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Routine maintenance edition

Prev: >>1880919 (Cross-thread)

Links:
Sheldon
https://sheldonbrown.com
Park Tool
https://www.youtube.com/@parktool/videos
RJ
https://www.youtube.com/@RJTheBikeGuy/videos
Moustache Man
https://www.youtube.com/c/SethsBikeHacks/videos
>>
>>1882608
I never really maintain my bike except lubing the chain once in half a year.
If something breaks i'll replace it but thats it
>>
>>1882608
Old one wasnt even at the bump limit yet
Bad form
>>
>cripple bike
>>
>>1882711
>>1882608
>carbon full suspension Cannondale Lefty

How much is that shit?
>>
>>1882713
Down payment on a 1 bedroom in the midwest
>>
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>Specialized
>buy up dozens of LBS and turn them into Specialized-only shops because Trek is doing this
>in early 2022, suddenly say they're going to do direct-to-consumer
>but keep buying more LBS to turn into Specialized-only shops
>piss off a lot of brick-and-mortar Specialized dealers
>direct-to-consumer shit is not taking off because Specialized themselves can't keep anything in stock and don't have a backorder waiting list system
>Jan 11, 2023 - announce they bought a building near Boulder for $15 million
>Jan 12, 2023 - announce layoff

Wtf is going on with this company?
>>
Can anyone recommend a good blowtorch, maybe the one in the picture?
>>
>>1882837
probably women on the board
>>
This

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/27-5-inch-mountain-bike-rockrider-st-540/_/R-p-301097?mc=8500757&c=BLACK

Or that?

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/mountain-bike-st-540-v2-27-5-blue/_/R-p-335529?mc=8667311&c=BLUE_TURQUOISE
>>
>>1882888
>decathlon
oh nononono

Blue paintjob looks less cheap and having a single in front is better, especially with a budget brand drivetrain.
>>
>>1882903
Blue is 1x10,black is 2x9
Can't wrap my head around the difference.
I'll use it to tour around and maybe commute
>>
>>1882905
Get the 1x version, Advent X is a brilliant mech
>>
>>1882905
Having a double in front means the gap between gears will be smaller (if you're just a casual you probably won't care) and the gear range will be slightly wider so there's a harder hardest gear and easier easiest gear (unless you're going up or down a very steep hill you probably won't care).

OTOH having a single chainring in front simplifies things by removing front shifting completely. If you wanted different gearing later than what comes on it it's possible to change parts but it wouldn't be super cheap.

>>1882913
>microshit
>>
>>1882914
9s Shimano turns into shit very quickly, absolutely horrible. Only 10s SRAM is worse.
Microshift is great - crisp and durable. I would go for 2x10 M5120, but that isn't an option here
>>
>ETRTO 35-584

Am I correct this is a 27.5x1.3?
>>
>>1882905
2x is obsolete on mountain bikes, get 1x. or get an entirely different bike without suspension.
>>
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What happened to my trusty Shimano Tourney TX derailleur? Wasn't the plastic disk supposed to stop this from happening?
>>
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This is what my current bar+stem combo looks like. 100mm stem and the bars have a reach of 105 or 100mm (couldn't measure it exactly) and a drop of 160mm. The drop is way too big and I don't like the classic shape because to reach the hoods, I have to turn my hand down a bit. The bar I'm thinking of getting has a reach of 75mm and a drop of 130mm. Should I get a 130mm stem if I get the new bar? Overall the hoods would be 5mm further away which should be fine...
>>
>>1882929
yes, closer to 1.35 actually
>>
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>>1882964
no, your limit screw is supposed to stop that from happening, dosk disks are useless
also holy shit that grime what the fuck is wrong with you disgusting subhuman
>>1882967
yes you should
in any case, those brake levers are meant to have that little downward bend behind them, if you install them on modern bars with flat ramps they're gonna look off, and feel off too, similar to pic related
>>
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>>1882969
...so you should also consider getting modern brake levers
>>
>>1882969
>pic related
But it looks like the end of the brake lever isn't even at same height as the bottom of the drops. Do you have another pic?
>>
>>1882969
>also holy shit that grime what the fuck is wrong with you disgusting subhuman
calm down, it's my winter bso which can't really be cleaned due to it freezing out and isn't even worth it
>>
>>1882964
did you shorten your chain recently by any chance?
also jesus christ service your chain once or twice a year at least
>>
>>1882969
>supposed
that works only if the pivots are not worn
also the cage plates can flex slightly
worn teeth can also throw a chain off
>>
>>1882837
sounds like a classic real estate scam, .ie fattening before the slaughter
the company's assets get diverted into a more Liquid capital so that the butcher can make a quick exit
>>
>>1882944
No suspension bike costs more, unless you want a townie.
I just want to commute and bash myself on centuries during the weekend.
Dropbars I find uncomfortable
>>
>>1882975
Nope, but I did notice the shifting was shit before it broke, had to shift 2 gears up and 1 down to get into the gear I wanted to, otherwise it wouldn't shift with some gears.

Wonder why the limit went out of align though, few weeks ago it was perfectly fine.
>>
What's the best way to raise my handlebars? I need to raise them by about an inch, but the stem is already at the very top of the head tube.
Should I replace the stem or get a taller head tube?
>>
>>1882990
do some core exercises so you won't have to
>>
>>1882991
No. At their current Max height my bars are just below below the seat height. It's too aggressive a stance for a touring bike. It makes using the drops impractical
>>
>>1882972
no sorry, just grabbed it from a quick google
but that's kinda what I was trying to illustrate, if you install an old style brake lever with the intention of having the back part line up with a flat ramp, the lever is gonna stick up like that, which makes for awkward hood braking and near impossible drops braking
as opposed to a brake lever like >>1882970 where the top part is flat and the lever points straight down
>>
>>1882990
Stem riser. Or high angle stem. Or adjustable stem. Or riser bars. Or this >>1882991.
>>
>>1882993
Yeah I know what you mean. Just bought the same stem in 130mm from ebay and I'll order the new bars to try it out. I was thinking about maybe (really not sure) getting the Campagnolo Veloce Ergopowers. So if it really doesn't work out, I'll get them.
>>
>>1882990
before you try anything take note of the length of the brake and shift cables, they may be too short to allow the handle bars to raise any further
to reach maximum hight requires re cabling and handle bars with a massive rise distance, aka BMX bars, or flipped and flared drop bars
>>
>>1882964
Look at those screws, probably the juction between the cage and the tensioner got rusted and broke down under tension. (maybe a rough change triggered it). Need better pictures of the thing properly clean to analize the breakdown better
>>
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>>1883004
that thing? doesn't look rusted
>>
>>1883007
The tensioner got literally tore apart by force. As they said already overtension in the chain caused by shorter chain could be the cause. Or didyou hit something even without falling?
>>
>>1883021
Didn't hit anything, shifted down to go up a hill and applied full force at the same time, bam! Stock chain, never done anything to it
>>
do bike brakes make enough heat to justify floating rotors?
>>
>>1882967
word of caution, that's a cinelli cockpit right? It might have a 26.4 clamp.

do not overtighten it with a 26 bar. Shim it.
>>
>>1883031
>It might have a 26.4 clamp.
What the fuck were they thinking?
>Hey boss, do we make our handlebars 26.0mm like true Italians, or 25.4 like most of the world?
>Huh, what? Ah, yes, 26.4, yes.
>>
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>>1883032
they were thinking you buy a cinelli stem and a cinelli handlebar and for a long time everyone with a nice bike did that and italian bikes were/are the best

they are based

The italian contrarian bottom bracket standard is the one that annoys me, pretty impressive that it actually endures though, considering how retarded it is for several reasons.
>>
Why does my touring bike feel "slow" ?

