven’t seen the warboss yet. You assume he’s a Deathskull, due the the prominence of members of the clan in his forces, but that’s about all you know of him. If he is on the ground, none of your forces have reported seeing him, and you hadn’t seen him on the cameras. It’s possible that he’s on the surface, but it’s impossible to be sure: You don’t have cameras out there that don’t point up, and your forces were ordered to defend the inside of the facility rather than risk themselves out in the open, which proved to be wise given the ork’s numbers.
>>
>>5063087
Do we have any stores of extremely volatile chemicals such as chlorine trifluoride? If so, pack the drones that will fit through the halls with as much of those as their grav drives can support with some explosives to spray the chemicals everywhere. Stagger these with other drones carrying high explosives & anything that will work as shrapnel. Ball bearings, metal scraps, any depleted uranium would be great, it's pyrophoric and will not only shred smaller orks but set others on fire. Defend the armory as the highest priority and just cause a massive industrial accident in the factory. Halon fire suppression systems? Activate them. Intentionally short any electric arc furnaces into the ground and fry anything near by. The works.
>>
>>5063252
[4/4]

The battle is on a timer, though the orks couldn’t possibly know it. They have, at most, another ten minutes before the cannons are ready to fire again, and while it would be possible for them to get out of range within that time frame, they’d need to pack up and leave very soon to make it. Right now, there’s a lull in the fighting, and you have some time to form a plan.

>[Redeploy the elites]
They’re fresh from their second fight, and ready for a third. You’ll have them load into the skimmer-transports, push through the line, and then break out onto the surface. You’ll be able to cut off the orks before they can retreat back to their landas, and if the elites discover something weird, they’re well armed enough to deal with it - more so with armour support - so they won’t need to wait for backup like a small recon team would.

>[Order a full assault]
The orks are waning. Order a mass assault across the whole line to shatter them. You may not have the best control over all the menials, but they should be able to follow a one word order. You expect casualties as they abandon their defensive positions, but it should ensure that if something goes wrong, you’ll have minimised the material the orks could loot.

>[Order everyone to hold fast]
There’s no need to be hasty. Send a few recon drones out there to scout, and report back, but in the meantime your forces will hold position and whittle the orks down. There aren’t enough of them to pose a threat, whether they’re on the surface or in the tunnels, and all you’ll accomplish by launching an attack now is to waste your own strength.
>>
>>5063253
Ah fuck I was just short.
>>
>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]
Hey QM could you put down the way you handle votes in words for the thread? Would be nice to know if your doing basic first past the post or something more involved like 2cd primarch quest way of vote counting.
Also its sad that a bunch of anons were suggesting thing after thing but never actually put down green text to support that thing regardless of what main option won.
Back on topic, these orks have to be puppeted by someone, they likely have a surprise in store so we should just send out the elites in force to stall them long enough to vaporize the hulk.
>>
>>5063258
First past the post, though if write ins aren't winning, I'll consolidate them into the most similar given option and try to include aspects of them where possible. It's not really anything formal, I'm just trying to gauge what the thread wants, generally speaking. If you'd like a more involved system, I could probably work something out. I don't want people feeling too left in the dark.
>>
>>5063254
> [Redeploy the elites]
>>
>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]

hey qm what was damaged or destroyed in the factory can be repaired/replaced or are we fucked?
>>
>>5063268
we're fucked, armory fags ruined mankind's future for some pew pew
>>
>>5063268
>[Redeploy the elites]
hopefully, this will delay the works long enough so we can destroy the hulk.
>>
>>5063268
There's almost nothing in the facility you couldn't repair or replace given enough time or resources, and you still have other factory complexes capable of manufacturing replacement parts, or whole units. It will take significant time and resources to repair, though determining how much of both will require a full inspection of the damage.
>>
>>5063273
it will take months to fix but it's not irreparable. also, it wasn't so we could have some pew pew it was to stop the orks from getting it and making the attack worse.
>>
>>5063277
no the dream is ded and you killed it
>>
>>5063275
oh ok
>It will take significant time and resources to repair
time will be a minor inconvenience but the resources are going to be a pain in the ass to get
>>
>>5063279
just look at the QM's post above my last one.
>>5063275
>>
>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]
They’re fresh from their second fight, and ready for a third. You’ll have them load into the skimmer-transports, push through the line, and then break out onto the surface. You’ll be able to cut off the orks before they can retreat back to their landas, and if the elites discover something weird, they’re well armed enough to deal with it - more so with armour support - so they won’t need to wait for backup like a small recon team would.
>>
>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]

Qm, is there a mechanics system that you’re working with or is this more narrative because there hasn’t been any dice rolled in thread.
>>
>>5063264
Think that this system works pretty well. Also appreciate the high quality writing.

>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]
Do we have anything that can stop these guys from leaving the surface? Can we lower the velocity threshold of the refractor shields to catch the shuttles? Since they seem capable of blocking ballistic weapon fire, I don't see why they wouldn't be capable of blocking larger and slower objects too.
>>
>>5063300
Narrative. When the stakes start to get higher I might request rolls. I'm hesitant to include stats or anything like that because of how the scale could/will vary, but I'm not entirely against the idea.

>>5063302
Glad you're enjoying it.

While lowering the velocity threshold of the refractor field wouldn't be difficult, calibrating them to block objects coming in from within the barrier would take longer than you have, and would likely prevent you from firing on the hulk in the meantime.
>>
>>5063254
>[Order a full assault]

Anons are retarded when it comes to sacrificing lives for the sake of keeping our facility operational. Live are cheap in this setting. Our technology and production facilities aren't. The more time we take repairing our broken production capacity is time that could be spend researching, producing supplies vital to humanity's survival, or beefing up our defensive capabilities further. Trying to save lives that were destined to die for the Imperium at the cost of our production capabilities is a fucking stupid waste, and y'all know it.
>>
>>5063321
I would rather have some infantry support on our strategic defenses than to leave them open for any kind of attack
>>
>>5063321
I see that you can’t read. Nobody who voted to defend the armory did it to save lives, they did it to stop the orks from taking weapons that they would immediately use on us. If the orks had gotten to the armory then the narrow stalemate we were in would have swung in the ork’s favor and at that point you can kiss the entire station goodbye.
>>
>>5063330
If word gets out to the Orks that this place is great for looting, we'll be dealing with constant incursions instead of a one-off mess to clean up. Every life spent now is a future baker's dozen saved, production and repair time saved, and future hassles dealt with. It is worth it to keep our technology and word of it out of our enemies' hands.
>>
>>5063254
>[Order a full assault]
let's try to minimize tech proliferation
>>5063248
don't apologize about length mate this is great
>>
>>5063333
I did read, you didn't. If we split our elites it would've lead to incursions to non-essential parts of the facility, not to the armory or the factory. It even said so in the description of the split option. You just decided to trash our factory to ensure that lives were saved elsewhere, not in defense of both critical areas. Next time think with your brain instead of you gut anon.
>>
>>5063305
QM how well guarded are the important parts of the facility even if we ordered a full assault? My concern is kommandos, eldar, chaos fuckers, or something else sneaking in and fucking us up while everyone is killing greenskins.
>>
>>5063254
>[Redeploy the elites]

We should try baiting the orks to come back and fall into a trap, calling them weak puny cowards who were too scared to fight for better loot and ran from the poorly defended armor that had the better loot with lots of dakka.

Should try and bait them into the kill zone again.
>>
>>5063369
The facility would be well defended enough that any infiltrators would be challenged, giving you long enough to recall your forces.
>>
>>5063254
>>[Order a full assault]

We've already taken too much damage. The lives the Magos gave us are expendable, whether he likes it or not.
>>
>>5063254
>>[Order a full assault]
>>
>>5063254
>[Order a full assault]
>>
>>5063254
>>5063258
>[Order a full assault]
Changing my vote, was paranoid over puppet masters making a move but we have enough security to throw everything at them. Time to make up somewhat for the fact we threw away the factory when it was unnecessary.
>>
>>5063254
>[Order a full assault]
>>
>>5063254
>Redeploy.
>make a lot of noise to attract the orks back
>>
>>5063432
With this in mind, changing to Full assault.
>>
>>5063437
Then order a full assault.
>>
[1/4?]

You can ill afford another ork attack, and with the factory complex damaged it is now critical for you to ensure that no further material can be stolen by the orks. The tide is about to turn. All you need to do is give it a little push.

You order the menials to push the orks back to their transports and force your line forward. The effect is immediate. You watch through your cameras as your forces leap from their entrenched positions into the ork’s waiting guns, any fear, pain, or exhaustion suppressed by the combat augments. Had their equipment been anything other than the best, they would’ve been cut down, but the small window of opportunity given to them by the refractor fields and their power armour is ruthlessly exploited. Firing on the move, your menials don’t just drive the orks back, but drive them into the grave. For every menial that falls, twice as many orks are cut down, and with every step they take forwards, they’re only improving the ratio.

Soon, your forces have pushed the orks back to the original line, and then with another push, out onto the surface on the moon. Fortunately, the power armour is pressure sealed and is unaffected by the thin atmosphere. The orks, on the other hand, don’t seem to have noticed that they’re operating in .2atm, and continue fighting with the same fervor they had indoors. Ork trukks and battlewagons are hastily recrewed by the retreating orks, who add their vehicles firepower to the fight. It’s enough firepower to cut down the first wave of menials caught out in the open, forcing the rest back into the facility, leaving their comrades bodies’ to cool in the open.

Then, with just less than perfect timing, your own vehicles begin to arrive, emerging from elevator shafts and wide garage doors as they rocket out over the ice. Skimmer-transports, armed and armoured better than most ‘modern’ tanks, with a land speed comparable to most air superiority fighters, carry their cargo into the fray, their heavy weapons blazing away. While their skitarii crew would’ve found the angular, plain vehicle more alien than the orks, they seemed to understand how to operate it well enough. If you didn’t know better, you might think they were having fun as you watch one of the transports drift over a mob of orks, firing it’s grav cannons into a nearby trukk, while also deploying a ruststalker from it’s rear hatch, who lands on one of the orks, transonic-razor first. This scene repeats itself across the length and breadth of the battlefield as any semblance of organisation breaks down, devolving the fight into an extended series of duels and squad-scale combat.
>>
>>5063747
[2/3?]

Your robots plow into the fray, your thanatars now free to deploy their mortars to annihilate entire ork squads in a single shot, while your conquerors and crusaders shred any that survive. Behind them, thousands of skitarii fall into well practiced ranks around their designated officers, decades of experience proving it’s value as they remain calm, cool, and collected in the chaotic battle that rages around them. The tech-adepts of the mechanicus, though far out of their depth, make surprisingly effective repairs to your damaged robots, even if their attempts would be far more effective if they dispensed with the chanting. When not effecting repairs, they’re far more at home commanding their skitarii, or carving out their own unique battlefield niche by force, with their own deeply personal mix of cybernetics and arcane weapons, some of which defy easy identification by even you.

You watch all this happen through the eyes and ears of your robots, and while it’s certainly a spectacle, there’s something wrong. You still haven’t found the warboss. There has to be one, and if you know anything about orks, you know that they wouldn’t be able to resist a fight like this. You banish the thought as you receive a report: The singularity cannons are almost ready to fire again. Soon, the warboss’ strange behaviour won’t matter. Just as you’re about to begin the firing sequence, though, you’re interrupted by a wall of error reports. Across the battlefield soldiers are thrown to their knees as the ground heaves, ice cracking open like the maw of some great beast, swallowing dozens of orks and skitarii alike, before slamming shut as the ground drops back down. There’s a second wave of thunder as a deafening metal clang rolls across the battlefield, then silence. What the hell was that? You scan the horizon, looking for the source of the disruption as the remaining combatants pick themselves up and resume the slaughter.

Then you see it: One of the singularity cannons is under attack. No, that’s not right - it’s being looted!

The orks have worked incredibly quickly, constructing what looks like a spindly gantry around the bottom half of the cannon out of scrap from the roks. That’s not the concerning part, though, because there’s no way they could physically drag the cannon to orbit even if they got it out of it’s housing. What’s concerning is the thin pool of aetheric energy crackling above it, the massive engines they’ve strapped to it, and the giant balloons tugging it upwards. You almost suffer a critical logic error looking at the scene. None of this should be physically possible, but you’re forced to accept reality. The orks are trying to rip the cannon from its housing to teleport it away.

You are apoplectic with rage.
>>
>>5063749
[3/3]

Their first attempt to wrench it free of their housing has caused shorts throughout the defence grid, delaying the warm-up process for the guns. Fortunately, you won’t be starting from scratch, but it has set back their activation by minutes you can’t afford. With most of the landas and remaining orks dead, thanks to the intensity of your counter attack, you don’t need to be too concerned about many escaping back to the hulk, the anti-aircraft defences should be able to handle the rest, freeing your hands. You order the elites over to the cannon. Though it’s a significant distance there that the menials simply won’t be able to cross in time to do anything about it, the skimmer-transports are more than fast enough to make it there, and the minor damage the orks were capable of inflicting on them is trivial enough for them to shrug it off.

It’s now clear to you, though, that the orks must have premeditated this attack. All this would’ve required simply too much planning and reconnaissance to be a fluke, and prior to a few days ago, no-one in the galaxy even knew you were here. It almost seems more likely that a warboss that just happens to have a planetary invasion WAAAGH! might be ready to steal extremely large guns at a moment's notice than that same warboss being able to effectively reconnoiter your position without you noticing, and then assemble an entire WAAAGH! in four days.

Something very weird was happening here, and you need to get to the bottom of it before things get any stranger. Capturing the warboss and torturing him for information might work, but trying to restrain a possibly thallax-sized ork is liable to cause casualties, or potentially give them an opportunity to escape, or cause some additional damage before finally being neutralised. Whatever you do, though, you aren’t going to let the ork loot that cannon, and thanks to your elites already being on the field, you won’t need to risk it happening. What orders will you give them regarding the warboss, though?

>[Kill on sight]
You’re not going to risk them getting away, or sabotaging something else. He’s caused enough damage. If your forces catch sight of an ork of unusual size, or an ork wearing a particularly fancy hat, they’ll turn it to ash immediately.

