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Post your recent hauls and recipes anons

>you DO know how to find your own food innawoods, don't you /out/?
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>finally find a patch of fiddleheads
>too late to harvest
JUST
>>
>>2345018
Fuck you because of that pic, also, yay for that pic.
>>
i always get envious of early foragefags since spring has just literally arrived where i live so nettles are pretty much the only wild good edible thing that has started to sprout here
>>
>>2345018
Please don't post pictures of my wife on the internet. That's my job.

Are those ramps or some other onion?
>>
Not fully foraged but I've just finished making 5kg of compound butter with three cornered leeks and wild basil.

Will sell it at the farmers market to middle class women for 3.50 per 100g.

Not a huge profit but it pays for my homebrew habit.
>>
>>2346051
atleast he gets her out of the house
>>
>>2345018
I pan fried some dandelions already and made sautéed some dead nettle and chopped wild onion leaves. I’m allergic to one of the latter two though because my throat closed up about 5 minutes after eating it.
>>
Come on, at least use a different picture this year
>>
Still shit weather here in Michigan, the Ramps are just started to pop their leaves. Still have quite awhile until I can nab some. Patiently waiting sort of.
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>>2345018

Ramps as far as you can see
>>
hey foragers! as last year, i'm back to bring you the beauty of wild-hop shoots! tasty and fun to pick, only grows in spots near other plants so it's a bitch to find. the place where i'm studying now for instance, in 5 years i found like 3 spots and they'resmall and miles apart.
where i'm from they're called "bruscandoli" and are much more abundant in the countryside. my latest haul i got almost 2 pounds of the stuff.
it's great in a risotto but works too in an omelette, just wash it and simmer it a few minutes with some onions. the shoots and about 2 inches of the stem are good, the leafs are discardedunless very fresh and tiny.
i'd love to know if anyone has ever seen it i their country (i'm from north-eastern italy)
>>
>>2346046
in my experience ramps are the first thing that show up innawoods, nettles only pop up a week or two later
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Does /out/ like my freshly foraged ramps?
What are some good recipes you guys recommend?
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>>2346578
>he doesn't have multiple endless ramps patches to re-visit each year
sorry anon but they're the first thing to pop up every springtime.
The trout lillies come a week later, and then the garlic mustard and nettles a couple weeks after.

>>2346163
look up nendoroids

>>2346859
no pics? sounds pretty tasty tbqh
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>>2345018

No ramps in my area. Plenty of agarita though, and the black persimmons and maypops are coming into season soon.
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>>2346859
I found a spot with tons of wild hops last year and want to get some shoots now. Don't know if they're up yet. Guess I'll go check sometime soon.
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>>2345018
I live in Tennessee. I have only ever eaten dandelions and blackberries. Whats a good place to start?
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>>2345018
Spring beauty. The raw greens were all right, but the tubers we're really excellent when cooked without their skin. Might be better than potatoes.
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Are these a variation of ramps or do they look more like spring onions to you?
>>
bear garlic
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>>2353058
>Are these a variation of ramps or do they look more like spring onions to you?
doesn't look like either tbqh anon.
What do they smell like? That's the easiest tell for alliums
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>>2346019
Is that what they are called in English? They taste delicious fried in tempura batter, but I heard if you eat too many of them they can make you sick.
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>>2354083
>Is that what they are called in English?
yes, fiddlehead because it looks like a fiddle's head
>pic related

>but I heard if you eat too many of them they can make you sick
yeah apparently they cause cancer if you eat too many but they're too good to resist.
If you boil in salt water and drain it's supposed to reduce the cancer risk.
>>
bingo
>>
>>2354797
I can make out the ramsons, whats the vieny looking leafs though?
very nice anon
>>
Should you make a foraging journal for your local environs?
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>>2345018
got 53 this year from one tree (26 last year), but it's fully dead now. dunno if i have many harvests at that spot left.
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>>2352483
sam thayer's books
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>>2345018
ramp pancakes
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>>2352483
Mulberries are basically foolproof and the season ought to be starting soon, if it hasn't already. We're close to it here in central NC.
Pawpaws are probably the foraging holy grail, and also very easy to ID, but that's not until September or so.
>>
>>2345018
I can't find anything where I live apart from nettles and soon blackberries
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>>2356267
Throw some Bull-dog tonkatsu sauce on that.

