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File: HGM303-1.png (395 KB, 500x500)
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USDA Hardiness Zone Map: https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/
Koppen Climate Map: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/K%C3%B6ppen_World_Map_High_Resolution.png

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Previous Thread: >>2219504

/HGM/ Unofficial Discord

https://discord.gg/fuZf4xWPNG
>>
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Have a good thread !
>>
Picked up some garlic today for my first attempt at growing something. Are there other veggies that can be grown over a canadian winter? Finding a lot of conflicting/confusing answers when I try to search for this
>>
I need to up my compost game. First problem is that I have too many fruit flies. Aside from burying fruit deep, what else can I do to mitigate the issue? The second thing is that I'm wondering if there's a better container for compost than a standard plastic storage bin with holes drilled in the bottom for drainage. I have an apartment with a patio so unfortunately I can't leave it on the ground.
>>
So summer gardening is basically done and over with now. What are you winter crops this year? Aside from my tree and succulents, I'm growing just radishes and carrots this year.

Unlike last year, planted them earlier, so they should be "mature" enough to withstand first frost this year and actually swell their root.
>>
>>2228884
Potential solutions might be a carpet/towel/hessian sack on top, more worms, or some kind of breathable covers on any access points for the flies.
What style of compost are you doing? If you're not doing hot compost or something like a johnson-su, you basically need worms to break stuff down fast enough, and kill pathogens.

The other option would be some kind of fermentation stage before it gets in the compost I guess, but that seems quite complex
>>
>>2228884
Why would you want to keep them out? Seems like they'd help break things down into nutritious insect crap and larval casings?
>>
>>2228826
>ate about 200g of my cherry tomatoes(completely red)
>taste keeps getting worse and worse
>it tastes like bitter poison and vomit
>taste stays in mouth for a whole day
this shit is just evil. no wonder why pests won't eat them
>>
>>2229097
Are they tasting bad due to it being the end of the season, you think?
>>
>>2229097
Which variety of cherry tomatoes, anon?
>>
>>2228884
Bokashi
>>
>>2229110
could be. they are the same color as they were during summer. big tomatoes are now pink and they used to be red in summer
>>2229116
I don't remember. I just know it's a mix of 3 varieties
>>
>>2229125
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/bitter-tasting-tomatoes.htm
>Besides choosing tomatoes that are touted to be high in sugar and low in acid, other factors coalesce to impact tomato flavor. Color, believe it or not, has something to do with whether a tomato is acidic. Yellow and orange tomatoes tend to taste less acidic than red tomatoes. This is really a combination of sugar and acid levels along with other compounds that makes for a milder flavor.
My vines all died this year with some weird galling on the roots.
>>
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expert status achieved
>>
i've started planting cuttings from leaf vegetable scraps my neighbour giving me to compost.
stuffs like amaranth, water spinach, malabar spinach, lettuces and stuffs

how much of these can actually stay alive indefinitely in tropical climate (south east asia)?
obviously i'd like to harvest from them perpetually
is there a limit on regrowing these veges from cuttings forever?
or should i collect seeds and start over once in a while?
if so, when will be a good time to do so?
>>
>>2228826
>getting cold faster than usual in NorCal
>check plants this morning
>a third have frost damage
Wtf I should have like another month. RIP pumpkins
>>
>>2229183
It's really impractical, collect seed. Grow from seed.
>>
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>>2229287
Sorry to hear that, anon. We must adapt to face the growing threat posed to us by global-cooling.
>>
Does anyone grow apples on the Gulf Coast? I have some pecan and plums trees, but I want to add some apples. I heard that Pink Ladies like the heat, but could they stand the humidity of the Gulf Coast?

>The Gulf Coast is the Gulf of Mexico USA South Coast for those who do not know off the top of their heads.
>>
What's a few basic level vegetables I can plant and cultivate as a first timer? I live in Victoria, Australia.
>>
>>2229728
Beans, peas, potatoes (especially Ruth stout), broccoli, kale,corn, and pumpkin are all easy from seed.

Check out 3 sisters, it's a great guild to try for new growers. Throw in flowers (commonly zinnia, marigold and nasturtiums) and other veggies you want to try around it. Melons, cucumber, squash and zuch can replace pumpkin.

Also lots of herbs grow well, rosemary, sage, and thyme are good options as they're able to handle dry summers
>>
>>2229480
that looks COZY
>>
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>>2228826
Why do my beefstake look so much better than my cherry wine same soil same watering schedule
>>
>>2229868
Thanks. I hope it really is cozy when the cold finally comes.

>>2229924
Different varieties are more vigorous and good in different environments. Your beefsteaks are probably just more resilient. Almost all my cherry tomatoes died except for Black Cherry. Those things grew like weeds no matter what.
>>
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>>2229480
>$1300 cuck shed to grow $20 worth of produce

Put seeds in the ground, if they don't grow try different seeds. Stop trying to grow shit that doesn't want to grow in your zone.
>>
>>2229998
Sorry, I'm bitter. Summer is over and nothing is growing. You do you MM
>>
>>2229998
>>2230000
Understandable, my friend. I'm loading it with figs, so they're all compatible with my zone(7b). I'm trying to keep them growing over winter and propagate some new ones for the discord frens. Hopefully by spring, I can have a bunch that are way ahead. It will also help when I retardedly plant all my plants too early. This past spring I had to carry a lot of seedlings in and out every day for about a month.

As far as cost, the tent kit was $250, and the lumber was another $150. Ill end up sinking more for lighting and fans, but thats worth it to me for what I get out of it. Growing a little over winter makes the season a lot nicer.
>>
>>2229743
You can replace corn with sunflowers too
>>
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Can anyone ID these bugs? Got em on the new growth on my grape vines.
>>
>>2230050
Its blurry, but most likely aphids.
>>
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>>2230060
little fuckers seem to be on alot of my garden plants too. can I just blast everything with (pic) and call it a day?
>>
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Any idea what this caterpillar(?) could be? I found it in my yard next to some fine gravel/soil, never seen this kind before and I can't seem to google it.
>>
Do any plants in your experience deter ants from your garden spot?
>>
>>2230068
>spraying poison on your own land
I hope you don't seriously consider this.

