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Was thinking to get a big set for wrenching that has everything in it, but it the reviews on the medium-priced tools are always like "WAAAAAH THE METAL IS TOO SOFT, EVERYTHING BRAKES WAAAH"

Are those ultra expensive tools even worth it for some occasional standard wrenching? A big set of those tools costs more than my fucking car, LMAO

Which brand of tools do you use or recommend?

General hints for buying tools?
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All my boys use KS tools
>>
this set has worked for me
Stanley 92-824 Black Chrome & Laser Etched Socket Set, 69 Piece
held up so far even when I attach pipe to the end of the 3/8" to get more leverage.
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>General hints for buying tools?
only buy specific tools you need for a job, the more you fix the more tools you will naturally acquire
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>>25040871
>start working on car
>almost finished before starting to assemble everything back in place
>whoops, missing that one key...
Not such great advice honestly. Everyone should have a good standard set ready.
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>>25040861
>KS tools
Been looking at this but a lot of people say it's crap quality.
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>>25040850
You're only going to use around ~10% of the shit in these kits so it makes more sense to buy shit separately. Start off with a good ratchet and a decent set of impact or regular sockets and a set or two of wrenches. I would put the rest towards an electric ratchet.
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>>25040850
You don't need the big sets. Just the basics will suffice most of the time. So some box end wrenches, socket wrench, socket sets, and some pliers is all u need most of the time.bAnd buy the specialized tools when u need them.
I recommend buying tools from harbor freight. They're actually pretty good quality overall. Stuff like wrench sets, socket sets, socket wrenches, breaker bars,drill bits are great and much cheaper than the name brands. Also their zip ties and threadlocker is a good deal too.
The only thing to be careful of is their power tools. Check the reviews first. But their higher tier brands like Braun are usually great. I have their cheapo $10 drillmaster angle grinder and it's been working like a champ for years. Only downside is it's loud as hell.
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>>25040904
We haven't had any problems. I broke a 1/4 extension because i was cranking on it with the 1/2 ratchet. It was a tight spot and I was trying to be clever.
The box I posted sells for 110 euro which should be around 125 freedom
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>>25040850
A set like that in the OP isn’t too bad to start. There are these 3-4 drawer plastic tool boxes sold by Craftsman, Husky, Kobalt, Gearwrench that run around $200 that are real nice, all Taiwan stuff with lifetime warranties.

The problem for Burgers is you sort of need metric and SAE for most stuff because there are tons of things around the house in inches. Anyway, a set like your pic or one of the $200 sets or anything with 1/4”, 3/8”, and 1/2” drive ratchets and sockets plus the open combination wrenches will do you good. As a starter though, all of the “Mechanic’s Kits” are pretty much wrenches and sockets, so drop $25 on a 4pc plier set with a cutter and everything, then get yourself a hammer and probably a proper screwdriver set for another $30.

Then there’s the jack. And a million other things you can buy as the jobs come up. But having the right tools will help give you a bit more confidence to tackle more jobs.
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>>25040912
What about a 1/2" electric impact wrench? Can you start out with a $50 ShartMart special or do you buy the $300 Milwaukee?
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>>25040897
>start working on car
>almost finished before starting to assemble everything back in place
>whoops, missing that one key...
how wouldve you have disasembled it retard
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>>25040923
I don't like to cheap out on anything with a motor or a battery. I'm sure there's a comparison of the two but you generally get what you pay for with power tools. Hand tools you can go ahead and cheap out on.
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>>25040912
Terrible advice.

You will waste a ton of time driving back and forth to Home Depot or VatoZone buying individual sockets, the 10% individually will end up costing as much as the whole set (plus the gas money), your tool bag will be a fucking mess of random sizes and you will waste more time thinking you might have the right tool and then driving to the store, and an electric ratchet is wayyyy down the list of tools you need to get work done on cars, there are no jobs that a cordless ratchet can get done that you wouldn’t be able to do with a regular ratchet. There’s like 10+ other power tools that a shadetree mechanic needs to get a job done without a giant headache before getting a cordless ratchet to save a couple minutes on a 6 hour job.
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>>25040933
this is true but if you only use it once its not worth going all out.

>>25040923
for my first electric driver i would get a 1/4in impact driver.
as you will be able to use it on more stuff around the house driving screws.
dont expect it to break lose your lug nuts tho.
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>>25040923
You don’t have to go with Milwaukee, but the shitty ebay brands won’t be so great and you won’t be able to get batteries for them if/when they die. Upside to sticking with one known brand is that you can use 2-3 batteries on 10 different tools because the batteries are expensive.

Ryobi is GOAT tier DIYer tools, they will sell you a 1/2” impact wrench for $200 that is 90% as powerful as the $300 Milwaukee, plus Ryobi batteries are much cheaper. There are a few other brands that are better values than Milwaukee, but Milwaukee has the best tool lineup for mechanics, however it’s a bit of a waste for weekenders.
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>>25040850
ebay used american made tools
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>>25040944
You're just going to break the cheap shit in these kits anyways and have to run to the store anyways sooo.

>>25040949
1/4 impacts are okay but at least go for the M18. I have one and it's borderline not powerful enough, I wouldn't bother with the M12 shit unless you plan on getting the e-ratchet right away.
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>>25040949
>>25040923
Also don’t buy 12V as your first cordless tools just because you think it’s cool to own Milwaukee for <$200. So many people try to do that and then attempt to justify it by saying it removed a lug nut on a car once. They’re compact tools for certain jobs and you will be limited in the tools you can use those batteries in. A 12V impact is never going to crack loose the axle nut that you broke your ratchet on,

Get the necessary 18V cordless first, then jump on the 12V in the future if you want some smaller stuff with less power to be a little more convenient when it comes to certain jobs,
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>>25040962
That’s why you don’t buy the $20 kit, get the $200 Gearwrench kit and have all the sizes you need and it will last fine as long as you don’t do anything totally retarded. Or get a Husky kit. That Taiwan stuff is pretty damn good for the money.
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>>25040925
>almost finished
as in 'only that last thing which I need a specific key for that I don't have'
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>>25040962
i just picked a random pic.
i have ryobi stuff myself.

also op try and buy into a battery system and stick with it.
the m18 stuff is good.
i have the ryoby one+ and like it.
but pick one and stick with it.
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>>25040956
What about the kobalt brand?
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>>25040971
>Taiwan stuff is pretty damn good for the money
From all the normie reviews I see, THAT is their first conclusion whenever they're unsatisfied or broke something.
>"IT'S CHEAP TAIWAN SHIT. IT WOULD STILL WORK IF IT WAS MADE IN GERMANY/ITALY/USA BLA BLA BLA"

I suppose those are just retards?
>>
>>25040995
if you have a home depot nearby i would go with ryobi.

is kobalt lowes? idk we dont have them around here as much as HD.
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>>25041002
Not him but: I have tekton impact heads and bosch impact bits, and craftsman made in the US ratchets heads. I have destroyed more faster walls and slits then I care to name. It drives me up the wall. On so so so so many things I have destroyed fasteners.
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>>25041002
Taiwan is a world class manufacturer of everything from bicycle frames to 5nm lithography processors. They make good stuff
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>>25040964
>A 12V impact is never going to crack loose the axle nut that you broke your ratchet on,

You are literally retarded.


@OP literally just buy the M12 1/2 impact, XC6.0 battery, charger, and the 8-38mm 1/2 impact socket set from tekton and be done with it.

Anyone who says the M12 isn't enough is retarded, it will take off literally any bolt or nut even siezed unless you are working on huge trucks or 18 wheelers.

250lbs of torque + penetrating oil + heat in the worst case scenario is going to remove any bolt or not on 99% of passenger cars.

Or just buy chink walmart shit and replace it as you go, idc. If I could do it all over again I would just buy by m12 impact and impact socket set and have myself covered for like 99% of jobs.
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>>25040986
I had all Ridgid 18V and ended up recently getting some Ryobi because they have so many tools for such good prices. My neighbors have all been telling me to try it, especially now they have the brushless HP stuff that’s like 90% the performance of Milwaukee for 50% the price, and you’re never going to notice that extra 10% when you’re only using them one weekend a month.

