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/qtddtot/ - Questions that don’t deserve their own thread

Didn't see one, so I'll make one.
I have an inflatable pad and a foam pad. Would it make any difference warmth-wise if I put the inflatable pad inside the sleeping bag and then sleep like that on the foam pad? Compared to having both of them outside of the sleeping bag.
>>
>>2468275
I was just thinking that the air inside the inflatable pad will keep warmer if it's also insulated by the sleeping bag.

>But it would probably also push down on the bag more, thus decreasing insulation a bit.
This is a good point. In general if it gets too cramped inside the sleeping bag the insulation will be worse.
I'll try it out tonight and see if it makes a difference.
>>
Are rain covers for external frames custom only at this point?
>>
What ammunition is best for skinwalkers and extraterrestrials?
>>
So I got these lixada solar panels a while ago, hooked two up to my power bank using a Y cable, but whenever a cloud passes, the power bank stops charging and doesn't resume unless I re-plug. Will getting a newer power bank fix this issue or are they all like that?
>>
>>2468339
It's about the simplest thing you could make yourself. There's a glut of sewing machines in thrift stores right now, after everyone wanted them to make masks.
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>>2468410
Sounds like the issue would be with your panels, unless there is a button or something manual to put the bank into charging mode.
>>
Looking for a good sleeping bag that isn't made in China. any suggestions?

thnx
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>>2468851
Don't have first hand experience with any of them, but Western Mountaineering, Zpacks, Feathered Friends.
>>
I'm heading to Anchorage, Alaska for 6 weeks starting this Saturday. Will only have weekends to go exploring. Any suggestions for trails to hike along?
>>
any good tips on dealing with sweat?
it's just about autumn now so figured I'd ask, I sweat a lot and it's been kind of an issue outdoors
in spring and summer it's just a mild inconvenience but when fall comes around it becomes an issue with body temperature
layering up isn't a really good option because it makes it worse in the long run and layering down still doesn't prevent sweat
best solution I've came up with is light top layer and pack extra bottom layers but that's kind of a pain to change outdoors
and if I move at a pace that I don't sweat I'm just too slow
>>
Anyone know the meaning of pic related?
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>>2468927
Yeah pretty much your only option is to hike in a lightweight wool/synthetic layer and have a base, mid and/or insulating layer to throw on when you stop moving/set up camp.
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>>2468933
Indiana sucks
>>
I need a squat, wide, army-style canteen because I find my steel bottle hard to pack. Very preferably steel, not AliExpress chinkshit and not surplus (I don't wanna get surplus for stuff I'm eating or drinking off of). So far I have found the Helikon-Tex Pathfinder but I'm not paying 60 fucking euros for a knockoff US army canteen with a mug. There's Mil-Tec and a brand "Rothko" that makes them, but they're both brands with questionable quality standards.
If you have bought a good plastic one that isn't shit and doesn't taste like cancer, please tell me.
There's also the Finnish army one from Varusteleka, I might get that one.
>>
>>2468927
where do you sweat from exactly? this is important because if you sweat a lot from your back it might be your backpack's fault. if a backpack doesn't have a good system for preventing sweat it's almost inevitable.
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>>2468271
Im looking through surplus stores to pick up some cheap rain gear and Ive realized I have no idea about any of it. Is there a difference between different military equipment? Are some militaries considered to have shittier gear? How did they waterproof their packs? I dont see external rain covers. Is it just internal dry bags and fuck it to the bag fabric getting soaked?

Any help would be appreciated because I am super confused
>>
Please recommend a headlamp that has close to these specs but also has a red led aswell
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>>2469368
And also takes one AA battery
>>
What would you all recommend bringing in a camera bag on a hike? I’m realizing the camera bag I bought is quite a bit bigger than what I need for my gear. What would be good to have on a hike? I’m not planning to actually camp, but I am a novice hiker.
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>>2469428
just dump all the electronics in it if it's waterproof. power banks, spare batteries for the headlamp, USB cables etc.
not sure how much extra space you have in it
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>>2469436
It’s 400d weatherproof. I have a mirror less camera with one prime lens and greatly overestimated the bag size. I will be picking up one more lens though so it will at least fill out a little bit.
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>>2469060
yeah that's one of the factors, extra sweat where the strap rests but that's kind of unavoidable, other than everywhere else in general
but definitely looking for a better pack just hesitant to drop the cash
>>
Anyone know what this is?
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>>2469368
I use a husky headlamp. Idk if it follows those specs but you can dial the beams focus and it has 3 light settings as well as red which is operated by a separate button so I think you can do both at the same time. Takes 3 AAA tho
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>>2469384
How bout belgian? I like that thurr jigsaw camo they have
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>>2469504
Aye, thats a plant with berries on it
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>>2469504
Those are buffaloberries. They're super toxic to humans and eating more than five or so can lead you to an agonizing and embarrassing death since they cause you to basically shit yourself nonstop until you die.

>Source: I'm a Pomologist
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>>2468271
Why do we need this thread exactly?
>>
>>2468271
where is this?
>>
Anyone else here have prodeals? Have you ever bought anything for someone else? Will they know?
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>>2469586
Switzerland
>>
I'm a side sleeper and I experience hip pain every time I sleep outside even though I use an inflatable pad + foam pad.
What can I do?
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>>2468271
Should I sell all my gear except for one tent, one pack, and one bag?
>>
>>2469437
Do you have a small tripod? I like the Velbon Macro (Micro?)
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>>2468358
Gauss cannon
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>>2469620
Get a thicker pad.
Add an auxiliary ccf pad underneath perhaps.
Take the hammock pill.
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>>2469620
Body pillow or substitute.
Dig a hip pit before you set up a tent.
Hammock.
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>>2469670
>Body pillow
something like this?
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>>2469671
Or your boots and stuff repacked in your backpack.
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>>2469578
so people can ask retarded questions they need answered without shitting up the board. thank you for demonstrating the usefulness of this thread with your contribution.
>>
is 1:50000 maps a pain in the ass to navigate with? i've only used 1:25000 but i dont want to print out multiple maps for this area i want to go to
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>>2468271
what does /out/ make of patagonia packs? any good? they seem durable
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>>2469170
GerMil experience from about 13y ago:

One of the first things they taught us in basic was: "Put the shit for your ruckie into a plastic trash bag. Only then pack it into the backpack." Saved my butt from changing into wet ass clothes more than once.

Regarding the rain gear: I remember it as the best piece of rain gear I ever donned. Then again I only started going out for funsies recently and my experience is reduced to the occasional rain shower in your consumer tiet McKinley Rain jacket. Every time the rain geag got excessively dirty, we pre washed them in a sink in the barracks and gave them away for proper cleaning for the weekend. I believe, that the shit got treared heavily with water repellant.
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My friend invited me for a 3 day trip in mid october, They're going to bring a tent so I dont need to worry about that but the only sleeping bag and pad I have are probably 25 or more years old. I do plan on doing a lot more overnight and multi day trips, had technology moved up signifigantly enough to justify getting a new sleeping bad and an inflatable/folding pad? Pic is the type of sleeping pad I have, though something had chewed on one corner.

When I packed everything up as a trial I struggled with how bulky the sleeping bag was, any suggestions for a reasonably affordable sleeping bag?
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>>2469625
What if you want yo invite /out/ a cute girl?
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>>2470852
shiggy
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>>2470849
If you're comfortable on a ccf pad like that then just keep it. If not then it's definitely worth the upgrade to an inflatable so you can actually get some sleep while /out/.
>any suggestions for a reasonably affordable sleeping bag?
Check out Kelly's Cosmic bags. They have multiple temp ranges in both down and synthetic. Or you could look into hammock gear's economy quilts if less weight and bulk is your top priority.
If you're really pinching pennies then try a compression sack for your current sleeping bag. Might be able to get it squeezed down a little smaller.
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>>2468812
Oh shit, i never thought of that but you are probably right. Ive been thinking of picking up sewing recently too. Ill see if its something i have the bandwidth for
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>>2468271
Hill People or Mystery Ranch for nice pack?
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>>2471138
But whats the pros cons my dude. I literally dont know anywhere else people would have such niche knowledge. Shit id do TAD if they made larger size packs and wanted to set all my money on fire
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>>2468933
>Anyone know the meaning of pic related?
I can take a guess. Back in the day, wood or coal were used to heat water for baths. If Indiana was experiencing winter fuel shortages back in the colonial or frontier days, that may have caused them to pass a "no winter baths" law.