If you're having a large scale infestation, there's something out of whack in your garden that needs to be addressed.
>>
>>2230099
how else do I get rid of them? I tried neem oil and (pic), and they just drank it up like nothing. I'm tired of these little cunts spreading disease.
>>
>>2230050
>>2230068
>using poison to deal with pests instead of making the plants healthy enough to resists pests
oh noooo...they got to you
>>
>>2230155
i'm gonna add a little extra poison concentrate to the mix just for you, anon. :^)
>>
>>2230161
Anger is like....pouring poison on your plants and expecting the anon to die.
>>
>>2230113
not that stuff, It organic but it kill the insect predators too. Army worms are nocternal and stay in the soil in the day. Water with soapy water and the will emerge from the soil, then kill them. Another is diatomaceous earth which is like making them crawl on ground glass. Another is chewing tobacco soaked in water and sprayed but not when things are flowering.
>>
>>2230165
gonna spray the bees too <:^)
>>
>>2230169
kinda have an aphid problem, apparently. not sure about army worms. does all that apply to aphids as well?
>>
>>2230113
Make your plants healthier. Most gardens don't have enough fungi in the soil, I'd start there. Sap suckers are the first to leave once your brix starts getting higher.

Do you have any mulch down? A carbon heavy mulch that's deep enough to have a persistent humid layer will encourage sapro fungi which will improve mineral cycling substantially. Smaller wood chips, straw, dried grasses, or a mix of all that is a good starting place. Regularly intensify bio activity by applying well made (google it) compost or worm compost, or teas from these will help. A diversity of flowers will encourage a diversity of predatory critters to also help enrich and control species population.

The answers are almost always the same
>>
>>2229924
Tomatoes are one of the WORST plants to grow for either food, survival, or even as a hobby. Absolute garbage. Don't even bother.
>>
>>2230084
Army worm.
>>
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>>2230176
awesome, i'll look into all that. i some of this stuff lying around. any good for that fungi you mentioned?
>>
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I am a expert in agriculture. Anything from small gardens to 10,000+ acre farms I have experience with and I'm willing to answer any questions you utter plebeians may have.
>>
>>2230182
You'd need to stick it under a microscope to know for sure. In general stuff out of a bag hasn't worked as well for me as stuff I've made.

Not to say there's no good products, but there's really consistent processes if you DIY, and those processes deliver excellent results
>>
>>2230183
I'm in 6b and sprouted some loquats for fun because I love them so much. I understand they should be winter hardy here, but is there any way to get them to actually fruit?
>>
>>2230068
Aphids won't really harm grapes, they're probably just fine. Just use a soap solution every couple days if they get way out of hand.
>>
>>2230194
If you are starting from seeds, it's going to take 3yrs+ before your plant is mature enough to produce fruit. Full sun in good soil and it will be productive in time. However, given that it's in Zone 6b, and the Loquat tends to flower in late fall, the flowers are unlikely to survive.
>>
>>2230183
How much do you know about actual botany? Cause I have a couple botany questions not easily answered through Google which becomes ever increasingly useless each passing year.
>>
>>2230202
A good amount, yes.
>>
>>2230211
Well in that case, reposting what I asked in /plant/.

Where can I read and learn about the specifics of certain plant mechanics and abilities, such as the phototropic effect, gravitropic effect, and how cacti determine which areoles become new buds or flowers, or how trees do similarly but for which nodes become new branches and stuff.

I actually really want to know more about this kind of stuff, not just acknowledging that they're things that exist.

Be even better if you could just explain it here, though supplemental reading would be appreciated.
>>
>>2230213

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11541950/
https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/66/8/2155/496922
https://academic.oup.com/plphys/article/120/2/343/6085154


Read up on plant cell totipotency:
https://passel2.unl.edu/view/lesson/a2f44b5b9a27/2#:~:text=A%20plant%20grows%20by%20increasing,the%20cells%20specialize%20their%20functions.&text=Therefore%2C%20every%20living%20cell%20of,This%20is%20called%20cell%20totipotency%20.

Honestly, look up google scholar and type in the topics you are interested in. 100s of results for each topic.
>>
I've got a pretty consistent spider mite problem in my greenhouse. Soapy solution works OK, but I can never seem to get rid of them. I think the problem being the closed environment. "Just make your plants healthy" is easier said than done. Going to spend more time in there I guess. Poison sucks, but I'm not worried about killing any beneficials, as there are none.
>>
>>2230243
Oh fuck yeah, this is awesome. Exactly what I wanted. Thanks a lot you fuckin legend.

Perhaps one more question I have is this - How long can I hypothetically keep a tree contained into a pot (specifically a fabric one which has greater drainage rate) before the soil becomes completely depleted in nutrients? More specifically, how long can I get away with simply keeping it in the same soil and just fertilizing it, both with layers of compost as well as water soluble all-purpose fertilizers (like a 20-20-20 blend)?

Cause I'm in that situation where with the hot summer and daily waterings, much of the soil nutrients that weren't taken up by the tree were undoubtedly drained out and only replaced with weekly fertilizing, which has worked well so far. I just need to know what the limit to doing this essentially is.

I want to know how akin it would be to hydroponically growing it, in a sense.
>>
>>2230245
So make your plants healthier and get beneficials in there. Do you compost slurry your seed(ling)s?
>>
>>2230181
Only ones I can find pictures of are yellow or tan, what's with this one being red?
>>
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>>2230259
Depends a lot upon the tree and the size of the container. I don't know of any tree that I'd recommend stay in a pot for very long. You can prune back tree limbs, but that's not really an option for the roots. The bigger the container the better. Only a small amount of nutrients should be added because the nitrogen will dissolve out fairly quickly. Light and frequent irrigation + fertilizer is best. Higher organic matter the better nutrients will be retained. I generally work just with high quality compost as a starting point.

Let me put it this way, growing things as nature intended (for trees) will almost universally turn out better. Anything approaching hydroponics is going to be both inefficient and not allow for nutrient cycling.

