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ROSEBURG, Ore. (KPIC) — Harry Burleigh went fishing in May and disappeared. For 17 days, his wife worried. His son traveled to Roseburg, Oregon from Arizona. Search and rescue crews combed the woods east of the city.

Then news broke: He'd been found — alive.

But for Burleigh himself, those 17 days were a fight to survive one more day to see his wife and family again.

He shared his story for the first time Thursday, almost two months after his ordeal.

Burleigh said he felt like he left the mountain top with something he didn't have before. His body was beaten and his mind was stretched, but his "life spark" was filled.

He also recognizes he didn't follow the general protocols of hiking and fishing. He was rusty; he hadn't been out in a year due to the COVID pandemic.

When the wind picked up, he cut his fishing trip short. But he had the need for a thrill and thought he could "dash" up a trail. He didn't bring any supplies because he thought he would be in and out of a trail.

It didn't work out that way.

After signing in at the trailhead, he hit a spot where the trail split. He said it would've been a good spot to turn around but he continued on. When he finally decided to turn around, it was dark. No one knew where he was. He was out of cell service range.

Then he realized he would be there overnight.

He found a log and cleaned it out. He got bark and laid it down so he wouldn't be on the ground. He didn't sleep because it was so cold. He got up and was greeted with snow.

He tried scaling down a rock and tripped and fell. He hit his head and was bleeding. In an instant, everything got serious. He says it was no longer just a hike. It was survival.
https://kpic.com/news/local/lost-in-woods-for-17-days-oregon-man-ate-bugs-drank-own-urine-to-survive-to-see-wife
>>
Around the fifth day, Burleigh said he heard a plane. He pulled off his sweater and grabbed his keys and tried to signal it. He says it was no more than 100 feet in the air, but it didn't see him. But that was OK: It proved to Burleigh that people knew he was missing and they were looking for him.

Burleigh said he had watched "Survivor" and seen people start fires on the show, so he tried to make one. It wasn't working. But he remembered 40 years earlier his step-father gave him a magnifying glass that he used to start the fire. It worked. He hoped the smoke would serve as a signal, but it dissipated. He realized he didn't have enough wood to stay where he was, so he decided to get to the high ground.

He started putting up markers for searchers, but he also started to faint. That's when he thought about what to do next to stave off hydration - and decided to drink his own urine.

Anything to survive one more day and get home to see his wife.

He took some "serious tumbles" trying to get to higher ground. He had twisted his ankle and been stabbed in the ball of his other foot by a branch. But he made it up.

And there, in the middle of nowhere, he found a waterfall. He stood mesmerized, unsure if anyone else had ever seen it.

Once he got up on the ridge, he saw the Coast Guard helicopter. But it was too far away and he couldn't get there fast enough. He watched it fly away but later he sent "thank you" notes to the two pilots he saw fly by but couldn't get to.

He collapsed again and fell on a rock. He hobbled half a mile to find water. He went back to the ridge to put markers and signals. He found a tree broken down with water in the base of the root. The water was brown with insects in it. He drank the water and ate the insects. He called it his "teapot."
>>
He made a cross and etched a heart on it, and every time he walked by it he'd say a prayer. The last couple of days, he accepted that he was going to die. He wasn't sad, and there was no fear. He felt like he was swimming in some "harmony."

He would drink water off of leaves. On the day it snowed, he filled a baggy with snow and ate it. On the morning he was rescued, he thought he saw blue sky. He pushed to get up. He didn't want to die not doing something. He wanted to live his last moments with the same zeal and zest that he always tried to exercise.

He couldn't get the fire going, so he went to get water from his teapot. On the way, he heard a big "bellow." He calls the man who rescued him "Guffaw Man." He says the man had eyes of compassion.

Rescuers asked him what he'd eaten? He recounted millipedes, scorpions, crawfish, a snail.

One search-and-rescue member joked with him about escargot. They laughed and it was euphoric.

After being rescued, he was taken to Riverbend hospital where he spent 12 days in intensive care and another 3 days in the hospital to make sure he was OK.

He went to the doctor again this week to check on his recovery. His gall bladder and feet remain a concern. But he feels like he left the mountain top with something he didn't have before. His body was beaten and his mind was stretched, but his "life spark" was filled.
>>
Very based, thanks for sharing Anon. Important lesson to be remembered though, even if you’re just going out and back on a trail you should have some degree of gear with you, regardless of wether you think it’s necessary or not.
>>
Bring a satellite GPS/comm device if you're going solo
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>>2168519
hello larper, you've never gone outdoors have you?
>>
>>2168519
Go touch grass, but make sure your Garmin subscription isn’t expired first
>>
>>2168522
>>2168548
The whole thing would have never happened if he wasn't a complete mouth breather.
>>
> When he finally decided to turn around, it was dark.
What a moron. I also doubt the vast majority of this story. This guy sounds like he staged the whole thing for his claim to fame. And finally let himself be “rescued” when he was ready. The whole thing sounds fake
>>
>>2168522
>>2168548
Good positive feedback. I'm sure your information ill be useful for the next person that needs to avoid this situation.
>>
>>2168482
>When he finally decided to turn around, it was dark. No one knew where he was. He was out of cell service range.
Either we are missing some serious details or I'm just not getting it. Why didn't he continue back down the trail in the dark, to his car?
>>
What an incredibly shitty fisherman.
>>
This is what I don't get. The guy was walking along an established trail and somehow didn't notice it was getting dark. OK, bit of a mistake but no big deal, you just turn on your head torch and walk back the way you came. He then decides he has to stay overnight for some reason but again - shouldn't be a big issue. You just make a shelter (as he did) and then walk back along the trail in daylight.