Also, just moved to the Appalachians, from the deep south, what is a good resource for learning to identify and forage for wild edibles?
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>>2356762
see >>2356241
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Just made a small batch of noyau (the british kind). I keep meaning to free up some more kilner jars for it before May but this is the third year in a row I've had not enough jars.

Now just the hard part of waiting 6 sodding months.
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>>2358785
What kind of leaves are those?
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>>2354095
>>2354083
I ate too many and didn't cook them well enough one time and got sick from it
>>
>he doesn't cut the bulbs off and leave them in the ground to grow back
Shameful, OP.
>>
>>2345018
any good guides for foraging in the north east US?
>>
>>2362162
yeah >>2356241
>>
>>2360680

Beech leaves, although only very young ones work well when they're translucent and light green so you only have a couple of weeks in April/May to gather.
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Seen a load of 2nd year burdock plants at the back of a field last year so went back yesterday and lo and behold a load of new first year ones had grown.
Spent hours digging the fuckers up with the tiny trowel I had with me
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>>2363098
Got enough to make about 3 gallons of dandelion and burdock beer
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>>2363101
>dandelion and burdock beer
wtf so you mean to tell me that was not just some made up thing on neopets?
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>>2363151
The hell is neopets?

They were used to make a traditional fermented drink in Europe, similar to root beer
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Hi /out/
I've never really gone foraging and only recently garnered a bit of an interest in it through meeting somebody who does.
I'd like to make some herbal butter for myself for meat or bread but rather than just run around aimlessly taking pictures of plants to identify them back at home I'd rather have a good idea on some likely candidates and specifically look for those. One candidate I have identified myself that grows in abundance nearby is garlic mustard/alliaria petiolata. Please give me some additional ideas on stuff worth looking out for. I live in northwestern Germany in a large city. There is running water but that's a bit of a track.

tl;dr give herb recommendations for herbal butter that are likely to grow in NW Germany
>>
>>2364007
>garlic mustard/alliaria petiolata.
That stuff is good it's related to rapeseed and brassica species. Only taste is a bit too stronger. Euros actually brought them over to north america for cultivation in the 1700s and you can identify old homestead areas when you find garlic mustard

>i live in northwestern germany
Try looking for ramsons, they're the euro version of ramps
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>>2364027
>Try looking for ramsons
This

I went out about a month ago when they were just coming up and picked loads. Made about 1.5Kg butter and spent the next couple of weeks frying everything in it.
If the flowers haven't opened on them yet, the little buds are delicious raw too but obviously you smell really strongly of garlic afterwards as I was reminded numerous times in the pub that night
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>>2364043
>>2364027
There were some in a huge local park, only issue that I'm a few weeks late and they were all in bloom, most damaged and/or sick. I grabbed some leaves and made a reminder for march next year. Probably not enough to make more than a tiny amount of butter, but should be good for some pesto. Thanks guys.

>Euros actually brought them over to north america for cultivation in the 1700s and you can identify old homestead areas when you find garlic mustard
Love stuff like this
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>>2363151
Fermentation started
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>>2365957
Add some psylocibin fungi to realize the german beer law was enacted to stop people putting things in beer to enhance the liquid with magical properties.
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>>2353058
Those look like surprise/lazarus/resurrection lilies (do NOT eat). If they smell at all like onion, iz good 2 go. If no onion smell, avoid
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>>2364027
Fun fact there is a shit ton of wild edibles that started out as European garden herbs/veggies back in the good old days when everyone had a garden (e.g. salsify, white goosefoot, dandelions, chickweed, plantago, and many more). They are more feral weeds than wild.
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Gonna dump some photos I've taken over the past few months. Starting with morels from early April.
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>>2367638
Only one spot I know of, and it only produces a few each year. I usually leave most of them to spread spores and only pick a couple to eat. I prefer chanterelles to morels anyway, and those are much more abundant.
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>>2367641
>>
>>2367638
>Starting with morels from early April.
What's your strat for finding morels anon?

I've been looking around elm trees but have had zero luck the past 2 years
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>>2367644
Nice big patch of wood sorrel. Usually just eat it as a trail snack.
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>>2367646
Mayapple flower from early April as well.