If you want maximum growth of food in a small space there are only two super crops: potatoes (in cool season) and sweet potatoes (in warm season).
>>
>>2230349
>Let me put it this way, growing things as nature intended (for trees) will almost universally turn out better.
Hmm, yeah, I recognize this, and it's not meant to stay in the container forever. Just kind of a long-term temporary solution (as in 1-2 years) until I actually have a permanent space to put it as I intend to move at some point.

Like I said, I just want to know how long I can get away with it before I either have to repot in larger pot with new soil, or put it in the ground. It's a 20 gallon pot extended to about 25-28 gallons through some cleverness of combining two together. I figure I can get away with one more growing season in that pot and that soil, but I just wanted to get your take on it.

If it'll help, I can take a picture perhaps tomorrow so you can see the actual sizes.
>>
>>2230198
Yeah I know all that, I was asking if you knew a way to force them anyways.
>>
>>2230183
please give me book names about...fucking anything on a deeper level than mere advice you get here
I want actual good books I can pirate and read to learn about plants (botany) and agriculture in a deeper level, I want to understand forests and my own garden, both things I love

I just want some of that 'this book is essential/must read' names, google doesny help
>>
GOAT Question.

I have read that goats need to have just had a Kid in order to produce milk, so a goat milk needs to have a Kid every year to produce milk. Is this correct?

If this is correct what do you do with all the extra goats? Sell them? Keep them? I only have 10 acres so I can only support so many goats.
>>
>>2230084
Fuck those things. Kill it.
>>
>>2230539
Yes, you need a kid to make milk. We have run over 10 acres will support more goats than you would think, we run 30 on 8. As for kids, greeks and spics buy them up like candy. Or you can bring to a salebarn, we got $1.80/lb last time we brought them in, so it's not going to make you rich but it's something. I would say eat them, but they aren't worth the hassle of cleaning if I'm honest thats why there are boers.
>>
>>2230451
Not the guy you asked, but some books I've read and enjoyed:
One straw revolution - Fukuoka - This helped me contextualize farming in a bigger way, and although he doesn't use the words, was the first book that got me to think about farming as being energy returned on energy and attention invested
Permaculture a designer's manual - Mollison and Holmgren - How do I apply the idea of EROEI to my household scale, and a reasonably deep grab bag of systems to further investigate if you find them interesting
Teaming with microbes - Lowenfels and Lewis - This shit is cool and interesting, I bought a microscope after this (and watching Elaine Ingham on youtube) so I could check out the quality of my inputs
Holistic Management - Savory and Butterfield - hope giving book, and I want to buy a much larger property soon, so I thought I should learn about livestock management (this book is about much more)
Edible forest gardens - Jacke and Toensmeier - If you live in a temperate region, this will become a bible of sorts. perennialsolutions.org is a great resource
Forest Ecosystems - Perry et al - I like forests and this was a good resource to learn more about them
The challenge of landscape - yeomans - I'm doing regrarians soon and wanted to do some preparation
Restoration agriculture - Shepard - The author is prone to hand waving details away, but videos of his farm make it pretty obvious that maybe hand waving details is a good idea. This helped me understand how to scale up permie / regen ag ideas, which hopefully regrarians will add new depth and complexity to

I try not to get stuck in "follow X with Y on the 8th of April" type super detailed books, because that seems like pissing away effort on precision in 1 area (annual market gardening) instead of achieving systemic complexity (integrated animals, woody perennials, herbaceous plants, fungi and so on), and I think systemic complexity will generate more positive interactions, leading to better EROEI.
>>
>>2230068
Against aphids you can use
>soap solution.
>garlic solution. Boil 5 cloves in 1 Lts. of water for 30 minutes. Filter and use.
>parsley solution. Boil for 10 minutes.
>>
I need to repot my blueberry bushes but I only have a bit of potting mix for roses which is meant to be an acidic mix, not enjough to repot all my blue bushes
Would it be ok using normal potting mix?
>>
would i be wasting my time trying to start growing rosemary (and other herbs) now on my (canopied) apartment balcony (south facing in zone 6b)
>>
>>2230892
>I bought a microscope after this (and watching Elaine Ingham on youtube) so I could check out the quality of my inputs
post pics of results
>>
>>2230956
You'll probably need to bring it in when it's cold, so account for that, and give it a shot. No harm in trying.

>>2230993
In about a week or two I'll be testing a few batches of compost, if I remember, I'll get some pics up here
>>
>>2230349
What kind of spuds, any will do or will Russets work the best, or should you go for a red/gold waxy variety? I saw some purple potatoes that looked pretty interesting, but when I grew them they turned up really small (I'm pretty sure I had some sort of deficiency).
I'm thinking of doing a bed of potatoes next year, along with another bed of a bunch of other things, or else I could do potatoes in containers.
Do you have any experience with those meme potato boxes? From what I've seen they actually produce lackluster results, which is a shame since harvesting them looks easy as shit.
>>
>>2230946
>I need to repot my blueberry bushes but I only have a bit of potting mix for roses which is meant to be an acidic mix, not enjough to repot all my blue bushes
>Would it be ok using normal potting mix?
Mine don't grow in regular potting mix. It really needs the correct pH to grow, in my experience.
>>
>>2230868
Have you ever raised meat goats? I heard they sell for quite a bit per pound, but no idea how much they need to eat, how old they need to be to sell, etc. and if it is ultimately profitable?
>>
>>2231040
Where I live, goats sell well to the curry brown population, but they don't fetch a high premium. The trade off is that goats are easier to feed (browse can make up more of their diet, and that opens up more perennial option) but harder to manage (they can climb ANYTHING). Carrying capacity is basically the same weight / acre as sheep, but the browse as a long term and larger proportion of diet makes them easier to feed.

I've heard of people renting goats out to clear blackberry thickets, so there may be ways to make extra cash by using them for scrub clearing duties.