>[Capture]
This whole situation is too weird. You’ll ensure that ork is captured and questioned, however many lives it takes to do it. You need to get to the bottom of this now, before things can escalate any more.
>>
>>5063755

>[Capture]
This whole situation is too weird. You’ll ensure that ork is captured and questioned, however many lives it takes to do it. You need to get to the bottom of this now, before things can escalate any more.
>>
>>5063755
>>[Kill on sight]

We have repairs to do.
>>
>>5063755
>>[Capture
>>
>>5063755
>[Capture]
Blood is cheap and getting at least basic info on who is puppeting this ork would be worth the cost.
>>
>>5063755
[Capture]
>>
>>5063755
>[Kill on sight]

We can't afford for this ork to live or be captured, why? Because we have A LOT to do and making sure that an ORK WARBOSS dosn't fuck around while we hold him capture is not what we want to use our time on, even if it would give us some answers.
>>
>>5063755
>[Capture]
Realize that, the warboss doesnt need arms or legs
>>
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>>5063755
>[Capture]
>orks conveniently get our location with complete tactical knowledge
>instantly know it's Eldar

The fucking Eldar are doing this, they're getting their elf butts dissected after we deal with the orks.
>>
>>5063755
>[Kill on sight]
>>
>>5063841
Yep. Orks can survive a LOT of punishment. Given how good our medical installations must be, I'm tempted to give our elites the order to use industrial cutters to remove it's limbs and whatever ports of it's trunk prove necessary to pacification.

Helsreach had an ork survive with just it's head for dozens of minutes. A basic Ork. That warboss has an entire WAAGH believing in him. He'll be fine until we can get him in a giant insulated test tube filled with fungicide.
>>
>>5062504
>>5063854
Someone better pick up that phone because i called it
>>
>>5063854
We're going to murder scores of them later, then experiment on their soul stones.

>>5063866
An easy work around to prevent them deteriorating due to an inability to fight, would be to install implantable in their mind to make them believe they're in a fight. We only need to do that every once in a while.
>>
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>[Capture]
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>>5063755
>[Capture]
Have the cannon self destruct a nanosecond after it leaves the moon. Maybe have it overload and kill anyone inside it or near it and slag the cannon. Plant bomb on it if we need to.
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>>5063755
> [Capture]
>>
>>5063755
>>[Kill on sight]
>>
>>5063755
>[Capture]
>>
I just want to build shit man. Fucking orks, eldar, and other bullshit

Since the factory is busted, should we consider doubling down on defense weapons? The super kill you lasers are nice, but they're absolute shit if they require a half hour cool down. I think we should make upscaled volkite cannons, or nova cannons. Yeah, let's make some surface to space Nova cannons, in addition to several missile batteries.
Fuck and we're also gonna need to figure out how to fix our spores problem, in addition to adding additional cameras and camera redundancies so we can lose track of things.

>>5063755
Are we capable of self replication? I'd rather we have copies of ourself dedicated to survalence, weapons, manufacturing, and learning how to be sociable for diplomacy reasons.
>>
>>5063994
While replication would theoretically be possible, it would require a computer system of comparable power and storage capacity, and a significant amount of time to preform. Not only would this be a significant drain on resources, but it would leave you incapacitated for the duration of the copying process. There is also the possibility that this copy may be corrupted, either by mundane replication errors, or (if phase iron was not used in the construction of the computer system) empyreal influence.
>>
>>5063755
>[Capture]

If Tzeentch or the eldar aren’t behind this I’ll eat a shoe, but first we need confirmation. Also, why are our guns so slow to fire? You’d think doat defenses wouldn’t get overwhelmed by a handful of roks towing a hulk.
>>
>>5064000
Well shit okay. What about lesser A.I.s like super servators?
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>>5064003
Your defenses are primarily designed to provide support to a nearby fleet, or to soften up an invading force before landing, hence a smaller number of very heavy weapons that are too large to place on even a captial ship were deemed optimal for that role. Under optimal conditions, such a large scale enemy offensive would've been detected weeks in advance, and a fleet would be dispatched to intercept it.

>>5064006
The production of lesser AIs would take a proportionally smaller investment of both resources and time, and provide a proportionally lesser degree of intelligence.
>>
>>5064003
Feel like we're in a situation where our weapons are simply unsuited for "modern" combat. Kinda like pitting a guided missile destroyer against a bunch of Somalian speedboats. That being said, we should definitely think about up-armoring once we have the chance. I'm personally in favor of saturating orbital space with stealth mines.

>>5063755
>[Capture]
All we really need is is the head. Since we have good scanners, maybe we don't even need to interrogate it. Just trawl the warboss and dump the body.
>>
>>5064013
>The production of lesser AIs would take a proportionally smaller investment of both resources and time, and provide a proportionally lesser degree of intelligence.
That's fine. That's all we'd really need actually.
>>
>>5063994
Laser and Plasma based point defenses and AA.
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>>5064027
And some hangerbays to deploy interceptors, additional surface garages to deploy vehicles, factories to create augmentations for soldiers, more terminator tier armor for riot suppression.
>>
>>5064035
Special light weight fast hover craft with shields to transport light infantry inside our corridors.

Internal turrets and special kill rooms that collapse and cut off an area with 50 tons of metal.
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>>5064035
We also need nuclear space mines.
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>>5064039
>>5064042
Yeah. We got a lot on our plate today. I think we should delegate some of the basic bitch repairs (bulk heads, weapons, robots) to the techpriest and enginseers while we focus on more complex things like the factory. I think these technophiles would love to live in our instillation if they could so help it. Itd probably be fine so long as they dont vandalize or put Graffiti of their cult everywhere.

>The damage they’ve done to the factory in mere moments will already take weeks to repair, though you’re forced to imagine, as you order the now victorious elites over to the factory, how much more damage is about to be done.
So after the fight over the factories, it's safe to assume it might take one or two months to get it all fixed, maybe a month AT BEST if we let the tech priests help.

>>5063755
I honestly thought it was kinda funny when you said the modified menials would only live up to 50 years. That's honestly doubling their life expectancy if they were to stay on the ship.
>>
>>5063755
>Capture.
The orc can survive a few lost limbs.
>>
[1/6?I lied.]
The elite forces board their transports and reorganise themselves again while the remaining menials push up again, over piles of ork and human corpses, and begin to grind the remaining orks down into dust. The threatened singularity cannon grows on the horizon as the transports zip towards it, firing their main grav-cannons at the orkish contraptions around it. It was a risk, but one that pays off. Focused graviton-beams strike the thruster assemblies and rickety gantries, causing them to suddenly collapse in on themselves under the phantom tug of their own massively amplified gravitational force, leaving them crumpled, fractured, and utterly inoperable, ensuring that no matter the damage that might come to the cannon, the orks won’t be escaping with it any more.

As your transports close in, they’re pelted by fire from the orks infesting the cannon. A shower of lead, poorly aimed rockets, and very optimistically thrown grenades rain down around them. Only a tenth of the fired ammunition actually lands within twenty meters of the fast moving skimmers, and of that only another tenth actually hits it. Despite the poor accuracy, the transports’ refractor shields begin to struggle under the sheer rain of shells. A lucky rockit strikes one of the transports, hitting the vulnerable anti-grav emitters on the left side, causing the transport to violently veer off to one side, before diving into the ice and promptly crumpling from the sudden deceleration, doubtless killing the crew in the process. The effort to get to the cannon at speed continues to claim a few more transports, before they reach the foot of the bunker-complex beneath it.

The bunker itself is nearly a hundred meters tall, and is layered with anti-aircraft firepower to prevent exactly this sort of thing from happening. They must’ve landed some distance away and stormed the position while your forces were busy holding off the assault. You check through internal cameras, and notice that the inside of the bunker itself is clear save for the handful of menials left inside to defend it. Rather than trying to break inside, it looks like the orks have forcibly welded the doors shut, preventing themselves from being flanked from behind for the moment. It would be trivial to break them open ordinarily, but it would’ve taken too long to get the equipment needed to the troops in the bunker. Besides, with most of your troops already committed outside, taking the transports was the only reasonable way to have gotten to the gun in time anyway.
>>
>>5064062
[2/6?]

It was a surprisingly kunnin’ plan, all things considered. The diversionary attack proved effective enough at holding your attention that you couldn’t launch reconnaissance missions, and even if you’d seen through the diversion, there would’ve been little you could’ve done without risking the ‘diversionary’ attack breaking through into the facility and wreaking havoc. They very nearly did already. By sealing themselves outside of the bunker, they ensured that they wouldn’t attract any attention during the main attack, and couldn’t be flanked once they were engaged. Not genius, but certainly better than you’d expect of an ork.

The fight ahead of your elites was to be brutal - first they had to scale the outer defences, battling their way up level after level of crenelated defences, clearing out the ork’s scrap barricades and firing positions all while under fire from the levels above. If the troops you had were any worse, this would be impossible. Instead, it was just really, really difficult.

Your men begin the push, allowing the heaviest and best defended robots to absorb the bulk of the orks’ fire as they push in. The atomantic shielding on your ancient thanatars proves more than a match for even their heaviest firepower, allowing them to act as the tip of the spear, smashing through each ork position one at a time, allowing the conquerors and crusaders to swarm in after them and clean up, while the skitarii and tech-priests lay down withering covering fire.

The further your men push up, the less fire they’re exposed to, but the more frequent ork ambushes become. Your forces are attacked from floors you thought clear, and are regularly attacked from every direction. Ork kommandos, hiding amongst the bodies of their fallen kin, or in dark corners just out of sight, emerge with knives to cut down a skitarii, or badly damage one of your robots, before they’re cut down in turn. Their tactics prove to be increasingly frustrating for you, as no amount of double checking each floor, and burning the bodies seems to stem the tide. Despite the ork’s best efforts, your men finally reach the top of the bunker.

There, the warboss has set up his field headquarters, in the shadow of the massive cannon. There’s no doubt that it’s his headquarters. Orks are simplistic creatures, and the squat fortification, bristling with guns and radio antennae, sporting a fetching blue paint job, and proudly displaying a giant banner depicting a squig’s head, could only be one thing.
>>
>>5064065
[3/6?]

You order the elites in, through a gauntlet of incoming fire from the orks. The kommandos are out in full force now, having abandoned sneakin’ in favour of fightin’. It seems like almost every single one of the remaining orks are kommandos, and there must be hundreds of them, appearing out of cover to fire off a burst of automatic fire, or launch a rokit before vanishing again. Your elites are forced to carefully consider each shot before they fire it, so as to ensure that they don’t accidentally delete the warboss, which proves troublesome due to the kommandos’ elusiveness. Losses mount, but you’re able to whittle down the remaining resistance to nothing.

And yet there’s still no sign of the warboss.

You have your elites fan out, breaking off small squads to investigate possible hiding places and clean up the ork corpses with flamers. The largest of these squads, you send to investigate the ‘HQ’. Skitarii lead the way, flanked by conquerors and crusaders, with a thanatar standing proudly behind them as they march towards the slightly smashed command post. It was exactly as you’d seen it from a distance. Just a tin shack cobbled together in what couldn't've been more than thirty seconds by a mek, with the wreckage of one of their landers. It’s too small to admit your thanatar, forcing it to remain outside while your skitarii bust down the door.

Immediately, they’re set upon. Looking through their eyes, you don’t even see what kills them before their necks are unceremoniously snapped by impact with the floor. From the outside, you watch as the skitarii storm inside to rescue, or more likely avenge their fallen comrades, only to be shot dead by a silenced weapon fired from… somewhere. You’re certain that whatever’s killing those men has to be inside, and there’s a very good chance that the something in question is the warboss. Rather than risk any more lives playing the warboss’ games, you order the thanatar to rip the ‘roof’ clean off the shack.

That achieves the desired effect, as the thanatar has little trouble ripping up the roof and lobbing it about a hundred meters away, revealing the entire command post… and the kommando warboss inside. He made an honestly pretty good effort to hide, even after his hiding place was compromised, but none of the tables in the HQ were big enough to conceal him, even after he’d smeared his face in charcoal. Once he realises he’s rumbled, the nearly four meter tall ork leaps up, throwing the tables off his back as he roars, charging towards the thanatar, blades in hand.
>>
>>5064069
[4/6?]

For a moment, you’re genuinely concerned. He managed to cut through the skitarii in moments, as though they weren’t even wearing power armour, and he seemed large enough that he might actually be able to cause some damage to the giant robot with his bare hands, let alone with the aid of his blades. The machine was too slow to react in time to stop the ork grappling it, as the warboss leaps up and begins hacking away at the robot’s joints, driving it’s knife through the unarmoured spots and into the hydraulics of its knees. The robots topples to the ground just as it was swiping to grab the boss, only missing by a few inches as it’s balance is thrown off. The thanatar twists and tumbles backwards, the boss still clutching at it’s waist. The warboss moves to deliver a killing blow, scrambling up the thanatar’s chest and towards it’s head, only to be lifted off a moment later by one of the robot’s massive hands. The ork rages as it’s lifted into the air, thrashing at the four metal pincers that keep it pinned with its knives. It even looks like it might break free for a seconds, before the thanatar brings it’s other hand over, ripping off the warboss’ cybork left arm, throwing the still angry knife wielding prosthetic some distance. That doesn’t quite stop him yet, so like a child plucking petals from a flower, the thanatar simply pulls off his other, organic arm.

It had been costly, for him and for you, but you have captured the ork warboss… mostly intact. With his incapacitation, those few remaining orks on the moon would quickly fall to infighting, or be mopped up by your own forces. If the space hulk was unwise enough to remain in position, uselessly bombarding your shields, it’d be so much space scrap in a few moments. As good as victory tastes, it’s still bitter. Your facility had taken significant damage in the attack.

You order the robots to drag the warboss off to a secure cell. A REALLY secure cell. The last thing you want is a repeat performance, though with him being crippled, there’s probably not much chance of him escaping. You make sure he’s well guarded all the same, just in case.
>>
>>5064071
[5/6]

A few hours later, and just as you’d predicted, the remaining orks had proved to be no trouble. The space hulk (unwisely) opted to remain in orbit long enough for your guns to mount a second volley. Three singularities struck it, and it had been reduced to a cloud of plasma and hunks of scrap floating through space. The wounded and damaged were being treated and repaired, respectively, and equipment, both stolen and issued, had been recalled, although a number of items had mysteriously disappeared. It was likely that much had been destroyed or actually lost, but the reluctance with which some of your auxiliaries parted with the equipment leads you to believe that they might have stolen some of it. A problem for another time. Your undamaged robots have loaded up on incendiary weapons, and have taken to scorching the grounds and burning the ork’s bodies before the fungicide wears off and the whole moon is cursed with orks forever more.

All that remains is to interrogate the warboss. In the meantime, though, you’ll need to begin repairs. It could be days or weeks before the magos returns, and you can work on receiving industrial quantities of material from the greater Imperium, so for now you’ll be unable to undertake any major construction efforts.
>>
>>5064073
[6/6]

What to have your drones focus on first, though? And do you allow your human allies to make themselves useful?

