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Post your recent hauls and recipes!

>Previous:
>>2076535 (spring edition)
>>
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I love fruits. You shouldn't hate fruits just because you don't understand them or think they might hurt you!

Every color of fruit can be delicious, even if it is different from what you are used to.
>>
>>2160149
Rainbow fags will be thrown off the highest building when china takes over.
>>
>>2160161
>Rainbow fags will be thrown off the highest building when china takes over.
No they won't. They will be throw off a mid-level building. The ones that don't die on impact will be pushed into a storm gutter until they perish.
>>
Just came back from my local woods in southern germany, found some nice german forest strawberries.

They are tiny and not all too sweet. Its really hard to harvest them without damaging them if they are ripe so i ripped them off with the stem.
>>
>>2160207
forgot to mention that foxes pee on them transmitting diseases so they have to be washed very well
>>
I also found some few blueberries but there was always one or two berries per bush because we had two days of frost very late into spring that killed a lot of fruit and plants this year
>>
>>2160209
I heard about those fox parasites as a child
Been paranoid ever since, never eat forest berries unless they grow high above ground
>>
>>2160207

east or west? I'd love to find good secret spots to forage summery treats around here
>>
>>2160212
yes they are fucked up there has never been a documented case of getting them from berries. Problem is between getting them and the first symptoms are usually 10 years lol and then it's too late.

I just wash them thoroughly.
>>
>>2160224
west, kinda close to france. It's called the black forest region.

Not going to disclose my location on here but right now is berry season. Blueberries grow on boulders here because the boulders are covered in moss and the blueberry plants grow on that specific moss.

The strawberries grow wherever there is enough sun, there are few small ones here and there but i found a nice field today.

Anyway in the black forest region there is lots of stuff to forage, mushrooms berries wild apples wild cherries wild pears etc. Come here this weekend and have fun anon!

You'll find strawberries on the side of every trail this weekend.
>>
>>2160230
I happen to live in the same region, so I am already here. ;)

I have only ever found a good chunk of blueberries growing at one single location, but I am admittedly far from the harvesting expert. Would love to find more this summer but alas
>>
>>2160240
oh wow so you're a schwarzwaldbro too, crazy.

I wish you good luck, hope you can find some nice stuff. Try to find places with sun, that's where the good stuff usually grows.
>>
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>>2160146
Where's rin-chan OP?

>>2159749
>>2159785
laetiporus cincinnatus
Congrats, that's the good tasting chicken of the woods
>>
>>2160209
Wouldn't they stink like a fox if they did that?

>>2160212
>>2160225
>fox parasites
>first symptoms in 10 years, when it's too late
w-what parasites? t. burger
>>
>>2160279
>Where's rin-chan OP?
D-did I fuck up? I just copypasta'd the previous spring thread.
>>
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>>2160716
>he didn't include a picture of rin in the foraging thread OP
son i am disappoint
>>
Some fields of blueberry where I’m working right now. I filled up a gas station coffee cup with them
>>
Found magic mushrooms in my vegetable garden could I dry them and eat them safely or will I have horrible diarrhea or will I die?
>>
>>2160211
You have blueberries in the black forest already? They're not ripe yet here in the alps, maybe i have to look at lower elevations.
>>
>>2161137
Look up Coprinellus Micaceus.
>>
>>2161137
Just eat as many raw mushrooms as you can, have a couple of beers and report back
>>
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>>2161159
Had a good haul yesterday in lower Bavaria.
We made cake and what was left over will be used for dessert today.
>>
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>>2161663
Final amount.
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>>2160146
Surprise find in a city park, mid June. Got more than this but I did not take more pictures. My friends did not believe orange raspberries are a thing and would not eat any...
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>>2160716
shimarin always goes in the OP of the foraging threads anon :(
>>
>>2161669
Damn without your hand in the pic that basket looks much bigger
>>
>>2161928
lol, theyre salmon berries
>>
>>2162048
It took me two hours to fill the small basket this much already. A bigger basket would not be worth it without help.
I was originally looking for chanterelles...
>>
>>2161379
Yes he is a knucklehead but everyone has to start somewhere. Coprinellus Micaceus + alcohol is a really bad idea. I know a micologist that thought eating them in a nice omelet 3 days after consuming alcohol would be ok. He puked all over a nice European restaurant. Long story short, they are basically Antabuse. Do not think this is a natural remedy for Alcoholism. Stop being a fag just because you know a little bit more than someone new. They are good in a omelet but refer to above.
>>
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r8 tea ingredient.
>>
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>>2163091
>>
>>2163092
>Strawberry leaves, mint, sage, raspberry, red currant, rosemary
No idea on the flowers or other berries.
>>
>>2163092
lemon balm
>>
>>2163091
>brewed strawberry leaves
i-is that actually a thing? nice plate btw

>>2164470
>No idea on the flowers or other berries.
uhhh you sure it's a good idea to eat them then
>>
>>2164636
I am not the anon who posted the photos, I was guessing what his haul was. Rating it, in a way.
>>
>>2163092
Above all, that just looks very nice.
>>
>>2164470
>rosemary
That's spruce and pine needles.
The flowers are calendula officinalis and centaurea cyanus, both edible. I found out recently a lot of flowers are edible. Daylillies eaten raw taste like spicy lettuce for example.
The other berries are black currant and linden nuts. I didn't use the nuts in a tea but instead roasted and grinded them and brewed them in a coffee pot like coffee. But it tasted mild, more like tea than coffee.

>>2164476
You're observant. I didn't expect someone to notice the lemon balm. There's also peppermint and regular mint.
The strawberry leaves are actually raw strawberry btw.