Goat dairy products (unlike meat in my region) fetch a high premium, and there's a market for small batch non-cow dairy products. If I had the time for goats, I'd probably look at setting up an integrated pasture / shrub (coppice Morus alba is the first thing that comes to mind) system for and try my hand at making a young goats cheese. I'd probably check out anglo-nubians, dual purpose, high fat milk, and they're cute as heck.

I bet there's a market for farm-to-table heat-and-eat goat curries too, if you've got a market garden and want to really value add on your products, you could turn $5 of vegetable and goat into $15 of organic regenerative pasture raised [ other adjectives ] prepared meals.
>>
>>2231031
>>2230946
The family blueberries are from rely on fungal associations to buffer their environment, the less of that fungal element, the more sensitive to pH they become. Coffee grounds are a common acidic waste stream you can use, but healthy plants are very capable of altering the pH in the soil around them, if the necessary fungi are in there with them.

Same reason you inoculate an acorn with soil and leaf mould from under the parent tree, to get those biological associations which provide substantial adaptations in the soil.

You might be okay to capture as much of the existing soil + add potting mix, you could add coffee grounds as an insurance policy, you might even be able to make your own blueberry inoculants.

The fungi they form an association with (which are presumably in the soil of any happy thriving blueberry plant) are sapros, which mean they can be grown on the right substrates, you may even be able to make a substrate from coffee grounds, add some of the soil from the blueberries, and keep that moist and at a steady temperature to breed your own inoculant.

Couldn't find any examples of people trying that, but it would make for a really interesting side by side, to see if you repot two or more blueberry plants into identical mixed soil, and just add the inoculant to one.
>>
>>2230892
>One straw revolution - Fukuoka
>watch some youtube clip about him and his methods
omg it's literally me, everything that man stands for is exactly what I am for.
>>
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How's your pepper garden this year?

>harvested enough ghost peppers to make more powder than I use in a year
>just bottled some low-heat fermented hot sauce (pic related; mostly jalapenos, some slightly hotter peppers, and threw in one Bahamian goat)
>have a huge bag of ripe jalapenos in the freezer, will probably make a batch of pepper jelly in a few weeks
>still have some more peppers outside I'm going to pick soon for pickling, drying, and freezing
>>
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I didn't realize one cilantro seed grows the equivalent of the bunch you would buy at the store. I've been overplanting.
>>
Mini-pumpkin update.
>>
>>2230245
Predatory mites work
>>
>>2231366
Looking really nice, anon. I keep forgetting to harvest my last one on the vine. Pumpkins are really rewarding to grow.
>>
I'm trying to be completely self-sustaining in case of emergency and I've got most things worked through except for salt. How am I supposed to get salt on a couple acres of land? Will I be required to trade for it? Southeast Tennessee btw.
>>
>>2231434
You don't HAVE to trade for it but it's way easier than getting it yourself. Having said that, you can observe deer in your area to find salt licks, and Practical Self Reliance has an article on foraging salt inland https://practicalselfreliance.com/foraging-salt-inland/
>>
>>2231434
>Will I be required to trade for it?
Unless you have access to a salt mine, yes. However, there are small amounts of salt naturally in meat and blood. The Maasai basically have a diet entirely of meat, milk, and blood (they even mix blood with milk and drink it).

Stock up on salt. It's insanely cheap, easy to buy at the moment, and literally lasts forever. If you're worried about getting enough sodium, you could buy a year's worth of basic table salt (let's say 5g per day) for less than $2, not even buying in bulk. Some decent sea salt might be $5 for a year's worth of emergency salt.
>>
>>2231449
>>2231452
Alright, thanks, I'll just stock up then.
>>
>>2230245
What happens in a greenhouse is that the plants in there attract pest insects / mites which in turn thrive in a *predator* free environment. So, you either need to introduce natural predators or hose everything down with lost of miticides / insecticides. Either way, it's a very unnatural growing environment which should be reserve only for growing seedlings or exotic plants.
>>
>>2231027
Firstly, we need to distinguish between POTATOES and SWEET potatoes.

Potatoes are cool season (not freezing) plants and need a substantial amount of fertilizers to get big yields. You grow these via "seed potatoes" which are nothing more than small potatoes used for growing the crop. You don't need to cut eyes out, though you can. Simple small potatoes from the bag you got at the store should generally be ok. Organic is likely to ensure they don't have any growth inhibiting chemicals on them. Just about any variety of potato should be ok. A lot more could be said about this, but I don't have time.

As for the sweet potatoes, these are grown from *slips* which are segments of vine that grows out of the tuber. All you need is a few segments of a vine that emerges, which is then planted. These are WARM season plants by the way. 80F+ is good. These need about half the fertilizers to grow a good crop. On a per acre basis and ease of production, there is no crop that compares to sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes can be grown in any climate that's sunny and warm for at least 120 days.

ALL OTHER CROPS ARE CRAP compared to sweet potatoes. Fact.
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>>2231595
sweet potatoes are the king of survival crops, but I think your description of humble normal taters is not quite right. The ruth stout method has turned a few small spuds from the bag we buy into a pretty decent yield using only grass clippings, straw, hay, and some chook poop. At a home scale, they're very capable of being a productive crop with no fertilizer by using waste streams as growing substrate amendments.

Sweet taters are definitely the best though, if you have the climate for them.
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>>2231610
I was surprised doing landscaping a few years back that all these "ornamental" sweet potato vines people grow in containers as flowers actually produce quite impressively sized tubers. I didn't want to eat much of them never being certain what kinds of pesticide and shit had been used but I did nibble bits here and there and they were certainly sweet and tasty.
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>>2231103
pine needles and saw dust also help soil acidity, you can go full retard and do bokashi composting and adding that to your compost pile before amending it to your soil
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>>2231610
>a productive crop with no fertilizer by using waste streams
That is fertilizer. So, not only do sweet potatoes require less fertilizer (from any source), they do even better when all fertilizer is added at the time of planting.
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>>2230183
I live in Zone 9, on the Gulf Coast near Biloxi Mississippi, I have a Loquat that is in a pot and about two feet tall, it has been doing well, but lately seems like it wants a permanent home. If I plant it in the ground will it grow big and strong like in your picture? Or will it just die down here? Is there anything I can do to help it take root and survive in my vile climate?
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>>2231591
>reserve only for growing seedlings or exotic plants
I live by Chicago, it's full of citrus and pepper plants. Wonderful place to enjoy in the middle of winter. I'm trying to get a handle on the dramatic temperature swings though.