Of course, even today, water is mostly heated with fuel since that's what generates most electricity.
>>
>>2471141
Mystery Ranch pros are "all of the above" (in particular, they're comfortable and well balanced to wear, and very rugged), cons are they're expensive and not lightweight.
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So I've been hiking and camping for a while, and last time I went out I decided to bring my plash Palatka and give it a test run on a 2 day excursion, great little piece of kit and I really enjoyed it. But does anyone know why it has only 1 arm hole? The east German version has 2 and I'm just curious
>>
I aim to hit 15k steps daily.
The last few times I had slower days, I went for a walk for 8-10k steps in one go.
I have no problems with it whatsoever but my feet were close to having blisters between the toes.

Should I tape them before going out in the future or leave them to produce more calluses?
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>>2471685
Are your shoes too tight in the forefoot? That can cause toe blisters. Taping might work but it'll get awful tedious doing it everyday. You could try a liner sock like pic rel instead.
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is it fine if i leave my sleeping bag compressed for 24 hours? going on a trip tmrw but i dont think i will have time tmrw to compact it in the morning
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>>2471783
Thanks, also should i bring two fleece mid layers or do i only need one? its gonna rain a lot on the first day but i dont think it will get wet
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>>2471793
i dont see why the location matters, im going to some highlands for 4 days its gonna be like 7-4C and rain on the first day then none for the rest of the days
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>>2471770
im sorry for the noob questions but its my first time backpacking for multiple days, is 3.4kg/7.5lbs of food a lot? i must have fucked up the calculations in the store but its something like 3800cal per day. i made 1kg of trail mix on accident also lol im gonna get bored of that fast i think.
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>>2468271
If your sleeping bag is big enough you can fit an inflatable pad inside it, then your sleeping bag is too big and you'll be cold. If you are winter camping, get a bag that fits you and is rated for the temps you are expecting. A closed cell foam pad should be enough, unless you are over 30 or particularly delicate. Assuming you aren't sleeping straight on the snow.
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>>2471860
>i made 1kg of trail mix on accident
A common mistake.

Protip - if you are going multiple days, you are much better off taking the nuts etc as individual bags. You are going to grow sick of a homogeneous mix after a few days. If the fixings are individual, each can be customized.
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>>2468339
>packcovers for big frames
No just get the biggest raincover you can find. I use varusteleka's 110L cover on all my packframes.
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>>2468851
>Bags made at home
German Carinthia Defense 1, 4, and 6
Polish Cumulus for Down Bags, Quilts, and Inner Sleeping Bags but there are lots of American cottage companies who make cheap quilts as well.
I am using the Defense 1 with an inner down quilt in those wet autumn conditions we have right now down to 10F (-10C).
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>>2471789
>extra clothes
If you'll have wet autumn weather bring one thin fleece to wear while active and another insulation layer to pull over while inactive. Bringing an extra set of clothes beyond sleeping clothes is usually not necessary unless its winter conditions. Then you should bring an extra set of thick base layers because of sweat.
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>>2471860
>how much food (3.5kg)
That's about 3 to 4 days of food if you are doing it right.
If you are a noob your body won't need more than 2000 or 2500kcal per day for the first 5 to 10 days. Then your body's metabolism will become "normal" and healthy and you'll need anywhere from 3500 to 5000kcal.
You should be able to get the weight of a daily food ration down to 700g-1000g.
If you are a beginner pack the food for each day in a separate 2L zip lock.
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>>2471141
>pack for life
Both HPG and especially MR lose out compared to the competition. If you really want to spend that kind of money for a single pack that will last you a lifetime look into Barney's Frontier Gear of Alaska, or maybe Exo Mtn Gear, Stone Glacier. And buy the biggest one (biggest bag volume) then you will never have to buy a bag again. Some people like Kifaru but they are usually fat and tall (and rich).
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Can anyone identify this rucksack?
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>>2472854
>waman posing on rock with backpack
Its an Initial Ascend IA4K. Never tried it myself but had it on my list (the IA6K).
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>>2472388
Wow those exo packs are extremely bad ass and surprisingly lightweight if the specs are true. Never heard of them before. Shame so many of these smaller producers cant get the recognition
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Planning a trip to Colorado in January. Anybody have some cool spots to visit? How is it during the winter? Visiting a friend in Fort Collins for a couple days, then spending the rest of the week doing whatever /out/ shit I can.
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gardenerbros, I need your help. I bought some organic topsoil for reptile enclosures. no plant food, no weed killer, just dirt. problem is it smells pretty strongly of ammonia. is that normal? will it go away as it airs out? do I need to counter it, maybe neutralize the base with an acid (vinegar)? do I need to shovel it back up and throw it out? thanks
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will diotemaceous earth help?
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What are the best US military issue thermal underwear? I need a bunch for work so I want to go with affordable surp.
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>>2473441
the waffle knits
the waffle fleece is worth picking up too
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>>2472388
>>2471860
>>2472895
if you want to get meal weight down and plan right this video and the spreadsheet in the description are very useful:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbmQRmuv88c
i only pack above 140++kcal/oz on serious trips and like 100kcal/oz when i'm just innawoods
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>>2469587
I get pro deals. I think they might occasionally look to make sure your sizing and sex are consistent. Sometimes some brands do give friend and family sales around the holidays.
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do you guys use any app to keep track of trails and so on? i like Alpine Quest but the full version is behind a paywall
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>>2473646
osmand is the best free global app probably. But you should really learn to navigate from a map. Most of the time you wont even need a compass if you learn it right.
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>>2472382
Nice. Will check out
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>>2473450
Thanks!
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>>2471860
Food boredom is good from a utilitarian perspective since best not to eat out of boredom. I find trail mix (or just peanuts and raisins, it's fuel so IDGAF) effective and have no use for cooking.

As MREs improved we kept them on the line trucks for snackage and to skip driving all the way to DFAC. Even wrenching all day inna Saudi heat many Airmen gained weight on deployment.

>>2472388
The ziploc method is very old and works great. If one is damaged it's segregated from the rest.
>>
I'm interested in designing some /out/ playing cards for myself since everything on the market is LARP-tier. It's an interesting exercise, what can you put on a small playing card that A) has a good chance of being useful and B) isn't something you should already have memorized?
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>>2474044
Tracks for animals in the area.
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can anyone recommend a cheap packable sweater/mid-layer, preferably focused on warmth rather than breathability? I want to toss one in my trunk with the rest of my winter driving kit, but don't want to fork too much for something that'll likely just sit in my car and rarely get used
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>>2474302
look for used mammut polartec jacket on ebay. Those have the best warmth to weight/bulk ratio and are high quality. If you dont mind the bulk and weight you can get a new bandit/helicontex fleece jacket for the ame price ($50), or even cheaper are the surplus army fleece jackets.

