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File: 3434h554yntntnyyt-min.jpg (41 KB, 864x486)
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Would modern overland freight shipping in America benefit from a broad gauge rail network like the Breitspurbahn?

Specifially a 10 foot gauge where giant flatcars could be loaded with a total of 18 53 foot intermodal shipping containers (2 across, 3 high and 3 long).
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axle load go brrrrrrr
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>>1812284
Not really. The cost increases to maintain a totally new rail gauge would offset any benefits that it would have for speed. It also would still get stuck with yard traffic, require the same downtime for maintenance, etc.
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It's way easier and cheaper to make longer trains.
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>>1812284
Not worth it.
More strain on the axles too, they're longer and flex far more as a result
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>>1812284
>Specifially a 10 foot gauge where giant flatcars could be loaded with a total of 18 53 foot intermodal shipping containers (2 across, 3 high and 3 long).

So a single loaded flatcar would have a stack 17.2 feet wide, 28.8 feet high, and 159 feet long. Why not just have 18 flatcars with 1 container each?
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Super gauge mega trains are a solution trying to find a problem.
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Choo choo :D
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>>1812349
there has to be a limit to how long you can make a train
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>>1812459
futurewill,,,have,onetrain,,,loooping back to join the tail.,so, length of track.
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>>1812456
fuck I hate the fucking design of those things
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>>1812284
>All those axles
Yeah that wouldn’t have a fucking bullshit task for mechanics let alone slaves.
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>>1812465
I do not like this prophecy :(
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>>1812459
You'd think so, but I've seen some beasts in the last year. 13,500' and 35,000 tons.
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>>1812284
2 rails is not enough for super broad massive trains
4-rail 2-track trains is what you need. So the railway line is compatible with normal trains too
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>>1812459
Practically the limit is how long your signal blocks are. With continuous block style signaling and distributed power you can basically have infinite length trains.
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>>1812472
Don't look up Virginian Railways number 700.
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>>1812317

I was thinking the main benefit would be a massive increase in cargo volume.
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the real benefit would be having an opera on wheels not freight service
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>you will never travel comfterbly across the country in a giant hotel on wheels
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>>1812807
thank God
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It makes you wonder how after WWII when the American government absorbed all the Nazi aerospace engineers for use in their space program how they didn't do the same with the Breitspurbahn planners.
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It would have given them an enormous industrial edge over the Soviets... at least until they would inevitably turn it into a dick waving contest with their own ultra-broad gauge railway.
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>>1812881
Why would the need to? Compare the weight and tractive effort of a Challenger or Big Boy to that of an BR 52.
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>>1812575
Most gantry cranes and inclined lifts run on two rails tens of meters apart, even shipyard cranes like the Kochs Goliaths runs on two tracks of a 210 meter gauge.
While breitspurbahn would have only been a few feet wider than GWR broardguage.
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>>1812881
>>1812917
Because there would have been a bigger market for high-speed freight trains than there would have been for widebodies
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>>1812920

>210 meter gauge

What?
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>>1812721
You can achieve that by adding more cars to a train. At a certain point, you wind up needing a larger locomotive, sure, but that's still significantly cheaper than building another full rail system.
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>>1813161

You could potentially ship massive objects by rail that you otherwise couldn't, i.e wind turbine blades.
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>>1813134
uh huh (lmao COCKS tee hee)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-zq3h92GdM
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>>1812721
I believe that was the logic behind broad gauge but in practice it was more expensive to operate (more power, more axle strain, etc.) and overall basically a wash.
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They already DO ship wind turbine blades via railroad.
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>>1812284

I think the fact that it was the Nazis who came up with this idea will mean that it will never find practical use.
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>>1813571
Well there are autobahns all over America, nothing stopping other good nazi ideas
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>>1812284
I can't really imagine this is anymore practical than having longer trains on regular gauge railways. It would still take the same amount of man hours to unload and the cost of upkeep and construction would be significantly higher.
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>>1813267
you can already do this
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>>1812459
The main limit is terminal capacity IIRC. if you have enough locomotives you can add as many cars as you want.
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>>1813903
>good nazi ideas
Autobahns were a Weimar idea.
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>>1813903
only good nazi idea was rocketry
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>>1813989
Fascists started with the autostrade in the 1920's
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>>1813999

This show almost bankrupted NBC
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>>1813999
Would a gauge this wide work in reality? What problems would it cause?
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>>1814736

That looks at least 15 feet. I have no idea.
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>>1813999
T H I C C
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>>1814736
axles wouldn't support all that weight
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>>1812284
imagine if america spend on trains/rails half of what it spents on roads
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>>1814954

If only...
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The real question :

Would modern America benefiet from cross country canals?

Transport through rivers is a hundred times cheaper than transport on roads. Europans realized this sturing the middle ages already.
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>>1815225
You already have the Mississippi (actually the Ohio river), and what's not in the Mississippi basin is behind mountains or is desert
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Why not have a third, central rail for weight distribution?
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>>1815234
probably because the rails would inevitably end up being part of a different plane, so the wheels would float over one of the rails and put too much stress on the axles
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>>1815235
Ah yeah, solid point. With two rails you only have to deal with the difference of a plane, adding a 3rd to that would just be useless and at worst dangerous if anything at all shifted.
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>>1815225

it takes a lot more effort to dig canals than to lay rails
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>>1814947
Realistically something that big would be maglev
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IMO the weight distribution issues could be solved by scaling up both the rails and the axles appropriate.