I'm going to kill them all.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5Xqaix2Tlc
Watching this tv series and holy fuck, 3 pound onions?
Is this normal?
Are they bad for cooking?
>>
What do, kiwiberrys lost all their leaves, now its just stem. Central germany, outdoors
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>>2231929
Might be a dormancy period. I don't have one of those so I can't say. Google it, I guess.
>>
What do you gentlemen think is the best way to determine the PH of your compost?

I was thinking to take a handful, steep it in water for a few hours, then use a PH test strip from an aquarium kit to test the water. Possibly also do the actual test with the liquid tester to get a more accurate result. This seems logical, no?
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>>2231942
10g of material per 100g of warm distilled ph neutral water. mix and let sit at least 10 minutes before testing.
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>>2231949
seems easy enough. thanks!
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Strawberries took the fuck over lmao
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>>2231299
I’ve pickled some of them already and there are still some ripening. The snow blanket helped them through the storm but 30 degree nights ahead for a while so they might not make it much longer. These are scotch bonnets and they are quite tasty.
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>>2232037
The habanero plant got some frost damage and a broken branch from where a sunflower fell on her.
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>>2232040
I let the other habanero plant get snowed on. I planted her to test where I should plant peppers which didn’t get enough light so only 6 were produced on this one.
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>>2231299
Early frost just killed my whole garden, but I got a good batch of peppers out of it over the season. The winner was Fresno chilis pickled in a honey garlic brine, I’m going to grow a ton of those next year. Currently have a habanero pineapple sauce fermenting, giving it a couple more weeks to see how it ends up.
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>>2232007
I see those sweet potatoes in there. Good stuff.
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I'm thinking about making some raised beds out of 2x6 planks and these concrete corner things and some cow panels, what do you all think of this design?

The beds would be at about 2' high, but I'm thinking I want to dig a trench down between them down like 1' beneath the surface so the beds would be at about waist level. The ground by me is all sand down to like 6 feet so I don't think drainage would be an issue, even in a trench.
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>>2232128
8x4' planter bed full of them, just harvested
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>>2232133
Looks good to me, anon. My only concern would be that it may be uncomfortable to work under if the arch is too low. With this design, it'd be easy to put plastic over in the cool months, or shad/insect cloth in the heat.
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>>2231595
>>2231610
How long do sweet potatoes take to grow, and am I screwed if I planted them mid-summer in a desert? I forget exactly when it was, regrettably, but I think it was around june or july when I put them in the ground. Since then, one of the plants has grown wildly, looping around a trellis I had. There's probably at least a couple of square meters of leaves there. It's only just gotten cold (<20C) these past couple of weeks, and it's unlikely to get below 10C for 2-3 more.
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>>2230179
Got it rough with the tomatoes?
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>>2232133
Why not attach the arches to the outside of the planters to give you a touch more room inside?
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as a longtime brownthumß I'm extremely chuffed my two plants are flourishing at home and I hope to keep collecting more

pic was a cheeky opportunity right at golden today
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>>2229117
>Bokashi
I keep seeing this word come up, is it a meme meant to sell those expensive bags of shit on amazon or is it something you can do yourself and that actually works?
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>>2229924
Think i figurd it out stem rot
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I would like a pole bean that is resistant to aphids. This year I grew long oriental beans that were great but the aphids attacked them constantly. Any bean recommendations?
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Pumpkins: harvested
Garden bed: mulched
Garlic: planted
Winter can come
Life is good, lads
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There are four camomile plants in this pot. What should I do? Separate them or plant the whole clump into a bigger container? Thanks.
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>>2232707
scarlet runner, year on year they seem to get more resistant and stronger. presumably higher brix over time?
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>>2232773
>scarlet runner
Does the pod have a string?
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>>2228826
Lads what type of gourds (or any cucurbits really) are there that can easily last at least 4 months in storage, and preferably 6 months to 1 year?

(Apart from fig-leaf gourd)
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>>2232842
Is pickling an option?
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>>2232842
I'm not expert but I believe Moschata squashes tend to last longer than Maxima, which last longer than Pepo
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>>2232842
Butternut squash
Blue hubbard
Sweet meat squash
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>>2231737
Loquats like well drained soil and do great in full sun or partial sun. Plant it with a bit of compost, which is optional, then be sure to water it just enough to soak the soil each day. A standard garden hose would take about 15-30 seconds to soak a recently planted tree. Keep the soil moist for 30 days and it will be have a good start. They don't really need anything after being established.
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>>2232228
From planting to harvest is usually 95 - 135 days. They like full sun and regular irrigation - just enough to keep moisture in the soil. A handful of generic fertilizer per plant should be enough.
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>>2232640
you can diy the entire process, if you have a wood shop and produce spare saw dust. you basically ferment your cellulose (sawdust) and use it to pickle your organic matter. you end up with a very acidic compost amendment, so people either use it for acidic soil preferring crops like onions and blueberries. but if you already have acidic soil, people add wood ash and bio char (if you have a wood shop, you may also have a wood burning stove to use your scraps). like vermiculture, you need room temperature, so a mud room is ideal, as you can put your plant food scraps in your worm bin, and your meat and dairy in the bokashi bucket. I literally just copy youtube videos and it's worked well for me.
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>>2232640
There are many ways to do it. You can culture lactobacter and use it to compost meats, veggies, fats, acidic produce, the works. add material and lactobacter over time until it's full and then as the last bit ferments you pour it out in your yard and in a week or so it turns into dirt. There are many ways to make it yourself, you don't have to buy the internet stuff.
>>
It's ok to buy the cheapest seeds at your local garden store right?
Just for basic herbs
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>>2232868
Yes pickling is an option

