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Does anyone on here work in the farming industry? If so, do you enjoy it? Is the pay worth it? Any advice to someone interested in farm work?
>>
born and raised, plenty of work, money is in owning land in ag. Farm labour pays shit, running machines also pays shit. You want also to have some skills. Guy that runs the tractor makes min wage but guy that runs tractor and knows how to prune orchards or has pesticide certs would make comparable to any skilled trade.
If you dont want to do a year of college for ag tech or something like that find a job where they'll teach you to run a tractor, backhoe, skid steer etc.
>>
>>2064625
I’m not a farmer like >>2064936 and I could tell you farming doesn’t pay shit why do you think the government gives so much money to farmers?
>>
Fuck farmers. They do more to destroy the environment than anything else and spend half of thier time bitching about how hard they have it
>>
>>2064625
>Get a career in agronomy in mexico
>No lands
>No money
>No social skills
I already know how this will end...
>>
I work on a family owned vegetable farm that specializes in hydroponics. The money is made in contracts or running a CSA, farmer's markets are shit and not worth labor of setting up with corona. Personally, I love my job and my coworkers. My advice to you would be to not be discouraged with the getting bitched at and do everything thoroughly in the proper manner. There are some websites that can put you in contact with farmer's who need farmhands or owners looking to be bought out of their farm.
>>
Just got an apprenticeship on a small farm that starts in June. If youre interested in farming and want to try it out internships and apprenticeships seem like the way to go. Anyone should be able to do something for a season of you don't like it quit at the end.
>>
>>2064625
Grown up on one all my life and worked best part of 20 years on my family farm. If you are interested in livestock then that can be an advantage as most young people entering the industry now just want to drive tractors for a living. Best thing to do is start off on smaller farms and gradually work your way up to larger set ups. You can pick up all sorts of advice etc that way, I’ve employed a few young bucks who think they know everything but can’t even put a plough on a tractor or know the basics of animal husbandry. I did a vocational diploma at a college for 2 years and then did a 3 year sandwich degree at university. Worked on a large estate in my sandwich year and learnt as much about man management and running the actual business as I did about practical knowledge. But don’t do it if your heart isn’t in it anon.
>>
>>2064625
i enjoy working with the livestock very much. i am just a worker and get paid badly.
the hours are very long and theres no time for a social life AT ALL. especially if you are in dairy, the hours are nuts. but the animals are great.
the part of farming i loathe is the culture, the attitude of people on farms. from one farm to the next its the same. everyone is communicating as though they are gangsters under surveillance through low-key insinuations and passive aggressive indirect mind fucking you. its all about who made the most recent mistakes, who knows this or didnt know that and yeah just bullshit bravado that makes me cringe.
>>
>>2064625
Had a buddy putting in 60+ hours a week welding metal carts for a green house. No overtime because it's "agriculture."

Small scale farmer bros need to keep their shit in order better and large scale like child labor Monsanto cucks charging $40,000 per pound for tomato seeds should get gassed.
>>
>>2064936
BASED farmbro advices. Not a lot of farming around here but if you are a loner or just like hours and hours a day alone with your thoughts making an "okay" wage then it seems alright.

I go with my buddy sometimes to take care of cattle and bullshit with the farmers around working on the land that isn't rock and cedar tree aids.

Seems alright if shit goes well that day
>>
>>2066153
Why don't you aquaponics?

Any tips for small scale farmers market after Corona? Sadly my "local" market is a fucking 2 hour drive away. So unless I can pocket $200 cash on a Saturday then I won't even try it.
>>
>>2065806
Do you enjoy eating?

Farming isn’t perfect and they certainly are whiny twats living off subsidies, but they perform a real essential function unlike you. Also if you’re concerned about farmers destroying the environment you should booms flight to Brazil or Indonesia and murder their farmers, considering they’re the worst offenders on Earth atm.
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>>2064625

I've been working on a dairy and beef farm in Australia for around 3.5 years and really enjoy it. I had no experience farming before which is both a blessing and a curse. Young people run away from it when they've been raised with it, but it leaves an opening for people like me to move in.

I've had better paying jobs but work a lot more hours so the time flies by. Also the area is prettier and living expenses are lower, so it's pretty easy to live like a king if you lower your social expectations. Like instead of eating out and going to shows you have to develop an interest in cooking and gardening, watching birds instead of netflix etc.