>>2164636
Thanks. You can also drink raspberry and blackberry twigs tea, I haven't tried it yet.
>>
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>page 8
bump
>>
>>2162048
bavarians are like 9-10 feet tall on average.
>>
>>2165644
On another note, this thread having to be saved is gross. Let's have more FUCKING TICK THREADS!
>>
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>>2165674
And the pic did not come through. Fuck this Captcha shit.
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>>2165674
Contribute.
>>
>>2165765
Fuck off tick boy.
>>
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Poison hemlock vs wild carrot chart
Xmr: 8C6NYHxbGvQ4V82qtrm3L2PwgB81cRjidQzEjWHytiRxi1rz2U226AvZzvv8yVhaYMVT2VoiBxxAEKZJGg9mpbYg2VDWcJ5


Btc:
bc1q5gln4pmgurpv22hpee5mwqh2k5fzczfkpexpny
>>
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>>2166976
Apiaceae is a very interesting family
>>
>>2167452
FUCK giant hogweed me and my homies all HATE giant hogweed
>>
Do you guys have tips for finding secluded areas where I could practice singing without bothering anyone in the American midwest, preferably near suburban areas?
Is the best way to just go to a local park and walk off the trail a bit?
Sorry if this is off topic, but it didn't seem like something worth making a thread for and you guys seem likely to know.
>>
>>2167717
>>2145776
>>
>>2167718
Oh, thanks, I missed that thread when browsing the catalog.
>>
>>2160146
can anybody tell me if it's alright to pick pine needles for tea in summer?
>>
Anybody know what these are?
>>
>>2166976
Lol are you accepting payment for blurry thayer pages?
>>2169125
Looks like cherries of some sort. Chokecherries would be black when ripe but they grow in a row like that.
>>
Is it possible to live off of edilbles like nettles, dead nettles, garlic mustard, dandelions and other stuff like that? Or atleast replace a large portion of your diet with them?
>>
>>2169241
What do you think people did before agriculture?
You need a variety though, and preferrably also meat to get all your nutrients.
>>
>>2169251
yes i know but what would happen if i replaced +50% of my diet with that stuff overnight? Would i run into some digestive or nutritional issues?
>>
>>2169364
lol when youve been eating triple quarter pounders every day for the past however many years then yes you will notice some digestive oopsies for a while
>>
Does anyone have any idea with these are? I live in North dakota. Also got chokecherries growing in my driveway so I'll have jam this winter.
>>
>>2169694
honeysuckle
It's poisonous, or so they say
>>
>>2160146
Can any anons recommend a good foraging book for identification? Bonus points for the Australian landscape.
>>
>>2160211
half of those aren't ripe
>>
>>2161669
What a haul, you got big plans for them?
>>
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Some pawpaws in the woods near me, here's hoping for a good haul this fall.
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>>2169241
Depends where you live, the time of year, etc. Dandelions for the flower/tea, dandelions for a salad, and dandelions for the root/coffee can get you a few meals, but you need to find somewhere to harvest them that doesn't get any weed killer, which is likely at home, but is that enough to eat? You also need to let them grow and put out seeds to not kill them. After that you have raspberries, but it's a gamble on whether the birds and bugs will get to them first or not, and you need protection from ticks and hours to harvest them. You can also get mulberries, but many of mine that are local require stepstools, ladders, or climbing the tree. You're not going to get everything you need out of them, but you could get decent amounts of food as long as you don't mind dying in the heat and humidity, ticks, and insects.
>>
>>2160146
It’s called vegan hunting
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>>2160209
Guy's... i think i've eaten a lot of fox pee
>>
Anyone have any good plant identification guides for Pennsylvania or the general area that would provide painted illustrations? Bought one already but it wasn't exactly what I was looking for.
>>
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Found this nice little snack on the side of the trail today
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>>2160209
oops I eat the ones in my yard directly off the ground
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>>2174473
I thought it was going to be a raccoon turd with raspberry/cherry seeds in it when I saw the thumbnail...
>>
Foraged some wild blueberries and made jam
>>
>>2175211
>>
>>2175215
A little rubbing alcohol on a towel or paper towel gets those old marker labels off like a charm.
>>
>>2169241
>Is it possible to live off of [wild] edilbles
Yes
>like nettles, dead nettles, garlic mustard, dandelions and other stuff like that?
No. What you lister are whats called the "european farmer folk knowledge" plants. Essentially weeds that have a tradition of being eaten by european peasants and those plants and traditions were exported to america where they remain. These plants are very nutritious but are not staple foods. Nobody, not even the peasants survived off these plants. They acted as free food. Being weeds, they required no extra land to grow and they very importantly supplemented the primarily grain diets of the peasants. But they weren't staples.
The actual wild foods that you can survive off of were demonized by the european colonists who didn't need them and wanted to delegitimize the lifeways of the natives. thats why the foraging literature is primarily those european "FFK" plants.
Some of these staple foods were eaten by colonists usually in times of need. Otherwise they were eaten but not as staples. Some were completely forgotten.
These include:
Nuts such as acorns, hickory, Black walnut, lotus and more.
Seeds such as wild rice, goosefoot, sunflower, golden club and more.
Roots such as sunchokes, groundnut, lotus root, camass, jack in the pulpit and more.
Of lesser importance are fruits, emphasis on larger fruits with more sustenance value and that can be gathered in quantity like pawpaw, perssimon and wild plums.
Most of these foods require lots of processing to make edible and these techniques are being forgotten.
These are foods you can really live off of. Obviously with other foods like meat, greens and mushrooms.
>>
>>2160146
Any Texas frens here that forage? I've been wanting to try it out but haven't had time. My grandpa had a jar of dewberry jelly, best stuff in the world. Greatly appreciate any advice.
>>
>>2176523
but if these "european farmer folk knowledge" plants are so nutritious and readily available why werent they staple foods?
>>
>>2176874
Go and pick enough nettles to make a hearty, dense pot of nettle soup and you'll understand.
>>
>>2176882
?
Do you mean they are annoying to gather because of the stings? Because they certainly are easy to come by and arent that hard to harvest as long as you have gloves.
I dont know how much i would need for a pot of nettle soup but a couple days ago i filled a 0.5L cup with nettle leaves, boiled them and ate them and gathering and processing that much nettle took me about 5 minutes
>>
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>>2176523
>Essentially weeds that have a tradition of being eaten by european peasants and those plants and traditions were exported to america where they remain. These plants are very nutritious but are not staple foods.
those aren't weeds, they were (and still are) actively cultivated in europe, and were original brought over as garden crops. They're only weeds here in north america since they grow readily and don't have much competition. You'll mostly find them in areas with old abandoned homesteads, and not in the middle of the mountains.

Hell even my local grocery sells dandelions, and i live in the mid atlantic.