I buy all my fleecejackets used off ebay, brands even. They sell cheap.
>>
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>>2474330
I more meant something that stuffs down real small so I can cram it into my safety kit, like a nano puff that doesn't cost as much as a fancy ul tent

but thank you for the fleece ideas
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Hydration packs - what's your opinion on them and should I get a cheap one?
I have a "MOLLE II 3L Camelbak® Hydration Carrier", and most of the 3L hydration packs that go with it are about 3 times the carrier's price. I'm thinking of just using it as a small backpack if the hydration pack is both expensive and not that useful
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>>2473599
The rep from Petzl told me they have no way of tracking pro deals and quickdraws are one size for all heheh
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>>2474370
>Hydration packs - what's your opinion on them and should I get a cheap one?
yeah. nothing is better for a short dayhike or a quick fuck-about the woods.
i like the kind with a single small pocket for a rain jacket or windbreaker, makes it a lot more useful. the military kind like that you can just add a pocket to when needed.
good piece of kit to have especially if you live in the kind of place where your back yard is /out/ and you dayhike a lot.
>>2474351
i would second anon's fleece suggestion (its what i use for my car kit) even knowing this.
storing a puffy compressed like that degrades it, you won't be able to count on it if its spent its whole life compressed and forgotten about.
if you do stick with the puffy idea get a larger stuff sack for it. don't store it compressed in its own sack. its only supposed to spend short periods of time that compressed.
>>
re: puffy
i would also suggest synthetic over down for this purpose, unless you're really sure of how well your trunk (or cabin) seals. not uncommon for cars to let moisture in and things stored in trunks to be moderately damp.
but... i'd also just go with fleece over synthetic puffy honestly. rolled up waffle fleece fits in my car emergency kit just fine.
>>
>>2468271
Do I need a hatchet/hand axe for bushcraft? I'm trying to get into it, there have been times where one would have been useful but all of you people say that it's unnecessary weight. As far as woodcutting goes, I only have my knife and folding saw.
On that note, is it worth getting shaped knives for carving?
>>
do bears come back for revenge?

I mean, say I'm cooking dinner at my camp site, bear comes up and I spray it and it fucks off. Will the bear come back? Like is (the extremely unlikely event of) a bear encounter grounds enough to leave and go back home or at the very least relocate your site?

I had a situation once where we left early because some meth heads came into our site and we didn't want to go to sleep with them knowing where we were, but idk how bears work
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>>2475102
Bears are worse than meth heads. Spray is not enough for either. You better bring something else.
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>>2475110
i mean of course we bring guns but I'm saying if we're in camp and a bear wanders by, what's the likelihood of the bear continuing to investigate us later in the night versus fucking off
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>>2475112
Probably zero. It'll either run away or it will keep a big distance anyways and not really care. Just don't cook anything too delicious for dinner and keep all cooking stuff and utensils in the food bag somewhere else.
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>>2475125
If the bear doesnt do that then you should probably camp somewhere else.
>>
Anyone have a QRD on Forestry Service temp trail jobs? I'm applying for next summer but I don't know how to play up my experience.
>>
can you feasibly use a weighted blanket with a hammock?
>>
>>2475660
In the summer I use one wool blanket to sleep on and one to to sleep under. No need for underquilts or anything, or mosquito nets either; just pull the wool over your face.
>>
>>2475675
i'm more worried about the weight specifically
i have a hard time sleeping without my weighted blanket but idk if it'll destabilize the hammock or something
i weigh almost 130lbs and the weighted blanket is like 20 on top of that, but it shifts around while i'll sleep so i'm afraid it might unbalance things and toss me out
>>
>>2475715
>sfw board
back to >>/pol/ nigger
>>
3-finger mittens. Good for winter mountaineering or should I just go with 5-finger? I want warmth but some extra dexterity for carabiners and rope work.
>>
how expensive is mountaineering for a beginner? what is the most essential equipment if i want to go somewhere mild but has no walkable path?
>>
>>2478149
It depends on how steep it is, and if there will be snow or not.

In order of "you need this for increasing steepness/exposure:"
>Good mountaineering boots
>Snow? Crampons
>Harness and rope
>Helmet against rockfall
>Snow? Ice axe
>Slings, locking carabiners
>Camming devices/nuts, quickdraws, prussiks and belay/rappel device
>Snow anchors for glacier travel/crevasse rescue
>Bivy bags/tent/stove for multidays

For off-trail hiking, even somewhat steep, good mountaineering boots will do. Throw exposure into the mix (you're scrambling, not hiking) and you need a rope. Securing an easy scramble can be done with some slings, locking binders, and a shoulder belay. A harder scramble, or low grade technical terrain, needs at least some nuts and a belay device. From there it's pretty much graduating to glacer terrain and multi days.
>>
I'm a city slicker idiot. How do I set up cooking for a picnic where I drive to a remote lake? Do I need one of those little gas burners? What do you recommend?
Also need a camping chair and some kind of sun shelter (awning / umbrella), any recommendations there would also be appreciated
I'm bringing a first aid kit, a map, and my phone in case there's reception, so I think I'll be okay.
>>
Will getting a dog for camping with be a good idea? I want to camp but got no people to camp with so I'm thinking a dog will be good protection. But I'm also worried that having a dog will attract predators too.
I want to do solo crown land camping in Canada.
>>
>>2478792
Dogs are great, but keeping one might impose some travel/hiking restrictions on you.
>>
My backpack is just a bucket style one with just a lid flap at the top and one big cavity for stuff. I only go on day-hikes at the moment, so this is fine. But, does anyone have any suggestions for organizing the inside? I'm not entirely sure what I'm looking for, but maybe some kind of dividers I can stuff inside to keep items separate?
>>
>>2478792
>I'm thinking a dog will be good protection.
you're like one of those people who only have kids so that they won't die alone
>>
>>2478798
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGlfnvpxE_c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xD-uHm9ksI4
>>
>>2468358
Hard cast lead that your pagan friend blesses.
>>
>>2478835
Ah, thanks. So, generally, just group things into their own little bags.
>>
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Can anyone identify the tree this branch came from? I'd like to make a wedge for my hatchet from it but looks like it needs to be a soft wood.
>>
>>2478986
That Is likely a soft wood, its some Sort of conifer.
Hard to tell without looking the needles.
>>
>>2478992
sweet, thanks. smells piney when I scratch the bark
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>>2478986
It's pine.
Can't say as to species but probably red or white pine.
>>
Are camp kettles worth it? Or just get a decent coffee perc and take out the brewing parts?
>>
>>2478409
>How do I set up cooking for a picnic where I drive to a remote lake
You can use a gas stove, but you can also use a campfire and a grill (wait until its ambers)
Gas stove Is quick, and Easy to use, but its going to be a pain in the ass for large stuff, like a hamburger. Its cool for water tho.
The campfire and a grill will cook everything, but if you dont have experience lighting a fire, its going to be a pain in the ass.
>>
>>2479016
Just use a pot. Why carry extra cooking ware?
>>
>>2468271
How much does being scared of heights preclude someone from hiking to the top of a mountain? Not really talking about climbing cliff faces. Are any of you scared of heights but still hike high elevations?
>>
>>2479148
No impact unless you're climbing steep cliffs, ridges can be difficult though
>>
>>2479148
If you are climbing an actual mountain, yes. If you are walking up a glorified hill, no.
>>
>>2479148
How the fuck is being scared of heighs real hahahahahaha just don't look down nigga close your eyes
>>
>>2478409
>Do I need one of those little gas burners?
The most common and easy solution is using a gas stove but you can use a stick/hobo stove. However to use that one you're supposed to find dry sticks on the ground so if you live somewhere wet it's probably not worth it, unless you want to split kindling.
>some kind of sun shelter
just get a cheap tarp. if there are no trees just use trekking poles or a couple long sticks.
>>
>>2479148
It depends of the mountain, but Is not scary in that way.
Consider that in some mountains you have to walk near a cliff, and that Will be scary.
And yes, im scared of the heights and still hike high elevations.
>>
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Pleas recommend female /out/ youtubers/instagram
>>
>>2479353
boku no pico
>>
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How are EXPED mats?
>>
Any tips for keeping my external frame hip belt from sliding off my hipbones? Maybe some kind of sticky cloth I could attach?
>lose the dad bod
Working on it.