>[General repairs]
The facility’s structure has taken significant damage from the rok impacts and ork intrusion. Tunnels need to be uncollapsed, trams need to be repaired, and the integrity of the outer hull needs to be restored. You should prioritise the facility’s structural integrity first and foremost, before you begin work on anything more specific.

>[Defences]
The facility’s structural integrity can wait. There’s clearly someone out to get you, and repairing the defences, including as much of the damaged equipment and robots as possible, need to be repaired now, in case there’s a followup attack.

>[Production]
After the disaster in the factory complex, you’ve lost a significant portion of your overall production capability, though fortunately much of the equipment is damaged rather than outright destroyed. It’ll be labour intensive, but completing as much of the repairs as you can now will leave you better positioned once you secure a source of raw material.

And what to do about the humans?

>[Ask them to join]
Some of the tech-priests have been more than useful. While you don’t want to risk them running off free after seeing all that they’ve seen, you might be able to tempt some of them in the same way you tempted Rane. After all, haven’t you treated them well? Don’t you offer more than the Imperium, or the Mechanicus? You could always use the extra hands.

>[Allow them to assist]
The tech-priests have proven themselves to be rather capable mechanics. You can use that talent in the facility, though it may risk exposing them to sensitive machinery. They’re still human, though. What’s the risk in letting them work on the equipment their ancestors designed?

>[Don’t allow them to assist]
The tech-priests, and all other humans, will be confined to quarters for the rest of their stay. You’ll activate enough of the residential systems to keep them comfortable, if bored, until you can figure out something to do with them in the long run.

>[Kill them]
Ask them to line up in a hall, and face the wall. They’ve seen too much, and you can always tell the magos that the orks killed them if you need to.
>>
>>5064074
>General repairs.

>Kill the menials
>Ofter the top percentage of adepts position here. Kill those who refused.
Nobody can leave this place without being loyal and serfs cant be trusted to keep a secret of such vitality.
>>
>>5064085
Actually, extend the offer of employment to all high performing individuals.

There is more to this stuff than just tech ability.
>>
>>5064063
I think they took some fabricator parts. Even if they cant use it, ork magic bullshit will probably allow them too, plus I want our shit back.

>>5064074
>[Production]

>[Ask them to join]
I think this would also be a good chance to convince them to return the goods they're trying to squirrel away, and future attempts. Now that the fighting is over, and have more than 5 minutes to spare, we can offer them significantly better and streamlined augmentations that dont look like you're typical gross Mechanicus stuff.
If we're able to finish the repairs sooner than expected, with their help, we can turn this station into a paradise.
>>
>>5064074
>[Production]
>[Ask them to join]
And whoever refuses strangely disappears
>>
>>5064023
>>5064013
On the subject of constructing smaller AI cores, would it be possible to fit our vehicles with AI systems to make them autonumous weapon platforms? I feel that would be a good use for them since we're low on manpower and can't be expected to man our whole vehicle fleet with just the Skitarii and menials.

Also, maybe it would be a good idea to construct a few heavily defended surface outposts with loads of automated defenses and heavy shielding. It could help funnel enemy attacks in towards them and help avoid a similar situation to the one we just ended, allowing us better control over enemy force concentration (so they don't end up splitting up the same way the Orks did just now.) and giving us access to our vehicles from the get go, instead of just after routing the enemy from our internal facilities.

What do you anons think?
>>
>>5064108
With some (extensive) refits, you could rework your vehicles to mount a simple AI. While it wouldn't be capable of making independent tactical decisions without becoming prohibitively expensive, it would be possible to have them automatically identify and fire at targets, as well as follow most basic orders, and allow for direct control if necessary, much like your robots.
>>
>>5064074
>[Production]
After the disaster in the factory complex, you’ve lost a significant portion of your overall production capability, though fortunately much of the equipment is damaged rather than outright destroyed. It’ll be labour intensive, but completing as much of the repairs as you can now will leave you better positioned once you secure a source of raw material.

>[Ask them to join]
Some of the tech-priests have been more than useful. While you don’t want to risk them running off free after seeing all that they’ve seen, you might be able to tempt some of them in the same way you tempted Rane. After all, haven’t you treated them well? Don’t you offer more than the Imperium, or the Mechanicus? You could always use the extra hands.
Also start warming up the psychology archives and start looking into how best to ensure their loyalty. They're already predisposed to fanatical religious thinking let's figure out how to become their object of worship
>>
>>5064073
>and equipment, both stolen and issued, had been recalled, although a number of items had mysteriously disappeared
FUCKING KNIFE EARS, YOU'LL GET WHAT'S COMING TOO YOU. ONE DAY, MARK MY WORDS!

>>5064074
>[General Repairs]
Ensure we have proper access to all facilities first and foremost. A blocked passageway that increases travel time by hours is a massive blow to our ability to move troops and equipment around efficiently.

>[Allow them to assist]
We need all help we can get to expidite repairs. If some of the Tech Priests would prefer to remain and aid us in completing the Work, they are absolutely welcome to do so.
>>
>>5064074
>[General repairs]

Everything is built up on a foundation, fix the foundation and install measures to prevent anything like the Orks trying to steal a whole cannon again.

>[Ask them to join]
This will allow us the possibility of pretending to be a lost forge world, among other things.

>[Allow them to assist]
Those that agree to join will be allowed to assist in repairs and fix things that are not too sensitive or complex.

I'd also like to allow rewards for the helpers who did very well and didn't steal anything. Those that stole stuff we will deal with later. Perhaps they will even still be rewarded but to a lesser degree.
>>
>>5064074

>[General repairs]

>[Ask them to join]

The menials, at least, will be not hard at all to convince. Besides, we pretty much doubled their usual life expectancy.
>>
>>5064074

>[General repairs]
The facility’s structure has taken significant damage from the rok impacts and ork intrusion. Tunnels need to be uncollapsed, trams need to be repaired, and the integrity of the outer hull needs to be restored. You should prioritise the facility’s structural integrity first and foremost, before you begin work on anything more specific.

>[Allow them to assist]
The tech-priests have proven themselves to be rather capable mechanics. You can use that talent in the facility, though it may risk exposing them to sensitive machinery. They’re still human, though. What’s the risk in letting them work on the equipment their ancestors designed?
>>
>>5064074
>[Production]
>[Don’t allow them to assist]

We can't trust them.
>>
>>5064074
>[Production]


>[Ask them to join]
>>
>>5064130
We would vet and slowly indoctrinate and test them for loyalty before full access of course. We can approach it from the prospective of getting closer to the ommessiah or something.
>>
>>5064101
This.

>>5064108
>>5064113
I can agree to this. Perhaps we could retrofit said vehicles to be more streamlined? Maybe give some of the skitarri some implants to they can seamlessly connect into the vehicle so they're like mini-princepts.

>>5064074
Can we create a meat puppet we can use to talk to people so they're less off put by the fact the entire facility is the A.I.? Heavily augmented with the phase iron materials of course.
Pic related, give it a nice classy GaoT suit, a very human looking appearance, but obviously augmented eyes.

>>5064137
My thoughts exactly. For the menials and other who are too untrustworthy, or working for the evil warp entities, we'll dispose of them.
>>
>>5064140
It would be possible to create a very convincing fake human, though they would only be capable of operating with the broadcast range of the facility. Alternatively, it would also be possible to use a servitor for the same purpose.
>>
>>5064074
>[General Repairs]
>[Ask them to join]
We need to get some humans in here eventually. The fact that they're already 1. technically proficient and 2. in possession of combat experience only works to our benefit.

Getting them to assist might actually be worst option. Exposing semi-loyal toaster fuckers to DAoT before letting them run off to the greater imperium/mechanicus wastes their efforts and compromises security.
>>
>>5064148
>only be capable of operating with the broadcast range of the facility
that's fine. it would only need to operate within the facility to streamline human interaction.
Scratch that, make it a three meter tall exterior looking human meat puppet, with all the advanced augmentations and machines on the inside.
Sure we could do the same with a servitor, but that wouldn't be nearly as stylish. The flesh on those guys literally rot off given enough time.
Just flex on the fact we can make functional quasi primarchs.
>>
>>5064156
We can say we just came out of cyro or some bs, as long as it looks human they'll eat it up
>>
>>5064149
3. already here.
>>
>>5064162
Bullshit is EZ. Just say that we were the GaoT Director of this facility, and we could leave the confines of our stasis pod until our body was fully prep to leave from our millenias long slumber, however we were still able to consciously interact with the systems within the facility to some degree.

Anyone here from the dead Man of Iron Quest?
>>
>>5064050
Its likely that what they've made off with so far is of no real value. They only stole processed materials that are useless on their own.

>>5064148
I'd like a kick ass cool looking Bigboi Human avatar Android. We can even use it as a morale booster and interactive presence for the people we are interacting with. I'm sure it will have a noticeable immediate effect on the locals.
>>
>>5064156
Seeing as we could shovel information into menials and crewmen in under 15 minutes, we can probably memory wipe them or brainwash them into not spilling secrets and "remembering" things differently.
>>
>>5064170
IDK about that one but I still mourn ded DAoT planet leader where we made a Kerensky expie
>>
>>5064181
I was there for that one too. I had high hops for that quest, but I set myself up for disappointment. Most world building quests usually burn really fast and rarely go past the first thread.
>>
>>5064170
I am. thought thats what inspired this quest.
>>
>>5064181
>Kerensky expie
wut?
>>
>>5064074
>>[Production]
Repair the foundries first. Then the second they're usable fucking blanket the surface with mines, AA platforms and just turn the areas around orbital batteries into death traps. Oh, and maybe invest in some VLS bays for missile support against targets in atmosphere and larger silos for orbital threats. Singularity cannons are nice and all but they're just not enough now. Everyone but the Eldar operate on throwing enough shit at the wall and hoping it sticks.
>>
>>5064192
I'm not familiar with it, but I'm sure I'm not doing anything too original. People have already kinda figured out where I'm drawing my inspiration from. It's a little bit of Foundation and a little bit of other shit from 40k. This is actually the first quest I've really been involved heavily in, as a player or a QM.
>>
>>5064194
From battletech, the future of the 80s giant mech combat game
>>
>>5064198
And we're going to need a lot of uranium, plutonium and all sorts of other elements because I'd like us to have orbital weapons stations capable of spamming a bunch of interceptors, general fighter craft and bombers.
>>
>>5064074
>>[Defences
>>[Ask them to join]
>>
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THE TO DO LIST BOY DOES IT SUCK BEING ALIVE:
>learn more about galactic bullshit
>create more Phase-iron
>create a fleet of ships (min. 4) to protect the moon sized instillation
>increase population of moon with civilians (max a few billion)
>[Focus on the facility] (options from here) >>5061790
>[Focus on humanity]
>[Focus on the work]
>[Production] (options from here) >>5062264
>[Defence]
>[Research]
>[Residential]
>[General repairs] (options from here) >>5064074
>[Defences]
>[Production]
>create D/GaoT tier faux Primarch as a flex
>reaugment menials, skitarri, techpriests, and enginseers so they're not using mechanicus tier garbage
>study ork fighting tactics for future confromtations
>build additional ship killer cannons
>build additional weapon batteries
>create better servitor A.I.s with heave Phase Iron implants
>streamline primcept tech so combatants can more seamlessly mesh with mechas and vehicles
>isolate ork spores in a smaller instillation to better study and combat the orks, with a deadmans switch the vaporize the whole facility if needed
>create a hanger bay and fill it with interceptors, general fighter crafts, and bombers
>figure out how to put thrusters on the ship for FTL travel if we need to leave

ORKS RUINED EVERYTHING! I swear to those knife ears, if it turned out they're responsible, we are obligated to find the coordinates of their craftworld, and dissent everything for study. Maybe even sell them to aliens or something for additional raw materials.
>>
>>5064200
Would you mind telling us what the rest of the system looks like? What kind of planet are we orbiting - a gas giant, a rocky planet, or an ice world? How far are we from the local asteroid belt - if it exists? If we're going to consider making a fleet, we should probably start worrying about what resources are available in-system.
>>
>>5064213
>I swear to those knife ears, if it turned out they're responsible
We feed them all to "you know who".

Add put more security sensors, detectors, and cameras for passive security and detection. Cover the whole planet. Maybe launch Surveillance & Defense satellites to scan the sky and surface of the moon.
>>
>>5064220
It be halrious if the whole time, the survivors offspring of our facility and scientists were below us on planet the entire time.....
>>
>>5064220
The moon is one of a dozen notable bodies orbiting a Class I gas giant with a radius of 65,000km, orbiting at a distance of 3.7 au from it's parent star, just beyond the frost line. The star is G-type main sequence star with a mass of .9 sols, and a faintly yellow-orange colouration when viewed in vacuum. Of the other bodies in the system, there is a broad asteroid belt orbiting from 1.0 to 1.2 au, three telluric planets at .15, 1.8, and 2.4 AU, and there are two more gas giants, one orbiting at .6 au and another at 5.6 au. The closest planet to the star is likely a chthonian planet, as it is incredibly dense, with a high metal content. Of the other telluric planets, none seem particularly useful for mining or habitation. The other gas giants possess their own system of moons, that likewise seem uninteresting. Of the moons orbiting your gas giant, there are two that may possess subsurface oceans, and could be useful for farming or potentially terraforming. One smaller moon still has some deposits of minerals, though most other resources in the planetary system have already been stripped millennia earlier.
>>
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>>5064236
The issue with feeding them to She Who Thirsts, is that we would be feeding and strengthening our of our many enemies. I'd prefer we run experiments on the xenos. Their warp focused wraithbone technology is of interest, but their affiliation with space magic is bad for us. Hmmm. Maybe we could do as the Necrons did and put scarubs in their brains.

>>5064239
That would actually be kind of nice. Get the chance to reconnect with the descendants of our original inhabitants.

