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Post all your bike touring related topics here.

Last thread >>1772528

What are your plans for summer?
>>
how much pack is too much pack?
>>
How much artificial cum to bring for a 3 day trip?
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>>1811504
As much as you can physically carry. Gotta be prepared.

>>1811503
Everything that you don't use during the trip is too much pack.
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>>1811441
Trans America Trail. I just put in notice at my job, so I'm committed now. Never bike-toured before, so I'll learn on the road. Hopefully it will be memorable.
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>>1813095
highly suggest you do a weekender or two first so you can shake down your gear and finesse a few things
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>>1811441
How far can I go with a handlebar bag and pic-related? I plan to make a 4 day trip somewhere that is about 3 hours away by car.
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>>1813426
>no estimate of bag volume
>no mention of weather conditions
>no mention of how/where you intend to sleep
>no mention of total miles/miles per day
how are we supposed to help you, you fucking retard?
>>
>>1813426
Do yourself a favor and buy real panniers instead of this thing.
>>
Is bike packing something you can do alone and you wouldn't be seen as weird?
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>>1814209
Perfect for a loner actually. Book hostels along your route and work your way somewhere new. Meet new people. Grow as a person.
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>>1814211
Do hostels/hotels/airbnb usually let you bring the bike in your room? I don't really want to leave my expensive carbon bike outside for the night or should I just get some cheap shitty bike for packing, the ride would suck then I guess
>>
>>1814213
Hey I’d love to give you an answer but I really don’t know! Hostel setups can vary so widely. Indoors in some places is more of a danger than chained up outside in others due to thieving bastards in your room in some places and nice gated compounds in others.
>>
>>1814213
Call them in advance and ask before you book.
Or ask nicely when you arrive, making clear that it's a condition of you staying there.
I've never had a place reject my bicycle, even if they had to store it behind the couch in the common room.

Your experience may vary, depending on where you are travelling.
>>
>>1814213
A bikepacking bike should be neither shitty nor a carbon Fred sled.
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>>1814220
>all carbon is Fred
Retard
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>>1814243
But it is anon.
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>>1814220
>Fred sled
This shit always makes me chuckle.
>>
>>1811441
Somebody on here was able to pull up old bicycle user manuals like it was no big deal. Found the one for my 1982 Specialized Sequoia in 3 seconds. Anybody know where to find that kind of stuff?
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>>1814358
>my 1982 Specialized Sequoia
ayo holdup what? the one i was shilling you? you got it?
>>
>>1814425
Oh that was you? Yeah I got it. I just quit my job, gonna ride it across the USA starting in August. It's an amazing bike. I wasn't larping in that thread.
>>
>>1814436
awesome man
>>
Just did the Holyhead to Cardiff route over 4 days. It probably suited my set-up predominately being on slow roads and off road/cycle path but I’d probably prefer more of a mix next time around (not that that’s many other long distance routes like this).

I hadn’t toured in years but it felt more sterile for some reason. Maybe I’m more jaded now or it was because I stayed in hostels rather than camping.

I probably should’ve trained for some of the mountains/hills as I ended up spending 8 hours riding (taking out breaks) to hit around 100km per day.
>>
>>1814436
fuck yea, keep us updated please

>>1814480
cute bike
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>>1814480
congrats anon
yeah not camping definitely kills some of the magic
any nice nature pics?
>>
>>1814480
niceeeee

would you recommend the route? how does it compare to other long routes in UK?

I haven't done any but hope to do some big rides soon
>>
>>1814589
I started in Holyhead and if you don’t mind steep climbs it’s worth it for the remoteness and views. As I side a mix of gravel, dedicated cycle paths and country lanes. You’ll go through woods, a bit of coast, mountains etc.

I took a garmin and then realised not to bother as it’s well sign posted and I probably only missed a turning twice over the 4 days which is pretty good. So that’s a bonus for 1st time tourers.

Loads of hostels and campsites, places to stop also.

I’ve done Lake District to Edinburgh previously which I’d say is similar in distance and was a great route.
>>1814578
Not many great photos I’m afraid. Even at some of the summits my phone seemed to make any view seem dull.