>He tried scaling down a rock and tripped and fell.
This is what I don't understand and I believe he is lying and/or omitting key information. You don't go from walking along a trail to splattering yourself on rocks unless you are high on crack or being chased.
>>
Maybe he took acid and fucked himself over when he got sober 10 hours later. Also the writing of this article is atrocious, god, its like someone finished their first year as an english major and decided to write for the local paper
>>
>>2168548
> Waaaaahhh I can't bring a foretrex with me it's too reliant on technology
Go chuck spears at bears, retard
>>
>>2168693
This. He probally went in the woods to shroom or fry balls and was disoriented when he came down. No reason to go up a snow covered mountain in the opposite direction of the trailhead.
>>
>>2168635
>for the next person that needs to avoid this situation.
Step one: don't go hiking after dark
Step two: that's it. There are no more steps
>>
Fuckin' Mr. Magoo here breaking his feet
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>>2168723
I've gone hiking after dark plenty. Just retain your fucking bearings. Don't be a retard. It's literally that simple.
>>
>>2168482
Just goes to show that literally tool, gadget, garbage bag, or meme survival device can make a big the difference. As long as you have something Doesn't have to be comprehensive.
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>>2168938
This dude's plight could've been solved by tucking a fucking flashlight in his pocket. Amazing.
>>
Typical citidiot.
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>>2168723
Night hikes are best hikes. Especially if you're a larger and have NODs.
>>
>>2168482
Smart guy. When asked whybhe survived he said to see his wife. When in reality the whole reason he went into nature was to escape her.
>>
>>2168482
I have no idea how these retards get lost.

Just go up and back on a trail if you dont know it. Their sense of direction must be terrible.

I understand the guys who go on a 15 day trek and fall into a difficult spot or something. But seriously going on a quick 2 hour hike and getting lost seems stupid to me.

Then again so many retards on the trails these days. They shut one of my local trails cause many people have died. The location is like a 3m scramble. I was there when one girl died she went down with her back to the wall trying to go down like the exorcist of course she fell and hit her head.

10 years ago on that trail Id see 5 people on the weekend. Now its absolutely crawling. But they are dressed for their selfie at the top.
>>
17 days lmao, is that it?
>>
>>2168599
This was my first instinct as well
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>>2170565
You would die after 3.
>>
>>2168599
>>2170623
It's always cringey when people who have a poor judge of legitimacy decide to share it with the world.

It's hard to describe for me.. it's like a kind of immaturity.
>>
>>2168482
what an absolute garbage source OP. you made me look it up

https://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/2021/07/lost-hiker-relies-on-ingenuity-40-year-old-gift-to-survive-17-days-in-oregon-wilds.html

explains it much better. still, this dude's a moron.
>>
>>2170846
Good source that did not exist when I posted the OP thanks anon!
>>
>>2170717
Interesting... your post invokes the same feeling in me

The guy wouldn't shut up about his connection with nature like he wanted to lean heavy into book and movie deals
>>
Is it so hard to believe that while the story may be a genuine, honest reproduction of the events, his detailed storytelling and embellishments like his "tea" and underwear hat and willingness to ramble on for hours help to create a sense he enjoys the attention and makes him look bad to more modest person's?
>>
>>2170846
Jesus man, how do you let this happen? Always ALWAYS look at a map of the area you're going. The whole fucking earth is available with satellite view, c'mon man.

If I were ever in that situation, worst case scenario just follow the creeks down. If you can't find your car after 1 day with zero gear you might as well roll the dice and go with the flow. He was less than 4 miles from other people the entire time, he could have been safe in 2 hours.
>>
>>2170928
>He was less than 4 miles from other people the entire time
This is actually pretty typical for a SAR case. They're usually never far from a trail, road, a homestead, or some other source of civilization.
>>
>>2170887
Since you explained a bit further I can understand why you'd think that, but I still disagree.

No one almost kills themselves for a movie deal. Well, maybe some people, but not a fisherman with kids.

It's simply more likely that he's telling a rough account of the truth.
Is romanticizing a shitty experience a form of cope?
Yeah. But that doesn't mean he isn't telling the truth from his perspective.

It's not like he said he met aliens.
He simply admitted his mistakes and explained that almost dying changed his life perspective. That kind of account is universal among people who almost die.

So that's why I think contrarians can be cringe.
>>
>He was rusty; he hadn't been out in a year due to the COVID pandemic.
Didn't think it was possible to lose common sense by having not hiked in a year.
>>
>>2171669
>It's simply more likely that he's telling a rough account of the truth.
It seems like he's leaving out some key details though. How did he end up off trail, and why didn't he get back onto the trail the next day? I think one of the other anons in here was right: he injured himself severely and didn't want to mention it in the story.
>>
>>2168482
>He was out of cell service range.
If it is a smartphone, it still has a GPS. Of course being a outdoors enthusiast you have a GPS app with offline maps, right? Right?
It usually also has a fucking flashlight, barely useful for outdoors, but could have made the difference in a situation like this.

>He got up and was greeted with snow.
>He tried scaling down a rock and tripped and fell.
Also, if you have no gear, are lost and it's suddenly snowing, don't go climbing down rocks like a complete unprepared moron.
>>
>>2168548
>Go touch grass
only extremely online faggots ever say this. do you dilate your axe wound when you're in the bush?
>>
>injured feet
>malnourished
>17 days in the woods followed by total of 15 days in the hospital

Lol this fuckin guy is not telling the whole story.
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>>2171890
Alright, could be.
>>
>>2170846
Not even a water bottle? Regardless of the distance this seems extra stupid





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