>>2367645
See >>2367641
I really only know of one little place where they grow. Not super crazy about finding more, either, as the flavor is nice, but I don't think I enjoy it as much as some people do. For what it's worth, I'm in central NC, in a relatively suburban area (albeit with a lot of greenway trails and parks and such) and this spot is by a little stream. People say morels are symbiotes with elm trees, and there are certainly elms and related species in the area, but I swear these ones have to be symbiotes with a couple of birches. They pop up right next to the trunk.
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>>2367656
Massive fucking indian turnip/jack in the pulpit. Only learned about these a few years ago and haven't picked any to eat yet, but this one was by far the largest I'd seen and I had to take a picture.
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>>2367659
Also my hands are about 7in/17.5cm from wrist to tip of middle finger, for a sense of scale on that one.

Some mayapple fruit forming from a couple of weekends ago. Still never managed to catch any of these when they're ripe and I really want to. A lot of the patches I see have mayapple rust on the leaves, and I'm hoping they survive long enough to let the fruit ripen. If anyone has a good idea of when that might be in central NC, do let me know.
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>>2367656
>People say morels are symbiotes with elm trees, and there are certainly elms and related species in the area, but I swear these ones have to be symbiotes with a couple of birches. They pop up right next to the trunk.
Thanks anon
I always have lots of luck with chanterelles and oysters and later species mushrooms, but morels have eluded me.

Nice trout lillies growing with those mayapples too
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>>2367664
And the first white mulberries from about last weekend. Picked some red ones today as well. Probably one of my favorite fruits, and I can never pick enough of them
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>>2367665
No problem. Chanterelles are probably the mushroom I've picked the most of in my few years of mushroom foraging. First flush seems to be in early June around my area, and I'm assuming that's a different species from the ones that fruit later in the summer/early autumn. I like to get a nice ribeye steak from the butcher and make a chanterelle cream sauce. Shit is delicious.

And yeah, trout lillies are a nice little spring flower. First found out about those a few years back when I noticed them on early spring walks and did some research. I've got a couple pictures of those I could upload as well. Haven't tried eating the leaves or the bulb so far, they're just so nice to look at. I did manage to get some seed pods this year and stuck 'em in a pot. Have to see if they grow next spring.
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>>2367666
And now, fellow /out/ists, I need your help. I noticed this plant earlier this year, and I have been unable to find out what it is. I'm not a novice in foraging or the outdoors by any means, but this has stumped me. This first caught my attention with very early spring flowers (pic), like beginning of March, so my first thought was Prunus. I admittedly don't know any Prunus species with yellow/green flowers, but there's nothing else I know of that blooms so early. Even the pawpaws are like late March around here.
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>>2367677
The most striking thing so far, however, has been the leaves. Here's a picture from early April. These things smell almost exactly like lemon balm (Melissa officinalis). At a cursory nibble, they also taste lemony. I certainly don't know of any Prunus species that have aromatic leaves.
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>>2367679
Another shot of the leaves more recently.
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>>2367683
Spicebush
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>>2367683
And it has fruit. They almost look like little cherries. This also from early April.
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>>2367679
>>2367688
>At a cursory nibble, they also taste lemony. I certainly don't know of any Prunus species that have aromatic leaves.
>red berries