My advice is just do it if you're interested. It sounds like bullshit to "Just do it", but I Just Did It by holidaying in a rural area and asking locals for work. Pick a direction and drive, find a spot you like, and go to a bar/pub on a friday night and ask if anyone needs a farmhand
>>
I find it enjoyable. My main goal this year is targeting farmers markets and selling heirlooms and interesting varieties. See how good of a gimmick selling white eggplants can get me. The pay isn't great, but it's reliable. It's hard work, but it's honest work. I find it very enjoyable watching my food start in the palm of my hand and grow bigger than football fields. Overall it's a "give it a try" sort of ordeal and see where it goes from there. Some farms make thousands upon thousands a year, and others need government subsidies to stay afloat. Like all occupations it really depends on where you are, and how you make the best of whatever you're given.
>>
>>2068513
> working on a dairy
> cooking
> oh look its 8pm better go to bed
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>>2068946
Not everyone is a sluggard pal
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>>2068949
fuck off cunt i work on dairys as well
you're on easy-mode in australia
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>>2066153
I just bought 5 acres of land (Zone 3A), and I plan on setting up passive solar greenhouses to do hydroponics in. Do you have any recommendations for the type of setup I should develop? I was thinking PVC pipes with cocoa peet and/or possibly sand/stonewool. I'd love to hear more about your career!
>>
>>2064625
>le farmer works so hard meme
i grew up in the country and every farmer I know is a fukken lazy cunt.
most of them dont even know what they're doing, they just sit on their front verandah with binoculars watching their neighbours and just copy what they see their neighbours doing.

not to mention apart from like 3 or 4 days a year they literally just sit around the rest of the time.
>one day to plant crop
>one day to fertilize
>one day to treat for pests
>sit around for 6 months
>one day to harvest it all
>one day to drive it to the city to be sold
>rake in a few hundred k
>blow it all on a new tractor when your house is falling apart and your family is literally wearing rags for clothes
>>
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>>2064625
I work a small family run 5 acre permacultured plot of land with ground crops and fruit trees. We do 2 markets a week at the peak season. And it's a cozy job I love it so much. We don't make a lot of money but it's okay because we barter with other vendors for things we don't grow ourselves like meat and coffee and have really low grocery bills and generals costs all year.

>>2064939
some large scale farming is not profitable anymore yes. In my area of southern BC (canada) many large scale (20+acres) apple growers are being forced to switch to wine grapes because apples are costing 18 cents a pound to make but only getting 13 cents a pound at the co-op.

However, being a small permaculture farmer with only 25 apple trees, I get to sell my apples for $2 a pound and the apple block is manageable with only one or two people, from all tasks: pruning/thinning/weedwhacking and picking.

If you are interested in farming I recommend finding a local permaculture farm and do like >>2066530 suggests. Also go to your local farmer's market and find a farm you like, express interest in learning and ask if the farmer needs help (he does). Don't worry about your own farm, just make mistakes on someone elses dime first.
>>
>>2068946

Haha yeah I feel that way sometimes. I've gotten into the habit of cooking bulk meals that last for a few days, or just making something that goes straight in the freezer when I've got the ingredients handy
>>
>>2069406
Is that why you chose to work McDonald's?
>>
>>2067552
>Any tips for small scale farmers market after Corona?
Not worth the cost desu
>>
>>2065806
Farmer anon here. I will have a greater impact on the environment this quarter by leaving the corners of a few wheat fields alone and maintaining irrigation ditches than you will have in your entire life. Suck it nerd.

I make my money managing labor, negotiating contracts, analyzing costs and returns, etc. It’s a business like any other business. If you don’t know shit about business you won’t make it. Most retards that get into it to larp like they’re on green acres and sell at the local farmers market go broke within a couple years and those that don’t only stay afloat by working off the farm. They don’t know shit about their soil. They don’t know shit about their markets. A lot of them are too retarded to know when to harvest or take out a big loan on equipment they can’t operate or maintain properly.

>I luvs muh jon durr eben do muh paymunt iz moar den muh yurly yeeld
>You overpaid for a green paint job and you over invested in an over sized depreciating asset that you should drive into an irrigation ditch for the insurance
>I dunt hab inshurints anon
>Kill yourself

Don’t get me started on the mouth breathers that buy land on a flood plain and then get swamped.
>>
>>2064936
>make comparable to any skilled trade.
I doubt that. I'm an 01 electrician and a journeyman plumber. My hourly rate for 01 is 72 an hour, while my plumbing is 43 an hour.
>>
>>2064625
farming has to be the hardest way to live off of government handouts. why not just go on wellfare the easy way?
>>
>>2064625
not worth it buddy. i did it for years until it ruined me. small scale farming is for hipsters, its literally a larp. people justifying the extra few bucks by claiming its value added. complete bullshitting. mega farms own all the real valuable land and market share. just grow some vegetables for yourself and have fun with that. the days of making money as a farmer are over
>>
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>>2067552
The markets last season weren't too bad considering covi hit us and made the outdoor markets super regulated and non-cozy. But somehow our sales numbers were the same.