>>Is it possible to live off of [wild] edilbles
>Yes
lolno, all of the natives (except the inuit) had some form of agriculture. And if you want to play lone wolf larper, the calories you get from those foods aren't worth the calories and time put into processing them unless you're working in a team/large groups.
>>
First time posting on /out/. This past year I've gotten super into consuming herbs as a way to supplement my normal diet. I probably take 6-7 herbal capsules and 9-10 herbal alcohol tinctures every day. Why are herbs so based? What's the downside, is it just that they are so low-calorie and cost time/money to acquire? I guess I'm probably getting about 1 drink's worth of alcohol per day because of the tinctures but that's not the worst thing in the world right?
>>
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>>2176926
>capsules and tinctures
you're looking for >>>/fit/, that is the health and fitness board.

/out/ is for people who go outdoors, not urbanite hippies
>>
>>2176934
All right, I guess I just figured since we're talking about herbs I could do that here. But you're definitely far superior in every way :^) peace and love friend.
>>
>>2176902
Multivitamin pills are pretty nutritious, right? Could you live off those? Absolutely not. You'll starve to death. Calories are the issue here, not micronutrients. Your wild herbs and berries are going to be pretty good for micronutrients, but there's a reason leafy greens aren't a staple food anywhere in the world. Depending somewhat on the government or medical agency you ask, the average adult human male needs 2000 calories per day. Per the USDA's food database, blanched stinging nettle has 47 calories per 100 grams. That means you would need to eat 4.76 kilograms, or nearly 10.5 pounds, of stinging nettles each day in order to meet your calorie needs. Given how little nettles weigh, I imagine you're probably looking at a couple dozen liters, unless you really pack the leaves down, in which case you might be able to get it under 10 liters. Compare to wheat grains, which have 327 calories per 100 grams, and you'd need to eat just under a pound and a half. Acorns, to stick with the foraging theme, have about 387 calories per 100 grams.

>>2176905
>What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have yet to be discovered.
>Ralph Waldo Emerson
Or as my dad likes to amend
>A plant whose virtues have been forgotten

Also, just because the natives had agriculture doesn't mean you can't survive on a foraged diet. Farming just makes things easier.
>>
>>2176905
>lolno, all of the natives (except the inuit) had some form of agriculture
Some tribes (Apache, Penobscot) had barely any agriculture. Even tribes that did more of agriculture didnt do much. Pehr Kalm says the Lenape didnt grow more thab 2 months worth of food in their fields and survived mostly on wild roots, nuts and game.
Also agriculture in the americas only began like 10k years ago. What did people do before that?
>>
>>2169694
Looks like honeysuckle. Don't eat those. It also looks to be invasive. If you cut one of the thicker branches and look at its cross section, it might be hollow inside with a brown lining inside. If so, it is an invasive honeysuckle. Cut it down and apply glyphosate(Roundup) or similar to the stump to prevent it from growing back.
>>
>>2175211
>>2175215
what's your recipe for blueberry jam?
>>
>>2177289
Agriculture only began worldwide about 11 000 years ago, so I assume they hunted and gathered like every other human being on the planet
>>
>>2177557
But roundup gibs me da cancer b0ss?
>>
>>2177734
I only had 2 cups of blueberries, so I did:
2 cups blueberries
1/2 cup sugar
Half a lemon squeezed in
Throw it into a sauce pot and keep it on mid heat for half hour or until you can separate it with a spoon and it forms back slowly and smoothly. You can adjust the recipe as you see fit. Some people use pectin in their jams, but it’s not necessary
>>
Ate a may apple fruit today, fruit was yellow and the plant was dying back which is what I've been told to look for, however I am beginning to second guess myself as the fruit wasn't as far gone as what I'm seeing in the videos on foraging them. How bad did I fuck up? Best I can find online is ld50 of around 100mg/kg for the toxin and the highest concentration found in mayapple is around 45mg/g dry weight which means I would need 4500mg/kg of dry plant matter and at roughly 110kg I would need to eat just shy of half a kilo or more than a pound of fruit to die and I only tasted the gel inside briefly not even consuming 10% of the fruit and not eating any of the seeds so I am not worried about that, just worried I'm in for a night of sickness from being a retard. Currently 4 hours out from consumption and completely free of any symptoms, but if I feel any I plan to visit the hospital.
>>
>>2178632
You're fine. Stop being a pussy. This was toxic and you are a retard but you're fine.
>>
Recently ate some chickasaw plums I found near a pond. Looking forward to going out for some muscadines in the near future.
>>
>>2169125
second chokecherry. mayday looks similar but the stems are longer
>>
Can anyone help me ID these berries? Found in Cleveland OH
>>
>>2177776
Disproved in the early 2000s just dont drink the shit and youll be fine
>>
>>2180014
those aren't berries, they're apples
>>
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>>2180063
>those aren't berries
Correct, those are pomes
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>>2180227
>ask for ID
>get upset when someone replies with ID
>>
>>2180504
It's a joke, buddy. Not every post needs to be srs bzns. I'm not even the one who asked what it was.
>>
>>2175985
I'm not that anon but for some reason those fucking lids hold on to sharpie like mad. Made pickles and some of my lids have multiple colors and bits of markings on them because between the brushed finish and I guess the heat from canning, they hold on to that ink like crazy. And I often use alcohol to remove ink on everything else.
>>
Well I found something out a few days ago. I can't believe you can even eat parts of the pokeweed plant; I was told everything on it is poisonous bad shit that will make your guts feel awful.
>American pokeweed is a member of the Phytolaccaceae, the Pokeweed family. Members of the family are found around the world in tropical and subtropical distribution with a few species that occur in temperate areas. About 16 genera and 100 species are recognized in the family. The genus Phytolacca contains about 25 species which range from herbs to shrubs to tall trees. Two native species of pokeweed are recognized in North America, one found across much of North America and one found in California and the southwestern U.S. A few tropical species have been introduced unintentionally in imported products or intentionally as ornamentals.
>This species may flower year around in southern states, and May to October in northern states. The entire plant is poisonous causing a variety of symptoms, including death in rare cases. The berries are especially poisonous. Young leaves and stems when properly cooked are edible and provide a good source of protein, fat and carbohydrate. Regional names for the plant include poke, poke sallet, poke salad, and pokeberry. The fruits are important food for mockingbirds, northern cardinals, and mourning doves. The name “phytolacca” means red dye plant.
-www.fs.fed.us