Ryob, Ridgid, and Milwaukee are all owned by the same company. When they design a new tool, they release it in Red first and charge $250, then a couple years later Ridgid will sell an Orange version for $150, and a year or two later Ryobi will have a $100 Lime version on the market.

Great thing about Ryobi is the affordable bare tools. I wanted the little ~10” fan for hurricane season and Milwaukee, Ridgid, and Ryobi are all the same damn thing. The Milwaukee is $100, the Ridgid is $70, and the Ryobi is $40, the Milwaukee isn’t built 2.5x as strong or anything either.
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>>25040850
i buy the exact set from your picrel every time any of the bits breaks, costs me 30$, got 3 already
it broke when i tried to unscrew the front seats and suspension frame
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>>25040904
I have 2 sets of these too, one for each of my cars since I like to keep a basic tool bag in my trunk. Havent had any issues with it at all but the box they come in is absolute trash if want to actually use it and want to carry it around. It works somewhat alright for basic storage in a garage but if you keep it somewhere where you move it a lot everything goes flying. I can recommend the tools but get a bag with it and some kind of nut organizer.
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>>25041041
You're not supposed to throw away the foam sheet, it keeps the bits in place
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>>25041041
Have you tried filling the gaps in the bit/nut holders in the case with some type of rubbery foam? Maybe it helps to keep shit in place?
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>>25041002
Yes, they’re retarded. There is some stuff where you might want the US-German-Jap made version if it’s critical, but all of the cheap tools are Chinese made. The Taiwan made tools are mostly mid-upper grade, they don’t pay extra to make shitty stuff in Taiwan. If you really want US made sockets and wrenches from SK or Proto, it’s a whole lot more cost for a marginal improvement in quality.

>>25040995
Lowe’s store brand. They’re good for the money. I have Ridgid which is Home Depot’s store brand. They’re a little below Milwaukee-DeWalt, but a little higher than Ryobi or Craftsman. The issue with both those brands is they have a limited lineup, they carry the basic tools and a few other cool things, but they don’t have the cool random shit like Ryobi’s hot glue gun and soldering iron or Milwaukee’s 12V torque wrench.

>>25041025
Kek. Don’t take this anon’s advice. You won’t be removing 38mm nuts with a 12V, and your 6.0Ah 12V battery won’t power a saw that can make real cuts. The 12V 1/2” impact won’t even touch lug nuts on lots of cars.

This is the mental gymnastics of somebody who bought M12 stuff because they wanted to be part of the Milwaukee club on a budget.
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>>25040964
Personally my choice was 20v DeWalt. Unlike Milwaukee they go on really good sales pretty regularly and you can get a combo kit with a drill, 1/4 impact, and one other tool (usually a small sawzall or one of those oscillating multitools) plus two of the small batteries for like $200, and then you can add a 1/2" impact for like $150 bare or $200ish with a bundled big battery if you wait for Memorial Day or Black Friday or similar sales. They just released new impacts recently and from what I've seen they're about on par with Milwaukee too. Milwaukee is probably a better choice for pro mechanics just because they make more automotive specialty stuff and they use materials that are more resistant to oils and chemicals but for an amateur it doesn't really matter and DeWalt makes a lot of good stuff for non-automotive projects, which is nice if you're a homeowner or DIYer.
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>>25041027
yup often times you can get a ryobi tool+battery+charger for the price of just the tool from milwakee.
but i would believe that there impacts are tougher, but i have a 80gal air compressor so i just use air impacts for anything serious.
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>>25041051
You get them with
>>25041048
But even with that the nuts started rattling around in the box or flew all over the place every time I opened it. And the hinges broke after opening and closing the box maybe 20 times. Maybe im just the exception but the fact that it happened on two identical tool boxes would suggest that either they are pretty trash or im too retarded to open a box.
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>>25041054
You won’t be removing 38mm nuts with a 12V, and your 6.0Ah 12V battery won’t power a saw that can make real cuts. The 12V 1/2” impact won’t even touch lug nuts on lots of cars.

How retarded can you be? You can literally just look this shit up on youtube, it isn't even difficult. Are fellow burgers really this dense?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elhJ99sh3Uw
https://youtu.be/EidYMrBK9RY?t=542

>a saw that can make real cuts.
OP didn't mentions saws retard. I would agree though if you care about other power tools outside of drills drivers and wrenchs you should probably move up to the M18 though.
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>>25041003
>>25041054
My bad I meant to say Dewalt, not kobalt
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>>25041068
little better than ryobi but less tool selection.
more aimed at commercial construction.
for cordless i would go with ryobi.
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>>25040850
I want to throw in the advice to get an electric wrench. It makes working on cars so much easier and faster. Sure it wont work on everything but you can get to a lot of spots you can get to with a normal big ratchet. I wouldnt get any impact drivers though, just get a good breaker bar. People really underestimate how easy it is to loosen even the hardest most stuck bolts with breaker bars.
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>>25040920
>you sort of need metric and SAE for most stuff because there are tons of things around the house in inches
This
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>>25041061
>either they are pretty trash or im too retarded to open a box
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>>25041067
I own 12V and 18V tools and own a stubby impact wrench just like yours. They are so different from the 18V high torque and even the newer mid torque guns. The stubby wrenches speed up shit you can do with a 1/2” ratchet while the big guys will remove nuts and bolts that are bending cheater bars.

One day you can save your tendie money and get the proper 18V rattle gun. Not very many cars have lugs that were just torqued with a torque wrench to 80ft-lbs like yours.

Also when you do more than fap off to your M12 impact wrench and torque your lugs to 80ft-lbs with anti-seize applied, you will come to a moment where a cordless saw or grinder is critical and those 12V packs won’t be much good for that.

>>25041056
DeWalt doesn’t have all the same sweet /o/ related tools, but they’re solid. Upside is tons of retailer sell DeWalt and they always have good sales.
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>>25040850
no set has everything in it, they mostly have more of the same stuff. your pic related for instance, 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4 sockets? why? 1/2 and 1/4 does it all, if anything you can get around with just 1/2 and some fixed tools.
i buy basic sets of 1/2 and 1/4 plus a few screwdrivers, pliers, adjustables, pipe wrench, small sledge and 1/2 breaker bar then take everything out of their stupid oversized box, stuff it in some cloth bag then squeeze it under my seat. now i got everything i need with me at all times and it takes no place.
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>>25041097
>just witnessed it taking off axle nuts
>muh 80lbs
>typing paragraphs full of low-tier memes because he got proven wrong with evidence he could have just googled

You make the choice OP.
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>>25041104
I didn't know 3/8 even existed, when i found out it changed my life
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>>25040850
A craftsman set is all you need for general wrenching.
I forget which was the good ~200 piece set. It actually wasn't the larger piece number.
I think it was the 216 piece over the 239 one because the 239 one has tons more little bits to inflate the count.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Uh_XGf6nrI

Can be had for $100 on sale.
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>>25041111
3/8 is only good if you can only own one set.

i never go get a 3/8.
if its small and cramped 1/4
everything else gets 1/2in
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>>25041111
i wish it didnt exist.
>impact and breaker all in 1/2 down to 8mm
>small ones in 1/4 up to 13mm
>random 3/8 sockets have sneaked their way into the collection so i now need another wrench just for them and they dont fit on the breaker nor impact without a reducer
>absolutely no reason for that size to exist in a normal tool set
i rather buy more 3/4 sockets
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>>25041097
>DeWalt doesn’t have all the same sweet /o/ related tools, but they’re solid. Upside is tons of retailer sell DeWalt and they always have good sales.
Yeah, but imo the average home mechanic probably doesn't do enough to justify most of those tools anyway though. For what it's worth there's also the option to mix brands anyway, if you go 18/20v for your first tools you're gonna need a new set of batteries to run most of Milwaukee's /o/ stuff anyway since it's 12v, so there's not a huge downside to going 20v DeWalt and 12v Milwaukee afaik. I've been thinking about doing exactly that down the line once I feel like I can justify an electric ratchet.