>>5064240
Looks like we know what to do in terms of mining. We're going to need to create a starport, some mining ships, cargo ships. The whole shebang. Definitely should expand our factories once we get them up and running.
>>
>>5064245
A few more hundred or even a few thousand of them won't matter. About that many die every year if not more, its not even a drop in the bucket compared to the beginning when Thirsty She was born. Billions if not Trillions died.
>>
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>>5064251
Still, if we kill them, we've earned those soul stones. Their chaos god can't have em.
https://wiki.eveuniversity.org/Rorqual
>>
>>5064253
Fine, but you better not lose them.
>>
>>5064245
Well that's a little unfortunate. Given the size of the moon, I suppose it makes sense that most accessible resources have already been exploited to furnish the research facility. Boosting ore deposits from the belt and inner planets will also be quite costly given their distance from the gas giant. That being said, it could still be feasible if we use automated drones that skim the lower atmosphere of the parent gas giant for hydrogen fusion fuel.
>>
>>5064259
We can do it with less material costs if we just use physics, gravity, and moment. Slingshot all the materials to us, and maybe set up a dyson sphere around the sun. Maybe set off the gas giant below us to make a smaller mini sun for energy.
>>
>>5064074

>[General repairs]

>[Ask them to join]
>>
>>5064213
Best defensive weapon against Eldar is toepoppers loaded with phase-iron. It'll blow the foot off of one and disable their warp bullshit with any trace of shrapnel left inside the body.
>>
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>>5064285
>name fag
WHO ARE YOU! WHAT DO YOU WANT!?!?!
>>
>>5064288
What about high velocity powdered phase iron? Just coat the fuckers and all their wraithbone in anti-warp powder.
>>
>>5064289
Wrenloft has been a staple of quests since /tg/ hosted them. His desires are, of course, beyond our comprehension.
>>
>>5064245
If the other giants in system are class II we've got basically endless hydrogen given they'd have water vapor in the atmosphere in large quantities.
>>
>>5064290
Autocannon turrets with phase-ion cored rounds. HE rounds with a phase-iron casing that can be set for airburst also would be good.
>>
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Guess we're good on gasses and promethium for a good while.

Anyone know of a forge world can double as a knight world? You know those worlds that maintain titans? If we are capable of making titans, would that mean we can make the non-goofy slouched ones? I really like knights if you couldn't tell.
>>
>[Production]

>[Ask them to join]
>>
>>5064289
Look at the newfag.

>>5064291
He's a planes walking Krogan looking for Quest to battletoad on.
>>
>>5064074
>[General repairs]
>[Ask them to join]
>>
[1/5]

It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but you decide that you need to get your production capabilities back up sooner rather than later to expedite future repairs. You set your drones to work in the factory complex, sorting the different damaged equipment into piles of completely destroyed parts, badly damaged but repairable parts, lightly damaged and easily repairable parts, and those that have simply been displaced or unplugged, and order them to work backwards through the list, using the destroyed components for spare parts where possible. Being an AI, you’re really rather good at this sort of micromanaging, and after a little optimisation you manage to sequence the repairs so that you’re able to bring as much of the factory complex back online as soon as possible, leaving the most difficult tasks for later. While it won’t speed up the overall repair job too much, you think you can restore a significant fraction of the repairs sooner than you would otherwise be able to.

With your drones now working on that, you turn your attention to the humans. A few hours after the last orks were driven off, they’re now licking their wounds in the clinics, being attended to by tech-priests and your own medical drones, or have been escorted to their quarters. You watch, and consider the potential value they have to offer. It would be risky to let them loose after what they’ve seen, and while it would be theoretically possible to rewrite the memories of each and every single one of them, such a process would be time consuming to say the least. Unfortunately, the combat augment array doesn’t work in reverse. No, it would be easier to secure their loyalty for yourself. That it offers you an additional labour pool is a cherry on top.

Of the humans given over to you, many of them seemed almost relieved to be off the ship, and though you might’ve ensured their early deaths and made it very difficult for them to reintegrate into society, they may still prefer the fate that you’ve offered them than the one they’d otherwise be subjected to. The others are a more mixed bag. The skitarii seem to possess limited free will, which doesn’t perturb you much, but does make their approval of the situation somewhat irrelevant. The tech-adepts and other Cult Mechanicus clergymen have mixed feelings on the situation. Some of them are willing to believe whatever lie it is that the magos spun, but to a man they all harbour suspicions as to your nature. For the moment, the technology you wield is, as much as it was for the magos, enough to keep them happy, though long term it’s not a conducive basis for loyalty, or even reliability.
>>
>>5064324
[2/5]

You start to weave a plan. The menial labourers are happy enough with warm beds and actual food to take you up on any offer you could give them that might keep them in those warm beds, and their stomachs full of that actual food. If you gathered them together and made a deal, you have no doubts they’d all accept. The skitarii’s loyalty belongs to their masters and their masters alone, and so the real issue is the tech-priests. They might be blinded by dogma, but they’re sharper than most, with a curious nature. They won’t be satisfied with evasive answers and simple comforts, and bribery won’t work forever. You’ll need to give them the truth, or something close to it, if you want to keep them on your side. To that end, you’ll slowly work on each of them as individuals, judging their disposition and offering little drips of information, and offers of access to the technology of their wildest dreams. Those that react poorly will suffer… industrial accidents. Those that pledge their loyalty, even if it’s dual loyalty to yourself and their god, will be tasked to work in the factory. The menials? You’ll set them to work clearing tunnels, or watching out for orks. You don’t expect them to make much progress, but they might go mad sitting on their hands, thanks to the biochemical changes you put them through.

With that plan formed and underway, you finally have the opportunity to turn your attention to the ork boss. Your robots carried him deep into the facility, a safe distance away from anything critical and deep enough that it wouldn’t be easy for him to escape if he somehow got free. You switch to look through the eyes of one of the conquerors guarding him, and find the ork bound by manacles to a comically undersized chair in the centre of a poorly lit room. Burns on the side of his face tell you that he has found out that he’s also in a conversion field cage the hard way. It’s the first time you’ve gotten a decent look at him, and he doesn’t look much like your average ork, insomuch as there is an average ork.
>>
>>5064326
[3/5]

He’s wearing a camouflage jumpsuit with a green-grey paint splotch pattern, under a soft armour vest and a staggering number of holsters and pouches. The holsters have been emptied, obviously, and a small pile of oversized handguns and ‘sub’machine guns has been collected and sent off to another secure room. Curiously, all of them were suppressed, which is tantamount to heresy for the orks. The ork himself was taller than even your average warboss, and bore the scars of countless years spent living on the battlefield, parts having been replaced wholesale by crude bionic replacements. It’s left shoulder still had a pile of twitching servos and sparking wires where the thanatar had ripped the arm out of the socket, and it’s right eye had been replaced by an ominous red orb, held in place by three leather straps. It hardly looked secure, but he didn’t seem troubled by it. Scars criss crossed his face, culminating in a hefty lump of ragged shrapnel sticking out of his brow, just above his cybernetic eye.

“Oi! Iz you awake, metal git?” The ork notices the conqueror’s movements as you order it to inspect him. “You’z gonna let me out now, or am I gonna hafta’ krump ya’ good?” The threat probably would’ve been more effective if he hadn’t been literally armless, and chained to a chair besides. Still, as good a point as any to start the interrogation.

“Explain how you were able to locate this facility.” Your voice echoes through the conqueror’s primitive speakers.

“Wot?” The ork frowns, his face crumpling up in confusion. “Da fas-ill-itty?” His eyes narrow as he searches for an answer, but suddenly looks back up with anger in his eyes. “You fink you’z a gud finker, do ya? I’z better finker dan dat, ya grot. You’z doin’ that… terragatin’ thing, ain’tcha? I’z ready for dat. Can’t terragate me.” He declares, triumphantly.

You don’t have time for this, not when your facility is at state. You reach through the conversion field with the conqueror’s hands, the field parting to allow entry. Grabbing him by the neck, he lets out a yelp of surprise before letting out an extended scream of pain as you force his face into the barrier, allowing it to slowly melt the atoms of his flesh, before throwing him back down. “Explain how you were able to locate this facility.” You repeat, the threat implicit.
>>
>>5064327
[4/4, not 5]

“ORL RITE! I ‘ear you, you’z don’t ‘ave to melt me face off!” They frown at you again, before rolling what’s left of their shoulders, literally shrugging off the pain. “You’z a gud terragator. I’z talkin’.” He leans over, seemingly now happy to give up his secrets. “Da panzees. Dey sez ‘da orks is bestest for foightin’, and der’s dis plannit wiv zoggin’ big dakka and da metal gits, and you’z can go ‘ave a big WAAAGH!, an’ it’ll be a propa larf’ an’ I sez ‘dat’s gud but I’z a… a… mer sen hairy, I’z only WAAAGH! fer shinny gubbins an’ that’, and dey sez ‘der’s proppa big dakka ter loot’, so I’ve get da’ Dakka Squigs and we’z come ‘ere to do da lootin’ wiv me big pull-ton loota.”

You listen, but it takes you longer than you’d like to admit to actually understand the creature’s interpretation of low-gothic through their heavy accent and their own poor understanding of the language, but it’s pretty obvious that the Eldar are behind this. It was either them, chaos, or pure blind luck, so you’re not too surprised, but you are angry.

“If dats orl you wantin’ ta know, ya’ gonna give me arms back?” He waits for a few moments for an answer, before it becomes obvious that you’re not going to answer. “Finkin’ not. Well, I’z mersenairy so I’z can krump dem panzees if you’z wantin’ dem krumped. Dey fink deyz’ ded cleva but I’z more kunnin’ dan dem. I’z put a trakkin’ beecon on der big kroozer, dat way da boyz can krump dem too!” He flashes a broad, fanged grin as he recounts the tale of his own deviousness. “So I’z ‘elp you krump da panzees, you gives me da flash dakka!” You remain silent, and their grin slowly fades. “I’z help you krump loadsa gitz! ‘Ooever you’s wantin’!”

It seems the ork is offering his service.

>[Accept]
It seems mad, but this ork has proven itself to be a highly effective tactician and capable infiltrator. Being that it seems willing to accept whatever terms you set, you could keep it on a short leash through the use of implanted bombs. Tinkering with its brain is probably impossible, though. Rewriting a human brain without the augment array is difficult, an ork is probably beyond you, but a bomb in it’s spine would produce a similar effect.

>[Refuse]
Absolutely not.

>[More questions - write in]
You’re not going to accept or refuse his offer just yet - you have more, specific questions for him. Then you’ll make a decision.
>>
>>5064329
>[Accept]
It seems mad, but this ork has proven itself to be a highly effective tactician and capable infiltrator. Being that it seems willing to accept whatever terms you set, you could keep it on a short leash through the use of implanted bombs. Tinkering with its brain is probably impossible, though. Rewriting a human brain without the augment array is difficult, an ork is probably beyond you, but a bomb in it’s spine would produce a similar effect.
>>
Just to note that it was actually a tie between general repairs and production, but when I started writing production was in the lead.
>>
>>5064329

Aaaargh I fucking KNEW it was the Eldar! This smacks of the exact kind of stupidity an Ulthwe Farseer would pull!

>[Accept]

Fuck it! Why not?
>>
I like his balls, but then I've always liked orks over shitty eldar
>>
>>5064329
>[More questions]
For the love of all that is holy, please don't accept his offer right away. As advanced as DAoT tech may be, I wouldn't bet on it for a second to overcome the sheer weirdness of orkoid physiology and slapdash "surgery." Besides, what would we even pay him with long term? The only form of currency that your average warboss respects is weaponry - weaponry that he will inevitable turn against us at his whim.

At least hold off until we can 1. independently confirm the veracity of his information and 2. fully understand how effectively we can hold him accountable if he slips. And remember that the problem goes beyond intentional betrayal. If he goes to another system and simply *talks* to some other orks about the shiny dakka in the facility, we'll be truffling for green mushrooms until the heat death of the universe. I'm not against using him if we can (he seems like a cool dude for an ork), but we should take a step back first.
>>
>>5064349

Backing this. Collaboration with an Ork won't play well with the Mechanicus either.

Best to put him in stasis until we can think of a good use for him or develop a proper mechanism of control.
>>
>>5064329
>>5064335
>>5064338

This can only go perfectly well for us. No blowback whatso ever Nosiree!

>[More questions - write in]
So you wana cut a deal huh? Ask how can we be sure you won't come back and trash our home again like last time?

Learn on how to talk to it more. Make some offers since it seems to claim to be mercenary in nature we could make some good deals with it.

Also ask how they were gonna plan on using the cannons since they can't be used without us powering them with the proper procedure and codes.

Ask him about Ork nature and society, whatever information we can get out of it about orks.
>>5064349
>don't accept his offer right away.

Agreed, make it a slow process we mull over after many days of interrogation. I bet the Eldar or whatever will attempt to raid this place afterwards. We'll arm him with some nice cheap Dakka like Stubber stuff cobbled together with their own tech to study them better and how their "teck" functions.

We can get around to using him at a later date. In exchange for the enemy cruiser we'll spare his live for now, and give him new arms by making him regrow his old arms.
>>
>>5064309
I hear that do this day he still votes for phasing.
>>
>>5064329
>[Accept]
luv me shiny gubbins
luv dakka
luv krumpin'
simple as
>>
>>5064329
>>[Accept]
>>
>>5064329
>[More questions - write in]
Tell me about your ork clans and politics, in addition to everything you know about the factions of this galaxy.

Untilmately kill him when we've exhausted all avenues of questions.

>>5064335
>>5064338
>>5064368
Are you sure? He knows about the defenses of our facility, and I worried that he'll redirect some orks our way again. I'd prefer to be finished with them, then virus bomb the eldari.
>>
>>5064368
>>5064371
>>5064335
>>5064338

I hate democracy.
>>
>>5064373
>>5064372
Lol
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>>5064372
>Are you sure? He knows about the defenses of our facility, and I worried that he'll redirect some orks our way again. I'd prefer to be finished with them, then virus bomb the eldari.
Think of the upsides.
He can be a "rogue trader" of sorts for us, sending him whenever we need a job done without drawing suspicion to ourselves. Just keep him on a short leash by making his egg pop if he disobeys.
Killing him would be a waste of talent.
>>
>>5064372
>>5064349
Support
>>
We'll be the Orkiest AI there ever was
>>
>>5064365
I don't really want to kill him right off, but just taking his offer right off the bat seems foolish.

Support
>>
We're going to take an intermission for a day or two while I'm away. In the meantime, feel free to discuss your plans, both generally and for the ork.
>>
>>5064365
+1
And let's also put some explosives in his brain so that if he decides to betray us, we only need to send the signal and the problem is over.
>>
>>5064400
Got it
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>>5064403
If he travels far enough we cant possibly pop his head. Theres also the possibility of the warp or wwwwaagh! energies interfering with our signal.
>>
>>5064365
Support accepting right now is just asking to get back stabbed.
>>
Coming soon in next thread: Looted AI quest
>>
Thinking back, I'm honestly impressed by this particular warboss. Besides for the sheer audacity of trying to loot a fixed surface-to-orbit singularity cannon by running it through a teleporter, this guy managed to sneak a tracking beacon onto a eldar cruiser. That's nothing to scoff at assuming that he isn't just bullshitting.

Is there any way we can actually secure his loyalty (rather than just incidental cooperation)? Do orks even understand the concept of loyalty? If we're actually going to employ this guy, it would be nice to not have to worry about getting backstabbed.