yeah this anon is right >>2367687
that's spicebush 100%

i hear there's some people who use the berries in cinnamon-y foods up here in PA (think apple pie) but never bothered going to lengths to gather them for that.
>>
>>2367687
>>2367693
Ah, that's definitely it! Thanks, anon. Never heard of this one before, not from boy scouts, not from my weird-plant-obsessed father. I'm familiar with sweetshrub, which grows in NC and is apparently in the same family, but the flowers are much showier and more heavily scented. I'll have to take a look at making some use of it. Wikipedia says the leaves can be used for tea, and if it tastes anything like it smells I could see that being a good use.
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>>2367645
find out from others in your area what trees they find them around and at what time. it may be in your area they're more prone to connect with a different tree. could be anything from tulip trees to ash to sycamore to apple etc. look around recently dead and dying trees. morels.com has forums for different states. look at pictures online of morels in different environments to get your brain more prone to seeing them.
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>>2367693
>up here in PA
hey there, fellow penn's woods bro
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>>2367700
i like to occasionally nibble the berries when hiking. hints of clove and pepper etc.
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>>2367700
Yeah the berries are real strong when green but they mellow out by the time they turn red
The leaves are milder, reminds me a bit like sassafras but still a bit on the sharp side
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>>2345018
Any good foraging guides online? I would be into making a forage garden, but I’d prefer gathering rather than buying to do it
>>
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Is this chicken of the woods, found growing on the bottom of a tulip poplar in PA
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>>2370834
Underside
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>>2370834
>>2370841
Yeah laetiporus sulfureus
Oh man that's fresh looking too, perfect harvesting age. Enjoy, i'm jelly
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>>2370849
Thanks lol I grabbed a bunch of it, I've seen it around but I've never tried any before
>>
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Looking for a second opinion on this. Think I found some Labrador tea by my folks place. Boggy area under some jack pines. The underside of the leaf has that fuzzy rustiness but the leaves make me think poisonous bog laurel.
Can I get a second opinion?
>>
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>>2371372
Underside
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>>2371373
Here's a patch of it
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got lots of willowherb and nettle shoots yesterday
filled my freezer and made some crepes
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>>2371372
Bog Laurel leaves are opposite; Labrador Tea is alternate.

Last bullet point before 'Uses of Labrador Tea'

https://wildadirondacks.org/adirondack-shrubs-labrador-tea-rhododendron-groenlandicum.html
>>
>>2371407
Thanks that's a useful article. Seems pretty safe to say that it's lab tea. Does anyone know how poisonous the look-alikes are? Am I brown bread if I misidentify?
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Anyone try mayapples? Forest floor is covered in them. I'll try to harvest them when they set fruit and rippen
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>>2367659
I didn't know jack-in-the-pulpit were edible. I see them often but they're normally much smaller than that.
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>>2372567
They aren't edible. The corms can be made edible if properly prepared in a long and drawn out process to reduce toxicity, but the plant as it grows is poisonous and only brings agonizing pain and potentially death.
>>
>>2372567
>>2372588
I should clarify that this is
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arisaema_triphyllum
which grows in the US, and not
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arum_maculatum
which grows in Europe, although both are called jack-in-the-pulpit, and I believe both are edible if properly prepared, and toxic if not.
>>
>>2367656
Mayapple is so delicious when you can keep it away from squirrels.
>>
>>2371561
>>2372703
>Mayapple is so delicious when you can keep it away from squirrels.
this, if you're lucky to get them when they're just ripe but before the bugs get to them, they're delicious

reminds me a lot like passionfruit, even the way you eat it too with the seeds and pulp inside
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>>2370834
Chickens in may?
That's very early, i'm used to seeing them in the fall only
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>>2345018
stumbled on these during a short walk today
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How does someone who's nearly mentally retarded, such as myself, start to learn how to forage?
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>>2375504
Not sure of the best way, but I started with identifying the 'weeds' that grow everywhere. Things like dandelion, plantain, purslane, chickweed, and onions. All I can find is dandelion and plantain, so plan on trying those soon
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>>2375504
>>
>>2375504
You have to start going outside first
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>>2375504
Not exactly sure as I am equally as retarded but I am working into it by just focusing on identifying it first. Going on hikes, and IDing plants that I find. Once you are comfortable using resources and your own observation skills to determine what plant you are looking at you can start to feel more confident that you aren't going to poison yourself if you make the wrong call.
>>
>>2375554
wish I had something like this in my country (paraguay). I'm pretty much clueless as to what I find out in the woods
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>>2371561
>rippen

>>2372703
>>2372733
I'd very much like to try them. I've seen them fruit in previous years (and this year) but I've never gotten to them in the past. >>2367664
>>
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>>2376230
I suspect the mayapple rust is getting to the patches near me. This one, and one right next to it, seem to be doing pretty poorly, and although the fruit are starting to turn colors, they're still quite hard. Not sure if those will survive to ripen, though there are some elsewhere that are doing better.