>>2232872
>>2232899
Thanks guys. Though really I'm only interested in short-season crops that take no more than 4 or 5 months to produce. It's a shame bottle gourds don't store long
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Welp just impulsively ordered a bunch of seeds for next season from Southern Exposure. I hope I like the taste of ground cherries because I just got two varieties despite never having tasted one before.
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>>2233144
It's mid October and I need to get my garlic in, there are still a ton of green peppers on my plants but they are really slowing and I'm not sure they will actually ripen. Should I rip them out or do you think they have a chance? It's been unreasonably warm and we should have frost in the next 2-4 weeks. Pic related
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>>2233273
I would if I were you, nothing wrong with green chili powder. You should chop them down instead of pulling them out though, the roots rotting in the ground will help your soil structure.
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>>2233277
Not sure why but these chilis are only hot when red. Some kind of burpee hybrid called "Thai hot" or something. Like a bird eye chili. When green they are not hot at all, vegetal tasting and very bitter
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>>2233273
My broccoli is kind of fucked too.
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>>2233273
I have a similar situation. My peppers are totally covered in row cloth now, hoping that gives them the edge to keep ripening a while.

It was a great year for some things, but sadly kiwis were not one of those things. Only got a tiny handful in the end. But, a tiny handful is sure better than no kiwis.
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>>2233299
I had a great year for tomato, pepper, and kale. String bean did great too. Broccoli for decimated by moths. Gourd and cucumber did awful but zucchini was unstoppable in the early season. This is my first year with my own garden
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>>2233286
crushed eggshell around base of plant
one of few things confirmed to work
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>>2233346
I'll have to try that next year
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>>2233127
It's okay, but you're buying the worst seeds. The best goes to nurseries, the shittiest ends up in your pack. I try to buy from small producers, normally permies, and they seem to consistently deliver way better growth. Could be genes, microbio stuff, probably both
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>>2233286
How new, thick, and integrated is the mulch? It's a less aggressive version of the fresh biochar problem where new dry mulch will suck nutrients up wherever it contacts soil, that's why mixing it in is a bad idea. That mulch looks pretty fresh.

Eggshells bro is right, but I'd crush my shells and vermicompost them, and put that on. Humidity and more fungi will turn the mulch from nutrient sucker to nutrient releaser sooner
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>>2233459
Mulch is pretty new but it's on top of an older layer that's pretty broken down. It's "Pine bark nuggets" so the pieces are pretty large. I'm gonna say a compacted inch or 1.5 of old broken down pine bark, the stuff on top is new (Less than a month) and about 6 inches thick.

The fucked broccoli is less from nutrient wicking and more from fucking little white moths and caterpillars and slugs.
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I regrew a celery from scraps.
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>>2233465
Not him but cedar leaks chemicals that impede the growth of other plants which is why it's used in landscaping around bushes that are big enough not to care and it helps keep weeds at bay. You basically poisoned your broccoli. I'd move it somewhere else if you can and next year use regular soil and just weed.
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>>2233468
Pinch the flowers off your basil.
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>a pool inside a greenhouse
this bitch is either an insane retard or a fucking genius

youtube.com/watch?v=j9njhmCAQAA
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>>2233468
Total calories: maybe 2000. If you want to garden for actual FOOD you need to throw out everything other than the best, heavy producers. Think sweet potatoes and potatoes every time you plant.

>>2233467
Celery provides you with negative calories...
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>>2233465
>>2233624

He pretty much nailed my thoughts, I was aiming nutrient theft not allelopathy, same outcome really, which lowers brix and makes your plants vulnerable to pests.

Mulch is fine, and in fact very good after the initial phase is overcome and it's full of life, every rain event is basically a compost tea application. To speed it up, my tired same old suggestion is aerate the soil under it deeply with a broad fork if you have compaction, add rock dust and any other minerals to vermicompost, and regularly apply a low concentration compost tea/slurry to fill your growing soil with life. I'd consider adding oyster mushrooms or wine caps in your case very strongly to expedite the softening of mulch (they're v hungry species)
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>>2233625
I would but the bees are so happy.
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>>2233682
It's not a hobby farm nigger. It's a herb garden.
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>>2233354
some anon posted a link some threads back to a standford (?) study about how this works
since then I've believed that but havent tried it yet myself
I will soon, some snails are tasting my broccoli, so I will find out soon as well
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>>2233467
that's so cool l anon
I tried myself with onions and leek and failed, kinda jelly to see you making it, good job
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Is it normal for hot peppers to take a while to get going?

>t. Southern Hemisphere - Spring
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>>2233904
Not sure about your exact conditions, but peppers are one of the longest maturing anuals we usually grow.
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>>2232449
Putting them on the inside means that they don't need anything to actually attach them because they stay in place due to the tension of the arch wanting to spring back to flat.

After checking the original video where I got this idea, I think I will be fine attaching them on the inside. In the video that I got the idea from, they attach them directly at ground level 7' apart and have room to stand directly in the center of the arch. If mine are 2' above that, I should have plenty of room
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>>2233682
>Celery provides you with negative calories
This is a meme
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>>2233144
Ground cherries are great, they're sweet and a little bit savory.
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>>2233682
I don't bother planting potatoes because home grown isn't that much better quality than from the store and they're so dirt cheap. Whereas it's nearly impossible to buy a decent tomoato for example. And no, celery is not calorie negative and it's delicious. I always grow some.

>>2233782
Very good reason indeed.
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>>2233782
this sparks joy
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I don't know what the fucking deal with my house is. If I have potatoes, and leave them out in the light, they turn green. Ok. So I put them in the pantry. Then they sprout. So I put them in the fridge. Then they dry out. Fuck my life.
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>>2234158
you should put them in your mouth
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>>2234158
are they store bought spuds or homegrown?
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what are these seedlings?
I only know the grass-like one is cumin
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>>2233682 #
>Celery provides you with negative calories...
So it cancels out the lard I saute it with and the cream cheese I stuff it with?
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>>2233682
it seems it provided you with negative IQ
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>>2234172
>Styrofoam provides you with negative calories...
So it cancels out the lard I saute it with and the cream cheese I stuff it with?