Also, we should ask where he was planning to teleport the gun. I have a feeling that it might lead us closer to our local friendly long-ear tribe.
>>
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>>5064329
>but a bomb in it’s spine would produce a similar effect.
Acutally orks can survive with just their heads alone. What you need is a miniture blackhole or nuclear bomb in the spine, torso, and skull.

>>5064335
>>5064365
>>5064368
>>5064377
>>5064474
Rereading the deal again, I can agree that killing him right off is a bat idea, but so is accepting the deal. The deal is that he'll help us kill the eldar, but in exchange he want the big giant gun. That what really kills it for me. The chances of him turning the giant laser on us one day is a possibility either through his ork magic circumventing our implanted explosives, or through another ork in possession of the mega death laser that's affiliated with the Kommando. Instead of giving him the laser, why don't we alter the deal? We staple all his limbs back on (not give him new AoT tier ones), he helps us find the eldar so we can kill them, and then we put him in stasis with the promise of future fights for him to krump to his hearts content?
His whole existence will literally be nothing but fighting since we would be freezing him once he was done with a fight, then moving him to the next fight and so on, and he wouldn't have to consciously wait for the next fight to come. Kind of like how Eversor assassins operate. You just keep freezing and unfreezing them until they die or there's nothing left to kill.
>>
>>5064482
The audacity lmao. I thought he just wanted *a* flash dakka for his efforts, not the fucking singularity cannon. We can probably afford to give him some nicer infantry/squad support weapons, but I agree that there's no way we can give him an entire weapon installation.
>>
>>5064482
Supporting this
>>
>>5064349
> Support
If we take his claims at face value...
He just demonstrated that he holds little to no respect for his business associates and is willing to backstab them with only minor provocation.
He's unreliable, untrustworthy, and dangerously opportunistic. Extract information on the particulars of these Eldar, so as to aid us in identifying them, then dispose of him.
>>
>>5064482
I say we give him slightly better limbs, but completely controlled and relayed through us, so that they become useless if he gets out of our range or decides to do something we don't like. Same with the atomic bomb, create a deadman's switch that'll activate at our pleasure or the moment it loses our signal. Might as well plant a listening and tracking devices on him as well, just to make sure.

>>5064526
Rather than disposing him, I'd rather conduct experiments on him, see if we can't find a weakness or a way to kill ork-kind.
>>
My thinking is as follows:
We keep him, make failsafes so he doesn't turn on us, and give him a good reason to be loyal on top of exploding if he disobeys (I assume our future plans will require violence, and I'm sure he would love a good scrap).
As to what we give him, I think (literal) arms plus some minor dakka when we send him to do our bidding. Nothing more.
Like this anon said >>5064335, he could be a very valuable asset. An unscrupulous galaxy requires unscrupulous tactics.
>>
I'm really loving the long, detailed responses here.
>>
>>5064329
>Get what information you can from him that seems relevant, if anyone else knows of the facility, did he take his whole army here, did he meet the eldar nearby and did they have a serious military with them, state of the local ork populations, etc...
>kill him afterwards
This ork is straight up 40k big boss so while he is awesome, he is fucking impossible to control and we will eternally regret not killing him now.
Also we can get fucked politically employing a ork mercenary, he is only making the offer to cheat death long enough to get back on his feet, then he will come back for round 2 later.
If we are lucky this was the work of one asshole farseer who his peers hate, but if we toss a waaagh! at them we are at total war with the craftworlders until the end of time. Best just to threaten them with retribution if they pull something like this again. The fact that all our humans now and future will be religious fanatics who can only tolerate a alien long enough to murder them ASAP will also leave us with huge headaches and make our magos job that much harder.
Lastly orks are a awful blight on the galaxy so anyone who employs them as mercenaries even backed into a corner will always end up hated.
>>
>>5064703
>we can get fucked politically
we are already fucked politically
>>
>>5064703
>>5064715
I mean fucked since we're working with the Mechanicus, and by extension the Imperium. We can probably just strap additional explosives and maybe stick a piece of phase iron in him to mitigate his ork bullshit magic.
I do disagree with the other anon that wants to give the irk Age of Technology or even slightly improved bionics. It would draw too much suspicious. All we should afford him are his stubbers, knives, and on par ork tier bionics.

>>5064400
Still kind of confused how stubbers and ork missiles can take out even just 1 power armored dude even with a force field. DaoT tier tech no less.
>>
>>5064329
>>[Refuse]
>>
>there are people in this thread right now that unironically believe you can control an Ork or buy yourself insurrance from the inevitable betrayal that awaits if you trust them with guns
Orks are literal fucking Bio-Weapons. They do nothing but fight and loot so they can fight bigger things and loot bigger stuff. An Ork's loyalty extends only to "Follow da biggest boi", and even then they'll still attempt to "krump da biggest boi if wez dun get enuff foightin' ".
You can't control Orks, only direct them with deceptions (like the Eldar does) or bribe them with weaponry, and I shouldn't have to explain why arming Orks with Volkite Weaponry/Other DaoT gear is a bad idea. Eventually they'll throw that weaponry against you when they run out of other things to fight.

This Warboss is a fucking unit, even by Warboss standards as we've pointed out in character that he's unusually large for a Warboss. If we let him go, even if we don't give him any gear, he'll gather another WAAAGH! just by the simple fact that he is the biggest. He could turn this WAAAGH! on the Eldar, or he could go after unrelated targets. Whatever he chooses to do, eventually he'll turn the WAAAGH! around and come right back to us for Round 2: Electric Boogaloo irrelevant of how many bombs we put in his spine, for two very simple reasons:

1: We put up a good fight
2: We have insane quantities of loot

Even if we detonate the bombs that's been suggested we implant in him the second he jumps in to the system, his Lieutenants will just krump each other until there is one left, who'll then direct the WAAAGH! to us anyway because "Deyz as gud as any place to foight, and de ol' Warboss sez it wuss gud".

That we're even having a discussion about "employing" an Ork is absolute insanity. We've already got what we wanted, we confirmed that the arrival of the Orks was orchestrated by outside forces (the Eldar), there is no reason to keep this Ork around any longer.

>>5064329
>[Refuse]
>>
>>5064329
Alright. Changing my vote to to thinking about it, getting the eldar location, but killing the ork later.
>>
>>5064760
>there is no reason to keep this Ork around any longer.
comic relief
>>
>>5064329
get the beacon location then kill him
>>
>>5064329
REFUSE
>>
>>5064760
Yeah this is the precise thing that worries me. I love him as a character, but ork physiology compels them to fight the biggest, nastiest thing that they can get their hands on. And right now, I would bet the emperor's right nut that we're the probably the best - and flashiest - fight that's to be had in several kiloparsecs. Worse, the more we use him to consolidate our power, the more attractive we become as a target when he inevitably gets in the mood for some 'krumpin.

I don't really want to kill him though. We should t least ask him some more questions. I'm a little curious about what he has to say in his own defense after openly admitting to betraying his last employer. I'm in favor of giving his arms back before putting him into stasis if his intel is actually decent.
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>>5064840
Could work. If his intel is bad, we'll simply kill him while he's in stasis. Sans the limbs. We'll decide if he gets them back at a later date.
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>>5064734
Yeah. I think this QM's interpretation of DAoT leans towards the more conservative side. It seems to be based on the more grounded interpretations of dark-age tech (ie. the Speranza) rather than the ridiculous star-altering artefacts present in other works. Most of the things that we're using seem to have a significant (but not totally overwhelming) advantage over great-crusade era equipment. Either that, or we just haven't built anything really nasty yet. It is still a research facility after all, so maybe we haven't constructed the best military tech available?
>>
>>5064845
Wait is it possible to find pre fall TV shows?
>>
>>5064845
>>5064849
isn't currently the 41st or 42 millennia right now?

>They’re an eclectic mix of ship-menials, just happy to be anywhere but a Mechanicus warship
Key word, "Mechanicum," not Mechanicus. The M is pre heresy. The S is post.
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>>5064845
A combination of all the factors you mentioned here. I didn't want this to be a complete walk in the park, but I did want to give you guys plenty of toys to play with. There will be some more esoteric stuff though (you haven't quite found everything in the facility yet).
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>>5064871
We haven't found it all yet? Jesus. Let's keep our guests out of the places we've yet to remember and explore. Can we go ahead and get started on growing a network of Servitors?
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>>5064849
I wish lmao. I'm just spitballing based on what little is available in some of the novels. The singularity cannons seem quite similar to one of the weapons detailed in the priest of mars series by McNeil. However, the same series also has some retardedly overpowered DAoT tech supposedly capable of reshaping stars and what not.
>>
I hope we regularly use casaba howitzers to delete anything chaos related. Nothing is a better cleansing agent than nuclear hellfire.
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>>5064971
While casaba howitzers are awesome I think we're a bit past that in weapons technology.
>>
>>5064971
>>5065035
I prefer miniature supernova explosions.
>>
>>5064760
This
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>>5065078
EXPLOSIONS HELL YEAH
>>
>>5064329
>[Refuse]
>>
>>5064329
>>[More questions - write in]
bomb in head
>>
>>5064329
Accept

TRUST
THE
QM
TWO
MORE
WAAAGHS
>>
>>5065252
No
>>
>[Refuse]
The greenskin will simply bring more trouble because it know we can give 'em a good fight
>>
>>5064365
+1
>>
>knows nothing about 40k
I find it hilarious that Orks apparently speak with a thick cockney accent.
Is that canonical?
>>
>>5065384
Yes
>>
>>5065384
Yes
>>
I'm back lads. Hope you're all enjoying it so far. Let me know if there's anything you guys want done differently. We'll be resuming regular programming in a couple hours
>>
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>>5065560
Cool
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>>5065560
SHOW US THE ROLLS
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>>5065579
>>5063305
>When the stakes start to get higher I might request rolls.
>>
[1/4]

He’s possibly the single most kunnin’ ork you’ve ever had the displeasure of crossing swords with. You couldn’t possibly take him at his word, not without, at least, asking him some more questions first. After that, you’ll have to decide what to do with him. You mentally prepare a list of questions you have for them before you even begin, and arrange them from most to least pressing, then shuffle certain questions around so that, hopefully, you can keep him talking for as long as possible while coaxing the truth out of him at the same time. Of course, if he tries to stay silent, you’ll just have to remind him what happens when he doesn’t play ball.

Only a few seconds have passed in the real world by the time you’re done planning, and that ork’s still looking at you hopefully. “You say you were employed by the eldar, and yet you betrayed them immediately. How do you expect me to trust that you would serve me loyally?”

“You’s gots it all wrong. Dem panzees wasn’t hirin’ me, dis woz jus’ lootin’. I’z never broke a kontract befor’. You’z ‘ire me, I krump da gits you’z tell me ta krump, I’z don’t even kick a grot ‘less da’ client sez so.” He nods, smiling with pride. It’s strange to see an ork proud over not killing things, and even stranger to hear an ork say the word ‘client’. “I’z worked fer da spikey beakeez ta kill ‘oomies, da grey-skins ta kill gribblies, da spikey panzees ta kill ‘oomies, ‘oomies ta kill ‘uvver ‘oomies. Killin’ ‘oomies mostly, but deys lotsa ‘oomies. Not as many as da boyz tho. Kill lotsa’ boys too. Da ol’ warboss got us foightin’ fer teef all da time, killin’ goffs fer snakebites an’ blud axes fer goffs an’ wot not. Gud scrap but bad lootin’, so I’z krump da Boss, cuz I was bigga and I’z go out and krump ‘oomies an’ panzees, an’ spikey gits an that.”

It’s quite the resume, but it’d be nearly impossible to verify any of it, unless you could hunt down one of his previous clients. “How did you encounter the eldar? How did you meet them, and what were the circumstances under which they gave you this information.”

“We woz lookin’ fer a foight, ‘cause da boyz wuz bored, and we’z find deez panzees on dis plannit. Dey wuz just sittin’ der, not doin’ anyfin, so me an da boyz goes to krump dem when dey’z sleepin’.” He smiles again, this time in blissful recollection of his previous murders. “Krumped lotsa panzees ‘fore one of ‘em woke up. Woz one of ‘der weirdboyz, an’ dey sez dat dey knew we woz comin’, an den I almos’ chopped him coz it would’a been funny, but I didn’, an’ den he sez dat he knew a propa gud place ta loot. I figurz he jus’ wantz me ta krump it fer him, but I’z don’ care cuz I wuz bored. He tol’ me where it woz and sez he saw it wiv his weird stuff, so I’z broke ‘is legs and sez I’z come back if der’s no loot.”
>>
>>5065778
[2/4]

“You broke his legs?” You confirm, but immediately realise that you really don’t need to. “If this meeting was on a planet, how did you get the beacon onto the cruiser?”

“Da propa big kroozer? Dats where da panzees hide. I’z never seen it, but I’z ‘eard of it, dey’re like grots, dey don’t like foightin’ much, ‘cept for when deyz gonna win. Hidin’s kunnin’, but only when you’z gonna krump a git dat ain’t seen ya yet, den ya yell WAAAGH! and krump ‘em. If you’z gonna hide and hide and hide wotz da point? Anyway, I bet dat kroozerz not dat killy, ‘cause if it woz dey wouldn’t need da orkz ta krump stuff for ‘em.” The ork talks around in circles for a while in a conversational tone, but with every word you’re just given more questions. “So I’z know dat his legs ain’t gonna stop ‘im, an’ dat he woz der fer me, but he finks I’z stoopid, so he finks dat I fink dat’ll stop ‘im. So’z ‘e neva’ looks fer da trakkin’ beecon I’z stuck in ‘im. It woz only-” The ork moves as though he were going to raise his hand, only to realise he doesn’t have one. “Zog. It woz dead little tho. Da mekboyz made it, little fing. Ya just jam it inta a git and it’s all sneaky like, den ya get da big gitfinda and find da git, thru anyfin’.”

So, if you’re to believe this series of events, the farseer left himself and his men out as bait, to draw the orks in and offer them your location. The warboss, aware of the attempt to manipulate him, decided to go along with it anyway, but not before crippling the eldar and using his arrogance to deflect suspicion away from his own true intentions. By letting the eldar believe that he was still in control of the situation, he all but guaranteed that he wouldn’t just get a fight on the moon, but also on what sounds like the eldar’s craftworld. Though you’re skeptical orkish technology would work as reliably, accurately, or with such long range as he says, with every word you find yourself more inclined to believe that he’s not boasting, if nothing else.

You remain quiet for a while, contemplating what you’ve heard. So far, it all makes sense, though he’s offered no way to verify it. You might as well try to get some more information out of him before you start turning the screws, though. “Can you find this beacon now?”