Pic only generally related. I have a vintage pack with a thick padded nylon belt.
>>
>>2479353
Homemade Wanderlust
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>>2479016
Pourover uber alles.
>>
>>2474370
Love them. I hydrate more if it's accessible on the move. I have a small 3L CamelBak for short hikes. I carry a rain jacket, sunglasses, phone, keys, and snacks. I have a carrier like yours, too. Consider adding a small MOLLE pouch.
>>
>>2479446
The belt should come across your torso between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your rib cage.

t. Radical External Frame Extremist
>>
>>2473450
Second this. I have two of the shirts that I wear for sleeping. Picked them up from thrift stores. Love them even more after seeing something similar commercially for $80 per piece.
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>>2479460
AFAIK it should be on the top of your hip bones. I always loved external frames and adjusted them so almost all the weight was on my hips. My problem now is love handles.
>>
is burning dead wood (branches) in a small patch of forest bad for the local eco system? I go there somewhat frequently and always sprinkle the old ashes around before building a new campfire. The forest is about a square km area by the creek.
Do the plants and trees and bugs and stuff need this wood for food or will it not really make an impact?
>>
>>2479483
whats the make and model of your pack? ive never had any issues with keeping the belt in place as long as it was tight enough
>>
>>2479492
Yes, dead wood creates habitat.
Just dont burn It all.
>>
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>>2478409
Something like pic related would work well if you're going for a picnic. If it's an established spot, sometimes you will find charcoal grills available, at least in the Midwest.
>>
>>2479502
Camp Trails Kodiak, but I don't know if the bag is original to the frame. I've seen some packs with a kind of sticky or rubbery material in the center of the hip belt. I wonder if adding that would help. But I don't know where to find it.
>>
>>2479502
I just discovered a product called Sock Stop that's intended for DIYing grippy socks. I might try putting that on the belt if more tightening and adjusting doesn't help.
>>
>>2479520
ok thanks
>>
>>2479536
Definitely looks like an old school pack. It could also be that the belt/buckle is worn and it loosens up as you move. Honestly I would look at getting a new pack. Kelty still makes external frames. I have the pack you posted with your question. It was a huge improvement over my old jansport.
>>
>>2478986
Looks like red pine
>>
>>2479492
It can be, depends on what else is around. Some smaller wildlife might be using it as shelter, but by removing it you also give ground foliage better exposure to sunlight, rainwater, etc, which may be beneficial in promoting a healthy forest understory
>>
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How do you navigate when off trail hiking? any tips in general?
>how offtrail are we talking
picrel is how 99% of areas around me look like on google maps. pretty much nothing but green untouched nature with absolutely no form of paths
terrain of that region is forests, mountains, lakes and different wetlands
most dangerous animals there are ticks and elks. bears rarely wander near that area, last sighting i could find was in 2010. apparently someone was swallowed by a bog a few years ago.
>>
>>2479967
GPS and phone app. Map and compass as a backup. Follow terrain. Mark your position on the map.
>okay, now I'm going up THIS valley toward THAT mountain...
>>
What do I need to do, learn, and/or buy to graduate from day hiking to overnight (1 night). I currently own boots, clothes, a backpack, water bottles, and a first aid kit.
>>
hello /out/. Can you help me identify my cool rock? Reddish brown smooth nodules, like glass maybe? Don’t think it’s obsidian but I could be wrong. The colored nodules are very smooth but surrounding material feels like broken concrete. Won it at an auction so not sure of where it originated from, but it was auctioned in southern idaho.
>>
>>2479967
sweden?
>>
>>2478946
Yeah just get a pack liner for waterproofing. I ended up getting B01IQJKFCE on Amazon (search it, it's an Osprey liner) but it was discounted. It's basically a giant dry sack for the entire pack. You can also use a large trash bag. I still use a couple dry sacks and silicone freezer bags for delicate things like batteries/electronics and my sketchbook.
>>
>>2479410
good, i have a synmat 7, its on the bulkier side when packed but very comfy and not that heavy. I think they made new models to replace older ones but they are lighter and at same price. pulling this out of my ass but i would get synthetic down instead of duck/goose down because it stays warm if it gets wet but unsure if it matters that much for a mat
>>
>>2480085
I haven't decided the exact place I am going to but it isn't that easy as some areas are pretty much just hundreds of square kilometers of just trees or wetlands and a lot of features like creaks or hills just keep repeating.
I don't know if and where i can find maps.

>>2480151
Norway near the swedish border
>>
>>2480104
Is not obsidian. Im sure of that.
>>
>>2480160
I went to REI (had gift cards) and got some "stuff sacks" to try and keep things in better order. I'm not too worried about water yet, since I'm still just doing day hikes (and I can stay home if it's raining too bad). But I will get one eventually, I want to try doing overnights at some point
>>
>>2480104
That's Chert.
Not exactly like obsidian, but you can nap it and make arrows.
>>
Wheres the best place to get snowshoes in the UK, use will mostly be for Alps and Cairngorms
>>
Does anyone know if it's legal or illegal to swim naked in US National Forest lakes?
>>
>>2480093
Literally just go lay down in the woods
>>
Does anyone have a recommendation for a cheap and light down quilt and foam sleeping pad? Something like AliExpress I guess. Want to use in conjunction with a 3 season bag and insulated pad for winter camp
>>
>>2482280
Won't I die of hypothermia or animal attack, or something? Can I just... sleep in the dirt?
>>
>>2482292
Probably not, and yeah you can.
If you want, you could bring a tent and a sleeping bag/mat and it would be a lot more comfortable. At that point all you're missing is some food for a standard camping experience
>>
Why are animeposters so incredibly savage in wilderness areas?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxJ-zAgJzt4&t=76s
>>
Hey /out/, whats the best way to keep electronics charged when camping?
I'm a college student who recently got a job at a local campsite. I will be leaving every Friday, camping two nights, then coming back on Sunday. I would like to bring a laptop so I can work on my assignments.

Should I get one of those portable solar panels, or should I just stock up on portable chargers?
>>
if im hiking in a couple hours to the place where im going to be crosscountry skiing whats the best way to sturdily carry my skis
>>
Should I worry about fire retardant chemicals in my sleeping bag and tarp? My sister is making a big deal about it but it just feels like the whole BPA water bottle shit again.
>>
>>2482407
They're probably bad for you, just like BPAs, but I think the bigger concern is that almost everything that we are in constant contact with in modern society has cancer causing chemicals and shit, so worrying about what your tent has in it (unless it's something ESPECIALLY fucked up) is missing the bigger problem that I'd love to see us correct as a society.
>>
got one of these corona folding pruning saws. how long should the blade last?
>>
>>2482916
if you're not using it every weekend and you're careful not to push your blade into dirt and dull it while cutting... idk a very long time. years and years. you'll probably lose it before you fuck the blade up.
btw i would highly recommend the curved model over the straight one, unless you plan to cut exclusively at waist height or are concerned with how small it folds up. the curved corona razor tooth cuts better.
and also btw your local hardware probably sells corona pruning saws, so getting replacements is trivial. i don't think home depot carries them but every other major chain does.
>>
>>2482920
sweet thx. I was being kinda conservative, like sawing half way and tryin to snap the limb, but I guess I dont have to worry about it.
>>
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Total inexperienced beginner here. For "fire by friction," what sort of wood are you supposed to use? I thought pine on pine would be okay, since they're both soft and I figured they would grind down together to create the hot dust needed to form the ember, but I tried putting the spindle in my power drill to just see if I could do something with that before even thinking of attempting anything with these materials by hand, and even using the drill for a few solid minutes nonstop, nothing seemed to be happening. I eventually took it off to feel if there was any warmth, and there was, but it certainly wasn't hot enough for a fire and no dust seemed to be forming. You could say that I didn't do it for long enough, but I've seen guys on youtube get a fire going by hand in less than a minute, so you'd think that I could get one going with an electric tool in 5, but nope. Not even close. The divot in the baseboard wasn't even turning black or anything. This is why I was thinking that maybe the wood is not the correct kind? What am I doing wrong?
>>
>>2482927
biggest thing to extend the life of a saw blade is to make an autistic level conscious effort to never run it through dirt when you're sawing shit. you would be surprised how fast dirt dulls them and how slowly cutting through wood does.
the only thing i don't like about coronas is its more expensive to replace the blade than the whole thing. i don't like being wasteful. but they last a very long time and you can grab one almost anywhere in the world 20bux.
>>
>>2483011
woods with low sap content and low ignition point. the best wood combination depends a lot on your locality and what's available.
some regions the best wood to use will change seasonally too. size of the tree its harvested from will impact the sap content for a lot of species btw.
>>
there's so much conflicting shit online. talk to a local online or just take a scientific approach if you want the guaranteed best answer:
- collect a sample of, and identify all the woods common to your area.
- see how easy it is to start a fire using the drilldo with it. try combinations of woods and mono types. use the same drilldo speeds/settings.
- record notes.
- practice doing it by hand with the better combinations.
- repeat above in different weather.
don't need to make an autistic event of it. good little activity to passively do on dayhikes.
>>
if you're a burger this forum thread i found:
https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/recommend-bow-drill-woods-for-your-area.235219/
i agree with the list the user "seahunter" compiled for the states i've been to. i assume its probably accurate enough elsewhere? if you're a eurofag, gotta do your own local research i can't help ya sorry.
>>
>>2483011
I watched this the other day, you might find it useful. never tried this stuff though
https://youtu.be/r-rLoYw64qE
>>
File deleted.
i pet an armadillo that was chilling at my campsite a few months ago, now my hand looks like this. could it be leprosy? my hand feels kind of pins and needly too but i think im just sleeping on it.
>>
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>>2483716
sorry, here's the photo rotated correctly
>>
any way of measuring the weight of an axehead with a handle attached?
>>
>>2482342
First, use less power. Turn on low power mode, turn on airplane mode, turn off all wireless (unless using), turn down brightness, volume, and set the screen to sleep. Turn off the device when not needed, sleeping etc.