>Young leaves and stems when properly cooked are edible
>provide a good source of protein, fat and carbohydrate
I would have never known. This shit is everywhere in my state. Anyone have some cooking videos? I'd love to try if I knew it wouldn't kill me/my guts.
>>
>>2181161
It's one of those "boil x minutes in y changes of water" plants that seem like they can't be worth it when lambsquarters and nettles exist. Then again my back yard is full of it so I think I'll try it next year. You're supposed to get it before it blooms so too late for this year.
>>
Made my own chokecherry jam, got two jars out of what I grabbed the other day, I’ll go pickin’ again and make some more this weekend when all the other stuff finishes getting ripe

also, would this be the thread for helping me find resources on identifying other berries/herbs or could I just post a picture and an anon help an anon out?
>>
>>2160161
truth
we used to throw their kind in the bog
>>
>>2161928
Orange raspberries exist but those don't look like them. Orange raspberries (aka golden raspberries) look more clear and darker?
>>
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>>2182117
do you mean salmonberries?
>>
>>2181161
Pokeweed and Poke salad was a thing in appalachia and other places people literally had nothing to work with during the depression, (and beyond, in the poorer places). If you want to try it for the experience, go ahead, but it's a waste of effort if you have better options.
>>
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>>2160146
those aren't raspberries, they're wineberries
>>
>>2181159
Oh, well if you're marking them before canning them then that would probably change things, yeah. I always write on them once they've been canned and have cooled. I do use the same Ball jars though.

>>2181161
>>2181368
>before it blooms
I was under the impression that you wanted to get them far earlier than that. Like new shoots type thing. I always heard that once they get any purple in them they're already poisonous. Of course, I have never tried eating them, so I'm just going on hearsay.
>>
>>2182244
blueberry jam anon here, I marked it after canning. I reused an old jar that I had, and didn’t bother cleaning off the sharpie past soap and water
>>
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>>2160146
here's our weekly haul of blackberries. still have about 2 acres worth of picking to do.

how can i profit from these little fuckers?
>>
>>2182260

u-pick
>>
>>2165644
Kek
>>
>>2182260
make delicious blackberry tarts and jam
>>
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Sassafras from my brothers land.
>>
Didn't bother to take any photos but got a few handfuls of saskatoons in a city park today. They were on a steep south-facing hill so they were nearly dried. 10/10 very tasty.
>>
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Blueberries from a couple weeks ago
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>>2182738
Well then you should eat them soon or they'll go bad.
>>
>>2182544
What do you do with sassafras, anon?
>>
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>>2182740
Made them into a pie that weekend and finished it in a couple days
>>
>>2182762
Not him but it's what they used to make root beer with along with sarsaparilla
Now people make dmt with the bark I think
>>
>>2182782
That looks great anon. Fan of cobbler at all? I think I’ve got a blueberry cobbler recipe stashed away somewhere cuz I prefer it to pie
>>
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>>2170115
Refer to the post right above for the plans concerning that haul.
After I showed my parents what I found by myself they wanted to get in on the fun. We went out again a few days later. My mom made jam and a few jars of preserve from about a bucket of blueberries that we gathered together.

Today's haul is a little different but also pretty great.
>>
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>>2182797
thanks! Ive never tried cobbler but i love crumbles/crisps
heres one i made in the fire last year but these were store bought blueberries with peach too
>>
>>2160240
How far are you guys from Trier?
>>
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Why are our blueberry bushes empty? Couldnt find a single berry
Central Germany 1000m above 0
>>
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>>2182140
Nope, golden raspberries. They look like pic related and have a much smoother, and less tart taste than red raspberries but not as sweet as black raspberries. I've tried adding them to my raspberry shrubs to see if I can somehow come up if a cross bred of both but I've yet to see a cross pop up
>>
>>2183111
"golden" raspberries lol... theyre just salmonberries. god the amount of nonsense marketing that is thrown around is embarrassing
>>
>>2183118
I actually did some light research on the topics. Salmon berries are in the same genus as red raspberries commonly seen in the supermarket but golden raspberries are a subspecies of red raspberries. Just something I find interesting and Incase you are too.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_spectabilis
https://www.delightedcooking.com/what-is-a-golden-raspberry.htm
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_leucodermis
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_idaeus
>>
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>>2183118
>theyre just salmonberries
We don't have them here but my understanding is that salmonberries are actually pretty different from standard raspberries in that they're an actual perennial shrub instead of each cane dying back to the roots after blooming. It's not just "any yellow raspberry looking thing". That'd be like calling them cloudberries even thought the cloudberry plant has a completely different growth habit.
>>2183187
There's hundreds of species in Rubus. Some are so similar that only autismos care, but there's also a lot of variation. Anyway most (all?) of them produce "looks like raspberries" fruit and I don't know of any that aren't good to eat.
>>
some nigga-san tell me if this weird wild berries edible or poisonous

they taste like unripe grapes and have a red blood juice that stains the fingers
>>
>>2183492
Barberry grapes. Mildly toxic but won’t kill you in small doses. Can be used to make purple dyes
>>
I think you guys might be good to ask. I came across a quite massive amount of elderberries. I know you have to cook them and make sure there's no stems or leaves but most of the recipes I looked at called for dried so I'm curious if anyone knows how to prepare them from fresh. I'm not looking for anything fancy, just want to make some juice to drink over the next few days.
>>
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First ripe dwarf pawpaw I found so far. Tastes just like the big ones, but the small size makes it a fleeting pleasure.