My friend and I did an experiment. He has a similar bike with same sized wheels and same tires. He's like 25 pounds heavier than me. We bike side by side on a flat road up to 30km/h and grab onto each other so we're going the same speed. Then we stop pedaling and let go of each other. Right away I start to slow down quicker than him.... Why would that be? Is my wheel hubs or something? It can't be weight or aero because he's heavier than me and much bigger cross sectionally.
>>
>>1883059
It's because he's heavier. That's how inertia works.
>>
>>1883060
Yea but wouldn't that also add more rolling friction
>>
>>1883061
A tiny bit more drag on his bearings perhaps, but so little it'd be tough to measure.
>>
>>1883064
Most of the added friction would be the larger contact patch from the rubber tires bearing more weight
>>
>>1882980
Specialized bought a building they didn't own previously. They didn't sell their building.
>>
>>1883059
this isn't super scientific because wheels behave differently on the road, but try spinning your wheels and see when they stop.

A 'good' hub should spin for a couple minutes.
>>
>>1883061
Fuck me you are thick
>>
>>1883076
for me it's Profile Elite, the loudest hub.
>>
>>1882854
Bernzomatic at your lowes or home depot

Get one with the auto lighter, its worth the cost
>>
>>1883077
F = C*N , F being rolling resistance force, C being rolling resistance coefficient, N being normal force. The higher the weight the higher the normal force, thus higher rolling resistance.
>>
>>1883030
ehhh, I won't pretend to be an engineer, but they can get pretty fucking hot. And there are a few floating rotor models out there, but not a ton. All the other rotors seem to do a pretty good job, so I don't view it as necessary.
>>
>>1883076
>A 'good' hub should spin for a couple minutes.
Please do this and take a video for us. The only hubs I've ever seen spin for minutes are high quality older cup-and-cone hubs, specifically because they don't have contact seals.
>>
>>1883092
It must be wild to not understand the basics of inertia and still google a formula to prove your hubs are rubbish lmao
>>
>>1883059
>>1883092
made me laugh

consider the following:
if you roll a paper ball and a steel ball of the same size at the same speed, which one will roll further?

>Well the steel ball is going to have more rolling resistance so it should stop first
>>
>>1883031
I think it's actually 26mm. I measured the bars and the clamp area was 26,1mm, but these are the "original" Cinelli bars that were put on the bike when it was built up.
>>
>>1883126
>>1883031
Now I'm not sure. I looked at some models on ebay and they're often for 26,4mm bars (supposedly). I don't want to get these overpriced Nitto shims or something, and I also heard that a Coke can cutout is way too thin...not sure what to do.
>>
>>1883128
paper or plastic is fine. Find an old plastic folder / journal and cut up the cover.
>>
or use maybe 3 or 4 layers of coke can
>>
>>1883129
But how do I actually know whether it's 26 or 26,4mm? It's the Cinella XA stem, but it seems like not all of them have the same clamp size.
>>
>>1883131
if you have vernier calipers or digital calipers you can verify the current diameter of the clamp. However if the frame is used you dont really know what other people have done before, so whatever you measure it as now might not be what it originally was.

This is okay though because wherever it is now, you want to bend it the least to minimise the chance of the aluminium tearing. So it doesn't actually matter what the measurements are. What matters is that your handlebar:
a) fits in the quill without prying it open much
b) doesnt require significant bending of the quill to clamp on

(a) is a matter of finding a handlebar that isn't too thick at the clamping point. (b) is a matter of shimming to the point where the clamp doesn't need to bend much to grip the bars. Lets say your handlebar is a loose fit and needs to be shimmed. If you cut 4 pieces of coke can out, slip them in one by one, if you get all 4 in and thers still room for another, keep going. If you can only slip 2 or 3 in then that's the amount you need. Dont force any shims in, the clamp can close down on a small gap, it just shouldnt be bent excessively
>>
>>1883134
Ok I think I'll have to check it out once the bars are in. I just read about some failures of the Cinelli XA stem lol, so that's not very reassuring.
>>
Is it possible to use a 10 speed crankset with an 8 speed chain and front derailleur?
I want to put it on an older endurance road bike that I mainly commute on, 50/34 feels a little too much for how I use it.
>>
>>1883141
Changing the cassette is the proper and cheaper way to fix this problem. Going from 50/34 to 46/30 in front is more or less the same as going from 11-28 to 11-32 in back. Would need a new chain too but it's 8 speed so both combined would be like $30 (assuming you or someone you know has the tools to install it).
>>
>>1883142
The problem is, I stripped the threads on the crankset and it is a very cheap one, I'm going to have to replace it anyway.
I've already installed an 11-32 cassette and a new chain, and going from 50/34 to 46/30 I would only need to shorten it.
>>
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>>1883144
Dunno about the 10 speed thing but get a claris crankset and git gud.
>>
>>1883144
>>1883142
I guess there's no point in looking for compatibility problems, I'll go for a Claris crankset instead.
>>
>>1883145
Yeah, you're right
>>
>>1883138
yea so you should do your best to not make things worse, but the design is shit in the first place and prone to breaking.
>>
>>1883141
yes, it's possible
it's also a good idea if you ever plan on bikepacking/touring with it, at some point 34-32 as your lowest gear won't be low enough
>>
>>1883151
I would also need a 10 speed chain to make it work, which wasn't in my plans.
In the end, I want the bike to be as reliable as possible, I'll stick to 8 speed for now.
I have a dedicated steel bike with a rack and panniers, there's no need to make the range excessively low
>>
https://bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/claris-r2000.html
>New CLARIS R2000 series correspond to entry riders. Riding style is not race oriented, but easy sports, long touring, town cruising with casual cloths, shopping and also commuting for daily use. The bike with CLARIS is a partner of the rider. Having the bike make riders feel happy. It's sporty looks but it promises that the opportunity of comfortable riding.
Why can't Shitmano afford to put a single native english speaker on the payroll?

>>1883151
Claris 3x is always a thing. Plus it's super cheap because fucking no one wants it.
>>
>>1883153
you can run an 8sp chain on 10sp cassettes. Bigger number of speeds = thinner.
>>
Any good chink mini light? All I can find is big, bulky lights almost the size of a flashlight, I just want something small.
>>
>>1883030
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3FCLdiVGWc
>>
>>1883155
>Claris 3x is always a thing. Plus it's super cheap because fucking no one wants it.

Claris 3x is no longer a thing. And the r2000 claris is the generation before current generation claris. The r2000 have the brake cables not tucked under.

The lowest 3x road bike set is Sora. That r2000 claris is a great mech. Reliable and no misshifts and doesnt eat cables.
>>
>>1883166
R2000 is current, 2400 had the brake cables out the side, all the necessary 3x parts are on performancebike for about $120 combined (or amazon for more).

https://www.performancebike.com/search?s=claris+r2030
>>
>>1883159
>AD
>>
>>1883169
the UK has stricter rules on shilling and they're sponsored so they just slap the AD disclaimer on like every vid, doesn't mean it's less factual than most other videos
>>
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>>1883176
The "AD" ones are the ones with overt shilling, the non-AD ones are just their standard level of uselessness.

> doesn't mean it's less factual than most other videos
Of course not, that would be a mathematical impossibility.
>>
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>>1883181
for example
https://www.youtube.com/@LinusTechTips/videos
this is GCN but with computers/phone/tech and they're american so they don't use the disclaimer
>>
*canadian
>>
>>1883141
there are speeds on crankset now?
>>
>>1883151
what about 34-34 that is my lowest
i also am looking for a sub compact for the future if that is the right word
>>
>>1883181
look at those npc faces trying to think
>>
chain lube:
I have a generic commuter bike. I only put 100km/week into it. 6 years ago I bought half a liter of Rock N Roll Gold, and it's almost run out.

