[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vm / vmg / vr / vrpg / vst / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/out/ - Outdoors

[Advertise on 4chan]


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.


[Advertise on 4chan]


File: 1603665315539.jpg (77 KB, 819x614)
77 KB
77 KB JPG
I am planning to climb the scaffolding of a tall building that is in the process of being constructed. I was wondering what i should expect in regard to security cameras etc, I would be doing it at midnight so it would be easier to go in undetected. Essentially just wondering if anyone has experience with this kind of thing.... will post pics when I do it. Pic unrelated
>>
>>1932265
depends how developed your country is
>>
This sounds sick as fuck. More details? Why are you doing it? Just cuz? Is it apartments, offices, what is it??
It will all depend on how much the security cards about it. I've been caught trespassing in a construction site at night, but the guard was super chill. We explained that we only came for the adventure and to look around before the building was complete, no stealing, no drinking, no destruction of property. I even encouraged him to check our bags if he wanted. He didn't, so I guess I was pretty convincing. Just told us to leave and that was it. Then again, I think we got LUCKY. I spotted him first, long before he saw us, but there was no way out. I had about 30 seconds to think about how I was likely going to jail with a $2000 tresspass fine or something. Idk. It was fun though.
>>
>>1932265
>Essentially just wondering if anyone has experience with this kind of thing....
yeah >>>/b/
>>
>>1932292
I am doing for lulz and the view at the top. Do you think its common for there to be over night guards?
>>
>>1932265
My advice for urbex..

>Research the area
At least google the site your going to and case it out before you do anything. remember locations of cameras, number of guards, guards routs, entrances and exits, etc.

>When climbing maintain 3 points of contact.
I hope this doesn't need to be said but just incase you know nothing about climbing it seems necessary for me to mention.

>Don't carry anything that will get you in trouble if you are caught.
Lockpicks, Drugs, Knifes, Guns, etc.

>Remember to Take lots of Pictures (And post them here)
Make sure that if you get caught take out the SSD from any camera you use
>>
File: 20201107_132738.jpg (3.39 MB, 3264x2448)
3.39 MB
3.39 MB JPG
>>1932265
Usually construction workers stop working (in the USA) well before sundown. And where i live in suburbia there is no guards. Where do you live anon?

Pic related
>>
File: Inejiro Asanuma.gif (1.35 MB, 336x252)
1.35 MB
1.35 MB GIF
>>1932265
Killing commies is based
>>
>>1932302
What type of building though? What's going there? And yes, guards are common. Thieves frequently steal tools, wire, whatever they can really. It can be a huge moneymaker for tweakers.
>>
>>1932859
This. Every job site in commercial construction has security cameras set up for both security overnight and during the day to record workers in case they do something stupid. Also climb up the inside of the scaffold so the crossbraces will break your fall. Then you can sue the subcontractor for not properly tagging out the staging and collect a nice fat check you fucking scumbag
>>
Worked on construction sites for a while, never knew about any cameras but they did have motion detectors. Idk much about them but at my most recent job even a bird could set those off. Get in, go up fast, hide well and wait a while to see if anyone comes out, then proceed.
>>
>>1932267
This
Depends on laws
In UK u can trespass and not break the law as long as you dont cause any property damage including theft.
Getting onto scaffolding is super easy even if they close off the first ladders. Dont try climbing the entire thing on the outside. Super cold right now and can be slippery.
Also check for any red light blips before going up, can indicate camera or motion sensors.
>>
What does this have to do with /out/
>>
>>1935908
urbex is /out/
>>
>>1932265
just wear a safety vest and hard hat, i've walked into dozens of construction sites to see what's up and the two times i was caught i just said i was an electrical subcontractor trying to figure out what i needed to bring in a couple of days and that i work mostly at night to avoid the daytime construction chaos

they didn't ask anymore questions either, just act like you're supposed to be there
>>
>>1936193
this. you can get away with damn near anything if you have a high vis vest
>>
>>1932265
I'de be careful anon.

I'm planning on doing something similar while bouldering gyms are shut however metal + cold is a recipe for a very slippery surface. Just be aware of your local laws, get an idea of how good their security is and don't do anything retarded that'll create excessive risk and you'll be fine. You can also do some smaller climbs to gain some confidence before attempting a big one

Pic to prove i have some experience
>>
>>1936554
Where do you guys live where there's all this cool abandoned places? Everything here either gets torn down or has a shit ton of security, even little rotting shacks on the side of the road have security cameras around.
>>
>>1936613
This is/was RAF Upwood (pic related for "was"). best bet is to look for historical structures or old airbases. There's some abandoned factories about up north as well

A lot of places claim to have security but really don't have much if any. Trespass is mostly legal anyway provided you don't damage anything (In the UK at least).
>>
>>1936613
Sidenote, if you plan to explore old abandoned places get a respirator and some gloves because of asbestos and animal feces in the structures
>>
as for regular buildings without ladders outside, what is the best way to scale em? i heard about climbing piping outside of it but it doesnt sound very sturdy...
>>
>>1932302
You say "high". The bigger the construction site, the more likely they have guards.

If there are security cameras, they are most likely around the possible entry points. Check out on daytime.

On a scaffolding you are quite visible.
Even you are just a swift shadow. Random folks can notice.
Check were you can find cover.
Many tall scaffolding have nets to prevent tools and stuff falling off.

Come before nightfall and observe.
When they bring in fresh concrete they'll be working all night. (Mostly done on Fridays so the concrete can harden during weekend.)

How is the construction site entered by the workers? They need key card or something like this? Sure sign of guarded site.

Take pictures of scaffolding, plan your way up, be quick.
>>
>>1937249
Storror have some videos climbing roofs around Cambridge in the UK, i'de follow what they do.

Do not climb pipes, they aren't designed to support weight and the brackets that hold them up are not very strong.
>>
>>1937469
>Storror
gotcha i 'll go whahtt itia theb
>>
My job’s tangential to the construction industry. Only thing I can tell you is the big trend over the last few years has been to replace security guards with free-standing motion detectors. They’re like 4/5ft tall and very sensitive to motion. They’ll usually give a loud audio warning first (to prevent birds and small animals from tripping the alarm again) and then notify authorities/security if tripped repeatedly in a short time. Larger, expensive sites might have one or more of these per floor.

If it’s a very large project in an urban area - with some serious cash behind it - you’ll have these in addition to a security guard on site.
>>
>>1937938
do tell me more



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.