If you want to make money try value added products. If you have garlic or herbs, dry it and add it to salt or infuse it into wine vinegar, boom $10 jar of garlic salt, $15 bottle of tarragon infused vinegar.

An average day at a busy market can net around $1200 and the peak day is twice that at $2500. An average day at a smaller farmer's market is $500 and a great day is $1000.

Even if you just grew garlic and sold it, you could make a nice amount of money especially given the value added products you can make with garlic. Last november I planted 400ft or 4000 cloves of garlic, which get you around $2 a bulb if you sell them individually. You can also save the biggest bulbs with the most cloves to re-plant next season and if you have a lot of good seed garlic, you can sell 6 seed bulbs for $25. Good honest money.
>>
>>2064625
>Is the pay worth it?
There's barely any salaried job in farming, if there are then they pay like shit.
Small trendy "permaculture" farms that produce a bit of everything in small quantities and generally don't use modern farming techniques need employees but they can't afford to pay them so either they're paid like utter shit or they aren't paid at all under the guise of "it's not work, it's a course to teach you farming" or similar bullshit (I've even seen trendy permaculture farms where urbanites pay to come work there a week or two kek).
Large scale operations that use modern machinery only need employees for 1 month during harvesting season, but no farm will teach you how to operate machinery or drive trucks so you'll have to stick to the same 2$/hours jobs that Mexicans usually do (sorting through vegetables or harvesting fruits/vegetables whose harvest can't be mechanized).
>>
Former farmhand here. Photo is inaccurate. Only time you ever get off is for church and when you marry off yer daughters.
>>
>>2071911

You are an inusfferable cunt, but you do a good job explaining what it's like to be a sub 500 acre farmer in 2021.
>>
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>>2072653
> trendy permaculture farms where urbanites pay to come work there a week or two kek

I operate one of those and it's really fun and rewarding. It's definitely not worth it to just make money. Better off opening up a liquor store in a small town that closes at midnight and retiring in five years. But I really like plants, gardening and interacting with people at markets who appreciate my hard work and give money to me.

Given how many novice gardeners make mistakes, it does make sense that a teaching farm would charge money or do something like a skilltrade. If you don't know what you are doing, you slow everyone on the farm down and even ruin whole crops or tools.
>>
>>2072653
>you'll have to stick to the same 2$/hours jobs that Mexicans usually do
yep, and some of the larger farms around here wont hire young people from the city because the foreign workers are way more dedicated and know what they are doing rather than some larp who thinks theyre the next eliot coleman
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>>2069406
>IhavenofuckingcluewhatImtalking about.jpeg
>>
>>2067556
Good point dude. That reminds me of a recent hospital visit I had. I kept catching the nurse going through my wallet and and spitting in my food. Whenever I called her out on it she was like "uuuh do you enjoy receiving healthcare?" And "if you want to complain go to south American and complain to thier healthcare providers, they're way worse" That really shut me up! Thanks for your service nurse!
>>
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The agricultural industry is as outdated as the first gasoline engine. Animals will get rights and you will be judged like a criminal. Monoculture is akin to building parking lots everywhere and the quality isnt that great either.

If you bring some Ideas of your own and have a clear perception ... yes.. but then you would not be asking a question as bland as "is it worth" that only retard capitalism can answer you with its internal logic which is overwritten by "do people eat food"
>>
>>2073413
thanks for showing the way forward, anon. I have an internship on a small farm this summer and it’s nice to know it’s doable to start my own later in life, instead of just going hurr durr Mexicans
>>
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>>2075115
we start the first farmer's market of the season this saturday and go until end of october. It's a lot of work but it's so much fun. Plus food and exercise and money. I expect a good upcoming year and I am learning a lot.
>>
>>2064625
Yes
Yes
Fuck no
Turn around and run. Farming isn’t worth it. It’s hard work and some even good years you go in the hole profit-wise.

I guess move to Africa and live like a rich Nigerian farmer.
>>
>>2077213
Its true, millions of kids are castrated every year as part of the tranny agenda and no one cares but God forbid you dont let a chicken outside for a 6 hour rest break and its an international incident
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>>2075094
>larp
>literally did not happen

Nice try 0/10 bate
>>
>>2075094
If it was a hot nurse that would turn me on
>>2077295
mega autism
>>
If mechanization meant we went from a society where most people farm to a small minority farm: how is farming still such a slog?
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>>2078139
What?
>>
>>2069440
>I get to sell my apples for $2 a pound
are you making more per pound because you are selling to consumers instead of the co op? that's a huge different from $0.13 to $2 per pound
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>>2078330
>In the 1800s, 90 percent of the population lived on farms; today it is around one percent.
https://www.pbs.org/ktca/farmhouses/sustainable_future.html#:~:text=Farming%20Then%20and%20Now&text=In%20the%201800s%2C%2090%20percent,farms%20were%20over%20500%20acres.

