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Do you use hiking poles /out/?

If not, why not?
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is it even possible to walk without diamond tipped carbon fiber poles?
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>>2130024
I tore my acl a couple of years ago. They help me going up and down things.
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>>2130024
They save my knees going downhill and make going uphill much easier. They help me keep balance when stepping on a loose rock and I use them as tent poles. They can also be used for a myofascial release massage in a pinch.
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>>2130052
>>2130034
Carbon or aluminium?

What's the best?
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>>2130024
I have your pic related but in carbon and longer cork handles.
>be me
>doing internship in Switzerland for the summer
>our group does a four day excursion in the french alps
>have to hike in and hike out
>notice all the plebs are walking hiking with trekking poles
>what are these Swiss faggots doing, do they not have any self respect?
>on the way out of the excursion on day 4 we hit this crazy steep grade for several km
>lots of loose rocks, gravel and small stones
>difficulty at times maintaining my balance with my pack full of supplies and camera equipment
>absolutely smoke my thighs and tweak my knee to the point where walking with a load is painful
>all the trekking pole fags carry on like nothing
>make serious mental notes on what they are using
>reevalute faggyness of trekking poles all the way back to the bahnhof
>once back in the US the following Fall promptly buy trekking poles
>use them for just about everything aside from walking down a street
>repurposed in the winter for splitboarding as well

Trekking poles are unassumingly based because the use of allows the user to engage their upper body as well as distribute load, help with balance through critical/wet sections of trail and save your knees during steep descents with a load.
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>>2130083
Good job overcoming your programming
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>>2130024
One is good for steep terrain. I use one of the spring loaded ones when hiking anything rough and steep. Two seems unnecessary, at least where I am.
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folding poles are the best, can fold them up and go hands free without dropping pack
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>>2130197
Fixed length carbon poles are best
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>>2130221
>fixed length
Absolute trash, unless you never plan on stowing them away or using them as tent poles.
>carbon
When they break, they break catastrophically. At least you can temporarily fix an aluminum pole.

What's the upside to a fixed length carbon fibre pole, aside from the lower weight?
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>>2130236
Considerably lower weight - my 115cm poles only weigh 4oz each. More rigidity since they’re only one piece. Less points of failure - literally nothing to break on them except the pole itself. I have no problem setting up my duplex with them.
How exactly are you going to temporarily fix an aluminum pole. Once it bends it loses all structural integrity unless you can straighten it without breaking it and you’d need to bring something like a tent pole sleeve to reinforce it. It’s true that there are times where I wish I could stow them (mainly boulder strewn sections of trail), but thats not generally a problem - simply lay the poles down on top of the next ledge, climb up, pick them up and resume.
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I think they look ugly. A good wooden walking stick on the other hand...
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I always thought they’re gay af.
Got a couple free from work, tried them out. Absolutely legendary for river crossing, don’t know how I went so long without.
I feel a bit silly using them though - people like Old Me are judging me ha ha
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>>2130083
>a high quality, thoughtful, and well-written discussion post on /out/
wtf this isn't supposed to happen
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I bought a pair of the black diamond carbon alpine trekking poles during the memorial day sale on their website.
Still haven't had a chance to use them though.
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>>2130024
No, if im going really steep hills i may take a stick from the woods. If im going down hill and its steep i run
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>>2130024
I didn’t
Then I did
Now I don’t
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>>2130078
Carbon upper, aluminum lower
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>>2130324
thanks for being open to change and honest about it
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>>2130024
Imagine being old lol.
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>>2130083
>anti-larper
Based.
Also: hiking boots with proper ankle support.
Combine the two and you can haul a bus.
Mechanical advantage is real.
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>>2130587
Try being in the army for a few years then you can kiss your hips, spine and knees goodbye
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>>2130587
Imagine being so inexperienced /out/ that you think your opinion is worthwhile
newfag
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>>2130083
had the same realization. didn't even feel bad because how cheap poles are for the utility
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>>2130375
poor guy, broke mine within a year
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>>2130024
More trouble than they're worth. If it's easy ground, they're a hassle to carry. If it's not, they mean your hands aren't free for scrambling. They're okay as tent poles, but not as good as actual tent poles.
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>>2130024
Fag poles: Number one cause of trail erosion
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Only Polish Star Trek fans use trekking poles.
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>>2130024
Yes because im not a contrarian faggot, and know there are real benefits to using them especially downhill.
If you care that much about looking like a faggot in a hobby where the goal is to NOT be around people, just be a fucking chad on your next hike, find a good solid branch, nice and straight, able to wrap your hand around it nicely, bonus if it has a nice little jutting branch you can grab just above. Cut, it, debark it, sand it, oil it and get a comfy walking stick.
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>>2130024
I use my giantass dicks as one
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>>2131441
Same pair?
What happened to them?
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>>2130024
I've never owned them but borrowed some once, I never felt like they were much of an advantage even on inclines, maybe if I tried them more I'd figure it out but as it stands, especially since I live in flatland I doubt I'll ever get any. However they are nice when backpacking because it gives your arms something to do so they don't just hang by your sides and get numb
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>>2131579
They are alot more useful on the down hill, having 3 points of contact at all times while going down with a load is a god send.
Going up, it saves something like 15% of your energy when you are using them to go up hill.
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>>2130083
i'm sold
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>>2130024
No I usually do not.
>why not?
I can't think of any practical uses of them, plus extra weight. The one exception is these ski poles my dad gave me that are hollowed out so you can keep some whiskey in them.
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Haha imagine carrying poles on a hike, like nigga just walk like you normally do xD
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>>2130024
i discovered trekking poles a few months ago and can't believe i didn't try them sooner