>>2375504
>>2375530
>>2375574
>>2375971
Some general advice if you're completely new.
>Spend some time getting familiar with plant/mushroom morphology (be very careful with mushrooms unless you want to die horribly, still a possibility with plants but there's less to trip you up). Woody vs. herbacious plants, simple vs. compound leaves, alternate vs. opposite leaves, smooth vs. serrated leaf margins, etc.
>Learn about common/easily identified edible and poisonous plants in your area. Go to a library/book store or search online for "<region> edible wild plants" or some such. If something edible has poisonous look-alikes, maybe best not to start with it, i.e. caesar's amanita mushroom vs. death cap mushroom.
>If it's your first few times ID'ing something, don't eat it immediately in the field. Take it home, check it against guides. Make sure you actually have what you think you have.
>If it's your first time eating something, don't eat 5 pounds of it immediately. Even with the above steps, you may not actually have what you think you have, or you could have a negative reaction even if whatever it is isn't normally poisonous. Try a tiny nibble, then spit it out. Wait a day.
>Often times when something is poisonous, it will have very unpleasant properties immediately. Very important to note this is not always the case. Toxic Amanita mushrooms will kill your liver, and by the time you feel terrible it will very likely be too late to save you, even with proper medical care. People who have survived death cap poisonings report that the mushroom is quite tasty.

If you can provide what region you're in, anons here might help get you started.
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>>2376249
As a caveat to the above, do not do the "try a bit and spit it out" if you are attempting to ID a mushroom. Gilled mushrooms in particular include the vast majority of the deadly toxic species, such as those in Amanita and Galerina. With rare exceptions, you should not try to eat gilled mushrooms unless you are experienced in identifying mushrooms. Don't be this anon.

>>2375971
As for you specifically, I don't have much in the way of advice. You're on the opposite hemisphere, unfortunately. I do know that you have yerba mate, Ilex paraguariensis, although you may not find that unless you're in the eastern portion of the country, if wikipedia is to be trusted. Cherimoya also seems to grown naturally or have been introduced near the north-western portion of the country, so you might find some of those wild. Solanaceae (the plant family that contains tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, nightshade, etc.) has much of its genetic diversity in Central and South America, so that might be a good starting point for you, although the family does contain toxic species. "Weird Fruit Explorer" on youtube has a lot of videos on stuff from all around the world, including a good collection of Solanaceae and likely some other South American fruits, may be worth checking out. He usually does a decent job of including native words for whatever fruit he's reviewing, in case that would be helpful.
>>
>>2346078
based
>>
>>2376260
>do not do the "try a bit and spit it out" if you are attempting to ID a mushroom
Lol what are you talking about anon? This is standard procedure for identifying several species like piperatus, boletes, etc.

Don't give advice if you don't know have experience in what you're talking about
>>
>>2377661
You think a novice and, in anon’s own words “near mental retard”, should be trying to ID boletes based on taste? You think they could even tell you whether a mushroom is a bolete or not?
>>
Hi guys, lately I've been starting to touch grass and I'd like to ask you if you recommend any app to help newmbies recognize edible plants.
My knowledge is limited so all I've been grabbing so far is asparagi, butcher's-broom sprouts and mulberries.