I'm lazy at bike maintenance and don't apply it as often as I should, should I buy something else, change what I do, or get the same thing again?
>>
>>1883197
that's GRX, you shouldn't assume that the chainline will be the same, the chain width is also different so it won't be a perfect fit
>>
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back from winter break, how consoomistic has /n/ turned to since my crusade against (((specialized))) slowed down.

you guys still shilling hydro/disc and anything other than square taper bbs or have you wisened up yet?
>>
>>1883207
there's nothing wrong with correctly installed external threaded bbs
>>
>>1883209
stay classy /n/ ill come back in another month or so
>>
>>1883204
https://bike.bikegremlin.com/5855/the-best-bicycle-chain-lubricant/
>>
>>1883211
thanks anon. this is much easier and cheaper than everything I was considering.
>>
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Need some help finding a bike rack to fit my bike. Tried one I had laying and it didn't fit, then one from a store that also didn't fit. I have 700x38C tires with fenders on them. I'll include some pictures of the set up.
>>
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>>1883215
2nd pic
>>
>>1883215
Lower the connecting brake cable to the tire to get more clearance and more braking power.
I don't see a reason why a rack wouldn't fit other than the rack being too small. To install it to the same eyelets you'll need longer bolts, preferably heat treated, and you'll want to mount the fender to the inside with nuts to get the rack mounts torqued properly.
>>
>>1883217
Bit new to this so you're saying just move that chrome metal piece that has the 3 cables coming out of it closer to the tire.

Then just use the same eyelets that the fenders are currently using for the rack, but just get longer bolts so that it can house both with the fenders on inside of the bolt?
>>
I've just found that my chain is at 0.75 wear on my gravel bike, so I'm looking to change it out in the next few days.

Saw a few articles saying that I should switch out the cassette too at that much wear. Seems a bit excessive to me as this is the first chain replaced on the bike. Or is this correct?

Also, looking to get some spare cassettes as on sale at the moment. What is the difference between an 11-34 and an 11-34t cassette?
>>
>>1883273
Nah, your cassette is fine.

> What is the difference between an 11-34 and an 11-34t cassette?
They mean the same thing. 11 is the number of teeth on the smallest sprocket, 34 is the number of teeth on the largest sprocket, t just means "teeth".
>>
>>1883275
Ah great, cheers for that.

My bike currently has a Shimano CS-HG500-10 11/34T 10spd cassette. I was just looking to buy a spare cassette a Shimano Tiagra HG500 10 Speed Road cassette 11-34. Are these interchangeable?
>>
>>1883276
From what I can tell, it's the same cassette. I did some googling and found it listed under different names, Tiagra, Deore, GRX. Seems like marketing bullshit.
The way Shimano names their parts, CS- means it's a casette, HG500 is an arbitrary designation where the HG stands for HyperGlide, and -10 means ten speed. Then 11-34 is the range. So yeah, it's the same cassette.
>>
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>>1883141
The other thing you can do is take a nice old mtb triple, and delete the middle ring. That's usually the one that's worn out anyway. Move the big ring to the middle with SS chainring bolts. Then you have an extreme subcompact.
>>
>>1883217
>Lower the connecting brake cable to the tire to get more clearance and more braking power.
People commonly run high straddle in the rear. He's got soft brake pads. It might work well
>>1883216
Don't go futzing with your cantilevers without understanding them and with no specific goals... Leave it alone if it works well.
>>
>>1883236
Look up a tutorial on setting up cantilever brakes for maximum power, it's pretty simple.
Yes, fenders on the inside and rack on the outside. That way you don't need spacers and the bolts have the least chance of breaking.
As for a type of rack, the more adjustable the better. Because when something isn't adjustable enough, dremmels, hacksaws and chisels inevitably come into play, which inevitably fuck up the look and often these permanent modifications make the rack impossible to put on a different bike.
Make sure you set the rack as low to the fender as possible to lower the center of gravity for best handling and stability.
I highly advise you to take your wheels to a cheap friendly bike shop to get them tensioned, that will save you from being angry at rim brakes for rubbing loose untrue wheels. Took me a several years to understand that wheels need adjustment at least once a season and retuning brakes is a pointless waste of time when the wheels are at fault.
Best of luck. Take care of your bike and I hope it doesn't fail you in your travels
>>
>>1883287
If the cable in the way of the rack, the brake has to be readjusted.
He has to know how to set his stuff up himself anyway. As long as he doesn't dig into pad adjustment, as they're already cartridges, it won't take much time.
If I were there giving him instructions, the rack would be on the bike in under 15 minutes ;)
>>
>>1883289
>Yes, fenders on the inside and rack on the outside.
No. Rack struts put a shear load on the bolt. Moving it further away adds leverage to that force. You want to have 'spacers' (washers) anyway as they deform to allow the bolt to be tightened better.
The fenders should go OUTSIDE the rack, or, attach them with p-clamps.

>As for a type of rack, the more adjustable the better.
The exact opposite of the advice i'd usually give. The 'adjustable' parts of racks add flex, a point of failure, and make them preform worse. They are usually concessions to running disc brakes or on the cheapest racks. The best rear racks are not adjustable on the lower part. Bending a rack to fit it is standard and does not fuck up the look nor is it permanent. There is no extreme modification he would ever have to make to fit a rear rack on that bike aside from shortening the top arms which is purely for aesthetics.

>wheels need tensioning every season
no lol they do not. You've just been unlucky with bad wheels.
>>
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>>1883215
Here are two examples of topeak racks anon. The one on the left is most common now in bike shops.
It is designed to fit around disc brakes. The bolts go in recessed holes. Avoid this type of rack. If your bolt head strips out it is more difficult to remove. It works with less tools. It's more akward. It has no beniefit for you. Also see how the lower arms are adjustable, but they are not on the right? The rack on the right is stronger.

Find a rack like on the right.
If you want something really nice I suggest Tubus Cosmo or other tubus rack off bike24 or something. But these better (blackburn, jandd, even cheng huor) oldschool racks also do float around for very cheap or free used.

Don't get a disc rack and don't get a rack that is adjustable on the bottom half
>>
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>>1883291
well yes sure but he can cross that bridge when he comes to it and it does not look to me like it would even

>If I were there giving him instructions, the rack would be on the bike in under 15 minutes ;)
I will come as well and then we can argue and take hours.

>>1883215
the other thing to look for in a rear rack design, is dual top rails, like on pic rel. This allows you to mount panniers lower, and keep the rack top free. It's far superior for touring.
>>
>>1883294
Room temperature IQ post
>>
>>1883215
Lastly, if the lower mounts on a rack do not line up with your lower bosses, it is trivial to bent the rack a little so that they do. You don't want to do this lots of times but once or twice is normal. It's only going to be a 5mm or so difference.

The upper arms can also be bent and should be totally adjustable. They will always be compatible with your bike.
The only 'does it fit or not' question is if it clears your wheel/fender. 26" racks might not, other than that, they mostly will. And 26" is a pretty dead standard so new racks probably all will.
>>
>>1883303
refute me bitch
>>
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>>1883303
tubus are the best racks
see any adjustable shit here?
>>
>>1883300
You'll hardly tell a thing when you aren't hauling 30kg of bricks. Have you ever seen a snapped rack leg? I've only ever seen snapped bolts going into frames.
Having the height and angle right is important.
>>1883304
The first rack I ever bought couldn't be installed on my tripple triangle frame because the upper mounts were too low and too far for it to level the surface.
I've used my fully adjustable rack for over 5 years on several bikes and never had a problem with it, both 28" and 26". Its only downside is that it's 200g heavier than the light barely adjustable one.
>>1883307
I have no idea what this brand is and I couldn't care fucking less who makes racks and what models there are. If I have to choose, I'll choose one that gives me more freedom.
>>
>>1883305
>Moving it further creates more leverage
Exactly. The rack leg needs to be bolted straight to the frame, the fender is mounted to the exiting side of the bolt, secured with a nut.
>bad wheels
How much do wheels need to cost to not be bad? If you look at one, you can easily tell, that steel spokes, being harder than the aluminum hub flanges, will dig into them, loosening the tension over time. Happens to all wheels, even hand built pre-tensioned ones.
>>
>>1883313
Okay, I guess straight spoked wheels don't suffer from the same problem, but low spoke count wheels and touring are different worlds.
>>
>>1883311
the issue is they're just inherently prone to more flex so they ride worse, not really that they're liable to break.