I also snapped my chain in the woods, forgot to bring a master link (chain didn’t have one) and then had an hour walk/scoot back from where I came to find a bike shop (no other shops in miles so I was probably lucky there!).
>>
all yalls riding with dynamo lights, do you charge your phone/others directly or do you charge a powerbank during the day and use it one whatever during the night?
also where do you store whatevers charging? i've broken so many cables by just simply leaving them in my panniers, they always break after a couple of days (gets loose? you know when it only works if it sits just right idk if there's a word for it in english). kinda thinking of sewing my own feedbag-esque thing that's waterproof for that singular purpose but I prolly don't have time. any other options?
>>
>>1814761
I have a charger on my bike currently but only because it came with the bike. Charge a powerbank during the day and charge the rest with this during the night. Most devices are really unhappy with unconsistent power sources.
However for the next trip i bought a fast charging powerbank + charger. I can charge with 100w + whatever the phone takes so i will just charge at a cafe / supermarket / whatever when stopping for half an hour to have enough energy for 3 days. 60-70wh in half an hour should be possible.
>>
>>1814625
>Even at some of the summits my phone seemed to make any view seem dull.
I know that feel
>>
>>1813426
It'll work. Even a milk crate and a few zip ties would do. Don't listen to the faggots that tell you you can't tour without buying pricey gear first.
>>
>>1815114
yeah anything works and if you get less days on the bike because of buying expensive gear then it's not worth it
but if you plan on doing it more times in the future chances are you're gonna buy nicer stuff eventually since it makes it more enjoyable. my opinion is go either dirt cheap and try it out or buy ortlieb or the like directly as you'll probably save money in the long run if you're sure you like it
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Muh ride, Fuji Touring LTD 2018, ready for Tromso to Sicily.
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>>1814213
>Airbnb
You can mention that you're bringing a bicycle during the booking process. Never experienced problems. If you stay at somebody's house they usually have a garden or garage.
>hotel
It's rarely permitted to take your bike to your room. My shoes are just as dirty as my bike's tires so it makes little sense to me but whatever. You can try and ask nicely anyway. They always try to find another acceptable solution though; in hotels with 24/7 reception leaving it locked in the reception area is often perfectly fine.
>hostel
Hostels are usually located where you don't wanna go by bicycle in the first place: centers of large cities. They are also more expensive than Airbnbs and sometimes even hotels. Haven't stayed in a hostel in ages.
>>
>>1815135
Ortlieb sucks though.
>>
>>1815228
It’s rare I find a hostel that’s over 10% the price of a hotel. Where are you looking bud?
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>>1815141
Haven fun and good luck bro.
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>>1815263
>Where are you looking bud?

In the outskirts of the city, not where the hostela are located.
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>>1815277
This was a ride in 2018 >:^)
It was awesome!
I still drive mostly the same kit, changed some worn parts obviously.
Steel frames are GOAT.
>>
>>1815259
what? ortlieb is fucking great? replaces parts and makes reparations no questions asked, waterproof and extremely durable. what do you not like about them
>>
>old boomer tours from Florida to California on a janky BSO jerry rigged with a lawn mower motor cussing and chain-smoking the whole way there?
https://youtu.be/BCy9sGLm_CM
What is YOUR excuse?
Seriously, this guy is unintentionally hilarious. It's like watching King of The Hill bike touring edition.
>>
>>1815506
They're okay, but a bit expensive and their mounting system isn't the greatest
The best panniers for your money I've found are Arkel, if you live in Canada.
Salsa Anything Cage + dry bag + hose clamp also works great for front fork setups
>>
On my second Cross Canada tour
Weather has been awful until about Minnesota (did two weeks in the USA to avoid the Trans Canada).
Bugs have been astronomically bad.
All the Warmshowers hosts are on vacation.
Currently trying to escape Ontario to Quebec where camping is cheaper and the food is nicer
>>
>>1816758
>their mounting system isn't the greatest
Are you mentally disabled? Asking unironically.
>>
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>>1816762
So someone online doesn't like your favorite thing--no need to get upset.

I've used a mess of bags on different bikes over the years (chron order: Carradice, Topeak, Ortlieb, Arkel, diy), and I agree with the other guy.