I probably missed a shitton of stuff, for example studying a bit what's in the area I see that I could have picked tons of horsetails, mauves etc
So ideally I'd like to use a semi reliable app to double check what I pick up.
>>
>>2378474
Had no idea asparagi could be taller than a person btw, I always thought they were little bushes
>>
>>2356450
already made our first mulberry pie here in Arkansas.
>>
>>2378474
PictureThis + order a guide on foraging if your country / region
>>
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>>2376249
>>2367664
>mayapple rust
same thing is happening over here. it's bad -- no fruit on these plants :(
>>
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where my serviceberry niggas at?
>>
it's time.
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>>2382589
those are some nice looking strawberries
>>
made spruce tree tip syrup today
3 liters of spruce tips boiled down to 1 liter of syrup and you can barely taste the resin so tomorrow i will try with 5
>>
The park nearby has a lot of salmonberries and wild garlic. Everybody skips the salmonberries but picks the wild garlic or lets his dog waddle through it. The berries tasted a bit boring but not bad at least
>>
>>2383916
thanks, not quite ripe yet that one but didn't wanna take a pic of me holding one with my grubby hands.
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good haul for few hours work if i may say so myself
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>>2384553
Uhhhh, anon...?
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>>2384610
yes now is the season for so called false morels
i made a pie too, have a taste
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I'm a bit late to picking serviceberries this year, they're mostly overripe.
What should i make /out/?
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>>2345018
Should I eat them, bros?
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>>2384553
Lmfao yes eat those anon. That'll be a good idea you're gonna love the way you feel.
Dumbfuck.
>>
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>>2385983
i still have something like 30 butter cartons worth of them in my freezer from past years like any other musherooms that people tend to freeze
salted mushrooms go really fast but freezed ones one tends to forget
just remember to boil them twice so you wont die
>>
>>2384610
>>2385983
You're the ones who're dumbasses. He didn't pick those by accident as "morels", he knows exactly what he's doing. Those are perfectly edible when you treat them properly and they're very highly valued culinary in many countries.
>>
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>>2385422
Ended up making serviceberry loaf
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>>2386081
S-so what are those anon?
>>
We get these FAT fox grapes around my neighborhood at the end of the summer. You can locate them by smell from about 20 feet away
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>>2390365
Gyromitra esculenta, the very same species you call "false morels" and seem to be so afraid of. Sure, they're toxic (potentially deadly and can cause permanent liver failure even if you survive) when fresh but all the toxins are water-soluble and easy to get rid off by proper precautons. Here they're both more commonly eaten and valued higher than "true" morels.
>>
>>2390499
Was meant for you:>>2389979
>>
>>2388688
That looks tasty. Can I have some anon?
>>
>>2384610
Does anyone have any more infographics like this? Going foraging for mushrooms for the first time tomorrow. Looking for some advice. Just want a cohesive list of mushrooms that are safe and that are toxic, so I can have a quick guide on my phone. I live in New England if that is relevant.
>>
how do you learn how to forage local food if you were raised by lead addlepated boomers who only taught you how to sit in school or an office for life?
>>
>>2377688
>trying to ID boletes
boletes are basically the easiest because of the lack of gills theres no amanita lookalikes
>>
>>2374660
nice ive never found a morel in my entire life i always wanted to try one
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>>2391413
Start small with the most easy and common plants and just focus on a few. Bring a book or an app if you're a zoomer.
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>>2391484
Easy as in recognizable I mean
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>>2391413
You have to start by going outdoors first.
You're not a citidiot /in/doorsman, are you?
>>
>>2391418
Morels are hard to get
They only grow when the weather's perfect
And they grow for a limited amount of time

Watch townsends video on morels
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>>2375504
Go to countryside
Ask the locals about foraging
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>>2387908
you are correct sir
got another haul yesterday, made sauce and put rest into freezer
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>>2392457
Stop this.
You know those are false morels.
Either you're trying to be funny or you're trying to get a newfag to kill himself eating those based on the pics you posted.
>>
there are lots of wild cherries around here starting to ripen but squirrel gang is destroying me
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>>2393710
Of course he knows they're "false morels".
See:
>>2386081
>>2387908
>>2390499
>>
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>>2393710
https://foragerchef.com/on-cooking-false-morels-gyromitra/
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>>2356237
It may throw up another one of there's enough energy left in the mycelial mass. A lot of morels for example will fruit quite vigorously for a few years after fire destroys their host tree.
>>
>>2394140
This recipe isn't good, he didn't mention the amount of water he used and he only boiled them once. You should boil them in a large kettle with atleast tripling the water for any amount of mushrooms, and you should do it twice with throwing the first water away and carefully rinsing them inbetween. If you're not eating them immediately, you can after those steps dry them in the sun when UV-rays possibly helps in removing any possibly remaining toxins, but that isn't strictly necessary and i'm not sure if it even actually does anything.