Second, once you see how long your device lasts, now bring as many power banks as you need to keep it charged for the duration of your stay. If you phone lasts 2 days with the above tricks, and a power bank charges it 3 times, and you're gone for a week - bring 2 power banks to be sure.
>>
>>2483718
anon... why did you pet an armadillo
go to a doctor
>>
>>2483725
Take the weight of the handle away from the axe weight
>>
>>2483725
only works for branded shit but if the brand sells replacement handles, you can safely remove the weight of the spare from the weight of the axe
less precise would be just looking for a handle of the same wood and same length and taking that weight off the total
>>
>>2483785
he looked cute and he was just sitting there. i thought he was a nice creature so i pet him and he didnt seem to mind
>>
anything you can do to removed a glued in axe handle wedge?
>>
I'm planning on trekking in the (french) Alps during the summer. Down seems complicated to take care of so I am guessing I should buy a synthetic one (I'm a very short dude so 400 more grams compared to a down bag doesn't sound like too big of a deal for a sleeping bag)?

Also not quite sure how to interpret the temperature rating. Pic related is -1°C/31°F for comfort, -7°C/20°F for lower limit and -24°C/-12°F for the extreme rating.

I'm not planning on doing alpinism but I honestly have no idea if this is good enough. I'm guessing something too warm could also be a problem?
>>
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Anyone knows if the temperature ratings on Snugpak sleeping bags can be trusted? Pic related costs around 70€ and claims -12°C comfort.
>>
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How do i take a shit above the tree line? i'm planning a long multiday mountain hike. issue is, there aren't gonna be any trees or the like that i can hide behind when taking a shit. what's the etiquette when shitting in large exposed areas without trees or cover?
>>
I don't know if I should be asking this in /n/ or /out/ but are there any places that look like alaska but with warm/hot weather instead?
>>
>>2486444
California forests closer to the coast like Los Padres are warmer
>>
Anyone ever take the REI "Wilderness Survival: 3-Season Skills" course?
I'm thinking about taking it just as something to do... I'm not expecting SERE training or anything... but is it remotely worthwhile?
>>
>>2486485
>cali
fuck!
>>
>>2478880
>Hard cast lead
Don't listen to this man. The fey are weak to iron.
>>
>>2479242
>>2479305
>cliff
Are US mountains not glaciated or something? It's not the cliffs or ridges, it's the fucking crevasses that should scared you, if anything.
>>
>>2486336
Do it behind a rock then bury it.
>>2486490
Go outside instead
>>
>>2486764
>Go outside instead
Yeah but I don't want to die because I didn't learn something basic and important... I really want to graduate from day-hiking to hiking out, camping overnight, and then hiking back.
>>
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Would a wider pot heat faster than a taller one?
I'm currently using a tatonka 600ml mug
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>>2486184
Nobody? It's on sale right now.
>>
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>>2486964
I've been looking at pic related also by tatonka or a Toaks 700ml pot
>>
>>2486967
The rating is what it is. Go Google temps in your area, focus on the comfort temp and if you have any other data (like bags you've owned before, how you sleep, reviews, etc)
>>
>>2486964
I know 8th grade science is hard, but the answer is yes. More surface area, faster boiling temps. I cook pasta in a large frying pan and it's done in half the time of the regular pot.
>>
Are cloaks viable /out/ gear? It seems like a good wax cloak would be pretty nice for outings or even general fall attire, shame there's so few good options
>>
>>2478792
pros
>great companionship
>may ward off smaller pests trying to steal food
>may alert to bigger predators entering camp
>might find cool shit
cons
>have to pack in food/water for your dog in addition to your own needs
>some parks/national forests may have restrictions on dogs and how they're allowed to roam
>dumb dogs are easy meals for bears/cougars/etc.
>have to account for it's shit in addition to your own
>general cost/effort of keeping a dog responsibly
>intense sadness 10-15 years from now
>country folks, your ex wife will take him
>>
>>2481805
how is anyone going to enforce it? if you're several miles from the next person, just do it: if there's a crowd, keep your clothes on
>>
>>2480093
shelter
>tent
>bivy sack
>hammock
>tarp shelter
sleeping bag or quilt appropriate for the temperature
food/cook system
>>
>>2487149
i imagine that the weight/effectiveness or cost/effectiveness is not worth it compared to typical coats/jackets
>>
>>2487149
I've worn my cloak /out. Not out, mind you, since I've a modicum of decency.
It's warm and works as an immediate blanket what's not to love.
>>
>>2487212
Cost yeah probably, the one in picture is like $240 and I imagine the wax coating makes it less warm than just wool

>>2487213
Mind linking the one you have? It's hard to find decent ones. I wouldn't mind wearing it around town in fall, maybe they'll come back into fashion. Besides there are some female clothing options pretty close to a cloak.
>>
>>2487032
It's going to be my first one. I guess I have no choice but to trust my guts and try it out myself, uh?
Thanks for the reply however, I appreciate it.
>>
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Best pants for winter hiking & camping? Right now I'm using flannel-lined jeans, but they take forever to dry.
>>
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>>2482342
I use a solar-charging battery pack. It kept me going on my ~4 day backpacking trip. I would hang it off my pack during my hikes/around camp to charge. But I only used my phone for photos & occasionally for GPS.
>>
>>2488211
polycotton cargo pants
>>
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This weekend I am going camping and the low temp is below freezing. I do not have a sleeping bad that is rated for those temperatures. I do have a ton of blankets, hand warmers, and a ton of these emergency blankets which are supposedly supposed to keep you warm.