“Nah. I needs da big propa gitfinda, don’ I?”

“And where is it?”

“On morkabase.” He answers, unhelpfully.

“Where is that?”

“I’z can’t point, can I?” He frowns back at you. “Ya tinboyz ‘ad me arms, an’ da propa good one too. It’z not too far, tho, jus’ a couple sistems ova’.” He jerks his head back to point in a vague direction that seems to imply ‘over there’ more than a specific place. “I’z can get back and activate da gitfinda, but den dey’ll see it, ‘cause it’ll be glowin’ in ‘im, so we’z only get a little window ta krump ‘em.”
>>
>>5065783
[3/4]
“Assuming we did go to ‘krump ‘em’, what would you want as payment for your service, specifically?”

“Dat flash dakka wot you’z have.”

“The ground-to-orbit cannon you were stealing? No. How did you even expect to use that?”

“I woz gonna put it on morkabase, an’ shoot gits wiv it.” His expression is blank, as though he thought the question was entirely pointless.

“How did you expect to power it? Aim it?”

“Well, we’z make it orky.” He explains. “If I’z had me arms, I’z draw ya da bloopints, but I don’t, does I? But nah, I jus wan’ some flash dakka what your boyz has. Da big-little zappas.” You can only assume he means the volkite rifles. “Ya give me one of dem, and I’z krump ‘ooever you want. An’ me arms back.” He adds on as an afterthought.

“How will I ensure your loyalty? I can’t take you at your word.”

“Mos’ do.” He looks up, and around, searching for a more satisfying answer. “You got me proppa gud, so you’s da boss, an’ I do what da boss sez.” With that, he tries to shrug. “You’z not very orky but ya krumped me boyz gud an proppa. Ya could kill me, an’ I don’ want ta die yet, der’s still gits ta krump.” That doesn’t seem to concern him too much. All things considered, he’s taking his defeat rather well, especially for an ork.

“Why would I need to pay you, then?”

“Becuz I’m a mersenairy.” He repeats. You’re left reconsidering whether he understands the concept. Still, it seems that he’s willing to accept whatever conditions you might impose on him, so long as he gets to fight, though you’re not sure whether you could get him to drop his insistence on payment in the form of ‘flash dakka’.

With that confirmed, you ask a string of other, less relevant questions, and try to get an idea of what the ork’s view on the immediate galaxy around you is. He speaks, mostly, about the people he has fought, talking about the ‘greyskins’ he fought, and gives a vague indication that they’re nearby. The descriptions he gives of them aren’t very detailed, but they don’t match any records you have of xenos species, though if his descriptions are at least accurate, you probably don’t need to worry too much about them. He also describes the ‘bugz’, who likewise don’t match any recorded alien species you know of, but sound considerably more concerning. Neither the ‘greyskins’ nor ‘bugz’ match aliens that the Magos spoke of, either, making it likely that they’re yet to be discovered by the greater Imperium, or that the Magos doesn’t consider them important enough to mention.
>>
>>5065785
[4/4]

He gives you a rather more exhaustive rundown of the various different ork clans, including a long list of orks he holds personal grudges against, usually ending with a plea for assistance in ‘krumpin’ them. You know now more about ork politics than you ever wanted to know, including the fact that orks have something approaching politics. Though you were somewhat familiar with the ork clan structure, you probably didn’t need to know all that. Nothing jumps out at you as particularly concerning. According to him, most of the other large groups of orks are some distance away, though, by his own admission, the green menace are pretty much everywhere.

With most of your questions asked, you’re left with another decision to make. He’s not offered any proof of what he’s saying beyond his word, though you’ve never before heard of an ork weaving such an intricate lie. Then again, you’ve never heard of an ork executing such an intricate plan, either, and yet one has to be true. If what he’s saying is true, a group of eldar, possibly even a whole craftworld, has taken issue with you, and seem to be plotting against you. Last you remember, the eldar were actually quite helpful on occasion. Certainly, they weren’t an enemy of humanity on the same level as the orks themselves, but apparently that has changed in the time you were asleep. Perhaps this ork could be an effective instrument against the craftworld that has challenged you?

>[Take the ork’s deal]
He seems, if nothing else, capable of keeping his mouth shut. You’ll agree for now, and prepare to send him - under escort - back to his base. If he can hold up his end of the deal, you’ll hold up yours, and give him back his arms. Once you’ve located the eldar, though, you’ll need to act quickly, especially if he really will be on a craftworld: they’re not known for staying still, so you’ll need to come up with a plan first.

>[Refuse the ork’s deal]
He’s offered you no concrete proof, and has the gall to demand payment? Refuse, point blank, and kill him before he finds a way out. Nothing good can come of this ork, even if he is telling the truth.

>[Alter the deal - write in]
Pray you don’t alter it any further. Be specific with what you want, though.
>>
>[Refuse the ork's deal]

Letting this one go will just attract a clown car squad of orks to this planet because of the obscene amount of loot and fighting that's in the planet.
>>
>>5065788
>"Gud scrap but bad lootin’, so I’z krump da Boss, cuz I was bigga"

>“Dat flash dakka wot you’z have.”
>“The ground-to-orbit cannon you were stealing? No. How did you even expect to use that?”
>“I woz gonna put it on morkabase, an’ shoot gits wiv it.” His expression is blank, as though he thought the question was entirely pointless.

He's already krumped his previous Warboss, he wants a Singularity Cannon to mount on "Morkabase" and he just wants to fight things. He says he's never broken a contract, but the second the Eldar are krumped dead the contract is null and void and we're no longer his employer. He'll also have the weapons he feel would let him become a Bigger Boss than we are, since we would be giving him all the 'flash dakka' he'd need to feel confident in challenging us.

Look at that, an absolute disaster waiting to happen. Who could've guessed. Wouldn't surprise me if Morkabase is actually a Space Hulk and after he krumps the Eldar he'll ram it straight into us to loot the remaining Singularity Cannons. Hard pass.

>[Refuse the ork’s deal]
>>
>>5065788
>>[Take the ork’s deal]
>>
>>5065788

>Refuse the Ork's deal

And put him in stasis! We need time to decide Ork physiology and perhaps develop an effective means of control. This guy is an effective weapon with a faulty targeting system, would be crazy to set him loose now.
>>
>>5065788
>Refuse.
Kill him.
>>
>>5065816
+1
>>
>>5065788
Holy shit my sides. We bagged the ork equivalent of Ursarker Creed. I didn't realize the eldar "kroozer" was a fucking craftworld.

>[Alter the deal]

Accept the deal and give back his arms, but put him into stasis for the forseeable future. There's no point in letting him back now - the emitter is time-sensitive once activated, and we simply can't project enough military force to prosecute a successful pacification campaign against the elder. We'll be wasting both our resources and a great opportunity to bag some knife ears.

Instead, we wait until we have a fleet and (relatively) secure relations with the imperium. Then, we thaw the warboss and escort him back to his base. By then, the power vacuum left behind by his extended absence should have reduced the military power of his base substantially, forcing him to consolidate his own forces before he can pursue any meaningful action against us. This places us into a substantially better negotiating position once the deal finishes. I don't really see downsides to this plan unless:

1. The chaos caused by the warboss' absence destroys the gitfinder/kills the mekboy

2. The eldar manage to find the implant during the intervening period.

Neither of these seem super likely to me, and at worst we end up with the status-quo.
>>
>>5065788
>>[Refuse the ork's deal]
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork's deal]
Bombs in head, though.
The opportunity is too good to pass up, and we can keep him on a short leash.
At the very least we should freeze him instead of killing him if we reject his offer.
>>5065806
He's not going to get a singularity cannon if we accept, and for as long as we are the biggest we are the boss.
>>
>>5065816
Support
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork’s deal]
The eldar wont leave us alone just because we didnt retaliate.
Fuck around and find out
Trust the QM
Wwg1wga
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork’s deal]
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork’s deal]
If need be, we can make a cybernetic legion to fight orks when the Eldar are done. And politically, this ork does not look like the type to share 'lootin' spots with rivals.
To catch an Eldar craftworld is not easy, so having this opportunity to 'krump' the one that did this to us, and with some discretion, seems like a good offer. We are only going to get more trouble from these shitty craftworlders. Send him on his merry chase, if the Eldar kill him, then we are good, if he kills the Eldar, we are good. Either way, the craftworlders will be too busy to give us trouble.
>>
>>5065788
>>[Take the ork’s deal]
We can always build another Ground to Space gun.
>>
>>5065788
> Refuse the deal
That fact we are even considering attempting to become this *literal bioweapon*'s buddy is absolute lunacy.
Perform a vivisection before hand if you are so inclined, then atomize it and move on..
>>
>>5065788
>[Alter the deal]
I agree with >>5065822, we should accept his deal, but cryo him until we have enough means to actually exploit this. If cryo isn't an option, then
>Kill
>>
>>5065788
I can't decide. On the one hand working with orks almost always blows up in your face. On the other hand this guy's fucking hilarious and I want more of him in the quest
>>
>>5065788
>[Alter the deal]
Add a permanent contract with his clan rather than the warboss, they will not attack us or our facilities and allies. In exchange we'd be willing to sell you weapons if they can afford them or sell/give them contracts to "krump" people.
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork’s deal]

>>5065822
Except for the fact that it's better for us long term if we use his power base and bash it into the eldar, who not only knows about us and our technology, but actively decided to act maliciously against us by sending an Ork army while we were defenseless. We need the threat eliminated before they decide to send another Ork army after us.
>>
>>5065788
>>[Refuse the ork’s deal]
>>
>>5065822
support

I like this guy, e's a proppa lad
>>
>>5065788
Refuse and stasis. Orks are memetic creatures. If you make an ork believe hes a guardsman, you best believe they're gonna be the best fucking guardsmen of the Imperium. (I love those ork meme comics, especially the ork commisar fighting against choas).
>>
>>5065788
Right so the ork still has a main base, he would have told his underlings where he was going so they will know regardless whether or not we kill him, also the eldar can keep 4d chess moving pawns into us to kill us and we either need to threaten them with a big enough stick or deal with whatever little cabal wants us gone.
If we send the orks to attack them they will learn it was us and eldar spite and shortsightedness will have them commit to full hostilities with us but we don't have a way to get in contact with them to tell them to fuck off on threat of mass eldar death, so if its a small cabal we get the whole craft world on us and we have to hope the orks and eldar wipe each other out or cripple each other.
>[Take the ork’s deal]
I don't like this but we can get the war boss to all in on attacking the eldar and commit suicide by craftworld while hopefully hurting the eldar enough to deter them from targeting us again.
>>
>>5065788
>[Take the ork’s deal]
Fuck it he's a right and proper lad.
>>
>>5065970
support
>also put a beacon and self destruct on the big gun so if he ever turns on us we can just blow him up.
also doesn't help that it will be less powerful without the black hole energy source.
>>
>>5066085
he wanted a volkite rifle, or several, not the ion cannon thing. Even if we put a bomb on it, I suspect he'll try to get some ork to modify the gun. making the explosive kind of redundant.
>>
>>5065822
+1
>>
>>5065970
Why do we think an ork clan will honour any contract? This seems to be a race that does things more "for the lulz" than anything else, and places no value on loyalty or honour.
>>
[1/4]

You mull over the offer. You’re reluctant to refuse, or kill him outright. Despite yourself, you’re actually going to accept. Hopefully if he does detonate, it’ll be at arm’s length.

“I need more assurances.” The words form in the conqueror’s speakers as they form in your mind. “First, I’ll need a promise that your ‘boyz’ will not act against this facility or it’s interests in perpetuity.”

“Per- wot?”

“Forever.”

“Oh. ‘owz I meant ta’ promise dat? I’z not gonna be ‘ere ferever.” They look back up at your robot, contemplating a counteroffer for a while. “If it’z in da kontrat datz gud enuff. Dey’ll know wot dat means, an’ dey won’t loot ya or krump ya or dat.”

That’s close enough. This warboss is surprisingly reasonable. The next one might not be, and despite what this one says, you can’t see the orks honouring that sort of deal. If he does keep to his word, though, it’ll keep them off your back until he’s replaced, at least. “Next, the weapons I give you will be fitted with a tamper-proof remote detonation charge. If you use them against me, I will destroy them. If you try to remove the charges, you will lose your hands. Is that clear?”

“So long as da mekboys can still make dem orky, datz fine.” You’re not sure what ‘make them orky’ actually means, but you suppose they’ll have to find out the hard way what happens if they try to remove those charges. You consider mentioning that you plan on sticking him with a beacon, but decide against it. That should probably be another surprise.

“Very well. I accept the terms as they are set out now.”

“Datz zoggin’ good dat is!” Relief is plain on the ork’s face. “‘Oosually we’z shake ‘ands an den da boyz would do sum rokkin’ but I’z not got any ‘and and da boyz ‘ere iz all dead. Wen I’z got me arms back, I’z do da kontrakt so we’z don’t ferget it.” He nods. “I will needs me arms back tho.”

With that, your deal with a green devil has been signed. You leave him to stew a little longer, and send your drones to go collect his limbs. He did specify that he wanted HIS arms back, after all, and with orkoid biology being what it is, you’re sure there won’t be any problems in reinstalling both the mechanical and organic one. You send him over to the medical bay under his own power, giving him a few opportunities to ‘escape’ his escort, with a rolling perimeter of robots just out of sight, just to test him. It’s hard to tell with orks, but he seems perfectly calm, and doesn’t make any attempts before reaching the clinic.
>>
>>5066441
[2/4]

The auto-surgeries are perfectly sterile white rooms, kept perfectly sterile at all times by a variety of low-power rad-emitters that, while perfectly safe to human cells, keep bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other potential hazards at bay. A human sized operating table in the center is surrounded by sensitive and highly capable robotic arms, equipped with every surgical tool that could be required. Often, nanomedical surgeries would be more expedient - simply inject a syringe of nanobots into the patient and allow them to carry out a pre-programmed task. They could operate with infinitely more precision than a human doctor, and carry out repairs that would otherwise be impossible, but some surgeries require heavier equipment. Like limb reattachments, for example. Though it feels crude in comparison to facilities on the glistening metropolises of Earth or Mars, it was enough to wow the ork.

You take the opportunity to put him under, and have the robots awkwardly secure him to the table and begin the surgery. The auto-surgeon requires little oversight from you - it knows what it’s doing - and so you’re free to prepare your surprise. Tiny antimatter bombs, to be implanted in his neck. You check to make sure he’s asleep, and slip them inside. A ring around his spine, and one deeper in the brain. You fit them with a QEC device and a homing beacon. Undetectable to anyone other than you, accessible from any range, and a QEC’s low bandwidth is no problem when you only need to send a package to order a detonation… which should be enough to turn his brain to mist.