Why is the set up that a few people work a lot of hours for not necessarily a lot of money when so much labor saving progress has occurred?
Why couldn't it be, for example, twice as many farmers doing half as much work individually?
If machines do so much more of the work it seems an unfair system if farmer still spends so much time at it.
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>>2064625
I worked on a farm for 2.5 years. I was functionally a utility guy, fixing water pumps, digging ditches, seeding the ground, building electric fences, that kind of thing.

I loved it. I loved every second of it. I would wake up early in the morning, breathe in the cool dewy air and work twelve hours each day. And after I was finished I would come home, shower, collapse in bed, and sleep more soundly than I had ever done before. The best part of every year was arriving at harvest and seeing your labor come to fruition.

I'm not shitposting when I say it was genuinely the best experience I have ever had working. I worked hard, slept hard, and I had a purpose which took up every single waking second of my life. The pay was meh, but my god, the work was good.

I miss it every day and I want to go back.
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>>2078342
Because it doesn't take much brains to pick a cabbage and there are 6 billion coloreds who will move to the west to make $7 an hour plus $50 an hour in welfare.
>>
What's up, farmchads? Spent the last few days setting up the irrigation in the newest orchard. It's cold as fuck here but life is good.
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>>2078339
yes, I do direct farmer's market and farm gate sales. You can see the prices in the picture.
>>
My idea of a utopian society has a permaculture farm (and greenhouse as needed) for each neighborhood, operated by those within the neighborhood taking turns via timeshare to serve food for said neighborhood.
With children being taught basic permaculture farming techniques as part of their educational curriculum (montessori/waldorf schools are also contained within the neighborhood, ran by people living there), everyone would more or less grow up knowing what they need to do.

Please tell me how naïve I am, or what I'm missing to making this work. Thank you anons.
>>
>>2078730
It would work fine in rural or smaller towns, and maybe some smaller, more dispersed cities, if you could make it part of a place's culture
But 90% of the world's population lives in a hellhole with no room or ability to support a farm, and the population density is too high for dividing urban land between business/housing and agriculture to be feasible.
Large cities can only exist when supported by equally large farms. Maybe vertical farming memes will come true eventually but until then, a skyscraper or housing complex's needs far outstrip a greenhouse with equal footprint's ability to match them.
>>
>>2079108
thank you for your reply. You think that permaculture is viable enough on a large scale? Assuming as I said, smaller neighborhood pods each with a farm providing for them.

I'm thinking realistically for cities you could supplement with rooftop gardens, but yeah my model is clearly not viable unless vertical farming or something similar becomes easier/more feasible.
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>>2064625
Have been in ag since day 1, Its incredibly hard work and not for the weak, i have done everything from milking cows to picking berries to wrenching on machinery. nothing compares to the satisfaction of farm work, even if the pay is lower, something about watching the sun come up over the trees on a cool summer morning. In terms advice if you want to get into farm work, be willing to learn, farmers love teaching their craft, also ask lots of questions and be prepared for long ass hours
also permaculture is a meme
hope this helps
>>
>>2066153
>running a CSA

Wat is that?
>>
>>2069406
No.
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>>2081328
community supported agriculture. yuppies pay you in advance and then you give them shitty yields and they dont return the next year
>>
>>2067552
All of your farmers market produce is just extra money. Farmers who are all in on monocultures don't have the correct attitude towards their business and lose out on the diversification that a few acres of heirlooms or niche crops can bring. Easy enough to get some folding money that way.
>>
>>2081474
To put it in perspective, if you don't do that hard work you will find a laborer adjacent person (Cousin or someone who works at a packing house) will suddenly set up at a farmers market with produce they were able to get their hands on at wholesale prices charging the markup you could be getting.
>>
>>2081328
confederate states of america
>>
>>2069406
What country do you live in?
>>
If you aren't already a landowner then it's a meme
>>
>>2081018
>Have been in ag since day 1
>Humans have been farming for about 12,000 years now
Holy fuck man, I didn't realize being a farmer was the key to immortality.
>>
>>2073413
damn your produce looks amazing. would buy
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>>2073413
lol ten dollars for garlic scapes you capitalist swine!!
>>
>>2084294
fuck off back to plebbit commie scum
>>
>>2069406
I am a farmer and this is 100% accurate





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