>>25041086
>I wouldnt get any impact drivers though, just get a good breaker bar. People really underestimate how easy it is to loosen even the hardest most stuck bolts with breaker bars.
imo they're worth for the convenience and speed more than the torque. Yeah you can break stuff loose with a breaker bar, but it's a hell of a lot easier to get projects done when you can just brrt brrt brrt all the bolts or lug nuts on and off instead of having to spend time and energy doing it by hand. 1/4" impact drivers are great tools to have too, super useful around the house and mine is probably my most used tool just because I've got an old house where I'm constantly having to pull hinges and door latches and shit like that apart and it's so much easier to be able to blast stuff apart and back together with an impact tool that won't strip the old screws instead of risking damage with a drill or taking forever with a hand screwdriver.
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>>25041136
>>25041140
Ok I like it. 1/2 doesn't fit everywhere
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>>25040850
>go on ebay
>save searches for "vintage craftsman tools", "vintage mac tools", "vintage snap-on tools", "vintage matco tools"
>have fun and snipe auctions or pick up buy it nows for tools that go for a quarter of the price you'll pay for new ones today
Alternatively, craftsman and kobalt from Lowes are made in Taiwan and are excellent for their price
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>>25041161
buy a shorter 1/2 wrench instead of a complete set of 3/8 then or simply cut down one?
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>>25041190
The ratchet mechanism is too big
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>>25041056
>>25041149
Oh actually just to add to this, I just checked Lowe's and you can get a 1/2" brushless 20v impact with a 4ah battery and charger for $179 right now. It's the midsize 330 ft/lb version but that's probably plenty for most people.
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>>25040923
There's no point getting a 12v impact if you are just starting out, anything a 12v impact can take off you'll be able to undo with a 1/2" rachet. Sure, it'll make it a little quicker to disassemble things, but if your new to wrenching you don't need to be fast all that will happen is you'll forget where shit goes.
>>
Or just buy 1/2, 3/8, and 1/4 don't be a poor fag. Each one has a reason to have it around.
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>>25041229
I have all of them. Three 1/2 ratchets. What I don't have is 3/4
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>>25041107
See >>25041226

Somebody else who owns lots of them saying it’s basically a speedy 1/2” ratchet tier tool, people actually posting their pics and jobs.

Also by axle nut, not talking about a bicycle axle or a lug nut on a VW Jetta
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>>25041194
>>25041190
Long handle 3/8” ratchets are a godsend. I use that way more than 1/2”. Especially with the flex head because you can swing them up and over obstructions.
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>>25041149
>most of Milwaukee’s /o/ stuff is 12V
Not really. Only certain compact tools that speed up jobs for mechanics on the clock, they all have a big 1/2” 18V there unless they’re still stuck on air, and likely more tools because drilling through metal is still quite shitty with the 12V tools.

>>25041198
The high torque DeWalt was cheap over Xmas. That 330lb model is a little outdated, the other mid-torques have gotten a lot stronger. 330 (claimed) is still on the level of being able to get it done with a 1/2” ratchet. Spend a couple more bucks on a high torque brushless 1/2” for the first impact wrench and it’s going to save your ass on the jobs that are a giant pain to do with hand tools.

A lot of the “looks cool” are more niche tools that save a little time on certain jobs. Look at the basic stuff like a good 18V drill and sawzall and the bigger 1/2” impact wrench, those are tools that will save you a whole Saturday of manual labor compared to the mid torque that will save you 5min here and there.

Mid torque is better than nothing for the time savings on wheels alone, but if you’re going to drop $180 on an older model, might as well try to find the bigger guy for $250. I think the DCF899 was $199 with a 4.0Ah pack and charger last month at Home Depot and Lowe’s.
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>>25040850
>Which brand do you use?
Wera, Bacho
>Hints
Get a bit ratchet, get diagnostics tools
Don't replace parts without having isolated the problem.
Don't be an idiot who mixed metric and imperial (and pre-standardization imperial)
>>
>>25040920
Gearwrench tool sets versus other tool sets under $300 are reviewed on youtube. Just go to the youtube homepage at youtube.com and search for:

gearwrench 232 piece set
best tool sets
best tool kits
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>>25041562
I’m convinced that a lot of those Taiwan mechanic’s sets come out of the same damn factory.

I’m a fan of Gearwrench because they do a good job filling the void between basic Husky and higher end tool truck stuff. The specialty tools I have from them like pullers and shit are a lot nicer than HF models and don’t cost anywhere close to the Snap On shit. Also compared to Craftsman and Husky and the other Taiwan companies, Gearwrench adds a couple extra things mechanics like, their socket sets have u-joints and others don’t, a lot of the GW is 6pt where Craftsman likes to do 12pt 1/2” sockets, and GW has knurling on their extensions so you can grab them easier with dirty hands. Sometimes that’s worth the couple extra bucks over Husky. Not many places to find flex head flare nut wrenches without paying $$$$ on the rape van.
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>>25041562
The Craftsman 216 piece set has a wider array of sockets, 1/2 inch drive, and looks to have a better arrangement with the ratchets in the same drawer as the corresponding sockets.
No ratcheting combination, but it's also a lot cheaper.
>>
Don’t do it anon. I bought a toolset like that back in 2015 to use for the ocasional oil change on my own car and now I’m a mechanic at the dealership. It’s a slippery slope
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>>25041605
I have that exact same gearwrench set, it's excellent for tight clearance areas.

taiwanese-made tools are better than chinese. Garage sales and ebay listings can turn up some ok deals. Hell, find the item number of a nice tool set and punch it into ebay.
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if you elect to get loose sockets or ones that aren't part of or won't return to a clamshell case, get something to keep them organized, it's a game changer over digging through a box or bag to find the right size
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Store usually have sales around Christmas and randomly halfway through the year. That's the time to buy.

>generic 1/4" and 3/8" socket set
>set of decent allen wrenches
>set of 6 point wrenches
>torque wrench
>screw drivers
>allen wrenches(ball end)
>breaker bar
>corded impact driver(if you're just starting out fuck battery powered tools)
>set of 1/2" impact sockets(yes you can get away using normal sockets. yes they do explode occasionally)
>2lb sledge
>set of adjustable wrenches
>vice grips
>set of good needle nose pliers
>some sort of mag light
>service manual for your vehicle
>a tape measure
>a toolbox

As you go or can find cheaply
>multimeter
>corded angle grinder
>tap and die set
>some files
>digital calipers
>compressor(fill tires, die grinders are cheap and useful)
>"MAP" torch
>110v mig fluxcore or arc/stick welder
>good ratchets
>grease gun
>deadblow hammer/various hammers(ballpeen, sledge, etc)
>brand of cordless tools. DeWalt is cheap and plentiful. Milwaukee & Makita make very good tools. You can get other brands cheaper, and while saving money short term you're locking into that 'cheaper' ecosystem. Use Craigslist to find tools
>car shit you'll want an impact and a wrench. use your corded 1/2" impact on ooga booga stuff, and get a nice 3/8 or 1/4" impact

Buy niche tools as you need them. Buy nice tools when you break shitty ones, or have a big job coming up where it will save you lots of time, or be used in the future often(get a Euro car, get a nice set of Metric sockets, etc).
>>25041454
agreed. though I dislike flex heads and always tape them.
>>
i have the tekton 1/4 drive and 3/8 drive sae+metric sets with the blow molded cases. absolutely love them. great value. if i had to do it again i would buy the sae and metric sets separately because the 3/8 case with both metric + sae is on the big side.
>>
I bought two snap-on 1/4" ratchets and one bahco 1/4" which uses the same mechanism to stick 3 3/8" rebuild kits in, and honestly after using them I get it now. They actually feel great. Even better than my ko-ken and Matco ratchets.
>>
>>25041605
>I’m convinced that a lot of those Taiwan mechanic’s sets come out of the same damn factory.
They do, it's all Apex Tool Group, from Sata all the way to Matco
>>
I need an impact of some sort. I have some coil overs on the way and it sounds like using an impact to put the nut on top of the shock shaft.

I'm not sure which one to go with. Is the harbor freight earthquake a POS?