Once he’s woken up, you discuss the plans for the craftworld attack with him for a while. He admits to knowing nothing about the “big kroozer” save for the fact that there must be “lotsa panzees” onboard. If true, that could be problematic. You remember the eldar of your time - distant, ancient, and in a state of inexorable decay, yet still in possession of incredible power and technology, with arrogance to match. Back then, relations with the eldar were… difficult. Occasionally combative, occasionally friendly, though always confusing. It’s fuzzy now, like a half remembered dream, but you remember the work with perfect clarity, and remember the aliens that leant aid on occasion.
>>
>>5066443
[3/4]

They were a sister empire to mankind’s own, though… an older sister. They had achieved all that they had wanted to achieve and then simply given up, retreating into themselves. Whereas men built, and moved ever forwards, expanding their borders and deepening their knowledge of the universe, seeking to bend it to their will, the eldar rested on their laurels, secure in their dwindling superiority. From the outside, it was clear that they would collapse eventually - that they would fall so far that their craftworlds seemed to be the only remaining lifeboats of their civilization was somewhat unexpected. Individual eldar would occasionally lend their expertise to the project, but their interest was fleeting and their attention split. They would speak of the warp in less derisive terms than their human contemporaries, with a deeper understanding of the way it worked. They didn’t know what you planned to do with that knowledge, and were they, they probably wouldn’t have spoken to you.

You see parallels between what you remember of the Eldar, and what you now see of the domain of men. You won’t let history repeat itself.

You return your attention to the ork, but remind yourself to set aside more time to index your memories. There was much you have yet to remember. The ork outlines a few different plans that he has. The first involves baiting the previously wounded farseer out with his teams’ ‘shiny gubbins roks’, and then activating the beacon on him as he attempts to enter the webway, tracking them through the webway, and then invading the craftworld itself with a ‘mob of [his] biggest kommando boyz’. By the sounds of it, the ork is confident that he could find a way to get the specific farseer’s attention, and lure him out with the promise of these rocks, and confident that they’ll be able to track him through the webway with the beacon. His next plan involves the use of a ‘kustom sneaky kill kroozer’ - the last of which was crashed into a ‘greyskin kroozer’ for ‘a larf’ - to stealthily deploy a smaller team of kommandos armed with a ‘big bomm’. The ork seems less confident about this plan, because he assumes that the craftworld will have an escort that his ship might struggle to get past intact. The last plan he offers needs only two words to articulate: “Krump ‘em.” He goes on to further explain the plan: Build up a fleet large enough to overwhelm the defenders, and then fire a large cannon at the craftworld until it dies.
>>
>>5066444
[4/4]

The plans all seem… reasonably good, but you don’t have the time or the resources to execute all but the first immediately. You’ll need to put your ork friend into stasis for a time - something he’s fine with once you clarify that he won’t realise time is passing, and that he won’t ‘get bored’ - until you’ve got the resources necessary to carry out the plan of your choosing. What to do…

>[Invade the craftworld immediately]
You’ll leave the ork to execute the first stage of the plan, while you prepare for the invasion. You’re lacking heavy lift capacity, so you’ll be dangerously reliant on the orks to carry out the operation, as you’ll be limited solely to supporting them with equipment and a light smattering of robots. Still, you can’t allow the eldar to start cooking up another plan. Hit them hard, fast, and brutally.

>[Invade the craftworld later]
Put him into stasis and start building up forces for an invasion of the craftworld. Craftworlds are huge, and you can’t rely on the orks to invade the whole thing alone. Plus, if you capture it, you can avoid unnecessary bloodshed, and avoid pissing off any other eldar, and get a cool ship out of the deal. Build up your capabilities, and then strike at a more opportune time.

>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
The warboss says he’ll need a stealth ship to effectively deploy his kommando team onto the craftworld with the bomb. You currently lack facilities for ship building, but you think you have some blueprints for a stealth ship around here somewhere… Besides, you’ll be needing to build shipyards at some point, anyway. While the attack will destroy the craftworld, you really don’t want the ship anyway.

>[Prepare a full fleet battle]
Subtlety is for people who don’t have black hole cannons. You were going to need to build up a whole fleet at some point, anyway. You might as well flex your muscles: Remind the eldar why they never went to war with humanity at their height, and show the galaxy that soon, they will be back.
>>
>>5066446
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
The warboss says he’ll need a stealth ship to effectively deploy his kommando team onto the craftworld with the bomb. You currently lack facilities for ship building, but you think you have some blueprints for a stealth ship around here somewhere… Besides, you’ll be needing to build shipyards at some point, anyway. While the attack will destroy the craftworld, you really don’t want the ship anyway.


>[Invade the craftworld immediately]
You’ll leave the ork to execute the first stage of the plan, while you prepare for the invasion. You’re lacking heavy lift capacity, so you’ll be dangerously reliant on the orks to carry out the operation, as you’ll be limited solely to supporting them with equipment and a light smattering of robots. Still, you can’t allow the eldar to start cooking up another plan. Hit them hard, fast, and brutally.

The idea of sending orks on a commando mission to blow up the eldar fleet tickles my fancy so much.
>>
>>5066446
>>[Invade the craftworld later]
>Put him into stasis and start building up forces for an invasion of the craftworld. Craftworlds are huge, and you can’t rely on the orks to invade the whole thing alone. Plus, if you capture it, you can avoid unnecessary bloodshed, and avoid pissing off any other eldar, and get a cool ship out of the deal. Build up your capabilities, and then strike at a more opportune time.
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
stasis his ass dealing with the orks is a baaaad idea until we have a better foot to stand on, no matter how charismatic they are. Not a fan of giving him the singularity cannon anyway like holy shit
>>
>>5066461
+1
>>
>>5066446
>>[Invade the craftworld later]
>>
>>5066446
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
'big bomm' that craftworld. We don't need it intact, and the best way to destroy it is with an ork nuke. We are effectively at war with an entire craftworld, best be decisive about it.

Consider this, the Eldar of that craftworld know this ork was not enough. The next level of escalation would be directly attacking us, or worse, warning the Admech and Imperium directly about us. All it takes is leaking info to some Admech guys, and we have all of Mars on our moon.
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
>>
>>5066446
Just realized I missed something so changing from
>>5066516
To
>[Invade the craftworld later]
&
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
>>
>>5066518
>>5066451
All options presented are mutally exclusive. You can only risk one use of the gitfinda.
>>
>>5066528
Fuck me. Alright then. changing mine here >>5066451 too

>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
The warboss says he’ll need a stealth ship to effectively deploy his kommando team onto the craftworld with the bomb. You currently lack facilities for ship building, but you think you have some blueprints for a stealth ship around here somewhere… Besides, you’ll be needing to build shipyards at some point, anyway. While the attack will destroy the craftworld, you really don’t want the ship anyway.
>>
>>5065788
>[Refuse the ork’s deal]

That we even voted to consider this is silly
>>
>>5066536
bruh
>>
>>5066446
>>[Invade the craftworld later]

>[Prepare a full fleet battle]
by this option I assume this will be our main goal later on.

>>5066536
bruh
>>
>>5066536
It really is
>>
>>5066536
Anons are retarded, what can I say?
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
Think this is the best option. While I hate eldar as much as anyone else here, destroying (or depopulating) an entire craftworld will probably have repercussions that we're not prepared to deal with at the moment.

Also, I'm curious if we can get the warboss to pull off 1 or 2 small raids against the eldar in the interim. If we arm the raiders with a few volkite rifles (since the deal is done anyways), the eldar might assume that the ork warband succeeded in looting our facility. Such a misconception could be enough to keep them from taking any action against us in the near future. A contract between a warboss and an DAoT-era AI is pretty retarded after all >>5066583, and seems to be just the thing a legless eldar farseer would overlook or dismiss.

>>5066469
I'm pretty sure we're not giving him singularity weapons? Just a smattering of volkite rifles and infantry weapons.
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
but I want the craftworld intact.


>>5066474
poke
>>
>>5066446
>>[Invade the craftworld later]

I doubt the Eldar, in their current arrogance, yet know of the outcome of the battle here. Plus, I quite like the idea of capturing the Craftworld and giving their swollen egos a blow.
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld immediately]
I am all for sending this war boss on a suicide mission, just a punishment for the eldars attack, we likely kill the farseer that arranged this and if the boss doesn't die we can just keep throwing him at nasty xenos or chaos holdouts with the bare minimum of prep or resources. I doubt his boys will uphold the contract but if they do we can keep them busy or get them all killed.
>>
>>5066641
This orks are at best disposable assets
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
Get back up and running, then we confront the knife-ears.
>>
>>5066446
>Prepare a kommando infiltration
We trust you will handle this matter with.. discretion.
>>
>>5066446
>[Invade the craftworld later]
I want to "brainwash" him while hes in stasis, make it fun and teach him a few things that will be mutually useful, like OPSEC and not spilling the beans.
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
Go big or go boom!

Forgot to add for him to not tell anyone the secrets of this place. Only he can know, what and where we are.
>>
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>>5066536
We know.
Can't wait until this bullshit inevitably hits the fan.
Not that the brainlets will learn anything from the experience of course, but the schadenfreude of them sinking the quest will be somewhat enjoyable.
>>
>>5066843
Playing it sensible isn't fun, and we already knew this board is filled with brainlets. Best to just enjoy the chaos, I say.
>>
>>5066843
Idk why you’re so pissed off about this. Thr Eldar are a much more serious threat than the orks, so the benefit outweighs the risk. Regardless, we could simply keep the ork in stasis forever if we wanted to, or deploy him like a pokemon should another threat (e.g. space marines) show up.
>>
>>5066446
>[Prepare a kommando infiltration]
Seems like the best bang for our buck. One less major problem in exchange for one stealth ship. Nice and plausibly deniable.
I think our situation is a little too precarious right now to be waving our virtual peener around with a big fleet, though we -will- definitely be needing our own PDF and defensive squadrons soon.
>>
>>5066843
...or you could just enjoy the fact that we're keeping around a genuinely funny character? Tactical wargaming is good and all, but making a few fun-but-sub-optimal decisions every once in a while isn't going to sink a quest.
>>
[1/4]

You direct the ork to stasis. While an invasion of the craftworld seems like the wisest use of the ‘gitfinder’, you’re in no position to provide meaningful support to such an operation at the moment. For now, you’ve bought yourself some time: it will take a while before the eldar in question learn what happened here, and longer still before they’ll be able to mount any other attempts against you. It should, hopefully, be enough time for you to rebuild your defences, and secure your position with the Imperium.

With that matter handled for the time being, you have little to do but wait for the Magos’ return. In the meantime, you continue working over the techpriests, and find that with a little convincing, most are receptive to your efforts. After handing out a few minor trinkets and toys, you’ve successfully recruited a good 75% of the remaining tech priests. Of the other 25%, roughly 15% seemed to be actively dangerous, while the last 10% are, at present, simply uninterested. You arrange accidents for those that may cause problems in the future, and continue working over the remaining 10%.

Of the menials, almost all accepted your offer, although most are beginning to suffer the deleterious effects of the combat augments. Roughly 50% are displaying signs of psychological damage, 30% are suffering neurological damage, and 10% have suffered extreme damage to the frontal lobe, resulting in unstable behaviour. You’re administering treatment where possible, but there’s little you can do in all but the worst cases of physical damage. There’s little you can do about the PTSD.

You dedicate more power to recovering and indexing memories, and allow your perception of time to speed up. You retrieve little of use. You can’t tell how important a specific memory will be until you’ve already re-indexed it, and oftentimes they’re useless. The wavelength of the colour of a human coworker’s hair. The specific chemical composition of a phase-iron alloy test piece. The smell of burning rangdan flesh. It’s a mixed bag. You do remember some useful things, though. The location of a few hidden weapon caches, material stockpiles, and drone bays. It’s not much, and it won’t cover the losses from the ork attack, but it’s encouraging if nothing else. There’s still more in the facility, and you will always have something to make your downtime productive.
>>
>>5066893
[2/4]

Three months pass like this before the magos returns. Progress has been steady in the interim. You have received regular reports from your drones and new human underlings. They have, working together, restored as much of the damage to the factory as it was possible to do without cannibalizing other parts of the facility. You’re quite surprised to learn that the techpriests are, when given actual manuals, highly effective and adaptable engineers. Perhaps there is some hope for them yet? The menials, however, make little progress in their tasks, failing to clear many of the collapses at all. You didn’t expect much of them, though. The robots and skitarii have successfully cleaned most of the moon’s surface, and the length and breadth of the facility of orks, ensuring that you won’t have to deal with a second wave of them cropping up from within. All in all, it has been a productive, though ultimately uneventful time. Still, lacking resources has tied your hands behind your back. Hopefully that will soon change.

You recognise the magos’ q-ship as it enters orbit around your moon, only this time it has brought friends. It doesn’t take long for the magos to hail you.

“Epimetheus, I have returned. I take it you have survived the ork’s attack?” As ever, Rane is straight to the point.

“After a fashion. I take it you were not killed for heresy?”

“After a fashion.” They reply. “I bring good news on that front. I had to change my story slightly, but I was able to offer my testimony before the meeting. I offered part of our first conversation as proof that there were fellow followers of the Omnissiah on the moon. Some questioned my original statements about the moon being depopulated, but I was able to explain it away. Technically, this delegation is to welcome your lost colony back into Mars’ embrace, but as a representative of Stygies found it, I was able to convince them to allow us to play a larger role.”

“Good.” You think. You’re really not sure if that is good yet, but the magos seems to think it is, and so you’re inclined to agree out of politeness if nothing else.

“It means that I have much closer control over who will be part of the first delegation. I’ve already prepared much.” They continue. “I will have my own men disguised as part of this ‘forge world’, and offer our brothers from the red planet a warm welcome. It should be enough to placate them, and report their mission a successful one. All you need to do is set aside a space for me to decorate, where I can house and entertain the delegation, I will handle the rest.” Letting them handle the political side of things is probably best - you really don’t understand enough about the specifics to handle that minefield.

“Is there anything I should be concerned about in this deal? Any obligations?”
>>
>>5066894
[3/4]

“None. Mars will try to keep you on a tight leash, but we’re deep in Segmentum Ultima. It won’t be hard for me to avoid that eventuality. Distance will give us the independence we need.”

“We?” There’s something about the way they phrased that. It could be nothing, but it bears asking.