>freedom
oh you're a brainlet lol
>>
>>1883313
>Exactly. The rack leg needs to be bolted straight to the frame, the fender is mounted to the exiting side of the bolt, secured with a nut.
Oh right i think we're just confusing each other discussing this. What you suggest is smart but most of the time it doesn't work because it will foul the chain on the lower cogs.
>>
>>1883318
Always worked for me, 7, 8, and even 10 speed. Disc brakes would be in the way though.
>>1883317
I've never ever felt significant flexing of the rack, because all my gear was under 15kg and I mounted it as low and strong as possible.
>brainlet
Okay, freedom isn't the right word, I meant adjustability. English isn't my first or primary language, I haven't spoken with a native speaker in years.
>>
>>1883322
I know, but there is a sense of freedom in the fact that I can put the rack on my road bike and ride fast and efficiently on smooth tarmac and the other day put it on my mtb and ride a rougher route.
Owning racks for both or having a dedicated touring bike would be excessive for me
>>
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>>1883211
>>1883214
>>
>>1883273
Worn chains wear out cassettes but if they wear together you might not experience any symptoms until after you replace the chain. If you put on the new chain and it starts slipping then the cassette's fucked too. If not then it's fine.
>>
>>1883159
ok now what about cheap mt200s?
>>
>>1883287
>>1883289
>>1883291
>>1883301
>>1883304
>>1883313
Thank you for the advice anons. Ordered a different rack and will give it another go once it arrives. Appreciate the help
>>
how much better is a caad13(2022) vs a caad9(2009)?
>>
>>1883368
Depends what you define as "better".

CAAD13 has
-the option of disc brakes
-tapered fork
-internal cable routing
-non-round seatpost
-thru-axles
-dropped seatstays
-fender mounts
-not made in USA
>>
>>1883084
thanks fren
>>
>>1883210
please don't, faggot
>>
ahem
>>
>>1883030
I think this is only important to people who ride ski lifts. if that's you, you and you've encountered "brake fade" on your descent, then maybe it will help.

but if you ride a ski lift, you're a fag.
>>
>>1883126
I have a cinelli stem that was 26.0 as well. Never heard of this 26.1 business
>>
>>1883197
chainrings are designed for specific chain widths. there are 6-8 speed chainrings and 10-11 speed chainrings
>>
>>1883214
can confirm, been using their formula for over a year now, probably two. works well and the price of maybe 2 bottles of Rock n Roll etc you get virtually a lifetime supply
>>
>>1883526
>works well and the price

*and for the price
>>
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I wonder if it's time to replace my seatpost
>>
>>1883533
meh, I've rode worse but no-name alu seatposts are like $15 on scamazon
>>
>>1883533
If it slips, definitely.
Otherwise no reason to do it
>>
>>1883286
Those are impossible to find and I'm not paying double its ebay price for shipping and import taxes
>>
>>1883533
>single bolt seatpost
should've been replaced to a two bolt seatpost a long time ago
>>
my tourney shifter refuses to click into the hardest gear / biggest chainring. the BB axle is the correct length (smallest chainring is only a couple mm away from the stays), the derailleur is for triple chainrings, and if I move it by hand it has more than enough travel to shift to the biggest chainring, but it just won't stay there, it doesn't click into place. if I remove the shifter and shift it by itself it clicks through all three speeds just fine
any ideas?
>>
>>1883577
Limit screw adjustment
>>
>>1883578
>if I move it by hand it has more than enough travel to shift to the biggest chainring, but it just won't stay there, it doesn't click into place
I.e. not limit screw
>>
>>1883578
yeah like anon said, the derailleur moves enough to shift, it just doesn't stay
removed the whole screw just in case, no difference
>>
>>1883577
Are you getting enough tension on the cable?
>>
>>1883584
seems fine, if anything there's too much tension, afraid of snapping something
>>
>>1883577
Do you have your cable routed correctly on the pinch bolt/all the guides?
>>
>>1883608
I assume so, shifting between the first two chainrings is flawless
though I guess a fresh set of cables and housing couldn't hurt
>>
>>1883559
It's been slipping for years. I have to stop every 10 miles to move the saddle back forward
>>
>>1883533
there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Just make sure you put a thin film of grease on the mating parts and thread so it clamps properly and doesn't creak.

>>1883568
single bolt seatposts are better. Easier to clean and adjust and more elegent. 2 bolts are for fit autists.
>>
>>1883618
>>1883568
It's pretty much flat. There's no texture left on the ridges. I ended up getting a two bolt seatpost
>>
>>1883620
nah that's normal. You fucked up. Did you even try installing it correctly with grease?
>>
>>1883622
I've swapped saddles out over the years so I've installed it so many times. It's just done dude
>>
What is the difference between 12 speed road and mtb? Will a 12 speed mtb fit on an 11 speed road?
>>
>>1883625
Most 12 speed stuff, road or mountain, uses different freehub fittings like XD(R) or Microspline. There's some cheap or 3rd party 12 speed mountain cassettes that fit onto Hyperglide freehubs. 11 speed road HG freehub is 1.85mm longer than an mtb freehub (or an 8-10 speed road freehub), because the bigger cogs of the mtb can be inset and clear the spokes.
Short answer no, long answer maybe.
>>
>>1883625
>Will a 12 speed mtb fit on an 11 speed road?
This is very vague, but for the most part, no.
>>
>>1883618
>>1883622
you're dumb and wrong
>>
>>1883522
The bars are 26mm of course, maybe just a slight inaccuracy while measuring. I just wanted to say that the bars aren't 26,4mm. But I still don't know if it's gonna be obvious whether the "new" stem I ordered off of ebay is for 26 or 26,4mm bars.
>>
>>1883618
imagine being on this much cope
get with the times grandpa
>>
>>1883403
too late consoomer
>>
How tight should I actually be tightening the brake calipers? After changing pads a few times the bolt washers looks like it slightly dug into the caliper and left circular marks and there's not much paint left that circle. This is definitely making it harder to center the pads. I kind of want to replace caliper now.
>>
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>disassemble 2017 Trek FX with quill stem
>expect regular threaded headset
>instead it's some weird sealed thing
>bearing is sealed in and can't be separated from the cup
>the bottom is the same way - bearing doesn't fall out when the fork is removed, and there doesn't seem to be a way to remove it from the cup
>no markings anywhere that says what type this is
>Trek spec sheet says '1-1/8" threadless, sealed semi-cartridge bearings'

What is this? The bearings seem fine for now. The minor noise the handlebar was making when turning disappeared with just cleaning the grime off the cup and crown race surfaces and regressing. But, how do I replace the bearings when they do get shot? Replace the entire headset?
>>
>>1883284
Nice one thanks for the help.
>>
>>1883803
On most of these old "cartridge" headsets the plastic can be removed with a flat screwdriver. Push it from the top corner towards the center and it will come out.
I bought a frame with one, it was heavily pitted and I had to replace it.
It's ridiculous that sellers mention leaving the old headset in the frame "as a bonus", when you have to pay a shop to remove the damn thing
>>
>>1883756
bro most bike stuff has torque settings. I bought a cheap deflection torque driver and it's pretty useful and reassuring
Topeak Combotorq Wrench & Bit
>>
>>1883845
i have the same one
>>
>>1883638
26.4 is a dead standard
all quill stems except some vintage cinelli will be 25.4 or 26. Most likely 25.4

The thing though is that these are not rigid standards. It's more like a spectrum of sizes. It's not always easy to determine which is which and many fall in the middle.
Often you can acceptably fit a '25.4' bar in a '26' stem with minor shimming, or spread a '25.4' stem to fit a 26 bar because they're actually way closer in size to one another than they 'should' be.