Most of these companies have multiple mounting systems, so to be clear, I'm comparing Ortlieb QL1 and the Arkel camlock/bungee/hook type (pic related). I know Ortlieb has several newer versions, but I haven't used them.
I recall the Arkel bags were more expensive (bought them from a local shop in PA), but they use that mounting system on various models.
>>
>>1816762
No but I have used several different brands of pannier in something like 25000 km of bike touring and I can confidently say that Ortlieb ranks below most other brands in terms of ease of field repair, interchangeable parts, and often suffer from a lot of wobble and drift on your racks, even when perfectly adjusted.
>>
Has any of you ever got any tail during your touring trips? Do the chicks you meet along the way find it cool or they don't care?
>>
>>1816760
I really can't imagine how you are able to enjoy being on the side of a high speed freeway for months at a time. And I can't imagine how it would be possible to cross Canada any other way.
Is there some secret to enjoying life and feeling like you're on an epic adventure while hearing the deafening sound of semi trucks day after day?
>>
>>1816784
>Ortlieb ranks below most other brands in terms of ease of field repair

i've never had to do any repairs on my ortliebs and i've been touring with them for ten years
>>
What are the things that suck about touring that no one talks about?
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>>1817832
For me it's washing clothes (where?) and shitting (where?).

Everything else is awesome.
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>>1817874
>For me it's washing clothes (where?)
You don't.

>>1817874
>and shitting (where?).
Anywhere is fine if you really have to.
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>>1817895
What is it with Americans and being unable to plan basic sanitation? Why do you people love to shit in public and where you sleep so much?
>>
>>1817874
>washing clothes (where?)
Just hand wash them quickly in a bathroom sink, or a lake/river. Unless it's raining, I wash socks and underwear every day. Dry in camp or clip them on the back of my saddlebag to dry riding. 3 pairs of each. Always have a fresh pair. The rest of my clothes i'll normally leave and do a bigger wash every week or two on a rest day. Most of my tops are merino so they last quite a long time before they get gross. The trick is just to not have too much clothing.

>shitting (where?)
You're either in a place with businesses and public toilets or somewhere appropriate to dig a hole to shit in. There is some technique to shitting in a hole well but that only really sucks if there are extreme numbers of sandflies/mozzies.
>>
>>1817832
washing pots
pitching a tent in the rain
being busy riding, camping, cooking, cleaning instead of just vacationing
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>>1817874
the thing about underwear and socks is (be smart about this and work it out before you go) they dry very quickly. It's very easy to manage drying/washing those in summer.

What doesn't dry quickly is chamois. And you really do not want to be wearing bibs without washing them. People who ride in cycling kit tend to stay always in private campgrounds or motels etc and use the coin washer/dryer every day.
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>>1817900
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>>1818086
>washing pots
2 pieces of cutlery and 2 pots/pans max for 1 person. Get good. That's like 2 minutes. You don't have enough stuff to make a real mess.

>rain
Rain is by far the worst part of cycle touring although I don't mind the odd shower at all, it's just persistent rain is really miserable. You can probably plan not to have that though by going at the right time. It's really more of an issue for super long term tourists.

>being busy riding, camping, cooking, cleaning instead of just vacationing
Lol who said you had to cook or camp? Or even ride more than you want to?
>>
>>1818086
>washing pots
sounds like you're relaying your experience car camping and you took way too much kitchen stuff.
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>>1817900
What is it with eurodumbs being unable to understand that America is a huge country and it's possible to be hours from the nearest public toilet if you're traveling by bike?
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>>1818119
Nice try lad, lived in remote deserts, and the poo question was never asked because the answer was obvious. If you’re close enough to civilisation that you can’t dig a deep hole and properly bury your waste, you’re close enough to use a toilet. If you’re not that close, you dig a deep hole and bury it. The act of digging a hole as part of the ritual is comfy, too. Of course, in reality, Americans just don’t want to use the camp toilets at the public campgrounds they’re staying at and so just shit on the floor next to their bed. To an American, this seems like the more hygienic option than sitting on a toilet seat someone else has sat on.
>>
>>1817246
The only place you are required to ride on busy highways with no alternative is in northern Ontario or Newfoundland if you're dumb enough to go there.
Every other place in Canada has a multitude of backroads, logging roads, rail trails, etc.
I even managed to do some gravel and rail trails on my first Cross Canada on a rigid touring bike with 32mm tires.
With the MTB I've been able to do at least as much gravel and off-road as highway riding. In fact, I'm leaving southern Ontario tomorrow and in the last week I've done about 300-400 km on rail trails and gravel back roads
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>>1817832
Hemorrhoids
Giardia
The smell of your farts in the tent after a 170 km day and subsequent feast of ramen noodles and candy
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>>1818968
Replying to my own post with an example of the trail riding that has been easy to find for most of the tour whenever I've gotten tired of highway riding
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>>1818969
>Hemorrhoids
Seems to be a personal problem.