“I have had time to think about it. This is a project I feel it best I remain close to. I will organise a transfer from Stygies. The fabricator-general never liked me. I don’t imagine they’ll raise many complaints.” There’s a pause. “She will complain, though.”

You don’t have any problem with that. Keeping Rane close could prove extremely useful. You move onto your next question. “Can we expect to receive material shipments?”

“Not yet. Mars may hold little sway over us, but the Administratum will want to visit us. Ordinarily, they might take decades, but this is an unprecedented circumstance. They will wish to see us as soon as they can. If we can produce some minor weapons for them in the meantime, I have no doubt they’ll also wish to see us returned to operation as soon as possible. Once they have, they will assign us a production grade, and begin material shipments. Under the circumstances, I expect they will exempt us from our tithe until we can restore ‘functionality’, and will provide us with material and a workforce.” Rane pauses again. “I will handle the Administratum. They will wish to see much of the facility, but I will ensure they cannot enter anywhere sensitive, and explain away any oddities as a quirk of the forge world. As long as we aren’t chaos worshippers, and can provide them with equipment, I don’t think they’ll question us. With that done, we will be an official part of the Adeptus Mechanicus, practically exempt from Inquisitorial investigation and Administratum oversight. The Collegiate Extremis may launch investigations, and we will obviously be obligated to provide a certain amount of equipment, and assistance to other Imperial forces, but other than that, we will have our independence.”
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>>5066896
[4/4]

That’s a lot of qualifiers to independence, but it offers you some advantages. You will soon have a method of drip feeding your technology into this human empire. How much you choose to distribute will be up to you, though your very function compels you to provide, at the very least, some harmless technologies, especially those that weaken the archenemy. What damage could be done to you by supplying the Imperium with phase-iron, or panacea? You could destroy the Plaguefather overnight.

“One last thing.” Your train of thought is interrupted by the magos. “We will need some iconography. A name, colours, a symbol, etcetera. For our forge world.” The question catches you by surprise. You hadn’t thought of that. “Heraldry is very important.” The magos confirms, sending you a datapacket with the last message: Some sort of blank image to colour in?

>[Write in]
A name, a primary and secondary colour, and a symbol. Now would also be a good time to specify any other design flair you wanted to include in your iconography. Normally, you’d brush something like this off, but you get the feeling that, even once you throw off your ‘Forge world’ disguise, this style of design might stick with the people who remain loyal to you.
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>>5066897
Nippon
Red Primary
White Secondary
Rising Sun Symbol

Let's do this.
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>>5066897
Did we at least manage to figure out all the secrets within our facility, or not yet? Do we have a cloning bay in our medical facility to create Servitors? Can we turn some of the super dying menials into Servitors? I want my security network upgrades pronto!

What about the spores? Did we manage to purge the entire base of spores? We CANNOT AFFORD to let a single microbe escape and dig its roots in anything.

>>5066909
This. I cant think of anything better, and its honestly not bad. Maybe we can explain to Rane why we picked this color scheme and a brief earth history lesson about japan.
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>>5066897
I'm not much of an artist and the paint-by-numbers wasn't quite co-operating, but I figure we'd want to go with a more "modern" feeling color scheme. For the stamp, since we're basically trying to reboot or system restore humanity, something like this but more stylized. Maybe make the arrows dragons or serpents, make the power-on sign an apple or eye, whatever. Talk with the Magos to make sure it's kosher. No idea on a name.
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>>5066897
Forge World Svartalfheim
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>>5066939
+1
>>
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Please don't name it Nippon lol. We should at least try to be semi original. Not against some pseudo-Japanese iconography though. Here's my best stab.
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>>5066897
I'm terrible with colour schemes but I think we should use a Phoenix for our symbol. After all we are rising again/reborn
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>>5066952
i'll agree to the phoenix but maybe mess it up so it fits 40k. maybe Forgeworld Phenex
white primary and red (or like a blue flame) secondary or black then red.
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>>5066897
Something with blue outer primary color, red inside of coat, and some color in-between, maybe purple or/and orange trim? I'd like for our appearance and weaponry designs aesthetics to look like some type of divergence from items in our inventory to look more unique.

We need some songs and music with appropriate divergences to make it distinct and form our own culture, some notable different from mainstream Mechanicum culture and rules of protocol that mainly work to benefit us.

>>5066952
I'd like to see a more aggressive phoenix, with a Volkrite Rifle in one claw, and a Power Sword in the other, surrounded by interlinked gears forming a circle or wreathe around it.
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I wonder if we can add our specialty as Phase Iron Gellar fields that are highly reliable and resistant to warp fuckery..
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>>5066897
Forgeworld Moebius

Disguise it as a mostly orange themed facility and personnel combined with both white and black, juggling between the AI's memory of old security guards and a new stagnated Admech look.
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>>5066897
Black Mesa
Orange and Black
Lambda Symbol
or
Aperture Science
Orange and Blue
Aperture Science logo

If anyone want some variety. I really enjoy >>5066909 choice, so I'll be supporting him for the moment.

>>5066951
I like that icon as well, we can have that be our official tech-priest symbol. If you got a better name though, please share it, because I got jack myself.
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>>5067033
Damnit 4chan! I want my pics back!
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>>5067033
The Lamba Symbol

>>5067035 is Aperture Science FYI.
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>>5066939
I like the symbol along with having blue as our primary colour so +1
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I vote for tri tachyon symbol/colors
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>>5066897
I'll back this guy >>5066939
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>>5066993
>aggressive phoenix
That sounds appropriate I'll back that idea
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>>5066939
+1
>>
>>5066939
> Support.
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>>5066897
>>5067035
I support Aperture Science.
fuck Black Mesa
>>
>>5066939
Support this as well.
Luv' colors
Luv' nordy bits
simple as
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>>5067046
Support
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>>5067046
support, Tri Tach is good
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>>5066939
support
>>
>>5066939
>Supporting this
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>>5066939
Interesting, could someone at least try to fill in the skitarii there somewhat or find a skitarii with a similar enough paint job so we can be sure it doesn't end up ugly in practice?
>+1 to name
>+1 to stamp
>>
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[1/4]

You dig deep into your historical records. Humans always recycled old stories to give life to their new projects, it only seems fitting for you to do the same. You consider a few options, including a few based on the name your creators gave you, but discard them, eventually arriving at something based on a different branch of old human mythology. Svartalfheim. Connections to smithing, the creation of artefacts of great power, and of beings that live deep underground. Appropriate, though you doubt anyone other than yourself will appreciate the reference. Should you succeed, perhaps one day they will all learn. For now, though, you are satisfied.

For colours, you opt for a blue main coat, supported by a secondary coat of silver-grey, contrasting with red highlights. This is somewhat of a divergence from what you have seen of the Mechanicus thus far, but the magos voices no disapproval as you deliver your decisions to them. Lastly, you choose the stamp, and icon of your forge world, which will be held aloft by your troops and stamped on your goods - a hammer surrounded by a cog.

“Very good. They will approve of the cog.” They say by way of approval. “It is acceptable. I will direct the menials to prepare decorations accordingly. Highlight a section of the facility that we may use. Preferably one with a wide open internal space, away from anything sensitive.” You do so, sending directions to a landing spot. There’s another one of the long pauses you’ve become accustomed to. “Did any of my men survive the battle?”

Ah, that might be awkward. “Yes. Many have opted to join our cause.”

“I see.” If the magos is surprised, there’s no sign of it in their words. “That should make things easier. I was concerned that they may alert Mars to the… oddities of the facility.” Another pause. “Excellent, in fact. Direct them to the landing site. I will bring them their new robes. We will have them pose as the survivors of the battle.” You do so, rousing them from their work and ordering them to assemble at the landing site.

With that done, the two of you fall into comfortable silence again, and the line is dropped. You both know what you have to do, and Rane certainly has the more involved job. You watch as shuttles whizz about, carrying men and equipment too and from the ground. Skitarii have been conscripted to handle the decorating, likely because the magos simply couldn’t trust menials to keep their mouths shut. You suppress the feeling of violation as they clad the halls and rooms you’ve become so familiar with prefabricated neo-gothic decorations. Walls and halls are draped in thick velvet curtains, festooned with metalwork statues and iconography, and freshly illuminated by hanging braziers. It’s strange to see it. A style of design that is at once extravagant and pragmatic. Harsh, unwelcoming, and aggressive, yet strangely serene at the same time. As much a contradiction as the worship of technology.
>>
>>5067371
A note on the above Skitarii - this is only my interpretation of the colour scheme. If you have any issues/alternative suggestions, let me know.
[2/4]

An arboretum once used for recreation is stripped bare and converted into some sort of cathedral. You have to interrupt once or twice to prevent the renovations causing any unnecessary damage, but you’re sure that you can live without one more arboretum, as painful as it might be to watch it destroyed. When they’re done, though, they have created a little segment of your facility that has been well disguised. For the moment, it will be enough, though at some point you know you’re going to have to abandon the cleaner look of the rest of the facility in favour of something closer to this. Perhaps you’ll have some opportunity to carve out a more distinctive aesthetic in the meantime.

Once renovations are complete, the magos lands in his shuttle, with a small delegation from Stygies and a larger one from Mars. The priests with him are a strange bunch. You watch them file out onto the icy surface of the moon, stalking out of their shuttle like some ancient predator from Earth, their heads sweeping the horizon as though they’re hunting prey. Each of them projects a strength and confidence that practically radiates out. You can, just by watching them enter, sense the size of the egos at play, and suddenly feel a lot happier than Rane is handling this rather than yourself.

They meet up with the ‘local’ delegation - one of Rane’s subordinates at the head of a procession of the veterans from the battle with the orks - in their ‘local’ colours, who leads them deeper into the facility, through the prepared halls and towards the prepared chapel. Your part in this is, for the moment, over. You have little interest in the politics of the situation. You have the Magos for that.
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>>5067372
[3/4]

It takes a few days for things to finally wrap up. The Martian delegation demanded much of ‘Svartalfheim’ at first, though through the combined efforts of Rane and his subordinate, they were able to argue out of most of those restrictions and demands as it became increasingly clear to everyone involved that Mars was simply happy to have another colony reenter the fold and continue supplying the Imperium… and that, were you to simply refuse, there was little Mars could do to enforce their demands at the moment. It seemed that the Imperium, and the Adeptus Mechanicus by extension, wasn’t having a great time. Once that was established, it didn’t take long for negotiations to wrap up. Svartalfheim offers their loyalty to Mars, their acceptance of the Lore Mechanicus, and some small trinkets. Mars, in return, offers their protection and general support. It amounted to little of actual value being exchanged, materially or in promises, though it was an important step. You were now officially recognised as part of the Imperium, and the Administratum would soon arrive.

Rane raised a point to you in private as things were winding down: Most forge worlds were known for the production of something specific. Something they did better than anyone else. A niche they could carve out. A feather in their caps. Eventually, once the facility is restored to full functionality, it should be possible for you to out produce any other forge world out there, both in terms of raw output and in the efficacy of your products, though you will need to start small. It might also be wiser to draw less attention to yourself by toning down the technological complexity and volume of your first products.
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>>5067375
[4/4]

You’ll always produce other things, supplying whatever equipment the Imperium requests, but what equipment will you be known for…

>[Infantry equipment]
You will be known for guns, armour, and personal refractor shields. Your weapons and armour will be especially well regarded compared to your other products, and those are the things you’ll focus on producing.

>[Vehicles]
Tanks, aircraft, and other atmospheric vehicles. You’ll produce vehicles for unique niches and roles, ensuring that every branch of the Imperium will seek out your craft.

>[Voidships]
You’ll build grand shipyards, to host grand fleets. Ships across the whole segmentum, and even further afield will bear your stamp, giving your moon a reputation for voidships that will endure for centuries to come.

>[Titans]
Warmechs - the most powerful terrestrial engines of war that humanity had ever produced. Those of the modern day are only shadows of what has been built in the past, and you’re familiar enough with their construction to begin making them yourself. People will certainly remember this.

>[Civilian/Industrial]
It’s all well and good to supply the equipment of war, but humanity has problems other than orks and eldar. You can do more good by supplying farming equipment, medical equipment, and all manner of other material to make the lives of your average human easier. Not flashy, but perhaps it’s the right thing to do.

>[Other - Write in]
Perhaps there’s something else you wish to be remembered for? Something specific?

And how advanced should your products be, to begin with?

>[Imperial standard]
You’ve seen the technology of the modern day. While your products will always be a little better than your contemporaries, you won’t make your superiority overt. Keep a low profile, keep your head down, and keep the best stuff for yourself. If nothing else, you'll be able to produce a lot of it.

>[Advanced]
You’ve seen the technology of the modern day, and it disgusts you. You can barely bring yourself to look at it, let alone produce it. You won’t hand out reflector fields like candy, but you can at the very least elevate the common technologies of the day with some ancient flair. Nothing too suspicious, but very noticeably better.

>[AoT standard]
You’re not tying your hands behind your back. This will rock some boats, but frankly you couldn’t care less. Start supplying humanity with the bounty of their ancestors, and ensure it’s spread as far and wide as you can. You might not be able to make as much as if you were churning out less sophisticated equipment, but one volkite rifle is worth a dozen lasrifles.
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>>5067046
Support. Time to export our "coffee machines" to every stronghold of the imperium. Gotta get information on everything you know?
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>>5067378
>[Civilian/Industrial]
It’s all well and good to supply the equipment of war, but humanity has problems other than orks and eldar. You can do more good by supplying farming equipment, medical equipment, and all manner of other material to make the lives of your average human easier. Not flashy, but perhaps it’s the right thing to do.

>[AoT standard]
You’re not tying your hands behind your back. This will rock some boats, but frankly you couldn’t care less. Start supplying humanity with the bounty of their ancestors, and ensure it’s spread as far and wide as you can. You might not be able to make as much as if you were churning out less sophisticated equipment, but one volkite rifle is worth a dozen lasrifles.

The perfect cover actually, It won't draw TOO much attention and it will boost the most amount of lives out there.
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>>5067388
+1
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>>5067388
+1
I'm assuming that this is just for export right? Hopefully can still produce military equipment for ourselves on the DL.
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>>5067378
>>[Other - Write in]
>[Civilian/Industrial]
Genetically modified crops, fertilizers for said crops given we're orbiting a giant nitrogen ball and perhaps dipping our toes into human gene engineering through said crops. Sneak in something into the crops that upon exposure to say herbicide or anything they produce pollen which is a vector for adenoviruses with new genes that can edit germ cells. Make the children of farmers and the like able to better absorb nutrients and grow faster plus generally increasing neuroplastity & intelligence.
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>>5067378
>[Civilian/Industrial]
>[AoT standard]
>>
>