It's extremely bad to bend the clamp on these stems more than you need to though.

An easy test is just to have a 25.4 straight bar and try to put it in a stem. If it won't fit without spreading the stem, the stem is definitely 25.4. If it goes in and there's a loose fit, it's probably 26 (though sometimes not).
I suspect some mfg deliberately produced bars and stems to fit in the middle of the two but many others just fucked up. Need to get some better calipers for more data on this but I've found trying to put them into two boxes only goes so far and it helps to be a bit flexible.
>>
>>1883756
did you grease the threads and the mating parts of the brake pad assembly (curved washers)?
>>
>>1883756
>How tight should I actually be tightening the brake calipers?
only as tight as that they don't slip.
Many brake pad bolts will strip the heads or threads out pretty quickly too.

Use cartridge pads and then re-adjusting them isn't really even a thing you just swap the inserts out.

If you rarely did badly marr the caliper arm, you could always just sand it flat again.
>>
>>1883756
If there's *any* paint left you couldn't have damaged the metal meaningfully, and if it was even possible to damage it just by tightening a little bolt you should replace it with one that isn't made of chinesium.

>How tight should I actually be tightening the brake calipers?
Eh, pretty tight but no need to go apeshit. They see a lot of force and you don't want them to twist.
>>
>>1883887
you can zero your caliper measurements against a drill bit shank or a piece of printer paper, both are very accurate references you can find at home.
>>
>>1883915
it's a non-digital $10 jobbie
>>
>>1883625
>>1883630
>>1883631
What about 12 speed road? Are 12 speed and 11 speed road the same hub body width just with a narrower chain? I'm buying some wheels that say 12 speed compatible but I don't know what spacer I'll need for 8-10 speed. I currently use "11 speed" wheels with a 11 -> 8/10 spacer and it works great.
>>
>>1883887
My 26mm bars arrived today and the mystery stem will probably arrive tomorrow. Maybe I'll post a pic or something. I'm not even sure I'll be able to get the bars onto the stem because there's no removable faceplate and the bars are more of a compact shape.
>>
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Reminder: Take the extra links from a new chain and connect them in a circle to make a dumb little autistic fidget toy.
>>
>>1883927
I save them so I can change ratios
>>
>>1883918
the shittiest caliper should easily give a reading within 0.1-0.2mm if you use it properly, enough to distinguish between 25.4 and 26mm
>>
you manually subtract the error
>>
>>1883918
if it has a vernier scale then you should be good to 0.1 if you preload it and stuff
>>
>>1883927
Im 30 and still don’t have any wrist hair left after doing this in high school
>>
>>1883751
it hasn't been a month yet. why are you such a faggot and so disingenuous?
>>
>>1883927
You mean one of those knuckle things for beating people
>>
>>1884008
i'm not sure you understand how those work.
>>
Maybe its a bicycle rosary
>>
>>1884008
Don't forget to file the shift ramps down until they're razor sharp.
>>
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It's over for Canyon.
>>
>>1884045
*bike shops
>>
My front wheel sits cocked to the side and not centered in the base. How can I fix this? I didn't even notice it until the other day. It rides ok either way, but after noticing it I can definitely feel the difference while riding. I haven't gotten into any accidents or crashes so idk whats up.
>>
>>1884045
How?
>>
>>1884045
Canyon gives you a full carbon fork for their bikes, while Giant uses heavier aluminium forks with carbon shafts in their cheaper bikes.
>>
>>1884054
I thought that changed after 2020? The cheapest road bike I see on the UK site says it's all carbon:
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/gb/contend-2-2021
>>
>mountain bike size in in S M L XL
>I'm 176 cm
>size M goes up to 174 cm
>size L starts from 175 cm

Am I wrong in thinking I should buy the size L for a multipurpose bicycle?
Or will I end up with a giant honking bike?
>>
Where to go for color touchups?

I've got a few dints and scratches that I'd like to tidy up on my bike, but the color is a specific matte off-white and I have no idea where to look for it
>>
>>1884098
my local auto parts store has a whole aisle for touch-up paint, you can probably walk your bike on in and match it directly. although I get better results from Testors model hobby paint, but a color like yours may be easier to find with touch-up.
>>
>>1884098
Have you tried asking a colour store? Matching colours is what they do.
>>
>>1884064
damn these entry level road bikes look pretty sweet now that there aren't a lot of high end rim brake road bikes available. it even has a D-shaped seatpost although if i were buying something like this i might prefer trek domane al 2 and put a chinese carbon seatpost on it.
>>
>>1884081
afaik for mountain bikes it comes down to personal preference. smaller bikes are more nimble but sketchier on jumps and such. some bikes don't even have S/M/L sizing they're just sized according to what reach you prefer.
>>
>>1884098
most bike brands won't help you with this but it might be worth asking them if they know what automotive paint code would be a good match
>>
>>1884136
What reach should I aim for?
I don't have a bike.
My arms are 57cm long
>>
>>1884081
>check size chart
>fit L size
>guys should I buy large?
>>
>>1884147
The one you prefer
>>
>>1884154
Useless reply. Anon is clearly inexperienced and doesn't know what they prefer.
>>
leather saddle and aluminium mudguards or brooks cambium and no mudguards?
>>
>>1884185
Depends. Sprung leather is goat for long miles and comfy touring but it doesn't 'feel' or look fast especially on a bike you just take out to hammer around on, and there is a weight penalty. And it doesn't fit well with much if any bar drop.

I -hate- cambiums though.
They're stupid heavy and the material is abrasive and fucks up shorts.
The rivet look is cringe outside of sprung leather, some selle regals look good on extremely flashy bikes, otherwise, no.
It's still a crapshoot on whether you find them comfortable or not but if you want the $$ retrodouche saddle, I far prefer classic selle repros, turbo, concor, rolls, flite, regal, etc.

Actually it makes most sense to decide if you like the fit of those saddles when a used one comes your way, because you're quite likely to get one when you pickup any high end classic road bike. I personally prefer the fit and quite like the look of some subtler modern selle and fizik saddles on fast classic/classic-esque bikes. That's what I run.
If you do buy a $$ saddle just already accept in your mind that if it hurts your balls you will get rid of it.

and post bike.
>>
>>1884185
also, you can obviously break this rule like all rules but saddle rails should match seatpost colour.

black rails on a silver post on a retro-y frame can clash horribly.
>>
>>1884185
I'd also seriously consider a decent mtb saddle like a wtb volt if you're on the fence between touring sprung leather and a hardman rock road saddle. Because that's the middle ground and some of them are quite subtle and can look nice.

and they're cheaper to experiment with.
>>
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>>1884187
>>1884188
>>1884189
nice responses, thank you
desu, what i actually should have asked for is recommendations for more weatherproof saddles, which you've done nicely
i already have the $$ retrodouche gilles berthoud, thankfully i love it but i'm considering something more weatherproof and cheaper for new circumstances
+ commuting to uni in a place i actually enjoy riding a bike around instead of suffering in an industrial/stroady shithole for work
+ will have plenty of time before/between/after classes to ride around, lots of places to go
- will often be locking the bike up outside unsupervised, the area is pretty safe but i would rather have something a bit more rain resistant and less expensive/appealing to thieves
i think i should give a selle or fizik or something a go
open to swapping away from brown
leather saddle/tape, but i do like being a riv-inspired shithead with waxed twine on my bars and dynamo wiring, and corks for bar end plugs. not pictured: brass bell that echoes the tiny bits of brass on the saddle rivets really nicely
you get the picture
>>
>>1884194
Grant would be ashamed that you put the rack he bought for you from china on a Surly
>>
>>1884195
it's a version of the nitto rack that blue lug had made specifically for surly forks
plus grant likes surly to a degree. not that i need his approval
>>
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>>1884194
your bike is gorgeous
you've got the retrodouche/modern balance down
imo a black saddle and blue or green tape would also look nice.
definitely prefer silver rails but not a huge deal.