>>2183492
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahonia
>>
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>>2184092
Some nice chicken

>>2183492
Also
>Please tell me if this berry I just ate is poisonous or not
I hope you have life insurance, for your family's sake.
>>
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>>2184093
And shining sumac? getting ready to bloom. I don't really think it could be anything else, but I'm not used to picking sumac so I'm not 100% certain.
>>
>>2182188
fug I just pulled that shit from google since I didn't have a picture I took on hand
>>
>>2182787
>Now people make dmt with the bark I think
Wait, REALLY? That's nuts...
>>
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What is it?
>>
>>2184689
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_serotina
>>
>>2160209
Pickle them
>>
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hey, someone has left a pile of blueberries for me
>>
>>2184798
Damn, blueberry fudge with raspberry seeds, break out a spoon and get to it, anon.
>>
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>>2184798
Wow, how great, they even pre-uploaded pics of it to google images for /in/cels like you!
>>
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>>2184094
that's pretty late for sumac, pic related staghorn sumac was from last month for me
>>
>>2184944
At least going on my Audubon tree field guide, the only types of sumac we should get here in central NC are are smooth sumac and shining sumac. No prairie sumac or staghorn sumac. And it does say that shining sumac should flower in late summer, with fruit ripening in autumn and staying attached into the winter, so that seems to match. Also notes that the leaves have a broad, winged axis, and that seems to be unique to shining sumac, and seems to match what I've seen pretty well.
>>
>>2184944
That's a comfy picture anon
>>
I think I picked close to 40 liters of chanterelles last week.
>>
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>>2185367
HOW

my biggest haul has only been 2 lbs
>>
>>2185367
>>2185370
Where/how do I find them
And how many ticks did you pick off yourselves afterwards
>>
>>2185631
I have a number of spots ive learned throughout the years and then its just a matter of getting good weather. Rain followed by a few days of sun and they usually pop up if its the right season.
Its mostly a matter of exploring a lot desu.
Its a great year where i am though. I think ive only picked up like 5 ticks this year.
>>
>>2185840
I agree. Not really any ticks where I am from. I bet they have been wiped out by COVID.
>>
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I've found a bunch of blackberries at a nearby train yard and tried to make some jam. Had to wash them real good because A LOT of berries were covered in lice and some had maggots/worms inside, yuck...
I didn't use any sugar or pectin, just lime juice to add some sweetness and a tiny bit of ginger (which I wouldn't recommend tbdesu). Good spreadable consistency after ~10 minutes of cooking, only could have been a tad bit more goo-y.

yum/10

Made vid_rel for a fellow Anon:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WePCSQ0iIPk
>>
Anybody know when would be the best time to harvest groundnut tubers? I've got some in a pot on the balcony that I've been letting grow for a few years, and I imagine there are enough tubers in there now that I should be able to pick some and leave the rest to sprout next spring. Should I pick once the leaves start to die off for the season?
>>
>>2184944
Shid, I'm in PA and forgot about it until yesterday. I think we still have some around, I'll have to go looking...
>>
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>>2160146
>>
>>2188436
State?
>>
>>2160209
Youre foot looks crooked
>>
>>2160161
you won't do shit you pussy
>>
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Mirabelle plums just got ripe, so I grab a handful every stop last time out
>>
>>2187455
Groundnuts are unique in terms of most wild roots in that they can be harvested year round. Other roots like jerusalem artichokes are small and full of indigestible inulin when out of season. However for best yields you should harvest the groundnuts when the plant dies back and stores all its energy in the roots too overwinter.
>>
I ate like 2 handfulls of elderberries yesterday and it made me nauseous. Be carefull with those things
>>
>>2184108
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychoactive_plants
Tons of quite common plants contain DMT. Reason no one freaks out about them is that you need to combine them with an MAOI for it to be orally active.
>>
>>2182787
close (ish), sassafrass is a source of myricistine which is a precursor chemical used in MDMA
>>
>>2188436
very nice

>>2191791
[x] Doubt
Raw elderberries taste like shit, stop LARPing
>>
>>2192984
raw elderberries taste like shit and a half!

>>2191791
I gotta ask, when you started chewing them and it tasted like a car battery was shitting in your mouth, why did you keep going?
>>
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>>2192996
>I gotta ask, when you started chewing them and it tasted like a car battery was shitting in your mouth, why did you keep going?
because he's an /in/cel LARPer who thinks that by making up stories he can fit in
>>
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Are these wild Raspberries?
They look like them, but the leaves don't match with the online photos.
Found these by a lake in upstate NY.
>>
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>>2193073
cf with purple flowering raspberry Rubus odoratus

also there's no poisonous lookalikes to raspberries so you could always just taste test and decide from there
>>
>>2193087
Awesome! Thanks for the info.
>>
>>2192984
>Raw elderberries taste like shit
>>2193002
>because he's an /in/cel LARPer who thinks that by making up stories he can fit in

wtf? They arent the best thing ive ever eaten and they do have a weird earthy/soapy aftertaste but other than that they tasted quite pleasant
>>
>>2193073
Those are thimbleberries. White is unripe. Scarlet red is ripe. They fall off the plant when ripe, so careful when you reach for them. My favorite berry. So fucking tart.
>>
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A few years back, My wife and I found a large copse of persimmons. There were wild turkey and deer just gobbling it up. Made some good jams and dug them when they were ripe. Found out recently that the grove was bulldozed:(

>>2182762
My brother makes a tea with the root.
>>
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>>2193217
I don't know about you but i've never particularly enjoyed eating them raw
>pic related, this season's elderberries
>>
Prickly pears started getting ripe
>>
I asked my local botanic gardens for advice about foraging prickly pears, and they sent me this bs.
Thoughts?
>>
>>2194410
Based harvest btw
>>
>>2195602
Better apply for your foraging loicense. Only $325, plus tip.
>>
>>2195731
That's why I'm going to ask a landowner instead of the Burros of Land Management.
>>
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>>2160146
Went gathering wild raspberries last week-end. Those taste to much better than supermarket ones. Made 7 jars of jam with them. That will make some nice homemade presents fort Christmas
>>
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>>2160146
Got a few gallons of beach plums the other day. I like these kinds of wild foods that you can harvest in quantity and preserve for the future. Made fruit leather, jam, dried whole, and made Asian plum sauce. Still.have a bunch left and might go out for a few gallons more.
>>
>>2192996
I don’t mind raw elderberries honestly, they have a kind of weird metallic/nightshady aftertaste for me but it’s not that unpleasant. I’ll nibble a few every now and then.
>>
I’ve been experimenting recently with making chocolate (or at least hot chocolate) from linden seeds (European linden not American, Tilia americana is very tannic from what I’ve heard). Dried, roasted, ground and infused into hot milk they tasted pretty good, chocolatey and malty but not as complex as real chocolate. I’m fermenting some small batches rn to see if it improves, one lacto-fermentation batch in some 2.5% brine, and one with some yeast + lactobacillus. Having a chocolate alternative that’s free, sustainable, and doesn’t rely on west african child slaves would be pretty cool.
>>
>>2196347
>he doesn't rely on west african child slaves
ngmi
>>
>>2196347
There are four Tilia cordata lindens, that are between 35-100+ years old, in the area I live in. Do you harvest the seeds from the plant or can you forage from the ground?
>>
>>2196781
I’ve been harvesting right from the tree but I don’t see why it’d make a difference if you got them from the ground, as long as they’re in decent condition.
>>
>>2161008
Nice
>>
Almost time
>>
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First big pawpaw harvest of the season!
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>>2197593
Some pretty good sized ones in there, as well
>>
>>2197593
Pawpaws sound awesome, it’s a shame we don’t get them in Europe. Maybe I’ll try growing one.
>>
>>2197618
Could work, they're definitely the most cold-tolerant member of the family. Grows all the way up to the great lakes in the US.
>>
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What are some cool things to forage in Nevada/Arizona around this time of the year?