>Giardia
Waterfilter. I use a Kathadyn Befree for 40€ or so. Sawyer Squeeze is also popular.

>The smell of your farts in the tent after a 170 km day and subsequent feast of ramen noodles and candy
It doesn't have to be that way.
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>>1818974
Very nice anon
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>>1818093
>>1818096
I'm just venting about the things I dislike the most, why are you trying to contend or correct it? It's not a debate, there's no right or wrong.
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>>1817832
Setting up camp in the rain
Mosquitoes
Heat
Mosquitoes and heat
Not finding anyplace to wash yourself and going to sleep caked in dried sweat mixed with UV cream and DEET
Shitting

I also hate procuring and preparing food, I'm always paranoid that I won't find an open store and end up unable fall asleep from hunger in the middle of the night, so I stock up on rations at every opportunity and I always end up finishing a trip with more food that than I left with, and making sandwiches or cooking at the end of the day feels like a chore when all I want to do is inhale some calories and go to sleep.
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>>1820312
>ot finding anyplace to wash yourself and going to sleep caked in dried sweat mixed with UV cream and DEET
All you need is a pack of wet wipes friend. They will change your life because they are basically pocketable showers.
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>>1811441
Is it wise to get a Tailfin pannier and install it on a road bike, or is it better to get a different sort of bike for touring? If the latter is better (considering weight and gearing), what sort of frame is best?
>>
>>1818968
>>1818974
That's crazy. Are "rail trails" just roads build adjacent to rails for maintenance or something?
I've never really seen those in my travels, but I guess I wasn't looking hard enough.
I don't see a way you'd be able to cross the Rockies AB-BC without taking one of those dreaded highways though. I suppose if you took a massive detour through northern BC?
Why don't you like Newfieland? I hear it's quite beautiful there.
Any advice on finding good travel routes? Do you just use satellite view and plot from there?
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>>1820370
I forgot to mention the dust from the road, at least on my legs, so using wet wipes creates an uniform layer of moist mud, which marginally worse. I now try to visit a cemetery shortly before making camp, they usually have a tap or a well, but on my last trip, there was no water in the tap, it was 30+ degrees, there was less than an hour to sundown and I had no camping spot picked yet.
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>>1820394
>there was less than an hour to sundown and I had no camping spot picked yet
This is actually the worst thing about touring and backpacking in general. H8 when you're panicking about where you'll spend the night.
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>>1820394
We all have been there. It sucks.
Bought 5l foldable water containers at Ebay. I try to fill one up for washing water if i can.
>>
>>1820373
This depends a lot on how your travel is structured - think about the basics, how will you sleep and eat. If you go light enough then the tailfin is fine however it will limit your ability on what you can do. If it is a nice roadbike touring can be harsh to it.
If you camp in warm climates and don't cook fancy meals you could get by with the tailfin.
I think it is very expensive for what it is though. If you can afford it a niche bike for touring is always best, what exactly you need will however vary greatly depending on your style.
My best advice for you would be to start cheap (used is a good starting point), try different kinds of stuff and invest in equipment that suits your touring needs.
>>
>>1820430
So, the idea I had in mind was maybe a bit too bourgeois...
I live in Europe, so camping is often restricted to official camp sites, and those are often filled full of camping vans (maybe an 1/8th the size of an American RV). But there are a great number of B&Bs/Guesthouses which are increasingly more and more open to cycle touring.