full fenders are super nice to have but also super nice to not have. Consider small fenders like pic rel. It's much better than nothing. You can diy them out of old bottles or old fenders, and not use the old mounts, drill holes, zip tie, cut, etc. The front one is also worthwhile to get more life out of your lower headset bearing. If you can stand the look.
>>
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Replaced the headset bearings on my steel bike and saw these abrasions just above where the lower bearings are seated. I bought it second-hand but anyone have an idea what might've caused this?
>>
>>1884203
looks like someone shaved it down with an angle grinder to make the race fit
>>
>>1884201
thanks very much, means a lot coming from someone who obviously knows what they're talking about
a lot of opinionated people don't seem to get it and think full retro or full modern is the only way!
i don't think i'm too concerned about the silver rails because my bars are black and sitting in a silver stem, it would match nicely. as much as i like silver
i agree on the mudguards, they're really great when you need them but such a fucking pain when you kick them into the tyre in a tight slow corner or something. i've gotten pretty fast at adding and removing them when i need to but i want to simplify a bit
that kind of mudguard would be a good fit, i might get a win wing or diy. really nice looking bike too
thanks a bunch for your help
>>
>>1884204
Hm could be..
>>
>>1884203
maybe someone had a hell of a time trying to remove a tight fitting crown race and those are marks from pliers or something. it's probably no big deal.
>>
Searched for torque recommendations for the quill stem bolt and came across this post in a forum
>Unscrew the locknuts of your headset to find the bottom thread on your steerer.
>**DO NOT place the top of the stem wedge or cone above the bottom thread, even if the lower limit line on the stem allows that to happen.
>The steerer can break at the threads because of the stem wedge or cone, and obviously you don't want that to happen.
I'm retarded and don't get what that means. Does "bottom thread" just mean "lower part of the thread/bottom OF the thread"? Iirc there's only one continuous thread on the steerer.
>>
>>1884052
If it's more probably the wheel needs to be trued and/or dished. If it wobbles side to side when you spin it that's definitely it. Otherwise test by taking the wheel out then putting it back in flipped around, if it's now off center to the other side then it's out of dish. Probably $15-ish at a bike shop to fix. You can DIY with a spoke wrench but if you don't know what you're doing it's easy to fuck up the wheel.

If you flip it around and it's still off center to the same side then the frame/fork is out of whack. Frames aren't always perfectly symmetric - either by design or manufacture - so a couple mm isn't necessarily even a problem. But if it's more than that and it's steel a bike shop might be able to align it.
>>
>>1884227
>Otherwise test by taking the wheel out then putting it back in flipped around, if it's now off center to the other side then it's out of dish.
make sure that the axle isn't bent otherwise you can get inconsistent results in this type of test
>>
>>1884221
Whoever wrote that was making things needlessly overcomplicated. With 99.99% of threaded headsets and quill stems, the minimum insert line on the stem will get the expander wedge below the threaded section on the fork. In practice if you find yourself worrying about getting your stem in that far that's a clear indicator the frame is too small for you or you need a riser stem anyways.
>>
>>1884230
I think I have the opposite problem though. I didn't know there was a butted section on the lower part which you should avoid. I just put the quill stem as low as it would go.
>>
>>1884242
You have a threaded fork with an internally butted steerer tube? What is it? Frankly I've never heard of such a thing existing...
>>
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>>1884243
Maybe I'm mixing things up or using the wrong words. I have a threaded fork with a quill stem. After researching a bit I came across pic rel.
>It isvitally importantthat the steerer extender (or stem) is not inserted so far that the wedge is installed where the steerer is narrowing, or it could come loose unpredictably.
>>
>>1884245
Okay, thank you. That makes sense. In that case, what stem are you using? You shouldn't be able to reach that far down into the steerer tube normally. Are you using a Nitto Technomic in a fork for a very, very small frame?
>>
>>1884243
They're all like that, it's why you can't knock a wedge out the bottom.
>>
>>1884248
Cinelli AX. It's a pretty small frame.
>>
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>>1884230
>With 99.99% of threaded headsets and quill stems, the minimum insert line on the stem will get the expander wedge below the threaded section on the fork

It's actually pretty common.
Lots of builders made/threaded 1 fork for every size of frame and then it was just cut it down to size. So on the bigger sizes there are way too many threads.
This is on nice bikes and shit ones. I have several frames with this problem.

It's boomervice not to have the wedge on the threads but in reality that's not realistic. It basically means junking a bunch of nice forks, or, they're not compatible with nice road quills AND they have to be slammed. Nobody is actually following the advice every time.

The failure does happen but it's extremely uncommon. I've spoken to grizzly shop mechanics who have never seen it happen. Grant has a post about it where he says it happens, but, the wedge will still hold the steerer together even if it splits it, and so there's a failsafe. Though, if it did happen, and go wrong, you could get -really- fucked up.

Imo it's best practice to observe 'within reason'.
>>
Can something like this be used to fill air shocks? I can't seem to find my shock pump. I only have this and it can handle over 150psi.
>>
>>1884251
why do you even want to slam it bro? It's not steezy with a quill. Even on race bikes they were rarely ever slammed. On a classic bike you have higher bars and favour the drops more.

slam da stem is a threadless meme
>>
>>1884254
if the head fits on then yes
>>
>>1884255
Because it's too high otherwise? I'm not doing it just because I think it looks cooler or something.
>>
>>1884258
ok good then
>>
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>>1884259
This is the height I have it at. I can only push it down 1,5 or 2cm max. So I guess it's already on the narrower part of the steerer tube. I hate it.
>>
>>1884260
If you don't mind constantly back of mind worrying about your handlebars flying off down a hill then you could shorten it with a hacksaw, and a drill. Just make sure you drill the stress riser in the slot.
>>
>>1884261
I posted about it a few times before but here's my situation: currently I have a 10cm stem and bars with a 10cm reach and a 16cm drop which is too much and it's a classical shape, so the hoods are pretty uncomfortable. Because I really like the bike otherwise I ordered the Deda Piega (7,5cm reach, 13cm drop and a modern shape). To accomodate the shorter reach I thought I'd get a longer stem and found a good deal on ebay. The exact same stem in 130mm (which is supposedly prone to cracking).
>>
How reliable are those slime skab patches? I just patched a fat tire tube with it and it seems to be holding up but have they worked for you guys as a long term solution?
>>
>>1884263
>want bars with less drop
>want to slam stem

>want bars with less reach
>buy longer stem
holdup what
>>
>>1884268
>>want bars with less drop
>>want to slam stem
I haven't received the new stem yet. The picture is the current 100mm stem.
>>want bars with less reach
>>buy longer stem
I want more comfortable bars i.e. usable drops and a nice transition from the bars to the hoods BUT still want to have the same reach overall.
>>
>>1884266
The glueless ones don't work as well with high pressure but for a fat bike you'll probably have better luck. Just keep an eye on the pressure for a few days and if it's not leaking you should be good.
>>
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Should I go for size M or size L if I'm 5'9 (177 cm)
>>
>>1884326
Manufacturers usually have size recommendation. Personally I'm inclined to size down when in doubt, for a more nimble ride.
>>
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>>1884326
>5'9"
>thinks there's any context in life where he's a "Large"
>>
>>1884329
M = from 165 cm to 174 cm (5'38" to 5'7")
L = from 175 cm to 184 cm (5'74" to 6'03")
>>
>>1884346
Excuse me... 5'9" = 175,26 cm
I am 5'9.69"
>>
>>1883922
Any 12 speed road stuff uses XDR or Microspline or whatever thing Campy uses.
>>
>>1884326
what will you be using this bike for? looks like a hardtail, geometry just looks a bit out of date. not sure i'd recommend it if you want to be riding trails

you can probably go L as the reach and stack are quite short. any way to ride it before?
>>
anybody know why canyon offers so many more builds in EU? been eyeing up the endurace but options are quite limited in the US.