I know Mesquite beans should be about ready to harvest.
>>
>>2198977
Manzanitas, carobs, pinon nuts and the fruit of multiple cactus seem to be in season.
>>
>>2198977
prickly pear just like this anon >>2194410
>>
>>2160209
Make sure there aren't false strawberries thrown in, they taste like shit
>>
>>2169119
Safe pine needles are always safe year round
>>
>>2176523
Do you have any books or resources on "staples"?
>>
>>2200410
no, but you could ask this expert
>>2200391
>>2200407
>>
>>2200412
Seethe
>>
Has anyone processed acorns like olives with lye? Usually you’d boil them to get the tannins out but where I live it’s mostly Quercus robur and Quercus petraea, both of them are much higher in tannins so boiling them takes hours, it’s a pisstake. Tannic acid is chemically similar to the bitter compounds in olives so it should work I guess.
>>
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>>2200410
Not that guy but the Thayer books are commonly shilled here, and he does a good job of describing how the foods were used by the indians for sustenance and covers some "boring" foods that are less well known than berries and greens, but have lots of calories. Good at least for the midwest US.
>>
>>2200518
any for the northeast US?
>>
>>2196347
Just tried them, adding a yeast starter is definitely the way to go, both were better than non-fermented though, very chocolatey. I would’ve liked for the milk to have gone more brown but that doesn’t really matter ig.
>>
>>2160225
>Problem is between getting them and the first symptoms are usually 10 years lol and then it's too late.
Wait, what?
>>
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found this bad boy a couple days ago and stewed it with some beef
>>
>>2169800
>>2177557
>honeysuckle
>poisonious
What fucking retard named that shit
>>
>>2160146
Hey, Idk shit about foraging. How to get started? My region doesn't have much info online, so I was thinking about getting a book or something.
>>
>>2200838
go out, find stuff, and ID it later, you're not gonna be eating for a while
>>
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Am I dumb for boiling or dehydrating all the stuff I forage?

>Look up stuff I can forage in my area.
>Come across a plant.
>Open up Seek.
>Machine learning magic does it's thing and identifies the plant.
>Look up the scientific name on google and compare it to what Seek is telling me.
>Get back home with a bag full of things.
>Wash everything.
>Look up youtube videos to see if what I got would make for a nice tea.
>??????
>usually dehydrate anything with leaves then boil any berries, roots, and stems.

Sorta unrelated but here is some Hibiscus.
>>
>>2201098
i mean you're retarded for worrying about it this much. You SHOULD boil, or dehydrate it (if you're not roasting or frying it, that is) since it, y'know, makes it safe and clean
>>
>>2200746
Because one can suck the sweet nectar out of the flowers when they're ripe... Everything else is toxic.
>>
I’ve never encountered these before. Hoping someone can help me ID them. I didn’t eat the or disturb them, I’m just curious. Thanks.
>>
>>2201121
Amanita of some sort
>>
>>2201121
>>2201140
The fat base of the stem makes me think Amanita daucipes, but god only knows there's probably at least a couple other Amanitas that look similar.
>>
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>>2197593
Second harvest, much bigger. And there's still so much fruit out there on the trees it's insane.

>>2200838
Well, if you tell us your region we might be able to point you to some resources or even some first-hand experience.
>>
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>>2201174
Processed about half that into a little more than a pound of pulp. Gonna try to make ice cream.
>>
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>>2201175
Also picked about a gallon of muscadines so far, with more on the way. Made most of this one into jam the other day.
>>
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>>2201176
And after some brief searching on North Carolina vining plants, I think this is Melothria pendula, the creeping cucumber.
>>
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>>2201181
>>
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>>2201182
>>
>>2201121
amanita definitely,,, abrupta, echinocephala, and virgineoides come to mind
>>
>>2201140
>>2201167
The mushroom app I downloaded said it was a carrot footed lepidella which looks like it’s a class of Amanita.
>>
>>2201365
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_daucipes
>common names carrot-footed lepidella, carrot-foot amanita, or turnip-foot amanita.

But again, there are some 600 species in the genus Amanita alone, so while your image is almost certainly an Amanita of some kind, it's very difficult to say whether it is one exact species or another. Sometimes the macroscopic characteristics aren't enough to easily distinguish one species from another (see death cap (Amanita phalloides) vs caesar's mushroom (Amanita caesarea)), especially if you're trusting an app to ID for you, and I don't know if that's going to be the case for A. daucipes.
>>
>>2201412
Pretty cool you’re that knowledgeable. I really appreciate it!
>>
>>2160517
Echinococcus multilocularis
I dont think you should worry about it
>>
>>2196347
Very interesting.
How did you get the idea to use linden seeds?
>>
been using this to make lettuce opium for a while now
>>
>>2200551
The plant communities of the midwest and northeast are practically the same. The only exceptions i can think of when it comes to staple foods is wild rice and american lotus which are two amazing water plants with loads of calories and are definitely more abundant in the midwest although still grow some places in the northeast.
>>
>>2182826
Yeah jam is quite nice. I don’t have a photo but got a few buckets of elderberries for my ma to make jam
>>
>>2202530
how to make jam if i can't afford pectin? I've wanted to for a while but have no idea how to start
>>
>>2202710
Pectin comes from fruit. All fruit contains pectin, albeit in varying amounts, with unripe fruit generally having higher concentrations. I have successfully made jam with nothing but fruit and sugar with: blackberries, wild black cherries, and muscadine grapes.
>>
>>2202755
ah, so all the white mommy blogs that show up when i search about it are just overcomplicating it, lovely
>>
>>2202844
Adding pectin will likely speed things up to be fair, you'll have to boil the mixture for a shorter period of time. But back to your original post, how the hell are you not able to afford pectin? I see some on amazon for as low as 30c an ounce.
>>
>>2203057
I'm barely a step up from homeless kek
>>
>>2202710
You don’t need to use pectin to make jam or jelly. I just put some sugar and a bit of lemon and let it sit on the cooktop