Do these blankets actually work? Could I line the inside of my tent with these and they would act as insulation? What do you think?
>>
>>2488211
kek
You're looking for softshell pants. Water-resistant but breathable. https://sectionhiker.com/sectionhiker-gear-guide/10-best-winter-hiking-pants/

do not listen to this retard >>2488393
>>
>>2488420
Yes, lining the inside of your tent with the shiny side facing you would increase warmth. But it's still highly advisable to get a proper sleeping bad, because the cold ground will literally suck the heat out of your body and make it impossible for you to stay warm no matter how many blankets you're covered with.
>>
>>2488454
Meant to say sleeping pad. Lots of thick comfy blankets can supplement a sleeping bag (to a point), but the sleeping pad is very much necessary.
>>
>>2488420
Like the other anon said, do something about the ground. Sleeping bag differences are real. I just came back from a trip I had to call off because I let my friend use the rated bag, and I used the improperly rated one; he slept soundly and I woke up shaking and nauseous. Temp was to get just below freezing at night too. Stay safe brother
>>
>>2478172
>Snow? Crampons
not that anon but i also want to go up mountains in winter. i should go directly for the big ones, right? i've done plenty of mountaineering, although never higher than 2600m peaks, and never in winter.

but this year i want to get into it, in particular i might go to the pirenees next week as a first contact (it's 3000m, being the pirenees my understanding is that there will be some snow but not a lot so i will be fine)
>>
When you hunt animals and you drop them and they have that sort of last flailing motion where their legs are just spasming are they still alive? I want to know if I am effectively shooting something or not.
>>
>>2468271

kiwi anons, I want to shit in your pristine wilderness come february! what trails would you recommend that allow wild camping?
>>
What do you guys do to keep your ass cheeks from chafing on long hikes?
>>
>>2488420
>kills self
>>
How do I sleep comfortably under the stars with two cats and a car?
>>
How do you deal with the upper rocky winter? I own jeans, hoodies, and a pair of steel toe work boots. I work construction. Help me to not die /out/
>>
>>2482342
>whats the best way to keep electronics charged when camping?
Turn them off.
>work on my assignments
You're missing the point of camping.
>>
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>>2489120

these type of boxers work well to stop chaffing. might have to tuck them between your ass cheeks though.
>>
>>2488959
It depends on what you mean by "alive." Conshious? I don't think so. The leg flailing thing happens with rabbits a lot, even though their brains are turned to mush. I've seen people put multiple shots through a rabbit's head, thinking it wasn't an effective shot, only for the rabbit to keep flailing its legs. I think it's just the body in its last throes. In my experience, it's quite rare to not get some kind of leg flailing with an effective shot.
>>
>>2489162
>How do you deal with the upper rocky winter?
Wool + ETAproof/ventile cotton
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSijIYbT-eQ
>>
>>2469368
Fenix HL30.
It has better specs than you listed.
It has a red LED.
But it uses 2x AA batteries instead of one..
>>
>>2468271
if i've never been camping should i go to one of those crowded sites with dozens of tent pads along a road since theyre easy and safe or should i go to an actual campsite alone that's 1 mile from the trailhead
i have a tent a pad a sleeping bag a tarp and some rope
>>
how do you stop cold winter air from giving you cold and sore throat everytime
>>
What's a good flat shovel that's sturdy enough to chop wood? Never used one and I'd like to have multipurpose items to bring on short trips. Think the ones at a milsurp store would be good enough? Not the combi tools, the ones I've had barely cut roots and always got loose after a few hits.
>>
>>2469669
collapsible cot
separates your body from the ground no hip ache
separates your body from the cold ground, less pads/insulation needed
allows airflow in hot temps(if you setup your tent right(and it has at least 2 openings) and again separates you from the HOT ground

hammocks are just frameless tarps that require 2 tree's/rocks/etc to hang in the air BUT
you are now susceptible to hot/cold air flow(unless wind blocker is used, but it better be gortex or you'll sweat like a pig/reason jerky rigs suspend meat in the air/remove moisture)
>>
>>2489900
i would recommend a campground like that first yes. just pick a weekday and if its not a tourist hotspot it will likely be pretty empty. use that time to test all your stuff. then hike in next time.
>>2490465
blow your nose
>>
About how many hours a week would it take to farm 100 acres part time? Factor 9 to 5 job and farm before and after job akin to the Amish. Figure use some of the land for self-sustaining with grain, livestock, and produce, 2 to 4 acres for ethanol production for fuel, and the rest for cash crops. 4 crop farming with nut and fruit trees along with crop and livestock rotations.
>>
>>2490606
Cold steel spetnaz shovel.
>>
if i buy a foam pad to put above/under my blow up sleeping pad for winter should i get a foam pad which is wider than the blow up pad or does it not really matter? would rather save the weight even though its only 60g
>>
>>2468271
I'm in the PNW and just hiked Mt. ellinor, I'm in Bremerton.

That hike was life changing and I can't wait to go on another one, where should I go next? Mountains please
>>
Does anyone know if life insurance pays out for dying innawoods? I'm not talking any kind of extreme stuff, like ice climbing or base jumping... just normal hiking/camping stuff.
>>
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What a good rain shell / light ski jacket that will let me provide my own DWR? I don't like the current short-chain PFAS (C6), don't like goretex / teflon, and don't trust the new unproven "plant based" chemical treatments.

Basically something like nylon without any DWR from factory? Either that or I do waxed canvas which I don't want to do
>>
I want to be able to navigate by the stars should any equipment fail. Don't fully trust the results from the browser search.
Where is a good place to get started?
>>
When I am camping in the winter should I set my bivvy directly on top of the snow or do I try to clear some out and get to somewhat solid dirt.
>>
Somebody knows a good cheap type of water bottle/canister?

>pic rel costs 15€+ for 25 litre capacity, seems sturdy
>>
>>2493483
or this, dump the destilled water and fill with tap.

>5 litre capacity, plastic is thinner, costs about 1,50€

Somebody knows another good container for drinking water, minimum 5 litres and cheap. Could wrap it in duc tape to improve make it bit more sturdy
>>
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>>2493483
hard to say without knowing the purpose but if you want something that compacts when not carrying water maybe get something like the GSI outdoors collapsible water holder, only 12usd for 20L.
Dosent really matter if youre car camping though just get whatever, other brands also make similar collapsible bucket things just to bring water to camp after setting up like sea2summit.
Lucky all of these things are very cheap anyways and shouldnt be more than 15usd.
>>
Is 22WMR overkill for a rabbit? Will it ruin the harvest?
>>
How do you guys stay non stinky in national forests or anywhere truly /out/? Especially in winter where you may not want to strip off and use a stream to clean your butt? It's the one thing keeping me from trying to camp in the cold, a stinky itchy asshole
>>
for guylines on tarps, any reason to use a truckers hitch over something like an adjustable grip hitch?
someone in the last tarp thread told me to use it but i didnt get time to ask him why before thread died :(
>>
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>>2493962
swamp ass in particular?
yeah here's a few tricks:
- don't be fat, if you are fat bring gold bond
- merino wool underwear. they're expensive and fall apart fast, but they're antimicrobial and you can camp for weeks without stank.
- when its too hot outside for merino wool underwear, get mesh underwear (no homo.)
- wear shorts, or shorts+leggings instead of pants whenever possible. the only time you need pants is extreme cold or when you are traveling off trail through stickers and heavy brush. or places with venomous snakes. etc.
- my personal G.O.A.T. hiking shorts/swim trunks have a vent in the ass crack, if you buy them in black you can't see it, a+ recommend https://fiveultimate.com/collections/hydro-shorts
- you know how you're told to wear tight fitting lofty clothes when you want to stay warm? do the opposite when you're traveling. i wear very loose fitting billowy clothing on the trail. my on trail hiking pants are mc hammer pants (search ripstop ballet warm up pants on amazon, staple thru-hiker gear) i buy all my shirts +3 sizes with spandex blend material. stuff like that. think: bedouin desert robes. emulate that.
picrel is a general guide what i wear in normal weather outdoors, usually, most of the time, when i'm not in a specific climate.