any other endurance bikes I should consider? looking for something at least 105 tier, at least 35mm tire clearance. the trek domane seems to meet the criteria but i'm a bit worried about climbing with that will feel weird, and i'm usually doing a lot of long climbs.
>>
>>1884428
Triban RC520
1499usd
Its in stock right now. These fucking things fly off the shelves in eu.
>>
>>1884444
nice quads

sadly its not real 105
>>
>>1884349
You're barely M
I'm 176 and my frame is size S. L is just massive
>>
>>1884479
unless you have the same frame your size is irrelevant
>>
>>1884479
It's you who are riding a too small frame, or the size designation of it is unconventional. If it works for you then that's great, but usually recommendations for ~176-177 cm tends to fall on the edge between M and L.
>>
>>1884201
i have decided to try out a flite.
i've ridden my friend's bike with one and liked it. i appreciate that it only weighs 230g as well
>>
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I'm rebuilding my blue Gunnar touring bike.
Really want to get some of the TRP levers because a bird ate my shimano hoods and they're sloppy now.

Fuck they're expensive though. And twice the price for the silver blades.

Anyone know where to get them from cheaper? Preferably the silver ones?
>>
>>1884266
In order of reliability:
>Piece of matching material cut in a circle, cemented on
>Good ol' sand-'n'-stick black and orange patches with the clear film (useless for latex)
>Just about anything
>"self adhesive" and other meme patches

>>1884272
Unless you have a very small upper body, or long arms, reach is beter than drop most of the time.
Unless of course your bike is too small, then upping the reach will affect your weight distribution and close your hip angle more than you might be able to function well with.
>>
>>1884484
Wrong. I'm a 52 and I'm 170, that's a small. 175 is a solid small.
>>
>>1884524
>>"self adhesive" and other meme patches
i've found the park self adhesive to work well, unless they're over a seam. Then it's kinda risky.

used dozens of em over the years.
>>
>>1884484
>but usually recommendations for ~176-177 cm tends to fall on the edge between M and L.
Lol
>>
>>1884524
>then upping the reach will affect your weight distribution and close your hip angle more
Really? I would think that more drop would close the hips more.
>>
>>1884535
both do...
>>
>>1884537
That's why I said "more" since we're apparently discussing reach vs. drop.
>>
>>1884521
You can buy replacement hoods for $10-$20, depending on the model.
>>
>>1884552
yeah but they're sloppy now too
>>
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>shift to low gear
>rubbning noises and bike feels braked
>flip it over
>wheels spin perfectly, chain seems to run smoothly
What could this be? I can't even tell where the noise comes from, but it sounds like the wheel scrapes against the mudguards. And why does it only happen on low gear?
>>
>>1884572
Wheel(s) plural even, but mostly the front
>>
>>1884572
considering it doesn't sound when you're not pedaling, it's probably a crank rubbing against something
>>
>>1884572
"Low" as in hard or easy? Rhythmic or steady noise?

You could test by taking the mudguards off. Shifting shouldn't affect the front wheel in any way, are you sure it's a gear thing and not a speed thing?
>>
>>1884572
you're shifting into low gear when you're on an uphill
when you're uphill there's more pressure on the rear tire
more pressure = higher volume = less clearance
the rubbing is the tire hitting the chainstay or the fender
>>
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>>1884596
He said front tire tho
>>
Fuck. Picked up my new quill stem today and there's no way I can put the Deda Piega bars in them. Already scratched the hell out of both of them.
>>
>>1884657
Nevermind. Just got them in.
>>
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>Leave bike in the shed for a month
>Rear rim catches measles
If I clean it off, will she survive, or is it terminal?
>>
>>1884194
Beautiful bike
>>
Question.
I cleaned the chain for my road bike one week ago.
Chain was pretty much clean and also the gears were gave a clean with a rag.
Since I use now the bike mostly on rollers while training i expected the chain to stay pmuch nice and clean for a while since Im riding indoor.

So why just after a week the chain has again an oily dark color?
>>
>>1884710
It's the fine metal powder that the drivetrain is grinding itself down to with every revolution.
>>
>>1884716
I guess then Ill have to clean and lube more often.
>>
>>1884718
Clean is the more important of the two
>>
>>1884710
Check the pulley wheels. Often they're really dirty and transfer that dirt onto the chain immediately.
>>
>>1884685
cant hurt to try, clean it good tho
>>
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Why are 700c wheels the standard for road cycling? Is the stability granted by enhanced gyroscopic effect over smaller wheels really that important? I think this could be less significant when accounting for modern wider tires that maximize their contact patch. I think the weight savings afforded by 650b could be a potential boon to performance, but it would limit the heat dissipation surface on rim brakes and wear more quickly. Modern 650b is being more pitched to the gravel crowd so they can run fatter tires so I'm not even sure there are any truly lightweight options or rim brake compatible models available. At best they would certainly not be as ubiquitous as more standard wheel choices.
>>
>>1884738
probably historical coincidence mostly. the discussion has mostly been around making bigger wheels for taller riders and there's a niche market for that so maybe it's best to have the biggest size wheels that you can fit for smooth rolling over surface irregularities without compromising the frame geometry. bikes are barely profitable and it would be more expensive and more difficult to make an entirely new frame concept and convince rim and tire manufacturers to adopt the new standard and customers would be skeptical about parts availability and incompatibility with their existing stuff.
>>
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>>1884738
those smaller meme tire sizes had their day in the sun for road in the 80s/90s with 650C (571 mm). It's smaller than 650b

650C was pretty common on time trial bikes, and road bikes, especially those for smaller riders.

You'll find arguments for and against if you look up those bikes, but ultimately they would have fallen out of favour because they weren't very good.
>>
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another one, Nikishi NFS (need for speed) designed by Richard Cunningham
>>
there were 650c Paramounts as well.
The cannondale ones and quintana roos are what I see most often though.
>>
>>1884710
experiment with different lube. I've found finish wet goes right back to black after a clean and what i'm using now, morgan blue race, is quite good compared.

Also cleaning a chain -really- well is fucking tedious you have to remove it and cycle it through solvent to actually flush out the whole thing. I spray it with engine degreaser, leave it, then hose it, and joodge it around a bit first, then into containers of kerosene, then hosed again, then towel then sun dried.
>>
>>1884748
in my area theres a lot more road grime than you'd think that can build up quick. after a day of riding a motorcycle on a trip your face is an entire different shade, you feel it in your ears, yuck. so i always think of that but its even worse for some bike parts being closer to the ground
>>
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Can you use snap ring pliers as a master link plier to remove a master link on a bike chain?
>>
>>1884738
maybe for flywheel effect, 180 degree cranks without a counter mass are not a smooth source of power
>>
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Can you use personal lubricant to lube a bike chain. I have a cheap bike and want to spend as little as possible on the bike, and since there are companies that provide free personal lube samples, can I use the personal lube on the bike chain?
>>
>>1884771
master link pliers are for convenience only. It's quite easy to open them with any number of other tools.

suggest you pass them through the link and then use a second set of pliers on the jaws from the other side as well
>>
>>1884773
KY doesn't even last ten minutes on your dick, on a bike chain it'll probably dry up before you're out the door.
>>
>>1884710
Chains are NEVER 100% clean. Even straight out of the package there's grease all over them.
>>
How safe are selfmade shims from a can used between stem and bar really? Difference is 4mm.
>>
>>1884782
I meant 0,4mm
>>
>>1884773
If you really need to save money on bike lube just use a quart of cheap motor oil or maybe monetary oil for the chain and some marine grease for your hubs/bb. I've used red n tacky and white lithium grease too, just take your pick.
>>
>>1884790
>Monetary oil
I mean mineral oil, my apologies.