I was thinking of spending around 300 or less. The only thing I work on is a Miata. I am going to beessing with suspension and diff mount bolts those are probably the toughest nuts I will need this impact for.
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>>25042030
Do you absolutely need cordless?

Do you have (good) air?

Do you already have a battery brand?

Just get a Harbor Fire corded 1/2" impact. You will get much more bang for your buck. They often go on sale for pennies. Good for taking tires of too.

Else get a Milwaukee 18v.
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>>25040923
You can get a harbor freight drill and light kit with battery and charger for like 20 bucks. Get the drill to socket adapters and you have a poorfag ratchet that you can use on a lot of jobs. Generally I just break the bolts with a breaker bar and finish with the electric.
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>>25042074

Good info ty. I have a compressor but it's a tiny pancake one.

>>25042098
That's a good option too
>>
I picked up the 1in D-ring milwaukee impact for work and it makes life so much simpler in the yard for trailer repair or if a truck only needs one tire swapped out. Yes it does cost an arm and a leg but if your constantly doing heavy diesel and don't wanna run a compressor on your truck shits a life saver.
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>>25040956
Seconding Ryobi. Best thing is that they sell a whole bunch of tools that other companies don't even make
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>>25042030
The harbor freight earthquake is a dead product, avoid it because you won't even be able to buy batteries for it. get a ryobi
>>
Every Tech I've ever worked with has said, Buy the Harbor freight bullshit to start. When they shit the bed gets the expensive ones, that means they actually see use. Snap-On is just a brand, other companies make their tools do some research and you can find the original brands. Matco ain't horrible but still, price rapes you.
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Why do you need so many different wrenches? Wouldn't an adjustable one be enough for all?
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>>25040850
buy a cheap tool set. when something in it breaks buy an expensive replacement.
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>>25042030
>I have some coil overs on the way and it sounds like using an impact to put the nut on top of the shock shaft.
If you're getting coilovers then wont the old shocks/springs come out in one piece? They do on mine and you only need an impact wrench if you're putting new springs on old shocks or new shocks on old springs.
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>>25042512
>you only need an impact wrench if you're putting new springs on old shocks or new shocks on old springs.
what i mean is that you need impact wrench to get the nut off and not put it on. you can just use a torque wrench to put the nut on new coilovers if they aren't already assembled.
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>>25042490
I don't know anon, between home and work I probably have like 15 ratchets
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>>25042030
You can get the mid torque DeWalt for $180 with a battery and charger, and it should be more than good enough for what you need.
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>>25040850
>Which brand of tools do you use or recommend?
I have so many different brands all mixed together, but if I had to go out today and buy myself a complete set of everything I'd go for Bahco. In my own personal experience they supply the best combination of quality vs. price for an "advanced amateur user".

Powertools; I find that Milwaukee has the widest range of tools with their M12 & M18 lines, and a great combination of durability and performance
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>>25042133
Tiny compressor won’t do shit on a 1/2”. Also this anon is right >>25042256 or look for that DeWalt DCF899 sale again. The more expensive HF power tools have always been a waste of money because they have basically no warranty compared to 3-5 years on the other brands, and that Earthquake has been an outdated brushed motor design for like 5 years already.
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>>25042554
Does he actually need one though? On my car the old shocks, springs, and bearings come out and all you have to do is take off 3 nuts and the shock,spring, and bearing all come out together and if you're putting new coilovers in then you can just buy new bearings and you dont need to fight the nut on the shock thats holding the bearing on and if youre getting new suspension why not get new bearings at the same time?
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>>25042490
Automotive stuff fucking sucks. Pic related was for spark plugs on a Grand Cherokee because a couple plugs are nearly under the firewall and every I needed all different combinations of ratchets-sockets-extensions to fit the wrench in there. I could’ve done it with less tools but I would end up having to take lots of other parts off to get access.
>>
Whats the trick to getting cheap, even used tools? I'd like to get myself a milwaukee impact but not too keen on spending $500 on just an impact.

I guess it doesn't even need to be just for milwaukee, I just want an electric impact gun I can use and have confidence it'll break anything loose, just like the big nigga 1400 ft lb milwaukee I use at work
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>>25042618
OfferUp or FB Marketplace or some shit? Or be patient and hop on a sale at Home Depot. This shit >>25042572 would be like $500 if you shopped everything piece by piece.

The Ridgid and Kobalt guns go on sale for great prices a lot as well if you don’t mind buying into a more limited battery platform. The mid torques from both those brands have some balls as well, I know a lot of reviewers have said Ridgid’s mid-torque is one of the best for the money when you can grab it on sale for like $150 with a 4.0 and charger. I honestly don’t use my big guy all that much because the 620ft-lb rated mid torque does most of the shit I need the ugga dugga for and it’s like the size of a brushed drill.
>>
>>25042618
>>25042634
Another steal online. If anon wanted to get into DIYing and was willing to drop like $600, get the Ridgid 4-tool kit with drill, impact driver, sawzall, and multitool and then get pic related and go rape whatever rusty nuts and bolts you can find. And the little brushless 1/4” impact driver in the 4pc kit with a socket adapter will take care of all those 10mm bolts.
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>>25042645
I'd have no issue dropping that much at once if its for multiple hopefully quality tools. I don't have any power tools but a walmart dremel and a corded Bauer impact from HF, and expectedly its kinda fucking useless. It couldn't even get a stuck caliper bolt loose from a junkyard knuckle.

I recently did a drum to disk conversion on my car, and brought my impact home from work. It was so nice to have all the 33 year old bolts loose in seconds instead of killing myself trying to crack stuff loose with a breaker bar. Made SUPER short work of my axle nuts, which get torqued to 200 ft lbs.
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>>25042657
Yeah the Bauer advertises bullshit “breakaway” numbers, and when you look at the specs, it’s actually rated at 450ft-lbs. After looking at other specs, I think it’s the same internals as the 450lb Porter Cable and Craftsman guns. And after owning the PC, I can tell you that my mid-torque has more power. They did some engineering with the newer brushless guns and made the high speed brushless motors match up perfectly with the hammers and anvils and got a shit ton of power out of fairly compact tools.

Ridgid and Kobalt have some quality for the money, but they’re not super expansive tool lineups. DeWalt always has great sales, but don’t sleep on Ryobi, they just put out the new brushless mid and high torque guns and their stuff is affordable with some quality HP tools, plus you can get 2x 4.0 batteries for $79 and they have an enormous lineup. After all of that and getting some Ryobi myself, I shill for that for every home gamer. Not really worth paying the premium for Milwaukee unless you’re using them to pay your mortgage, although maybe in the future you could get down on M12 for some specialty tools if you start doing a lot of side jobs.
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>>25042673
Yep, that PC unit looks EXACTLY like my piece of shit, other than colors. Honestly my biggest gripe with it is how big and heavy it is for its weakness, and that the trigger isn't pressure sensitive.
This is shaping up pretty good, they both seem to be on sale. I could probably swing this next paycheck or two. Unless I should wait for them to go on a deeper sale?
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Clearly I'm fucking retarded and they're not both on sale, but the point still stands.