armpit sweat bonus round:
- wear fleece/down vests instead of jackets whenever the temp allows
- wear tank tops instead of t shirts whenever possible
>>
also one thing on my infographic is wrong, in any situation you can get away with it, rain skirt > rain pants. pants just aren't well designed to be made out of waterproof material and are clammy. big one for avoiding sweat, if you live in a rainy area.
>>
>>2488959
>>2489246
the crazy flailing about is called "disinhibition," there cerebral connection is essentially severed and the rest of the muscles in the body are spasming out from the impulses still going through it, they're effectively dead and are not in pain, the body is dead and just doesn't know it yet, until the heart stops pumping blood/loses enough blood pressure or brain death
>>
>>2494236
>>2494234
Saved thanks. Doesn't answer my question, how do I physically clean my ass? Wet wipes? And then what? Continue hiking with a doggy bag with my shit in it? This is restraining me to say hikes and campground camping lol
>>
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I've been reading dharma bums and it's got some hiking/out stuff in it and made me realise I've never read much /out/ tier books, any recommendations? really into the easygoing hippyish stuff right now but anythings good
>>
Sunscreen bros, help me out.
Ginger here, pale skin burn in 5 minutes outside. Pic related is what I currently use, it works nice but it’s expensive at $16 a bottle. Any recs for good brands that don’t have crazy chemical concoctions in them?
>>
>>2494404
Wear clothing that covers your entire body. It's natural, chemical free and well, free.
>>
I’m going caving for the first time in my life this weekend. I’ve got a good deal of experience outdoors, but I’ve never gone underground except for a couple guided cavern tours. What should I know to prevent any huge fuckups? Aside from some light sources, what do I need to bring? Thanks in advance boys.
>>
>>2494503
a second light source, and probably a third backup.
>>
>>2494234
Not the original guy who asked but the sweatiest parts of my body are my chest and back (even when not wearing pack). Is there a simple solution for this?
>>
>>2494650
back: expensive heavy backpacks with way over-designed suspensions like osprey anti-gravity is the only way to not sweat. they don't carry as well as normal packs but they put an air gap between the pack and your back. short of that the most you can do is go for backpacks with thicker padding with grooves cut in them.
chest: you're just wearing too many layers, stop and take the time to shed/don layers more often. tank tops help bigly, as does over-sizing all your shit. in my oversized clothes, unless i have my outer shell on, there's always air flowing around my body except where the pack rests on my back.
>>
>>2494503
multiple redundant light sources.
lots of batteries.
helmet, don't cheap out.
maybe a wet suit depending on where.
check your weather reports, don't cave during or after heavy rainfall.
check the local water resevoir levels before entering a cave whenever possible.
if you're carrying gear for a longer trip you will need one of those thick PU fully waterproof rubber backpacks like they make for kayakers.
good footwear.
i assume if its a cave that involves rope work you know what to bring, or you should not be doing it.
i definitely missed things, just some off the top of my head.
>>
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>>2468271
would you guys rather have some land and a bigger house in SC, NC or VA or would you rather have a normal home in WA, UT or ID?
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>>2494264
question 1 backcountry bidet (diy = poke hole in spare water bottle cap) check your work with a compostable wet wipe
question 2 bury it in a cat hole.
practice the bidet thing in the yard/shower its goofy to use at first.
>>
Where is the climb general?
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How do I "walk" a route with a car?
Life situation prevents me from traveling sadly, but I discovered a nice 50km route going around my town. If I could do a section then return every night home for chores, that'd be cool.
But how do I plan that? Any tips on how to plan the stops for the car I'd be returning to?
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>>2495186
look for parking spots using google maps and google street view. or obviously you could look for spots while driving through the area
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>>2495275
Sure. I was just thinking if it's better to park at the start of each section or the middle, which would be the least of a pain to walk back to. Maybe parking at the end of the section and just doing every part twice is not too bad
It's probably simple. I should do it ASAP when the weather allows
>>
>>2495534
the two ways to do it is section it in loops and walk back to your starting point each day
or have a friend pick you up and drive you back to your car each day if you have a friend based enough to do that. or you could accomplish the same with a rideshare app. sometimes you may find public transport routes to take you back to your car if its pretty urban.
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>>2468271
What knife is this
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>>2495654
Thanks. I think I'll just do it in sections at park at the start of each.
>>
>>2495725
>at
and
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>>2494505
>>2494658
Thank you guys. I had a killer time. One of my lights shat itself at the bottom, so I was glad I had two more.
>>
2 questions.
what is your opinion on Gore-Tex vs leather boots?