But yeah, bikes have been around way longer than we've had specialized lubricants for them - lots of things will work.
>>
>>1884781
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYxzHClWfQU
>>
>>1884773
https://bike.bikegremlin.com/5855/the-best-bicycle-chain-lubricant/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXFKyOtDFwk
>>
>YouTube bike shills claiming everything's over-stocked and has to go on fire sale
>local bike shops still can't get a lot of models in, and there's hardly any discounts

Why do shills lie like this and get my hopes up?
>>
>>1884722
Definitely wrong. Both are important, but a clean, dry chain will completely fuck itself within a couple rides
>>
>>1884818
You are a fool but also a loud one
>>
>>1884820
Try it and then come back to me lmao
>>
I've got a Shimano quick link chain, can I reuse the quick link or do I need a new one if I detach it.

Also what do you think of ultrasonic cleaners to clean chain/cassette?
>>
>>1884827
>I've got a Shimano quick link chain, can I reuse the quick link or do I need a new one if I detach it.
How many speeds? According to them, the 11 and 12 speed quick links shouldn't be reused, but I'm not sure about the others. That being said, people reuse them all the time, but just know that it's on you.

>Also what do you think of ultrasonic cleaners to clean chain/cassette?
They're OK. You can experiment with different cleaning solutions and temperatures to achieve best results. For really nasty stuff, I find it easier and faster to clean it by hand, or at least a pre-clean by hand.
>>
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>>1884827
>I've got a Shimano quick link chain, can I reuse the quick link or do I need a new one if I detach it.
Officially no, realistically yes. Unless it's the shitty kind like pic in which case just replace it to get rid of it. Links from other brands are reusable sometimes, depends on what speed the chain is.
>Also what do you think of ultrasonic cleaners to clean chain/cassette?
Overkill but probably work good.
>>
>>1884821
You’re arguing with edge cases in your head. What kind of consumer redditor lubes their chain as much as they clean it lmao
>>
>>1884831
every guide says to lube the chain after you clean it? dutchies would neglect bike maintenance and not know how to clean the chain other than to wipe it down a bit but they at least know to pump up their tires and lube the chain once in a while. lube isn't all that expensive so i'm not sure why you associate it with being a "consoomer".
>>
>>1884742
I always thought that 650c was the other name for 26"(559mm). 650c really is 571mm and 650b is 584mm.
It's crazy how many standards there are
>>
>>1884830
I wonder when my quick link will fail, I've taken the chain off my bike dozens of times.
I carry a spare just in case
>>
>>1884831
So you clean all the lube off your chain and then just ride it un-lubricated?
>>
>>1884843
No, you clean it with a rag after every ride and lube it every second ride.
And wash it in petrol when it gets too dirty, I do that 3-4 times a season
>>
>>1884844
Ah ok, I don't mean to get in the middle of you and the other anon, but by "clean" I thought you meant like completely cleaning it, like in petrol or some other solvent like you said.
>>
>>1884831
It sounds like you’re just not doing a good job of cleaning it, so there’s still lube left over. I’m talking about a CLEAN chain, which shouldn’t even be allowed to exist in atmospheric conditions. The manufacturers pack their chains in globs of grease to prevent corrosion, and we lube our chains to prevent EXTREME grinding forces. Unlubricated metal to metal meshing together will polish and grind the chain into dust very quickly, and the rust that will begin to form within day one will just speed up that process. Chains are not meant to be unlubricated.
>>
>>1884844
>you clean it with a rag after every ride and lube it every second ride.
what the fuck
>>
>>1884841
Considering normal chain tension would keep it attached even if the link was completely worn out you'd probably need a ridiculous amount of chain suck for it to ever fall apart.
>>
>>1884844
I guess the question now is does the fine black dust that builds up on your chain accelerate chain wear if you don’t wipe it off regularly? Even assuming your chain is properly lubed? Probably yeah… most lube manufacturers agree you should regularly wipe shit off of your chain. But lube is absolutely 100% necessary, and yeah, can last a long time if you’re using thick gooey low-effort lube (which happens to collect grime more than light viscosity short-lasting “consumer” lubes)
>>
>>1884849
Depends on things. Full degrease+relube after every wet ride is best to prevent rust and get all the shit that washed inside it out. For dry, clean riding the relube interval might be every 50 miles or every 500 miles depending on the lube.
>>
>>1884782
>>1884786
Bump...
>>
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>>1884964
Buy the correct size, dummy.
>>
>>1884966
Ok then rec me a nice silver 130mm quill stem. Oh wait, you can't.
>>
>>1884855
The less abrasive contamination the better
>>
>>1884987
>130mm
>correct
anon...
>>
>>1885001
Why not?
>>
>>1885010
130mm is on the extreme end of the scale. it's mostly used by pros. your frame is probably too small if you really need a 130mm stem. it deviates from the intended steering geometry and might make for less than ideal cockpit stiffness. 130mm is an uncommon size even for ahead stems, at least it was so a couple of years ago for budget brands. 140+ mm is firmly in exotic custom pro tier. at 17 degrees 130mm is almost non-existent, for example this maxes out at 110mm:
https://www.wiggle.co.uk/deda-zero-17-degree-stem-blackblack-100mm
>>
>>1884840
590 and 597 are also not unusual on old bikes.
>>
>>1885016
I know my bike is a bit too small for me, so what? What's your suggestion? The bike came with a 10cm stem and 10cm reach bars. I now have a 13cm stem and 7,5cm reach bars. So in the end, nothing's changed. Not the weight distribution, not the steering, nothing. You're just close-minded.
>>
>>1885036
The specific worry about using a homemade shim is that the bars might slip around, especially if they have a long reach to the hoods you’ll be putting some leverage on them. Usually handlebar shims aren’t recommended, but that doesn’t stop the Chinese from selling them by the hundreds
>>
>>1885037
>if they have a long reach
7,5cm is on the lower end though I think. I've been thinking about the shim stuff for 2 days now. I think in the end I'm just gonna sell the stem and just get the Deda Murex in 120mm and be done with it. Would reduce my overall reach a bit, but fuck it. I don't think I'll have peace of mind knowing that a fucking coke can cutout is the thing my life depends on.
>>
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What's up with integrated crown races? I had to replace a lower bearing on a headset and the instruction slip from acros depicted a crown race. But there's no crown race that I can see, either in the bike now, or in the bag of shit from acros

My bare fork/steerer tube looks something like this and the internet has plenty of discussion of this phenomenon but it seems like an incredibly terrible idea to me, putting the entire weight of the bike on a <2mm wide faceted steel surface resting directly on bare carbon. Am I missing something here? How are these not assploding all over the place?
>>
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>>1885050
Like here take a look at this (not my actual bearing but close enough). That chamfer, as far as I can tell, is the main load bearing surface. It seems to fit, and I guess they know what they're doing but how is this not asking for failure? Because if I wanted to make a booby trap practical joke bike that kills you, this is probably how I'd do it.
>>
>>1885084
>>1885084
>>1885084
>>
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>>1885050
>>1885051
dont worry, carbon strongk
>>
>>1885050
solid carbon is strong and the bearing has a pretty good fit along the full circumference of the integrated race. it's basically the same thing as if you had a normal crown race just that the mating surface is at an angle instead of flat. think of how thin the walls are in the fork leg for example and the fork leg is strong enough. just get the proper fitting bearing and preload it correctly.



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