>Planning called for a ballastless track (much as was developed 30 years later for San Francisco BART and 40 years later for German high-speed lines) which consisted of two parallel pre-stressed concrete "walls" sunk into the ground, joined at the top by a flat transverse slab.
>The rails were fixed on top of the "walls", with an elastic material between rail and concrete. Because it did not have conventional railway sleepers, this track would also have formed an ideal road for maintenance and military purposes.
>The rails would be either 155 pounds per yard (77 kg/m) (Pennsylvania special; 8-inch (200 mm) tall) rails or proposed 190 lb/yd (94 kg/m) (height-width ratio of 1:1) rails.
>The passing loop length would be more than a mile (11⁄2 km).

I could argue that standard gauge rail technology has just about reached its limit.
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>>1815714
>Japanese took notes from this shape to create the Shinkansen
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>>1812459
A limiter is the strength of the knuckle couplers, more and more knuckles are breaking and when trains are miles long it can take a long ass time for the conductor to carry a new one back to the car to replace it.
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Like this?
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The real question is what can you transport on a 10 foot gauge that you can't tranport on a 4' 8-1/2" gauge that would be worth the upgrade?
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>>1815233
canal from the saint croix river to lake Superior would connect the Mississippi to the great lakes
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>>1816268
olympic pools and whales
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>>1815341
Being wide enough for cars between the rails seems p. Good
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>>1812284
>>1815341
youre all wrong
this is the way to do it
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>>1812917
The BR52 was an excellent locomotive, it just wasn’t fit for American railroads.
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>>1820806
How do you do superelevation or switches on double track.
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>>1821009
think of it as 2 normal trains always running side by side
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>>1812284

The only feasible use of a broad gauge I can think of is to replace NASA's shuttle crawler with giant railcars that can carry heavy rocket cores up to 10m in diameter. It would only be a short line running from the vehicle assembly center to one or more launch sites.
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>>1823382
They did the crawler specifically because rail couldn't be used for whatever reason. I do think that with all the new investment in spaceflight that they'll replace the crawler with something else soon.
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>>1815901
Easy answer: higher strength knuckles.

If every knuckle is made from alien alloys then the train length could be limited only by the strength of the chassis.
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>>1824732
Has a car ever been torn in half due to a chassis failure?
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>>1812284
Just run more trains or make your existing ones longer. If you're already running so many trains that you can't run more, then lay down more parallel track. In most cases all you're really doing is just merging existing sidings anyways.
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>>1815901
Distributed power solves that problem.
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>>1813267
You can have objects occupy multiple carts, only being limited by the curvature of the tracks.

>>1812459
Nope.
There is a limit to axle weight, not length.
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>>1824734
>Has a car ever been torn in half due to a chassis failure?
No, the Janney coupler pin is the weak point intentionally.
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>>1824744
Doesn't solve the problem that knuckle breaks are inevitable and the logistical problem of the conductor needing to walk the entire train after it goes into emergency.
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>>1812284
American freight rail is actually quite good. Prioritizing freight over transportation is part of why Amtrak sucks.
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>>1815989
Are you, by any chance, jewish ?
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>>1812284
No, but I love collecting all the reasons for making it happen in fiction.
In Brigador the trains have to be large enough to haul mechs to the front lines

I think a lot of videogames like them too because long narrow hallways are way less fun than wide, triple-decker train cars.
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>>1817856
doesn’t this already exist near Chicago? it connects Lake Michigan to the Illinois River and then to the Mississippi
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>>1825162
Yes.
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>>1813923
We missed a good "America" oppurtunity by not going with the largest gauge. Ford should have gotten into the train game. We'd be talking right now about if we should be going even larger.
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>>1812284

Imagine road crossings with a giant gauge like this.

Standard gauge trains with state-of-the-art braking systems already need thousands of meters to come to a stop and there are always plenty of dumbass drivers who try to jump the gate only to get flattened.
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>>1825198

The auto industry used every ounce of their lobbying power to prevent modernization of the U.S passenger railroad infrastructure.

Maybe in a parallel universe.
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Wasn't there some anon who had a worldbuilding project that had a postwar-era America with a Breitspurbahn-like broad gauge?

What happened to him?
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what if we made a train that could go super broad gauge but also squeeze down to standard without stopping? best of both worlds.
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>>1812459
long trains struggle with sharp turns
also points start to cause more problems
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>>1831068
Not him, but I've got my own side-project making a history for an OpenTTD mod.

Starting with "Instead of standard gauge, Brits' Gauge Act of 1846 creates 7'7" Broad Gauge and 3'0" Narrow Gauge"

and Ending, so far, with "McLean pushed the American loading gauge to its limit with the double-wide, double-decker, 4x40' railbarge to maximize intermodal crane efficiency"
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>>1831143

>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_gauge
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>>1816268
Trains, but sideways
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>>1820806
I approve. This way, only infrastructure loading gauges need to be adjusted.
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>>1824732
Knuckle strength isn't that much of a problem, it just dictates how long you can make a train before needing locomotives in the middle.
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jdv8x
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdSmwI-KEZM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoHq0x6ZxDM
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>>1812284
>irl snowpiercer
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>>1812881
Lack of profit
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>>1834899
snowpiercer would be more comfy with normal sized train



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