Thanks for the help
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>>25042579
It's basically impossible to get the suspension apart on some cars without an impact, been a while since I've run into the problem but iirc many stock setups force you to use one to remove the top hat because there's no way to grab the shock shaft and it'll just spin if you try to use a regular wrench, but the speed and the hammering motion of an impact will spin the top nut right off. Suspension stuff also tends to be pretty rusty and full of grit and you're way more likely to get bolts out in one piece with an impact than a breaker bar.
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>>25042729
>It's basically impossible to get the suspension apart on some cars without an impact
Yeah thats because the nut on the shock holding the bearing on seizes.
>iirc many stock setups force you to use one to remove the top hat
Yeah but not all of them need you to remove the bearing to get the shock, spring, and bearing out so you can just undo 3 nuts (like on my car) or a clip like on some others and if you buy new bearings you dont need an impact wrench to get the nut off shock absorber to remove the bearing and put it on your new coilovers. That's why i was asking if he actually needed it because he could just get new bearings instead of using old bearings on new coilovers.
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>>25042763
From his first post it sounds like he needs to assemble the coilovers. IMO it's worth having the impact anyway, makes the whole job a lot lower stress and it's ridiculously useful to have around for anybody that works on cars.
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>>25041437
Do you live in a rust area or something?
the 1/2" M12 was able to take off my axle nuts off my camry after just 3-4 secs on the max setting...ironically, it wasn't able to take off the rear strut x wheel carrier bolts. Had to use ATF and a cheater bar to crack that shit loose.
Most sedan and hatchback lug nuts are around the 80 ft-lb/103 n m torque spec so it's usually good enough for anyone not working on anything bigger than that.
The axle nut factory torque is 294 N m/216 ft-lb, rear strut bolts were 255/188. It zipped off the axle nut that had likely been there for at least a decade. Might be worth mentioning that rust is rarely a problem where I live.
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>>25042771
>From his first post it sounds like he needs to assemble the coilovers.
yeah but you dont need an impact wrench to get the bearing on. only to take it off because it siezes and the shock absorber spins around like you said unless you've got a clamp/spring compressor to hold it and if he's getting new coilovers might as well get new bearings at the same time. They're only like £30 for a pair for my car instead of £150 for an impact wrench so you can use old bearings and top mount with new suspension
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anyone ever use one of these metrinch sets? They're super fucking expensive, but it claims to fit both metric and imperial sockets and can apparently remove rounded bolts really well. From what I've read so far some people don't like the slop they have but others have said it's normal
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>>25042812
Sounds like a recipe for rounded nuts
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>>25042840
that's what i thought as well, but they seem to grab the flats of the nut, rather than the corners like regular sockets do. A fair number of forum threads about them most of the replies were just about how useful they were at the junkyard, probably because there's no need to fiddle with imperial/metric since they seem to fit both.
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>>25042983
Just get Ko-Ken Surface Drive® sockets.
>>25041454
>receive long 3/8 Stahlwille flex head as a gift
>hinge pin falls out after using it twice
>turn it in for warranty
>still not repaired after 2 weeks
Fuck Stahlwille
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>>25043038
Put the pin back in and mushroom it so it doesn't fall out again
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>>25043041
The pin is supposed to have an interference fit on the ratchet head, it's free floating in the handle, either way I lost the damned pin when my """FOD""" ratchet blew up, sent the lock button, spring, washer, etc flying.

It's a 120 usd ratchet, Stahlwille takes that shit back and gives me a working one, never even had a 3 usd aliexpress one fail like this.
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>>25043045
2 weeks is a long time
Do They not have it in stock?
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>>25043050
Local dealer doesn't have one in stock, but if he wanted to he could have one the next day, my guess is that they're waiting on a new pin from the factory to hammer in, hoping that it was the pin that was undersized and not the holes that were machined too large. I should have gotten one of those new Ko-Ken Zeal or Nepros ones for the money desu
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>>25042799
And my Boxster's axle nut is torqued down to 325 ft-lbs from the factory, realistically after 20+ years you'd need something rated well over 400 ft-lbs to get it off, and this car is galvanized with no rust
Not everything is a rust free Camry
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>>25040850
Go to yard sales or estate sales and buy older tools that are made in USA. Boomers are dying off and often their millennial/zoomer children are too soi to properly value tools.
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>>25040850
Grab this kit on sale. Ratchet and impact are 2 power tools that you'll use the most, and new Ryobi brushless stuff is just older Milwaukee stuff for cheap. I recommend grabbing a 4ah HP battery as well to get the most out of the impact
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>>25042490
Assuming you're new to wrenching and not just trolling, the answer is because adjustables SUCK.
You need a tight fit to avoid rounding off the nut, but it's hard to get an adjustable tight. There's slop in the mechanism which means you aren't going to get it super tight cinching it down on the nut (especially with rust/grime on it), and adjusting it off the nut and then getting it back on is hard because you need to muscle it on past the slop -- which is made more difficult because adjustables usually have a bit more angle to them than combination wrenches so you can't really push them straight on with your arm but have to push with your wrist..
There's also an access issue. You usually have some clearance issue -- either you need relief off the nut meaning a socket possibly with extension, or you're coming in a tight space from the side. An adjustable's head is too large.

An adjustable is an imprecise tool where you really need a precise one. Rounding off a bolt can turn a 5 minute job into a two-day engine-out experience.
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>>25040850
i literally snapped an allen wrench with my bare hands. more expensive tools are guaranteed going to save you money in the long run
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>>25042581
>>25043557
Thanks.
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>>25043364
>>25042216
>>25040956

Fourth for ryobi. That new brushless impact will take it off or break it off, and it holds its own with the expensive tools.
Did an entire grand marquis front suspension job with it. Get the big 4ah or greater batteries to run the lil fucker
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>>25043988
wtf that's a great deal
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>>25044004
Reposting but with the caveat that it's the compact. (1700 inch pounds for the impact, when the full sized seems to be 300 ft lbs)

https://www.directtoolsoutlet.com/product/ZRPSBCK01K

COMPACT 1/2 inch impact + drill + 2 1.5AH batteries for $76+10S&H

https://www.directtoolsoutlet.com/product/ZRPSBCK01K
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>>25044020
Shit, forgot to mention it's refurb.
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>>25042688
That’s not bad at all, but as mentioned, the lineup isn’t huge and Milwaukee is going to release the cool tools first and eventually they trickle down to Ridgid and then Ryobi, so it’s up to you. I had a little bit of regret when I first got it because they didn’t offer a >1000lb impact wrench for a year or two, but it came eventually, and then I ended up getting Ryobi stuff too because of their lineup of yard tools for random shit.

That Ridgid kit is nice because it’s hard to find good brushless kits with a hammer drill for a reasonable price, all the $199 18V kits from DeWalt or Milwaukee are compact drills. And the 3 batteries in that kit is a good combo because 4.0+ packs on drills and impact drivers are annoying for smaller projects. Also Ridgid has the lifetime service thing if you register them.

I think those sales go through the end of January, it’s still the holiday sales. Also they have 2 for $179, so if you wanted to get an angle grinder or jigsaw with the impact wrench, it wouldn’t cost much more. Just remember that your batteries won’t fit the coolest $300 right angle impact torque wrench Milwaukee releases and Ridgid probably won’t ever sell an 18V pool scrubber like Ryobi. Also the newer Ryobi HP tools are very very similar to some of the Ridgid Octane tools, so it’s something to think about.
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>>25043173
>drives a Boxster
Jesus christ, so you’re the guy that wants the cheapest version of something from a brand so you can be in the club and then you try to justify it like “My boxster with bolt-ons can beat your GT3!”

OP, don’t buy a 12V stubby impact if you want power, they weren’t built for that purpose and they don’t have any more power than what you can do with a 1/2” ratchet.
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>>25044020
Anon, a modern full size brushless is not 300ft-lbs and a modern brushless 18V 1/2” is not the same tool as a 1/4” impact driver. One of them is for screws and can be used on smaller fasteners with nut drivers and socket adapters, the other one has 10x the power.
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>>25044949
>owns the absolute worst compact impact wrench on the market
>power literally on par with electric ratchets
your opinion may be biased
The new DeWalt 20v dcf921/dcf923 are very good and the 12v dcf901 slightly below them, and Milwaukee's M12 stubby outperforms the M18 stubby according to some testers.