2. I'm hiking up mt. Marcy would cross country shoes with spikes suffice for icy bits?
>>
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>>2494938
>those rankings
The power of being populous, as evidenced by Maine being ranked two to three points below states that Califirenians can easily reach.
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>>2496045
1. just depends what you want them for. also gore-tex and leather aren't exclusive. there are leather upper boots with a gore tex membrane too, that's a thing.
i like gore-tex boots as my trail boots for a few reasons:
- i hike in sandals/trailrunners/hiking shoes when i can. so when my boots get used when the weather is total shit out or if i'm off trail in rugged areas.
- most hiking boots use an eva or pu midsole, which i like, but the lifespan is only 900 miles tops. so the long term durability of the upper of the boot does not matter much to me. they have to get replaced before its likely to get too fucked up anyways.
- i live in the pac nw
if i was using my boots, say, as my primary footwear when /out/ and i lived somewhere that doesn't rain a lot i may opt for a non waterproof boot.
if i didn't like trail runners/shoes/sandals then i would probably buy 2 pairs of boots, 1 of each kind.
rather than telling you what to do that's my thought process behind my boot choice, to give you an idea how to decide what's best for you.
2. from plebbit
>If approaching from the plateau than microspikes/snowshoes are usually fine. If approaching from the 4-corners there are definitely times I’ve needed full crampons. That southern slope is way steeper and it gets more sun…so way more ice.
pro tip: if you want local, recent trail conditions and no ones made a post on all trails recently, ask on plebbit. its the highest traffic outdoor board so you're most likely to get someone who's been there in the last week.
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onii chan why you doing this
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Any tents like the ionosphere but freestanding, not the stratosphere since it's single layer
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>>2496222
basically want something small, freestanding and dual layered
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I read somewhere that the base layer is primarily for wicking moisture and not for keeping you warm (which is what the mid layer supposedly is for). Is this true? Does that mean that wearing multiple (merino) base layers won't significantly add up in terms of warmth?
>>
Why is everything plastic? I am trying to find a good warm jacket because I'm moving to a cold area soon. But all these fancy brands like Patagonia use polyester in everything. They even have polyester fleece. I thought they were supposed to be environmentally friendly. But this shit is why we have microplastics in our lungs and blood.
>>
I'm working at a new job that pays well but is sort of far away from where I reside(for free).
Therefore, I'm thinking about buying a small plot of land near there & building a "shed" that contains the maximum amount of square footage on the floor to not need a permit. I would reside within the shed, of course. How feasible is this idea? The total cost wouldn't exceed 9,500$
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What sort of tree produced these nuts? Looks like an oak leaf, but it's a circular nut that doesn't look like an acorn.
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im going winter camping for the first time this weekend. any handy tips yall got? forecast is high of 35F and low of 15F, no rain or snow.
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>>2496282
they should do a bit of both. wick away moisture and provide warmth but not a whole bunch. personally i wouldnt see the point of wearing multiple base layers since your base wicks moisture with some insulating, and the mid layer does the bulk of insulating. could go out and try it though maybe im wrong
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>>2496574
It looks like a gall. It's a corky growth made by a parasitic gall wasp, which injects its egg and a cocktail of inflammatory chemicals into the branch. The tree then forms a sore around the egg, which hatches and eats the growth to grow. The wasp then emerges the following spring and starts the cycle anew.
>>
>>2480104
The matrix looks like rhyolite or some other vesicular volcanic rock - Being from southern Idaho, that makes sense geologically. The orange nodules look like chert as >>2480209 says. So, it's probably a vesicular volcanic rock that got mineralized with chert following its burial.
>>
>>2496318
>They even have polyester fleece.
virtually every fleece you find marketed for outdoors use or performance is going to be polyester fleece.
cotton fleeces aren't really an outdoors thing. more of a casual fashion thing.
>I thought they were supposed to be environmentally friendly.
they are. patagonia is the only company excluding tiny mom and pop shops where you can buy merino wool clothes that aren't treated with superwash. everyone else's merino is spray coated in plastic from the factory to make it machine washable without shrinking or special care instructions.
patagonia's Thing isn't that everything they sell is environmentally friendly. their marketing and brand philosophy is more "we'll sell you a more environmentally fleece than the other brands" than "everything we sell is environmentally friendly." in this specific example, all their fleeces are recycled polyester.
a lot of these things we rely on /out/ like fleeces, rain jackets, etc are just bad for the planet by definition of what they are.
non-brandfagging advice on fleeces and being environmentally friendly:
stick to low pile fleeces that don't shed fibers. they're more thermally efficient anyways. recycled poly isn't as good as new polyester because the porosity of the fibers is different with noticeable impact to the thermal qualities.
the most important thing you can do to minimize impact is: get the most life possible out of the garment and don't wash it very much.
i'm gonna be real with you guys nothing you buy for /out/ is going to have virtually any positive impact on the environment when shein, malls, amazon.com, and fast fashion exist. but its nice to feel like you didn't contribute to it. the impact of the entire history of the outdoor industry start to finish is probably like an average day for shien.
>>
There seem to be 2 types of space blankets:
one is more tear-resistant than the other one but they look the same
how do I tell them apart? because I obviously want the one thats more resistant
>>
>>2495656
ok What I know so far:
the knife in the pic seems to be part of a stock image made by a guy named "Igor bispo" is brazil and was uploaded to "unsplash" in 2020
on the other side of the knife the word "ecooda" in engraved, which is a japanese company for diving equipment so that didn't make any sense and then I thought it's some company engraved chinesium knife intended a present or something but I couldn't find it on aliexpress either.
so apparently the knife is no longer produced or its a cgi render.
if you want to know more you need to ask igor on instagram.
>>
Is the Stanley brand for bottles really that low quality nowaday?
looking to replace my old scratched insulated bottle for black friday and i kept hearing about this brand in general but i see quite many reviews that says their products aren't as good as before comparing old and new.
Should i still give a try or just go for other brands?
i'm just looking for a 1L bottle that can retain heat for my hot tea, i don't care about tea filter inside, i justt throw my leaves inside and take care of it later.
>>
Hello lads I have two questions for you:
What are some good lightweight waterbladders for long distance hiking?
What do you use in your backpack as a water resistant layer? So far I always used trash bags, but it's kind of wasteful because they're not durable.
>>
>>2498190
Buy a compactor or contractor bag. Or try the nyflume bags. Works best in bags which don't have stuff inside the main compartment for snag points.
>>
>>2497961
I can’t speak to their bottles, but the last Stanley product I owned was a pot that developed a pin hole after only a couple months of use. Never had that happen to any other pot and I haven’t bought anything Stanley since
>>
What gloves/systems do you use for higher altitude hiking in the northeast like 4k footers in New Hampshire? I've seen people say that they use Showa fishing gloves even up mt washington outside of deep winter but even just doing some of the lower altitude hikes my hands were cold in cheaper softshell gloves.
>>
Does a heavier weight base layer not move moisture as well as a lighter one? I'm looking at smartwool ones for cold weather, I don't like synthetics.
>>
Nephew is super /out/ activities. What /out/ stuff would you have loved to get for your 10th birthday?
>>
>>2499205
Every kid needs a BB gun
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>>2499277
100% but my brother has already gotten one for him and his brothers.
>>
Stupid question here, but I'll ask anyways. I'm putting together sort of an all purpose survival bag, but I don't have any experience with this. So far, it has:
>Zippo lighter (plus two Bicks)
>fire striker
>multi-tool (pliers/knife/saw/file/can opener/scissors/screwdriver)
>compass
>map
>hatchet
>small camping pot
>small tarp
>food
>water
>ultra light Waterproof clothes
>bug net
>1/8in diameter rope
>Fishing line with lures and many treble hooks
What would you change or add? Again, keep in mind that this is supposed to be "all purpose," so camping if need be, survival if need be, war if need be. I'm not making several different bags for each purpose, I want one bag that will do it all.
>>
>>2497448
Don't wait until you'll cold until you put on layers or get in the bag. Using hot food or drinks is a great way to kick start your body temp. And don't breath into your sleeping bag.

>>2499429
Need a light source and some kind of weather appropriate insulation
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>>2499205
A big knoife
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>>2499429
>zippo
get a cheap butane lighter with a torch flame
it's more reliable and if you lose it just get a new one for $3

also:
space blanket
10m duct tape
small mirror
iodine - water purification and antiseptic
bandana

more on that topic :
https://youtu.be/iZiQMrVPGTg
>>
>>2497859
polyethylene is more dureable reflects more heat(90%) and is more expensive
polyesther is less durable reflects less heat(80%) and is more cheaper
>>
Should I buy a wool blanket in addition to a military grade "woobie" for sleeping warm with minimal or no fire in the bush, or is that overkill? I'm not trying to LARP here, just trying to keep warm. Was looking at this one https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AD6KDVC/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
>>
why does my thermarest lose its air/support by the end of the day. it's new.
>>
>>2500505
have you tried inflating it and then push it underwater and look for bubbles?
almost 1/3rd of all my sleeping pads and air matresses had holes form the start
>>
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What happens when zombies when out?
>>
>>2498577
to better answer your question:
are your hands getting wet, are wind chills the issue, or are your liners just not warm enough all around?
just normal generic ass synthetic liner gloves and softshell gloves do me to 10k. brand = whatever fits my fingers best at rei when i try them all on.
if you want a warmer replacement for modern synthetic liner gloves get a pair of bison down or alpaca wool gloves. they typically run around $50-100 and are worth it. no need to shill a brand, i have gear from all the ones that come up on a jewgle search and they're all good. can't go wrong.
>>
and to pre-emptively answer you:
if your glove is getting wet or wind chills wear a over-mitten liner.
if your hands are too cold even with mega warm thick liner gloves, switch to a mitten.
they're pretty rare but you can also sometimes find fingerless gloves with fold-over mittens. i like those a lot but its hard to find ones made of anything but cheaper synthetic blends.
>>
Why do so many people wear specialised clothes/shoes to walk up hiking paths? Why can't they just wear jeans/tracksuits and sneakers like normal people? Why are they so weird?
>>
>Oh but this mountain is 1,345m tall!
Yeah and there's a path that leads straight to the summit, what's the point in these people?
>>
>>2501848
i own specialty gear because i do things that require it to survive. you'll die pretty quickly in the cascades hiking in jeans unless you only go outside 2 months out of the year. its practically a meme that at least one or two dumb ass tourists and cali transplants die from wearing the wrong gear on the mountains i do my bi-weekly training hikes in.
and i wear said specialty gear on easy day-hikes that you don't need it for, because why not, i own it already.
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>>2501853
even animals with brains the size of walnuts are smart enough to establish trails and follow established trails
>>
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>>2501854
>>2501856
Rate my mountain climbing shoes
>>
>>2501863
i got a beaner friend who hikes in af1's and vans
what's the point of your post though? af1's cost more than trail runners. why ruin your white sneakers?
>>
>>2501867
Point is you dress up playing weirdos look funny
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>>2501871
why would i buy shoes meant for basketball and fashion to hike in?
>>
>>2469504
>>2469577
It's Pyracantha
>Source: I'm a botanist and anon is clearly from the UK
>>
How is sleeping with a hot water nalgene comfortable? Wouldn't it be too hot at the start and not hot enough when you actually need heat?
>>
are Nalgenes safe on the long term?



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