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Any beekeeping bros here?
First timer here, just set up two hives. Been a lot of fun so far.
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>>2065056
I'm getting a couple of hives at the end of april. just been putting in the prep work and building a stand like you have in your pic. definitely looking forward to getting started with them. glad to hear it's been as fun as you expected too.
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Noticed them in my backyard last week. Woke up this morning and they are gone. Got me somewhat interested in making some bee boxes. Gonna follow this thread for ideas
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>>2065056
beebro here, planning on grabbing some bees sometime this week given it'll be flowering real soon
How far along have you gotten with your hives?
>>2065072
Grab them while you can dude, I've been looking at some sites so far and some are only selling Italians. haven't checked to see if the Russians or Carolinas were sold out across the board, but given the pandemic I don't doubt there's been an increase in demand for those strains
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>>2065076
usually this is the season to catch wild bees. If you're seeing a swarm like that, then that means now's the perfect time to catch them.
Local bees are also usually best given they're adapted to your local climate compared to bees that are shipped out from other states.
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Anyone get Saskatraz from OHB yet? Waiting on some packages in May.
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I destroy every beehive I come across
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I also keep bees for one year now, even got asked to be a boardmember on my local association because it only has old people
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>>2065056
I wanna put one hive in my backyard but idk it the neighbors wont start shitting bricks
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>>2065506
>”Yes officer, I thought it was a bear trying to raid my hives again. I was afraid for my livestock.”
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>>2065445
I've only just heard about Saskatraz strains, don't have much experience with them though. Fairly interested in keeping them though, so I have my eye open on them
for now though, just planning on grabbing some Carolinas and hoping the Midwestern weather won't kill them
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>>2065551
It depends on how close your neighbors are and how you conduct yourself around them.
Best way to ensure their comfort is to let them know you may keep bees and explain how much experience you have with beekeeping. If you're in a crowded neighborhood though, you're better off either setting them up on a friend's/family member's property for a cut of the honey, or do some stealth shit
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>>2065822
I mean, if it wasn’t for the fact that winters here were brutal, strain wouldn’t matter to me. I just enjoy beekeeping and all its aspects. Maybe someday I’d like to join a commercial apiary but I’d rather try to set up a cooperative effort where I live since the honey prices are shit. I really just want to chat and hang out with other beekeepers and potentially learn things from them as well as introduce them to techniques that I’ve enjoyed using.
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Any recommendations on apiary literature? I wanted to see that I could get a hive started myself in the coming years.
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>>2066321
that is totally doable, anon. start looking around for other people interested in it, and see if someone has enough property for a couple hives.
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/an/ has a lot of good beekeeping threads every year
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>>2066455
I’ve already got some hives ready for packages at one property, and I’m trying to establish communication with other beekeepers. The ones that want to do it for money are more reluctant to try and form a cooperative though. I don’t understand why, since we’re all competing against Chinese syrup that’s tanking honey price.
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>>2066453
>The Hive and the Honey Bee
>A-Ž Beekeeping with the Slovenian Hive
>U of M textbooks including Beekeeping in Northern Climates, Successful Queen Rearing, and Honey Bee Diseases and Pests

Just the ones I have at hand. I have several more books, but everyone always recommends Beekeeping for Dummies and The Backyard Beekeeper. The first volume I mentioned also goes through multiple revisions through the years.
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>>2066566
Yooo thanks so much! I'm gonna cechk those out.
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All mine have died, three years in a row. I've wasted too much time and money in something that can't even manage to stay alive while 99% of their needs are fully provided. Fuck 'em.
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I miss my bees.
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>>2065056
My grandfather has been a beekeeper for years and he gifted me one of his newer hives and the thing is I have no idea what kind of bees they are. He doesn't know either all he knows is he had them since he was 20 (he's 80) he said they where black when he got them now they don't look anything like that and are quite adapted for the area. Did my grandfather breed a new strain? They don't look like any kind of honey bee strain I've seen and they are quite friendly to my family so they can't be Africanized.

Tldr: I think my grandfather has made a new strain.

Thx Poppy
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>>2067738
Damn anon, sounds like your grandpa gave you an awesome retirement plan. Got any pics of the queen?

Make sure you move to an IPM plan so you can start selectively breeding for varroa and disease resistance if your grandpa hasn’t done that yet.
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>>2067738
>>2067903
Also plugging U of M again, they might be able to identify if you sent them some deceased workers.
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>>2065056
My dad's bees keep dabbing on him year after year, swarming at the absolute most inconvenient time possible.
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>>2067917
Your dad is shitty at hive management then. If he’s checking them infrequently then he cannot establish a pattern of swarm behavior and won’t be able to prevent a swarm from happening.
Are the workers making a cell on the bottom or edge of the frames like in the picture? They do that sometimes but if they’re definitely preparing to swarm you’ll see a queen larva inside the cup or it will be capped off and have a pupating queen inside it, which will then be about 9 days until they emerge. After that you have a couple choices. You can squish the larva, or if you fancy yourself someone who wants to try husbandry you can remove that frame and try to put it into a nucleus hive, and if you’re successful you’ll have doubled your bees and have a second colony.
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>>2065056
So those are two separate hives? Do the bees get along when they're so close together and competing for the same resources?
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>>2068107
It’s usually okay if you paint the hives different colors but they ultimately locate by pheromones. Wind can muddle it with scent from the other hives and they may accidentally try to enter the wrong hive and may get killed by guard bees. It also helps if you stagger main entrance spaces with each individual hive and space out the bodies from other hives by about 3 feet. Make enough room to move safely, or else your ass will inevitably knock over an adjacent hive.
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How do you guys deal with wasps. I tried everything I could think of but they just raped my entire hive. I put up traps. I found their little nests and torched and squished them but they just kept coming.
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>>2068760
You need to build up a solid brood early in the season. In the early spring make sure to supplement their diet with pollen so they can start building up brood. This will give you additional workers to act as guards if an invasion happens.
It also helps to keep syrup feeders either inside the hives or far away from them. The nectar sources can attract robber bees, wasps, and sometimes even larger mammalian predators that can completely destroy your hives.
If nothing else, utilize entrance reduction if your colony is weak, low-numbered, or sustaining a current attack.
If you decide to implement all of the above methods and continue wasp destruction/frustration, then you should see better results as far as incursions go.
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>>2066555
Really? Made a thread there a few weeks ago and nobody posted anything in it.