>>2233991
Assuming potatoes will be available indefinitely. Why grow anything at all if it's always going to be available?

>>2234243
#triggered
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>>2233890
>I tried myself with onions
I want to do that with white onion but it always turns into a problem trying to cut a onion while saving the core.
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>>2234273
>Why grow anything at all if it's always going to be available?

Because certain things like tomatoes, peppers, most fruit etc are far better in quality than what you can get from a store and even then they're expensive.

Sure if all society suddenly breaks down and I need to maximize food production I'll plant different things. But so long as I can get 10 lbs of potatoes for a couple bucks I'll keep my berry patches and other tasty things.

p.s. calling someone triggered for laughing at you over the celery thing is pretty laughable. Just check your facts.
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>>2230451
Here's a good starting point. He makes some great recommendations for books and apps that'll get you started.
https://youtu.be/Z314Njbw5k0
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>>2234299
....you have to save the core?
damn suddenly I know why y onions failed
wait, no, that cant be, they grew stalks again for a bit until they got too thin and fall over and dry out, anyone know why Im shit at regrowing alliums?
I have put them on water and then in soil when it made roots, all 3-4 attempts I did ended same way
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>>2233910
>peppers are one of the longest maturing anuals
They are? I thought they take 3 months to fruit. Damn, how long do Capsicum annum species take to crop? I'm growing peppers for the first time next year and was hoping the plants wouldn't take up space the whole season

>>2234305
Nice yield anon. How many plants produced that redcurrant crop?
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Can anyone take a look at my plan for next year and tell me why I'm retarded?

Plot is in the south of the UK and full sun with no shade at all. All gaps due to differences in planting times will be filled by the glorious radish.
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>>2232767
the roots are thin as fuck so it'll die in literally 3 seconds if you transplant it. This could get big though so be prepared.
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>>2232767
If the root system is developed and entangle with each other then keep them together. If not then separate them into other pots. Reach into the soil below the root ball and pull out the plants individually. If you mess it up they will die. If you do it right they may die.
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>>2234677
So I have 6 currant bushes but over half of those are from one. They grow wild in the woods near me so a few years back I took a cutting and it did so well that I started taking more. My first is the biggest now but they're all getting bigger and bigger. I got 4 or 5 harvests like that of them over the season.

I love that since legalization, here us Canada marijuana is the new zucchini. Neighbours all grow so much they don't know what to do with it all and keep giving away huge hunks they can't be bothered to deal with. We're almost at the point of saying no more ourselves lol
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>>2229183
>amaranth
get rid of that garbage now
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>>2234771
Amaranth is great.
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>>2234779
Way too invasive for me, but it's kinda cool.
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>>2234852
I get it. It can be, but there are many invasive but useful species. Some people look aghast that we purposefully put a nettle patch in our yard, but we use it a lot and I feel better knowing the exact conditions it's growing in and hasn't been messed with. And it's not really that hard to keep things in check if you're attentive.
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>>2234852
I love my amaranth, super productive low effort way to supplement chook feed. Aesthetic too.
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hey guys ive recently gotten quite intrested in home steading and gardening, any plants you guys recomend during this season?
>>
I want to grow some grapes, but there's a solid 1.8m fence blocking most of the light. Would it be feasible to trellis them up right over the top of it? Worried about them running out of juice before the get over the top.
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>>2234960
>Worried about them running out of juice before the get over the top.
There's no such thing, go crazy
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>>2234998
nice
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>>2231366
You should look into growing Cassabanana fruits
they look like giant eggplants and taste like a cross between a cantaloupe and a pumpkin
>>
piss question here
should urine go into compost or "dilute and feed plant"?
>>
>>2234915
How much space do you have? What is your goal?

If you are trying to have higher quality produce that you already use, just figure out what you can grow that you already buy at the grocery store frequently, like onions, lettuce, tomatoes, bell peppers, garlic, broccoli, et cetera.
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>>2235086
How big is the compost pile?

Every day is probably too often, but twice a week would probably be fine.
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>>2233665
>not putting a natural pool in a walipini to supply an aquaponics system
ngmi
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>>2234915
When I first got into gardening there were 3 main traits I was looking for in plants to consider growing them: high yields, long storage times, and general hardiness (e.g. drought-tolerant, few pests/diseases, low soil nutrient requirements, etc)

These 3 more or less still stand today and it guides how I use most of my space.

For homesteading, I think those 3 things, and perhaps growing a staple crop, are the characteristics u should be looking at. Though add a few herbs and spices too (I've personally developed an interest recently in medicinal herbs and spices that suppress appetite)
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>>2234305
>p.s. calling someone triggered for laughing at you over the celery thing is pretty laughable. Just check your facts.
Actually thinking anyone here is serious when they use #triggered
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>>2235178
>high yields, long storage times, and general hardiness
Basically my same line of thinking. Squash, Carrots, Beans, Potatoes, Cabbage, Onion. All high yield and long storage times. One thing that I've been trying to focus on is not planting food that my family doesn't like. We don't eat corn, so we don't plant corn. Simple as. I see a lot of people planting stuff they don't want to eat, it boggles my mind.
Also, figuring out how to propagate effectively and plant succession crops.
>>
>>2235246
Just planted my winter wheat. My small pot plants are failing and so is my aquaponics coffee. Here's everything I'm growing:
>Perennials:
Apple
Raspberries
Figs
Cherries
Grapes
Blueberries
Blackberries
Spearmint
Coffee
Lemon
Potatoes
Oregano
Dill
Strawberries
>Annuals:
Wheat
Weed
Cayennes
Habeneros
>Livestock:
Tilapia

Am I gonna make up boys? Anything else I should grow?
>>
I need to plant mint but I refuse to pay for it.
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>>2235366
Mint grows like a weed. Find someone in your neighborhood who has a bunch in their yard and ask if you can take a piece, they will probably say yes.
>>
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>I didn't hear no bell
>>
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Anyone else here experiment with growing their own grains? Obviously small-scale grain production is more work with reward than growing acres of the stuff and processing it with machines, but I gave it a shot one year just to have something to fill in gaps in the garden and it turns out it's extremely fun. So far I've grown:

Winter rye
>pretty easy to grow and process
Winter wheat
>easy to grow but kind of a pain to process
Sorghum
>easy to grow and process, kind of want to make molasses at some point but that seems like a pain in the ass to do small-scale
Flour corn
>annoying to grow with all the pest pressure here but extremely easy to process
Amaranth
>annoying to process but tough as nails, has self-seeded everywhere
Pearl millet
>annoying to process but FUCKING INDESTRUCTABLE, has self-seeded everywhere and made my yard a bird sanctuary
>>
just planted some purple and blue bluebonnets :)
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>>2234895
I had a a purple/red variety that was gorgeous. Then suddenly I had a million of them and it took me years of pulling up all the seedlings to finally get them in check. Turns out I had friends that were buying the seedlings as "micro greens" at the farmer's market. I couldn't believe it....never crossed my mind.
>>
how do i enact genocide upon white beetle grubs without killing the worms?
i thought neem would be the answer but apparently, according to bunnings, I can't use them on edibles.
>>
>>2235623
actually never mind i found something that does what i need
>>
>>2235623
I've never had to deal with grubs, but I've gotten rid of other garden pests with a shopvac. Worked great for getting rid of earwigs. Figure out what time they surface and feed and then just go out there at that time and suck them off your plants.
>>
Any 8b people?
Anything to grow in the winter?
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>>2235436
How do you process
>>
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>>2235246
lol beans are definitely not a high yielding crop, commercially, most legumes don't even reach 1 ton of yield per hectare. I just grew 45 individual dwarf Phaseolus vulgaris plants and barely got 550 grams (19.4 ounces) of beans.

That tends to be the case with crops where it's the seed that's eaten, they're the lowest yielders. The highest yielders are where it's the fruit or tubers/bulbs that are eaten.

>>2235263
>winter wheat
Nice. I think growing grains is underrated, most people will never grow any grain except corn. I want to plant some oat next year and see if I have enough to make a cup of oat milk lol, but no one sells any damn seeds since no one grows em. Prob gonna have to buy the seeds as bird feed. Also wanna try barley

Pic unrelated
>>
How does chicken manure do with curcubits? I plan on growing a few next year and want to know why people keep saying it's not good for them
>>
>>2235712
>want to plant some oat next year and see if I have enough to make a cup of oat milk lol, but no one sells any damn seeds since no one grows em.
Unironically get them on the internet. I've concluded a long time ago most box stores don't ever sell grain seeds.
>>
Baby bok choi harvest.
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>>2235436
I'm British but man that picture gives me... feelings...
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>>2234767
I planted snowberries by my stream for the wildlife around here. Deer and birds seem to like them. I think cannabis should move towards the homegrown model. It hurts the industry’s profits and growth potential which is why the plant limit is so harsh. Cannabis grows much better when cared for individually instead of being jammed tightly into large grow rooms anyways. I give away about 50% of my harvest instead of selling it since there is no legal way to sell but gifting is fine. If I could legally have 8 immature plants then breeding would be much easier with more to pick from. It’s 4 plants total now.
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>>2236025
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>>2230539
You make gyros
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>>2234305
what are the dark ones in the red raspberry bowl ?
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>>2236082
Those are some variety of blackberry. The other dark berries look like black raspberries. Blackberries and raspberries are closely related and I don't know where the line is drawn really. I have noticed that almost all raspberries are hollowed out where the fruit attaches to the plant, which is related to the structure of the bracts which are the modified leaves that hold the flower and the fruit. Maybe you can sort out the specific variety.

https://www.luberaedibles.com/en/blackberry-varieties-8211-an-overview-of-our-range-p50
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>>2235246
I think a lot of people grow corn when they grow beans because it forms a complete protein. Personally I prefer sunflowers for this purpose, especially since sunflower seeds make a decent pine nut sub for pesto.
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>>2235741
Cucurbits require lower nitrogen levels to fruit, and chicken shit is high N.
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>>2234771
but they barely stays alive
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>Tomatoes in a bag of compost
What can go wrong?
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>>2236288
>Whole house proceeds to burn down due to your tomatoes
>Tomatoes carry some sort of weird fungus like fusarium that fucks with your garden forever
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>>2236391
let me rephrase my question
i mean, can this possibly work?
i've not grown tomato before, more over a random rotten tomato from bottom of fridge

if things could go wrong for tomatoes in a sack of compost, what could it be?
some random malnutrition issue?
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>>2228826
My wife and I just bought 3 acres in SE Idaho. We won't be moving there for another 3-5 years but I want to get some trees started in the mean time. How much do newly planted trees need to be watered? I won't really be able to water them with us being 3 hours away from the property
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>>2236437
pay someone to go water them at least a couple times a week the first year. after the first year they'll probably be fine on their own.
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>>2236437
Usually its the first couple months that are the most important. You could mulch heavily to retain as much moisture as possible, then poke a pinhole in a bucket, fill it with water and leave it at the base of the tree. You could even pee in the bucket for good measure.
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>>2236082
>>2236092

Those are boysenberries, a wonderful hybrid between a blackberry and a raspberry. Really great flavour, here's the vine.
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>>2236430
It could work, I've grown plenty of things by chucking seeds or whole fruit and forgetting about it
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>>2236288
I have volunteer tomatoes everywhere. The store bought romas I've composed grow like a weed but I think they're hybrids because they don't grow romas they grow cherry tomatoes.
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>>2236683
I bought a pumpkin a few years back at a local farm and saved the seeds, but when i planted them I got summer squash instead, so it must have been some hybrid. I feel you
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>>2236761
Interesting thing I just read. Apparently summer squash is the same species as a pumpkin (or winter squash) that is rather just immature and will become a pumpkin if let be for longer.
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>>2236805
>>2236761
Technically a summer squash that is grown to become mature is called a "Marrow", as that's the name of a mature zucchini





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