Voltage doesn't really mean much anymore. Or else Makita 40v would be btfoing everything else.
>>
Anybody have a recommendation for a portable tire inflator? I have DeWalt batteries but I'm not sure I want to spend $129 on theirs, something that plugs into the 12v socket in my car would probably be fine.
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>>25044949
>Jesus christ, so you’re the guy that wants the cheapest version of something from a brand so you can be in the club and then you try to justify it like “My boxster with bolt-ons can beat your GT3!”
Jesus Christ what a leap in logic. Can't say I expect anything else from a tripfag
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>>25043173
>Not everything is a rust free Camry
im more than aware of that...but if all you ever plan on wrenching on are small cars the 12v really might be enough. But if you can easily afford the bigger 18v tools or arent a as much of a jew with money as i am, then go right ahead and get them.
Fasteners typically require less torque to loosen them than to tighten them, but i dont know how much other shit like weather or moisture etc. play into that figure.
I just used 10 years as a safe figure, it might've been the og CV joints from 1996 lol.
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>>25040850
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>>25045723
to be fair 18v Ryobis stuff is cheaper than 12v Milwaukee stuff, and at that point it just makes sense to have more power than you need
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>>25045733
where i lived ryobi was only just coming out with cordless tools and they didnt have impacts yet. I bought the M12 on a whim because I was just sick of undoing lug nuts and shit by hand.
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>>25040850
at least for europoors, Toptul has the best value for money. most mechanics have those where i've worked. i've been aggressively using my home depot tier tools for 7 years now and i've just recently cracked my first wrench from doubling up too many times

there are 2 tools that will multiply your work speed and those are a 2-ton wheel jack and a medium sized impact
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I'm not even sure if I went to spend the $250 on the Makita high torque (all my 18v stuff is Makita) my Milwaukee 3/8 stubby can handle mostly everything, and if I really need it my compressor has enough capacity for like four seconds of air impacts. I'm sure I'll cop one eventually, I just don't know when
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>>25045966
M18 1/2 inch high torque Milwaukee was a game changer for me dude that shits so Clutch. It’ll take off any chassis or subframe bolt whatsoever axle nuts anything. Ive even taken off crank pulleys with it a handful of times on trashed motors where I don’t care about damaging the crank. If I ever had the balls I’d try to take off center lock wheels with it since that’s only 444 nm but I’m worried if the splines slip or something and it fuck up the center lock mechanism or wheel.
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>>25046009
I've done suspension with just my 1/2 right angle and 3/8 stubby. But I'm in California. Tearing apart a rust bucket right now where I need to use handtools to crack nuts/bolts free, so I was considering getting something bigger
>>
I have absolutely no desire for an impact wrench, and I never even use the electric screwdriver that I got as a gift years ago. Am I retarded? Is it actually that much more convenient to use power tools?
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>>25046042
Honestly for disassembly they're fucking great, I used to think electric ratchets we're a gimmick, but they're extremely useful and save your wrist.
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>>25046046
I feel like if I go too fast with it I'll make mistakes and either put bolts in the wrong box or literally just take off the wrong bolts. I know it's stupid, but I feel like I need to take my time with mechanical stuff.
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>>25046053
Yeah for sure. It's good for when you have a bunch of fasteners all the same size and length you can just zip through them all, like dropping an oil pan
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>>25046046
Depends on application, Theres certain times you should absolutely not use power tools. Im a flat rate tech though so for shit like underbody panels and stuff where it’s a hundred t25 screws the zippy gun is great and my electric 3/8 and 1/4 are fucking awesome.
>>25046025
Some of these subframe bolts are like 200 ftlbs plus 90 degrees to torque having the 1/2 impact makes it a breeze.
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>>25046009

What model # is the high torque?

I'm looking at Model# 2767-21B
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>>25046156
This is the one i have 2767-20 I got it off tool topia
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>>25046204
>>
for keeping sockets on impacts, which do you prefer? detent pin or friction ring?
>>
>>25045168
Voltage does mean something, there’s a reason you don’t see 7-1/4” circular saws running off 12V batteries. The 12V stuff is all lower power compact specialty tools.

Also you know the M12 stubby and the Ridgid stubby are nearly the same thing, right?

>>25045414
I mean you’re the one telling anon to buy a 12V stubby as his first impact wrench, which is retarded because anybody who works on cars who owns a single 1/2” impact wrench will want one that consistently removes lug nuts at the very least.

>>25046156
Yes, that’s the current high torque 1/2”. Make sure it’s the hog ring and not the detent pin, detent pins are just annoying for /o/ wrenching.

>>25046253
See above. The pins are for iron workers and shit who have one size socket all day and are working 300ft off the ground, not the mechanic who might need 3 different size sockets in 10 minutes. Nobody really uses the pins anymore. The rings wear out after a lot of use but they’re cheap and you can replace them
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>>25046042
2 things without having to spend a ton of money…

Every DIYer should own a proper 18V drill and 1/4” impact driver set, that’s why it’s the most common thing at any tool store. That impact driver will help you build a deck and you can stick a socket adapter in there and speed up the removal of the dozens of 8mm/10mm fasteners under the hood when you nrrd to replace fucking anything on a modern car.

Then there’s the 1/2” guns, I bought a corded one and after a couple used got myself a cordless 1/2” after realizing how fast removing wheels is. Doing a simple tire rotation or brake job requres you to crack the lugs loose on the ground, then jack the car up, then go around to all 4 wheels again to loosen them completely. And for installation with hand tools, same shit, hand tighten while in the air and then tighten them again on the ground. With the impact wrench, you can do everything when the car is in the air.

After realizing that, I said it’s probably worthwhile for the hobbyist to at least get one of those >400ft-lb corded guns for ~$80 just because it saves like 30min every time you need to take 4 wheels off. Bonus is the cordless guns are awesome to take on road trips, especially if you tow trailers that like to blow tires. And if you get a high torque cordless 1/2”, it will bust loose those big suspension and drivetrain bolts that would stop a 25” breaker bar.

It’s up to you how much you’re going to use them and what the time savings is worth, but everybody needs a cordless drill so you might as well get the 2 tool kit with the impact driver.
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>>25040866
That's the kit I keep in the car. It's been good to me for the past 10 years or so.
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>>25046450
>Also you know the M12 stubby and the Ridgid stubby are nearly the same thing, right?
They are not. The Ridgid is in a class of its own (downward one tier) when compared to the DeWalt dcf901 and Milwaukee M12 stubby.

Sure they won't be the best tool for every job, but if you're working on cars where space is a premium and you're doing normal car things then these are enough.
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>>25040850
I use masterforce Hand tools. Reasonable price and quality. Haven’t failed me yet
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>>25046450
>I mean you’re the one telling anon to buy a 12V stubby as his first impact wrench
Are you having trouble following posts? Nowhere did I ever tell anyone to buy a 12v impact. In fact I was arguing against it
I know reading is hard for tripfags but jesus fucking christ, cunt
>>
>>25040850
the problem with medium sized tools is not the quality but the retards who use them incorrectly. The would destroy anything from mystery chinese crap to facom or wera because they are retarded.
With cheap tools the damage is excused as expected because of cheapness and this type of people will not buy high end either so all their complaints go into the middle bracket of price/quality tools. With care and proper practices everything more decent than 10€ a box knockoff shit will go far.
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>>25040850
after bitching for months at work that I lack tools, I finally managed to get my hands on some, all unior and gedore. I'll take them home, at work I'll continue using tools made in Yugoslavia and DDR kek
>>
Fuck pre-made tool sets.

Every set I've ever seen either lacks shit you obviously will need, fills loads of space with socket sizes that no manufacturer uses so they can put "10000 piece tool kit!" on the cover.

They almost never have extractors and if they do they're made of metallic playdough.

Don't buy pre-made kits. Sure they're cheap as fuck, but they're also useless as fuck.

Figure out what you're going to need and assemble your own tool kit.
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>>25046806
Not really. TTi had to knock the Ridgid down by 10% because after the Octane tools they learned it wasn’t smart to make a $30k Jetta faster than a $90k Audi.

The brand new DeWalt beats em, but that’s because it’s brand new.

>>25047099
This is why you trip!
>>
>>25047315
>>25046806
Pic related is what happened with the Octane, so the Orange Stubby was built like the M12 Fuel and then handicapped by 25ft-lbs
>>
>dad goes with dewalt for drill/driver
>pick up orbital, whipper snipper, impact wrench and multitool
>want a cordless ratchet for things that the wrench will just destroy in one hit
>also want a cordless stapler

kind of annoying how limited their range is compared to ryobi, already bought an ozito (australian hardware store rebrand of some euro range i think) stapler, so ruins the whole point of one battery and charger system and now if i want a ratchet itll have to be ryobi or some cheap shit brand and ANOTHER battery/charger
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>>25047485
This is when you could probably justify the M12, they have the stapler as well. If it’s going to be two different battery systems either way, the M12 might be a little more convenient for those tools, although I think the Ryobi head turns so you can try to keep the battery out of the way.