I was surprised to see this thread on /out/. I just started my first two hives this season and I've enjoyed the building, painting, and research so far.
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>>2069339
kek
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>>2065056
Used to keep bees, I built it into a business and sold it at the start of last year. If you can into online marketing (FB) it's suuuper easy to do.

First free tip: don't be afraid to work with "africanized" Bees. They are better producers.
>Just buy a full suit, only rob at night and smoke like a madman
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>>2069499
I respectfully disagree with the recommendation of Africanized bees for a beginner. The main reason is their tendency to swarm is greater than other strains, and most novices won’t know how to manage swarming behavior, let alone tackle a swarm that has just left the hive. Not to mention the fact that these bees are highly aggressive and have been known to kill people and animals for the crime of simply being too close. It’s just not worth it to deal with them imo unless you want bees that can handle higher temperatures.
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What is this "swarming" everyone keeps talking about? Aren't bees normally in a swarm?
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>>2069850
For an absolute first timer sure. For someone who is keeping their hives in the 'burbs sure. As for the rest, Nah. Plus, swarming is an easy way to grow the number of hives you have and learning to detect a coming swarm is ez pz.

Also, the part about them being super aggressive and attacking randoms is a meme. It's only if you walk right up to the hive on a hot day that your in danger

>>2070390
tl;dr: it's how bees replicate. Under certain conditions the hive will split into two and one portion will go off to find a new home - normally they have found one already. A hive going from A to B is a swarm.
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>>2070390
Its how beehives spread, just don't be a retard, do proper splits and frequently check hives and you'll be fine. Check out VINO farms on youtube for a great series on beekeeping though/
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>>2069339
>convince your partner they have TINNITUS
Laughed until I cried.
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Alright can someone redpill me onf Saskatraz Bees and if they're worth getting over Russians or Germans? I've seen reviews here and there but I definitely need a better picture before I buy them for next year, given I went with the Italians for the first round of bees.
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>>2070390
Swarming is a natural behavior that occurs typically for a variety of reasons but the most common is crowding. In this instance about half the bees will leave the hive with a new queen, so this pre-swarming behavior is usually noted by a visible increase in worker bees and the creation of swarm cells, which are queen cups made near the bottom or edges of comb. To control swarming behavior effectively, check your hives frequently during the pollen flow or while you are actively supplementing pollen. Honeybees will be bulking up their worker population for foraging nectar when the nectar flow happens, also to act as guards when mammalian predators begin coming out of hibernation.
They are much different than supercedure cells, that are created usually in the middle of the comb in the instance where the queen is old or dead, and the workers are attempting to raise a new queen. In that case depending on your bees you may want to requeen or if you’re feeling lucky go ahead and squish your current queen so the workers can raise a new queen without fuss. If you don’t euthanize the old queen there’s a good chance she’ll sting the queen pupa as they emerge from the cell. Search “queen piping”, it’s a distinct sound that the pupa will make when she emerges to challenge the queen. Insects are rad.
>>2070570
I mean, I only talk from experience, just walking up to them 10-15 feet away and already getting tagged by 5 of them. Didn’t even approach in their flight path, but I guess it was my fault since I had showered that morning.
>>2070783
Saskatraz bees are a strain of honeybees with Russian, Italian, and German genetic lineage that have been bred for better overwintering, hygienic behavior, and varroa resistance. They are quite expensive though, with a single package w/mated queen selling from Mann Lake for $208. I am waiting on a pair of Saskatraz packages and maybe will post an update if other beekanons wanna keep discussing apiculture on this board.
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>>2072120
>In this instance about half the bees will leave the hive with a new queen
I could be wrong since I'm a newb but don't they swarm with the old queen and then a new queen takes over the old hive? Don't remember where I heard that from but it stuck in my brain.
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>>2072200
It’s either that or the opposite. I’ve heard it both ways.
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>>2072120
You're throwing a lot of terminology at me dude.
>>2072200
>>2072205
Maybe it just depends on how alpha the new and old queens are.
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Used to be a beekeeper for a local business. At our peak had something like 200 hives. Was a lot of fun working with all of my friends, did stupid shit like throwing bees at each other's faces while in the suits. Pretty messed up but when you're that young and you're inspecting dozens of hives a day it was just a fun way to freak each other out. Once I move into a bigger place I'll get my own and treat em good





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