t. Blueberry anon
>>
>>2176523
>free foods
They don't really offer much macronutrition, so more like free multivitamins
>>
>>2202710
Hawthorn berries are neutral tasting and extremely high in pectin, we used them in England to make jams before pectin was widely available.
>>
>>2201498
I read about some french chemist in the 1700’s who figured out how to make chocolate from them, but I’m pretty sure the actual method has been lost to time because the one recipe I found is unsourced and doesn’t work lol. Fuck knows how he managed to make solid chocolate with it.
>>
>>2201121
carrot amanita
>>
>>2202222
How does it work out for you? I tried it a bunch some years ago but found the effects so mild it wasn't worth the effort.
>>
>>2184938
I think that anon was making a joke, anon. Consider lightening up.
>>
>>2203061
>>2203229
I'll give both of these a shot when i get the chance, thank you very much anons
>>2203305
it's like mild opium, it's not amazing but it works. Not hard to make either once you start doing it in large enough batches.
>>
>>2201174
>>2201175
Ohh man I'm jealous. I live at the northern tip of the pawpaw range and the only real tree I know of doesn't fruit much because it's under so much shade and then the squirrels almost always get to.them first.

I took a sapling from there a few years back but it's still small and hasn't fruited but I think I see premature flower buds forming so I might at least get blooms next year.
>>
>>2203321
I might just have a high tolerance, I could get a bit of an effect but found it very mild. How do you extract the latex?
>>
>>2203328
i use alkalized water/ethanol solution, then i evaporate the whole thing. Leaves a layer of black tar thats hard to smoke but gets me buzzy
>>
>>2203327
Pawpaws shouldn't really be bothered by shade, as they are often an understory tree. It could be the tree is too young to fruit, or that there isn't another tree nearby for cross polination: they're supposedly not self-fertile. I have heard that taking young shoots of pawpaw may also not work that well, because most of the shoots you see aren't actually seedlings, but root suckers that don't have their own robust root system. It could still work out, though.
>>
Walking my acreage for the first time and found this. Are these wild grapes? Southern Michigan.
>>
>>2203628
looks like riverbank grape. Totally edible, if a little tart. Makes a specialty wine in these parts.
>>
>>2203628
i have a grape vine outside my window, so can confirm that the leaves are the same
>>
>>2203641
Thanks. I have a grapevine as well and saw the leaves were similar. Exciting find.
>>
>>2203359
Hmmm maybe I should give that a shot again sometime .

>>2203566
Yeah this one tree I know of is literally the only one in at least a 5 km radius. I know every inch of those woods and it's this one weird random pawpaw in a mix of spruce, sugar maple and old oaks that totally dwarf it. I took 3 saplings from there in total over the years to try and spread it around. One for my yard and two for my father's which borders on the forest where this one grows. One of them was killed by deer though. I'll just keep propagating though.
>>
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>>2203157
I know it's frustrating, and with pumpkins being big and sprawling it's hard, but don't loose hope. You can prevail. My curse this year has been pepper maggots, usually they're not a problem but everything this season has been crazy. Almost every cayenne and habenero had worms, though strangely only 1 in 5 or so of the scotch bonnets and none of the cayenettas...

I have a ton more blossoms and almost starting fruit though so I gave it all a good check and then encased it all in row cover . It means I'll have to do some pollinating by hand but if it gets me peppers it's worth it.
>>
Auslet here.
How the fuck do you find all this shit? Literally comb riversides for miles pushing through dense brush and not seeing a single fruit or berry.
>>
>>2204159
most edibles aren't gonna be fruit, ID leaves and roots too and your harvest should be more bountiful
>>
>>2204159
Well you'd probably want to start by figuring out what the edibles in your location are, and where they can be found. If nothing that produces edible fruit grows on riversides where you are, of course you aren't going to find any.
>>
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Can you help me identify these plants? (Nevada)
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I assume they're probably toxic.
>>
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I'm pretty sure this one is Pokeweed
>>
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>>2204544
virginia creeper, not edible sadly
>>2204552
climbing nightshade, very toxic
no idea on the others though, sorry
>>
>>2204540
Almost certainly a rose of some kind.

>>2204541
>>2204543
Elaeagnus species maybe? Looks pretty close to it if not.
>>
>>2204541
>>2204543
>>2204703
Yea russian olive.
>>
moment of appreciation for the best wild edible in the world
>>
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I went back to look at the plant with the white berries.

Maybe it's a Symphoricarpos getting rekt by insects? I found a few leaves that aren't damaged, this is how they look.
>>
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This is how the plant looks from a distance
>>
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The berry has white skin, white meat and two seeds in the center.
>>
>>2205260
100% correct yes, thought it looked like a bush i had nearby, can confirm symphoricarpos albus. The fruit is edible and readily sought after by pretty much every north american animal ever. can be used to make soap too.
>>
>>2205298
It tastes like soap.

I might bring back some seeds or a cutting for my garden back home.
>>
>>2205477
plant it further away from the fruit you plan on harvesting, it'll attract all sorts of unwanted pests to terrorize your more desirable fruit (unless your garden is decorative)
>>
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>>2205298
>The fruit is edible
you sure about that? I have what looks like one of those but I came to the conclusion it's probably poisonous.
google seems to be conflating two completely different species here, how convenient.
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>>2205667
>common names

Are you sure that's referring to the same species?
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>>2205667
I went to bed and realized i didn't fully elaborate on that "edible" kek, edible in smaller quantities* just don't treat it as a diet staple or it becaumes unpleasant. Otherwise, it's fine as a now-and-then-snack, and probably rather healthy that way due to having a unique antioxidant/nutrient profile lacking in most grocery store fruit
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>>2160174
Kek
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>>2205667
This is why we use scientific names.
>>
Any idea what these are? I was thinking nightshade but the leaves look different.
I have wild grape vines lining my whole property but there are also Virginia creeper and various other berries mixed in. Trying to find out what everything is so no one dies thinking they're eating something safe since it's surrounded by grapes.