The idea was that if it's "doable", a day's journey could be planned to go from a starting position to a guesthouse or the like for an overnight stop. I realise then that the "luggage" you'd bring with you are fresh changes of clothes and so on. No need to bring a tent or sleeping bag, and I suppose by extension no need to bring a gas stove and such.
What I realise is that carrying "luggage" is heavy, and as such a road bike that's probably got a lowest gearing of 34/32 may struggle up hills if it's weighed down. By contrast, something that's got a lowest gearing of 30/36 might be very effective up hills, if not slowly. The other thing that comes to mind is that road bikes are typically built around narrower tyres for the speed. But a narrower tyre can't really "absorb" much in the way of uneven roads, especially if it's weighed down.
So... what's ultimately the best option?
Buy a new cheap af road bike with mounts for fenders and racks and enough space for wide tyres and rebuild it? Buy a second hand hybrid and modify it? Or build a full rigid MTB?
>>
>>1820716
You're overthinking a lot. While wild camping isn't technically legal in much of Europe, I've never had an issue with it in multiple countries during 2 decades. Just don't be an ass and be friendly. Generally, hiding deep in the woods is worse than being seen camping next to a trail.
If you stay in hostels and such, you literally only need food for the day, 2 water bottles, 1 (one) change of clothes, bike tools and spares, and your electronics. You could fit all that on a road bike without a rack and it won't weigh you down more than a full English breakfast.
I've had 1/1 as lowest gear on a mountain bike and it was enough. I've toured on a 42/16 fixie with 23mm tires (with camping gear) and it was awesome. The only thing that gets hurt when you push up a steep hill is your ego.

So my advice for your first trip would be: Use whatever bike you have right now and strap some bag to it.

If you don't have a bike yet, get a used bike that can fit >28mm tires for countries with good roads and >40mm for those without.

You'll figure out what works and what doesn't as you go along. Those early experiences in carefree touring, without the gearfaggotry, will never come back, so enjoy them.
>>
>>1820716
In italy you are free to camp in public places if you stay for less than 24 hours (evening to morning). Obviously dont camp on private property (or ask kindly before country people might be more hospitable than you think)
>>
>>1820740
I have two bikes.
I have a road bike with a 2x11 groupset with 34/32 as the lowest gear. It has eyelets for a pannier at the rear. It's fast, faster than me, but I guess as my general fitness improves, so will speed.
I've ordered a Tailfin cargo cage with the small bag - it's more than suitable for day riding where I can carry snacks, maybe a coat and something else. My tools and asthma inhaler are kept in a saddle pouch.
At present, I can average about 21km/h on it.

I have a hybrid bike - it's 16kg and has a 3x7 groupset with 24/34 as the lowest gear. The square taper BB creaks when climbing up hills. It has a stock rear rack and pannier. I keep a topeak rack bag on it to store water and stuff, since the frame has no bottle cage mounts. I'm not sure what to do with this bike now. I don't live in the city, but it's very much a city bike. It's much too heavy to properly accommodate a faster Hollowtech II crankset. I'm considering selling it to some city dwelling old lady.
I can only average about 14 km/h on this hybrid frame as is.
>>
>>1820755
It's never the BB, replace your worn out crank arm for 20€.
>>
>>1820716
Staying in hostels etc is perfectly fine if that is what you like. It will limit your options where you can sleep however. For that style of touring the tailfin is the right thing to get.

But as >>1820749 and >>1820749 said camping is really no problem even in densely populated areas. I've never had issues, the exception being some evenings in bad weather were I could not find a camp spot. People will generally not care that you camp and in the worst case they will just tell you to leave.
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>>1820381
Not the anon you asked but they are generally old abandoned rail right of ways that were converted into a recreational path by the local township/county etc. Just picture a railroad but instead of tracks there's a gravel or asphalt path.
>>
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Question for those who load their forks/handlebars with cargo:

Have you ever felt like you might need or want pic related?
>>
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>>1821814
Because whenever I load my front rack heavy, the forks have a very unpleasant tendency to swing wildly to the side when the bike is stopped/parked. It really pisses me off sometimes.
I also don't feel comfortable riding hands free for this reason.
Do you think one of these steer stoppers would be a nice thing to have?
>>
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>>1821814
that's clever but you can just use a strap to the same effect
>>
>>1821815
and what helps actually riding them is having a slacker front end
really slack front end and you can ride no-hands with a load upfront
if you want super stable it's probably just about having a different bike.
>>
>>1821818
>>1821816
Oh neat. What is that - the cord from a jacket or something?
What do you mean by slacker front end exactly?
>>
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>>1821820
its this
real handy