-work out your upper body/spread out the fatigue
-burn more calories than just using your legs
-reduce impact on knees and lower back
-improved walking posture
-hike/walk/run faster as though you were a four-legged creature, propelling yourself with an extra pair of limbs

even when im on flat ground i still use the poles nordic walking-style
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No i use walking stick like wizard man
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what poles are good?
Fixed only please.
Folders need not apply.
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>>2132798
Ultimate Direction FK Carbon. So good I bought two pairs in case I ever snap one.
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Why not just pick up sticks on the ground instead of consoomering yet another plastic product ?
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>>2130083
>reevalute faggyness of trekking poles
People who say they're faggy ignore the fact that people have used sticks to walk with for as long as humans have existed. Trekking poles are simply a more refined and efficient version of the wooden walking stick.
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>>2131448
>they're a hassle to carry.
They weigh a few ounces and you can just strap them to your pack for scrambling.
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>>2130024
Once, the terrain was certainly some of the shittiest I've ever experienced and the meme poles actually helped a lot. Elevation + centuries of untouched tussock/moss growth + pits where that moss has died and didn't keep up w/ the other moss = sweating in the arctic
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>>2134564
They're incredibly useful in melting snow. Without them i'm slipping constantly even with spikes because all the snow around your foot moves. Would never go mountaineering in spring without trekking poles.
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>>2132939
thanks friend. Though 200 dollars is a lot for one piece of gear.
I'll see if Trail and Sky has anything affordable.
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>>2135137
$150, you can generally find a 20% coupon at backcountry by signing up for the email list
https://www.backcountry.com/ultimate-direction-fk-carbon-trekking-pole
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>>2130083
I had basically the same experience. I was struggling and the guys with the poles were having an easier time. I went and bought two of the least expensive poles I could find to try it out and haven't done any serious hiking without them since. What I have noticed though is that the ones with the springs built in seem to be more fragile, I've seen two people break them so far.
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>>2130197
I have these they are under a pound and easy to bust out in a snap, then I can store them in my crossbody bag when i want
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>>2134553
>Trekking poles are simply a more refined and efficient version of the wooden walking stick
Yeah unfortunately they don't look nearly as cool as a traditional walking stick like >>2132389
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>>2135291
fucked up link. meant this: >>2133123
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>>2130024
i use only one. has many other uses with things in my kit including shelter and as a camera monopod.
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>>2130024
no because i am not a massive cocksucking faggot
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>>2130024
I have weak ankles and I hate wearing boots and I’ll only wear trail runners. Trekking poles have saved me from twisting my ankles countless times.

You’re a larper and an /in/cel if you think trekking poles are worthless.
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I use one at a time and it has worked very well for me. I usually do short day hikes, steep, with not much stuff to carry. one pole is enough to give me some support, but leaves me with a free hand for scrambling steep stuff, grabbing water, picking flowers or whatever.

>imbalances!

Some times i'm asked about imbalances, but i just switch periodically or when the terrain requires switching.
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Poles are great...best going down steep rocky trails...reach forward and use straps...reminds me of what it must be like for spiders going down hill.

Back to you...
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>>2137423
holy shit... are you 60 years old... people talk like this on ham radio forums...

back to you...
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>>2130593
I only wear VANS when I hike and theres no prob
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>>2135362
Same.
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>>2137466
Look at the picture dickhead.
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>>2139608
is it a movie reference? sorry brah
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You know, I used to use them when I had a problem with my knee and they were god sent. I just came back from a week long hike and found myself just carrying them around uselessly the whole time now that my knee problem is gone. I tried them for a while, but didn't really feel like using them.
I'm going on my next trip soon where I'm going to need my tent and can't use my hammock so I'm gonna take them with me because my tent needs them.
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Easy trail, I strap em to the pack.
Heavy pack, steep terrain, they will save your butt (and knees).
Here's a bear trail we were on last weekend, it was loose and steep- poles were worth every gram.
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>>2130024
I don't use them much, but I like to bring one as a tarp pole that can come in handy while hiking
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>>2130083
from greentext it appears you simply didn't hike as regularly as those stickfags
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why two poles not just one tho?
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>>2141848
More support, preventing muscle imbalance, always having 3 points of contact with the ground, can be used as tarp/tent poles. Sometimes, when the terrain requires me to have a hand free for scrambling, I tuck one away, but I like having the freedom to choose and a single pole doesn't weigh much.
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>>2130083
I have been thinking of getting trekking poles but its been on my backburner for forever. What should I look for feature and material wise and what brands are good and what brands are to be avoided.
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>>2130083
Similar experience: one bad, potentially-dangerous trek across snow capped ridges and frozen valleys criss-crossed with streams and I was sold on poles and microspikes.
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I just pick up a long stick to use along the way. Free and effective.
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I did a multi-day trail where I was clocking >20 miles/day and carrying a >40lbs pack and realised how essential poles are if you’re doing a serious distance with a serious weight on your back. Have never looked back since.



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