Fuckin Ryobi though, so many random ass tools.
>>
>>25047512
i wonder if ryobi to dewalt adapter is the go

i heard that some tools have the circuitry in them and others have them in the battery and it can be bad to use those adapters if you mix them up
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>>25047519
DeWalt tools normally have 3 pins to work, a +, -, and T. The T pin is the one that has to be tricked, I have seen it done fairly easily, it’s a temp sensor that reads the resistance between the T pin and - I believe, so the adapters very likely have a resistor built in to trick the DeWalt tools, but if it’s built like that, make sure your battery doesn’t run too hot. Some tools have extra pins, think like the HP and Octane and probably some HO packs where the tool’s electronics notice the better packs and will run harder, but they will normally run fine without those extra pins, however it will be slightly less powerful if it doesn’t get the info from a high demand pack.

The other way around, I’m not sure. I gotta look at some of the Ryobi tools. It’s typically something similar, and many older and lower power tools don’t even have the temp sensors. Typically the battery has most of the protection built into the pack rather than the tool, so as long as the adapter gets the + and - and whatever 3rd pin on the tool for temp gets the reading it wants, then it will work fine. They can make the tool a little clunky and awkward though and 2x4.0Ah Ryobi packs in the US are $79 so you’re choice. And the newest Ryobi HP tools probably won’t run at 100% off an adapter, but then again those tools probably want to see the data pin from the more expensive HP batteries to run at full power anyway.
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>>25047519
>>25047603
Just looked at some of the stuff, the Ryobi batteries have 4 pins, but all of the tools I have only have 2 pins, the + and - to power the tool. None of the tools are HP though, they likely have a 3rd pin to notice the HP packs and run with a little more power.

The Ryobi charger had contacts for all 4 pins though. Remember that the 18V stuff is backwards compatible with old NiCd packs and the new packs work on old tools, so if I had to guess, pin #3 or #4 is to communicate with the charger and let the charger know it’s lithium and not NiCd.

But that makes it easy for DeWalt packs to power Ryobi tools if the tools only want the + and - pins. I’m sure DeWalt has protection built into the packs like most other companies. The only 18V pack I have seen with no protection in the pack was HF’s Bauer, and that battery also had like 5 or 6 pins because the charger had to take care of the balancing, and I’m hoping the tool has low voltage and temp protection but who knows because it’s HF.
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>>25047519
>>25047647
Here’s an example of a battery with no circuitry in it. These 12V batteries don’t have room for the protection board, so there are lots of pins. + and - for power, a T pin for the temp pin inside the battery, and then the other 3 pins are for each individual cell because lithium packs need to be balanced when they’re charged.

The charger has all 6 pins, 2 to actually charge, 1 to make sure the battery isn’t too hot or cold, and 3 to check voltages on each of the 3 cells.

The tool has 3, + and - for power (and the tool will shut off when power gets low) and then the T sensor so the tool can shut off if the battery gets too hot.
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>>25046450

Thank you for all the info, got a few questions...

I have a little ryobi drill/impact driver combo, I saw your posts about needing those - so I'm covered there.

I'm thinking of grabbing that 2767-21B kit - Seems like its around 350 + tax and I can do store pickup at Ace or HD to skip shipping. I was talking to you earlier about the HF impact / air guns / etc. I think I'm going to spend a little more on this 2767 and be good to go?

I'm also not sure if I should spend an extra $100 for the 2767-22 kit. It comes with a hard plastic case and and extra battery. I can't find any good articles or YT vids testing the battery life. I'm assuming I would be ok with a single battery for weekend projects.

I also need some sort of tool to cut into sheet metal to install a roll bar. I have a crappy little jigsaw from harbor freight and the tiny low powered battery dremel.

What is a good tool to make clean easy cuts on thin sheet metal (rear package shelf area on a miata)
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>>25047853
>2767
>Miata
gave me a chuckle
get the 2962-22 instead if you really want the extra power, but any wheel, brakes, and suspension stuff shouldn't even be torqued over 100 ftlbs
the 2767 is going to break everything on a miata

and step drill bits are made for drilling into sheet metal
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>>25047888
Checked

Those new mid torques do have a lot of balls, but if anon gets the bigger one he can always dial down the torque, but the mid torque might not get a crankshaft bolt on his friend’s Honda. Weigh the options. Also that 2962 is brand new and still expensive. The 2767 has been out a couple years and can often be found for $249-$299 with a free 5.0Ah pack.

>>25047853
If you already have Ryobi, why not pic related? Brand new, 1200ft-lbs breakaway, pretty compact for the power, $199 right now plus HD I think still has 2x 4.0Ah HP batteries for $99 to make sure it hits hard. The newest brushless mid-torque from Ryobi HP is like 600 breakaway, similar to that brand new Milwaukee mid torque anon posted about and similar to the Ridgid everybody loves for closer to $150, or $180 with a 4.0 HP battery and charger. I would tell you to go high torque for the first one, but those 600ft-lb mid torques should handle 95%+ of what you will run into with /o/ stuff unless you’re doing trucks in the rust belt.
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>>25047853
What kind of holes do you need to cut? Aviation snips, dremel with the little cutting wheels, they sell metal cutting jigsaw blades, angle grinder, drill bits of all sorts including regular bits up to 1/2”, or step bits like anon mentioned, or hole saw bits. Depends what you need to do.
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>>25047888
I was mostly wanting an impact for being able to break loose tough bolts. The car has no rust and every bolt I have worked on so far has been fairly easy to take off by hand. You are right maybe I am going a little overkill here?

>>25048071
I was wrong, I just went and checked - my drill and impact driver are 12v Dewalt.

I want to get a few other tools too (ratcheting wrenches / snap ring pliers). Maybe I should grab this cheaper one and spend the difference on other tools.

Other than using the impact to break bolts loose on the Miata,he biggest job I can see myself doing is maybe helping my friend swap a clutch in his Nissan Frontier (We live in AL, his truck is also pretty good shape/no rusty bolts).

I see the $150 rigid kit (18V OCTANE Brushless Cordless 1/2 in. Impact Wrench Kit with (1) 4.0 Ah Battery and Charger) you are talking about. Think I would be good to go for most Miata stuff with this kit, and grab the corded HF impact you mentioned earlier if I run into something super tough to remove?

>>25048082
I need to cut some sections out of the interior sheet metal below the package shelf. This pic shows the spots. I want to make the cuts clean, I saw a guy do these cuts with snips and it turned out kind of rough. I will also have to trim back some plastic interior panels, but I think my tiny dremel is going to be perfect for those.
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>>25048278

One more tool I forgot to ask about - I built a wooden bench and need to put a vice on it.

Harbor Freight vices all seem to get roasted in the reviews I have found.

I think I need a 5 or 6 inch vice. I will be putting the diff housing in it to remove/install new bushings down the road.

What is a good $ to spend on a vice and are there any specific ones you guys can recommend?
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>>25048361

This is the part of the diff that I need to grab w/ a vice. I'm assuming I should get a 6 inch vice - that seems to be the standard?
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Are these really that dangerous as they say on YouTube?
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Loving this one. Makes certain jobs a lot easier
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>>25048375

I am going to need to use some of those soon. I saw this setup where the compressor has an extrra set of hooks to hold it snug to the spring. I'm assuming this makes them a little safer?
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>>25042490
>Wouldn't an adjustable one be enough for all?
You will round off nuts or bolt heads. The adjustable wrench has a limited number of faces contacting the nut/bolt so all the force goes onto that limited number. Now consider the 6-sided socket that contacts all faces of the nut or bolt. You can see which one is able to put high torque on removing the nut without rounding it.
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>>25040850
I never bought any of that shit. Got a toolbox and bought sockets and wrenches as I needed them.
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>>25040986
Is your Ryobi gear doing well? I had a one+ drill and the batteries kept fucking out. Switched to Milwaukee fuel after that
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>>25048375
The spring on your vehicle is designed to handle the entire axel weight at MAX LOAD at whatever silly speed the vehicle is rated for.
Which quickly translates to 1,5 tons at 170km/h, PER SPRING.