They're completely edible and they're very good but you still have to know what you're doing.
>>
>>2345018
Bärlauch, nice.
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>>2367641
If you pick a morel carry it in a mesh bag, you can spread it's spores better than it could ever hope to. Spores that land close to the original mycelial network won't increase future yield at that location, they can just start new colonies elsewhere.
>>
>>2394312
You should also boil them outside because the monomethylhydrazine can aerosolize during boiling
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>>2396276
I like to sacrifice some of them and make a slurry, I started some saplings and hoping I can get them established with the mycorrhizae
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>>2394312
>>2396290
since i was a child i was taught that mushrooms should always be boiled in loose water, loose water basically means 3 parts water 1 part mushrooms
when it comes to korvasieni (ear mushroom, false morel) you boil them 2 times over and change the water like anon said then they are safe to eat
i know of one old woman who lost her consciousness while breathing the boiling steam and it was basically part of her livelihood, she did it every day for weeks for years
>>2394140
after reading this i am finally willing to believe people outside of europe are actually deathly afraid of this mushroom
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>>2396290
He did mention the importance of good ventilation though.
>>
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This little strawberry patch is doing well this year.
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>>2397559
put some in the ground so u get more next year anon
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>>2397894
They make runners. And I'll let the birds and squirrels do that.
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>>2397559
uh huh
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>>2398131
Well we'll. What are these? Runners on the plants the produced these berries?
But your quick search must be right! The internet doesn't like or have inaccurate information. Never ever.
>>
>>2356450
i just found a mulberry tree. not quite ripe yet though
>>
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>>2398253
sorry man, thought they were alpines. i forage for them a lot myself. cheers.
>>
>>2398595
thats virginiana. wild strawberry
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>>2397559
Wut those look like raspberries not strawberries, where are the seeds
>>
Does anyone eat white clover?
I've been picking mulberries and white clovers would add an interesting taste to a wine I feel.
>>
>>2393768
>>2390499
Is it really worth the risk?
>>
>>2400462
What risk? As i said, there is easy, simple and sure method for making it completely safe. It isn't as if you flip a coin every time you make a meal of them and it either kills you or doesn't, fresh mushrooms are poisonous and properly cooked ones are not and that's it.
>>
>>2400474
I mean, just the fact that you're consuming something that can kill you or make you seriously ill if not processed correctly seems like playing with fire. Maybe what you read about processing them was incorrect, or maybe you made a mistake and didn't boil it for long enough or something like that. It just seems like an odd hobby when you consider the risk vs reward.
>>
>>2356241
Highly recommend Sam Thayer. I have a great place for ramps and wild chives.
>>
>>2375504
One plant at a time. Don’t try to overwhelm yourself.
>>
>>2385863
I've heard blue mushrooms give you superpowers
>>
>>2400532
Dude, there are literally two steps. Boil and rinse. Then repeat. Try not to sniff the fumes. If you fail in doing that you're deserving everythin that's coming for you.
>>
>>2400995
How long do you need to boil it for? Why do you need to repeat the process?
>>
>>2400532
>just the fact that you're consuming something that can kill you or make you seriously ill if not processed correctly seems like playing with fire
i´m the said anon and where i live it is completely normal to eat these mushrooms and everyone knows how to handle them since childhood
it was already pointed out in this thread how they are apparently seen as some final boss of the poisonous mushrooms outside of europe where they are thought as delicacies
>>
>>2401173
>How long do you need to boil it for?
About five to ten minutes.
>Why do you need to repeat the process?
Because boiling doesn't destroy the toxin, it just transfers it from the mushroom to the water. If you don't do it twice, you're just soaking your food in poison.
>>
>>2401192
yeah how about i just not deal with poisonous mushrooms at all because im a retard
are poisonous mushrooms the root cause of eastern europeans being so fucking stupid?
>>
>>2401192
Is it five or ten? What happens if I only boil it for 4 minutes? When serious illness or death is the risk, we need to be a little more precise than that. Also why do I need to boil it the second time as opposed to just rinsing it well? Doesn't the first boil take the toxins out?
>>
>>2401198
Just stay /in/ where it's safe.
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>>2401218
Or I could just, you know, not eat poisonous mushrooms.
>>
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>>2400995
>>2401173
how about we settle this for once and for all
this is from my most recent mushroom book published in 2020

>korvasieni is deadly if eaten raw, if prepared properly really delicious
>POISONOUS IF EATEN RAW. also carcinogenic