SE Michigan USA
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>>2207238
Fuck
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>>2207239
There are also these with different leaves and white berries
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>>2207242
And these
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>>2207243
Are these rose hips?
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>>2207247
Yeah, probably invasive multiflora rose
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>>2202461
If I showed this to my botanist friend she would probably vomit
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>>2207243
this is 100% common buckthorn, not appetizing or exceptionally edible at all, the juice doesn't stain well enough to make ink, the wood isn't strong enough to build with, and the young ones grow fucking spikes on the trunk to keep you from ripping them up, if you're in NA it's an invasive species and you should kill as many of them as possible whenever you can
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>>2207239
these ones are red currants, 100% edible, and most people favourite currant
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>>2207239
>>2207277
I don't think that's red currant. I am by no means an expert as we don't have those here in NC, but the leaves remind me more of a viburnum. Doing some quick searches for red currants, Ribes rubrum fruits in a raceme, and those fruits definitely look to be clustered instead.
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>>2207277
>>2207274
>>2207264
Thanks for the insight. I just bought this property and have been very excited about the foragables. So far I've found:

Red currants
Rose hips
Walnuts
Grapes-the fence line from the toad to the back of my property is a little more than a quarter mile and is absolutely covered.
Herbs-Mullein, clover etc.
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>>2207297
Maybe Viburnum trilobum?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_trilobum

Fruits in the fall, leaves look similar. I'd be hesitant to positively ID though, as again I don't have experience.
>>
>>2207242
Honestly that might be a viburnum as well. Maybe V. nudum, as that's the only one I can find with white fruit, but the berries don't seem as elongated in that photo compared to what I'm seeing for V. nudum. Doesn't help that there's like 150 different species to pick through.
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>>2207297
>>2207301
>>2207300
We could confirm if we knew the flower colour, currants have magenta flowers, high cranberries have white flowers
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>>2207335
I mean, I'm willing to rule out red currant simply on the basis that those berries are not in a raceme. Pic is from wikipedia, and that is definitely not how the berries in anon's photo are arranged.
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>>2207342
Aha fuck you're right, on a second investigation, the bark is definitely not red currant either
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>>2207297
>>2207335
Thanks. I won't be able to get back out there until left week but I'll check out the flowers then.
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>>2207239
High bush cranberry for sure. I've eaten lots. My yard is full of red currants, they're quite different.
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>>2207242
This is dogwood.

>>2207243
This is buckthorn.

>>2207247
Yes those are rosehips.
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>>2207524
>dogwood
You got a scientific name for that? It's definitely not Cornus florida, but that's about the only dogwood I'm familiar with. The leaves to look similar. A shot of the whole plant and maybe the bark on the trunk (if it has a well-developed one) would certainly help.
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>>2205675
No, I know it's not, I just thought it was funny that the google bot chose these two excerpts using 2 year old logic.
>>2207277
no
>>2207297
Yes. I didn't believe it until I tried many unpleasant ones, but some bushes really do taste like cranberries. Most taste awful. It may also help to eat them when they're still hard and not quite ripe, but I haven't tried enough in different stages to tell.
>>2207550
Not that guy but it looks like the grey dogwood we have here, Cornus racemosa.
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>>2207550
It's red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) there are many many different dogwoods
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>>2207650
Usually highbush cranberry isn't harvested till after the first frost which sweetens them up a little.
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>>2207650
>>2207666
Well C. racemosa and C. stolonifera do both have white fruit that cluster like in anon's image, and both grow in SE Michigan. The question, then, is which one is it. I'll concede it's probably a dogwood though. Asked for the scientific name because, as has been mentioned, there are many different dogwoods, and just searching "dogwood" might not provide useful identification. And because we've already had one mistaken ID so far.
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>>2208063
Also, have a pic of today's pawpaw harvest. A whopping 6.5 pounds of raw fruit. Some of them got pretty badly mushed from being carried in my backpack. Probably need to work out a better carrying solution, though this is only my second year of picking in all fairness and I only got a small handful of fruit last year.
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>>2208066
Some choice, very large fruit
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>>2208069
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>>2208070
Some where they've fallen on the ground
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>>2208071
And more muscadines. Made about half of these into jam the other day. Might get another 3-4 pints out of the remaining.
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>>2207239
Looks to me like Viburnum opulus, sometimes commonly known as guelder rose or highbush cranberry. Harvest the berries after a few good frosts and use them to make jams and jellies. They stink like shit at first but if you add a lot of sugar/honey, lemon, spices and cook it well it tastes really good imo.
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>>2203231
Cool. Keep experimenting man, maybe you will find a way to make some reasonable chocolate.
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>>2160146
any herb frens?
what do you find most often in the woods and on meadows during autumn?
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>>2208354
We get creeping charlie, and a couple species of mint up where I am, not very good pickings. Lemon balm is common enough though, and so is yarrow.
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>>2208354
I can't really think of many herbs that grow wild in NC off the top of my head. I know in the mountains we get mountain mint (some species of Pycnanthemum), and there's waxmyrtle (Myrica cerifera) over the eastern half of the state. Never done much with either myself, though I have a friend whose father used to talk about putting waxmyrtle leaves in home made spaghetti sauce when we were back in boy scouts.
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>>2160146
This shit low key bussin no cap.
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I found more fruits and berries that I could use help identifying. (Nevada)
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>>2208354
We get lots of purslane, miner's lettuce and sage over here.
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Firethorn berries of some kind, maybe?
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Manzanita?
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>>2209439
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>>2209478
Sycamore. No edible use
>>2209480
Tartarian honey suckle. Not edible
>>2209482
Looks like beach plum. You at a beach in the northeast?
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>>2207272
Theres probably not edible plant in those books that exists in the forested part of the midwest thats not also in the northeast. Maybe when you include prairie plants like tinpsila, but prairie midwest is very different than forest midwest.



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