Its not that spring compressors are dangerous, is that spring compressors failing is very dangerous.
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>>25040850
>Are those ultra expensive tools even worth it for some occasional standard wrenching?
No. You won't regret getting good shit, but you definitely don't need it.
>General hints for buying tools?
Sort by popular, get first thing that pops up that doesn't smell like lowest tier chink shit made of plastic. For example, 'metal is too soft' is a valid criticisim, so if comment sounds reliable, skip those. Most countries have their own respective local brands/local popular chink imports of quality stuff

also
>Was thinking to get a big set for wrenching that has everything in it
Maybe don't bother with this one, just get basic set of sockets and basic set of wrenches (maybe get two sets of wrenches, cars kinda like providing scenarios where two sets are necessary). Depending on a car, you'll be able to do 90% of shit you'll need. Depending on a car, you might also need specific tools that you could never guess otherwise, and could never find in usual 'everything' sets anyway, meaning super big set of chink shit is not going to save you anyway.
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>>25040850
Trust me you don't need quality tools for the occasional repair. Buy the best mechanic tool set at harbor freight for a few hundred dollars and be done with it. If you somehow manage to break something either go back and have the tool warrantied or go buy a higher quality version on Amazon. Just don't buy cheap drill bits or taps, if either one of those break inside of something you're going to be really pissed.
t. wrench for a living
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>>25048375
These are fine. Successfully used an electric impact on the AutoZone rentals on Honda springs which are tall and have lots of coils. The most important thing is to inspect the tool before you use it and make sure they don't start twisting like in the picture >>25048397 otherwise the spring can go flying
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>>25048370
HF just released a whole new line of vices, they’re nicer than the old cheap ass ones, but they’re also the same thing as slightly cheaper ones on Amazon but rebranded for HF.

And if you want the Ridgid, it’s not bad, but remember what I said about the limited lineup. The mid torque Ryobi will probably be in a deal some time soon, and it’s only $180 witn t he battery and charger.

And that pic, a bunch of different things could cut that metal. Try the tiny cutoff wheel on the Dremel, if it’s not enough, maybe the jigsaw with a good metal blade could do it.
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>>25049380

Oh cool, I had not seen these HF doyle vices yet. The blue ones had terrible reviews when I last looked.

I grabbed the rigid, the 6 inch doyle + rigid comes in right around the price of the Milwaukee impact kit.
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>>25049498
Used vices can be a good buy too because you can get some heavy duty ones for cheap, just gotta jump on it when a boomer dies.

There was just a thread on /diy/ about those new Doyle vices, and somebody else posted what looked like the exact same thing from an Amazon brand for a few bucks less so it’s up to you. Something about the iron, they’re like the most affordable vices made of the proper steel because the cheap older HF ones are made of some dogshit potmetal. It was about ductile iron or something like that.

HF also has pic related this weekend tho, although I hate shopping there with the prices all going way up and dogshit warranties on everything besides basic hand tools.
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>>25049527
damn, might use this to grab that daytona jack
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>>25045966
I ended up buying a bootleg Makita "800nm" Makita for 62 dollars since I rarely use high torque guns anyway, I figure if it can produce even 60% of it's rated claim it would be good enough compared to my 12V Milwaukee tools.
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>>25050000
Oops wasted those digits with an extra Makita in my sentence
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>>25048375
ive got an oemtools one from amazon, despite all the dangers ive heard about them either on various forums or youtube, i never felt in any danger at all. something worth noting, i didnt use an impact, many spring compressors explicitly say to not use an impact on them, others dont say anything. i played it safe and just used ratchets. time consuming but beats getting rekt by an exploding spring.
>>25048397
most of them come with those locking/securing pins/hooks to stop the spring from suddenly coming loose.
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>>25050000
Checked

That fag AvE did a rundown on a $35 Makita from Ali and it actually held up ok. I’m not sure about 60% of any claimed chink numbers (see 30,000mAh 18650 cells) but they already have the brushless motors in China and could easily clone the hammer and anvil so maybe it will end up decently close to the original. I don’t know if I would trust chink knockoff battery packs in those high demand tools though.
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>>25042572
I have that impact and it kicks fucking ass. It blasted thru CV axle nuts like nothing

I wish Dewalt would come out with an electric ratchet like Milwaukee but as a boomer homeowner I can tell you their gardening tools are great. I have their 60v string trimmer and it fucks
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>>25050140
Nah I'm going to use my Makita batteries, I'll pick up the real high torque next Black Friday or something.

>>25048375
I used the OEM tools one (with an impact, just be smart and take it slow) and I'm still alive.
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>>25050124
Ive used the OEM tools ones about a dozen times probably, both the McPherson compressors and the older style on car coil spring compresser, the one that goes inside the center of the spring for older double a-arm cars with coil springs. They both work great. I’ve lately been thinking about getting this Eastwood one, it’s very close to the factory special tool we use at the Porsche dealership on everything from sports cars to cayennes. Three different sizes Interchangeable to the screw mechanism and you can mix match sizes on top and bottom so it also works for variable rate springs and those beehive ones. The one we have at the dealer is some super heavy duty forged thing, Idk if this Eastwood one is some cast chinkshit though
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>>25050160
This is the other style OEM tools one I own, and I’ve got 4 of these >>25050155
like this dude posted. Overall they work pretty well i mean im not dead
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>>25050148
Milwaukee was smart by taking over that automotive tech market from the tool trucks. There was a lot of money left on that market while DeWalt was going for contractors along with Makita and Milwaukee was trying to hang onto the sparkies, plumbers, and HVAC guys.

What is that pic? Some new shit coming out? I wouldn’t be surprised as DeWalt just released those new stubby impacts plus a new compact battery to match them, and those are definitely more mechanic-focused tools

>>25050160
I think Eastwood is that website brand, right? I was looking at some of their random crap and it looks like affordable rebranded mid-tier stuff. They didn’t really stick that name on super cheap eBay tier tools,

>>25050165
It’s a lot of energy, but so is a gallon of gasoline, as is a 40psi+ tire. Be smart and don’t use a damaged tool or fuck with damaged parts and you will probably survive. I blame the accidents on the retarded stoned grease monkeys who can’t manage to install more than 2 of the 6 or 8 screws on the bottom engine cover after an oil change.
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>>25050234
The one at the dealer looks like it could be this Schwaben brand one if not very close. Looks like the Eastwood one is a copy of it. No brand on the dealership one it just had the Porsche tool number on it for what cabinet it belongs on
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>>25050148
dewalt is the best balance for homeowner/weekend wrencher.
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>>25050258
Our mac guy always trying to sell us deWalt tools I think they share batteries
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>>25050270
Owned by the same Company (Stanley B&D).
>>
Been wrenching for a couple years now. Got a really good christmas a few years ago and my dad got me a few deep sockets of metric and SAE by snapon and MAC. past that i've crafstman box wrenches and when i normally need a one off socket or tool i just go get a crafstman. unless its something that i will use a LOT (like a good set of screwdrivers) i dont go for gucchi brands. im still in the search for a 1/4" socket wrench about 7" in length in the budget of 30-100 if you guys have reccomendations
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>>25050290
All my 1/4" body ratchets have 3/8" anvils, but I do have a 1/4" ko-ken at work and I like it
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>>25050307
Also the ko-ken USA mark up is insane, buy off Amazon Japan
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>>25050307
Koken is the shit I use their semi wobbles as my main extensions on gearwrench 120 tooth ratchets with OEM tools sockets
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>>25050290
>>25050307
thanks! i found them online and the 72tooth is perfect also. gonna take >>25050308 advice and find it a bit cheaper. honestly thanks fellas gonna order these tonight and i look forward to using them. heres the beast, happy wrenching!
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>>25050148
MAC electric ratchets use DeWalt batteries and are pretty close in price to Milwaukee equivalents.
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>>25040850
Harbor freight 225 piece set is goated
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>>25052487
301 piece homie get those torx bits



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