>how to use: boil in loose water 2 times for 5 minutes, rinse thoroughly
>beware rinsing water is poisonous, not for consumption or use
>boiling and rinsing wont remove all the poison so it is not recommended for constant consumption, mainly not 2 times in 2 row at any times
>>
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>>2401225
Suomiiii
>>
>>2401225
>boiling and rinsing wont remove all the poison so it is not recommended for constant consumption, mainly not 2 times in 2 row at any times
So you're basically eating a small but significant amount of poison to make your taste buds happy. I'll stick with the non-toxic shrooms which still taste good.
>>
>>2401234
happy nationwide drinking day is happy
>>2401237
basically yes
>>
>>2401237
Well to be honest, Binlan is Chernobyl fallout hotspot, so every single mushroom growing in that country is a bit toxic and carcinogenic.
>>
>>2401237
Raw morels are toxic. The cooking renders the toxins harmless. Why would false morels be any different? Again, just stay /in/ where you’re safe.
>>
>>2401413
That's not the same thing though, and surely you must realize that. The way you cook morels and the way you cook false morels are not the same. You wouldn't just fry false morels up in some butter, because it's not that the toxins are destroyed by heat, it's that they're leached into the water and then disposed of, at least to my understanding. Not the same anon as before, just to avoid confusion.
>>
>>2388688
Could these make decent pancakes?
>>
>>2401413
>Why would false morels be any different?
Because they're not the same mushroom and they contain different types of toxins which are neutralized in different ways and to different degrees? If you need someone to explain this to you, you probably shouldn't be eating mushrooms from the forest.
>>
>>2401237
The dose makes the poison, retard
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>>2401666
They taste like blueberries, so yes
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>>2400540
why did you pull the roots? just cut it above them so they can regrow next year.
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>>2404056
>Sam thayer
His only foraging experience is from youtube videos. What did you expect from a fatherless urbanite?
>>
>>2401237
>So you're basically eating a small but significant amount of poison to make your taste buds happy. I'll stick with the non-toxic shrooms which still taste good.
I mean isn't that the same as drinking alcohol?
>>
>>2406456
Yeah. Which is why I don't drink
>>
>>2367645
They pop up a lot in areas that have been burned, I tend to find them around apple trees,too.
>>
What are some fruits or anything I can forage in Connecticut/New England? I wanted to hunt for PawPaw's but those don't grow in my region.
>>
>>2406855
Looks like you get wild black cherry and chokecherry, and I imagine the season would be starting soon for you, given that we're already getting to the tail end of it here in NC. Might also have some luck with with blueberries and brambles, maybe highbush cranberry, and probably fox grapes (the origin of the concord grape).
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>>2406855
>Connecticut/New England?
You just missed serviceberry season
Blueberry season is coming up, and they're all over the northeast. Plus easy to forage since you can't mistake them
>>
>>2345018
The only forgeable thing in my area is wild spinaches which grow in places where people shit
So I don't really forage those
But if you're lucky, you may get some quality spinaches that are often sold in wet markets for large prices
I haven't found those yet
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>>2407118
>>2407138
Thank you, I'll look into these. I also found an area with either Wild Strawberries or Snakeberries, I'm not sure which ones. Have to check them when I go back. Here's a picture of a deer I took on the same trail. About to head back now.
>>
>>2345018
I made the mistake of thinking this was /biz/ and I seen this thread first and thought "oh how the might crypto fags have fallen"
>>
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>>2407174
This is a mock strawberry right?
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>>2407198
here's a better image of the berry itself
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>>2407198
>>2407199
There were absolutely 0 flowers but I assume these are Mock Strawberries/Snake Berries
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>>2407198
yeah, they are. you can eat them but there's almost no flavour and the leaves make good tea
>>
what the hell can you forage in the southern rocky mountains
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>>2408098
Maybe ephedra/mormon tea?
>>
>>2407732
>there's almost no flavour
really? i always found them tastier than everything else i usually find outside
>>
>>2408214
oh sorry i must be thinking about wild strawberries, in norwegian the word for them, markjordbær sounds similar. Found some wild strawberries last week though, nice change from the blueberries which are starting to pop up now
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>>2408226
That's why we have scientific names. Anon is probably referring to Duchesnea/Potentilla indica, rather than any of the species of Fragaria. P. indica, often called mock strawberry (i.e. false strawberry) or indian strawberry (native-american indians), is in the rose family with normal strawberries, but it does taste quite bland. Still edible though.
>>
>>2407732
>>2408279
yeah I ate one I found today and it tasted very bland and there was essentially 0 flavor.



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