toe straps (from oldschool cage pedals) work ok too but you can't cinch em as tight and its more fiddly
>>
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>>1821820
>What do you mean by slacker front end exactly?
combination of the head tube angle and the trail (trail being achieved on straight forks by not having the fork blades inline with the headtube)

really stable bikes will be super slack and often have a lot of trail
opposite of race bike geometry.
>>
>>1821824
*not a lot of trail
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>>1821816
That's nice.
I will be using this on my next tour. Thank you.
Was looking at complicated solutions before but this is a lot easier to implement. (And propably a lot safer compared to whatever DIY solution.)
>>
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Way back in time, some bikes had integrated steering locks. Kind of the same intention, but I've never read much about them being used on touring bikes. It kind of seems like it's a pre-kickstand alternative.

>>1821814
Nope, haven't wanted one.
It's never bothered me when I'm off the bike. Even if you're leaning it against a signpost, skinny tree, etc, you learn how to get it right. But I know what you're talking about, how it feels while riding.

One of the best things I did was replace my olde headset with one of those 'IRD Double RollerDrive' headsets (the kind with orange inserts, needle bearings up top and bottom).
Kind of hard to describe. The bearings are very smooth, but there's slightly more friction vs ball bearings. It's not a negative thing, it turns just fine while riding. But that little bit is very noticeable if you lift the bike (not often), or ride no hands (very useful for having a snack).

>>1821822
It's common to see those as "lineloc" in the camping/hammocking world.
>>
>>1821850
That specific thing he posted seems to only be available in New Zeland fyi
>>
>>1821858
That's not a problem, I have some supplies here and will just DIY this. Basically just a elastic rope with a loop on one side and a blocking piece you can push through the loop on the other side. I'll just make it to fit my touring bike, so having it being a fixed length is fine.
The solution is just so simple that I feel kinda retarded for not seeing it myself earlier.
I will also only be using this for unstable terrain / winds. So it is just a niche item even on tour.
>>
>>1811441
I am planning a 10 day trip along the northern coast of France and will take my stock specialized Allez (2020) with me. My wheels have been recently trued and I have attached a S-Works elite carriage in the back. Surfaces will be mostly established dirt bike paths and stretches of asphalt. I have never travelled this far in one sitting with it and wondered if the Allez will be up to task and how to distribute the luggage across the bike.
> (Distance: 385km ; Total elevation: 1250m ; luggage: 25kg)
Anons in the /bqg/ have said I will be having a mellow ride, but may have to put wider tires on to make it.
>>
>>1820312
you sleep better hungry
>>
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Can I get your opinion on the Fuji Touring bike for bike touring? I can get a bike for cheap which I pay off over a 2 year period with zero interest as part of a government scheme in the UK and I want to get a Fuji. Primarily I'd want to use it for commuting as well as for going on multi-day rides with camping..
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>>1821950
Ask me anything. Fuji Touring LTD 2018.
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>>1821897
it really depends on what those "established dirt bike paths" are, it could range from tarmac-like hardpack to steep ass washboard nightmare. in any case I'd still fit the widest possible tires your bike will take, 28mm probably, 32mm if you're lucky. I've done all sorts of terrains on my alu/carbon road bike with 32mms and panniers+bags on, it's fine. some roads are less enjoyable than others that's all.
as for weight distribution try to aim for something like 65% back 35% front, I know a lot of anons around here have a fetish for front loading though so just adjust to your preference. a big saddlebag, handlebar bag and frame bag will probably be enough to carry all your stuff. those can all be strapped directly to your bike so you don't need any sort of mount or rack.
IMO it's a good idea to get the bags first and then figure out what you're gonna bring with you, that way you go down to the bare essentials instead of overloading with stuff you don't really need.
avoid backpacks, they're really uncomfortable on long rides.
10 days is a long time for a 400km ride, you could probably do it in way less no problem.
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>start
>50 km of nothing
>small town
>70 km of nothing
>small town
>130 km of nothing
>end

wishing my hometown wasnt in bumfuck lapland
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>>1822005
Thanks for the rec and reply. The percentages really help for planning out the packing. I will be doing some sightseeing and camping near Brügge, Calais and Dunkirk, hence the generous schedule. Do you use any tents on your tours? I was thinking that a tarp and sleeping bag would do in August.
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>>1821950
>which I pay off over a 2 year period with zero interest
...and you'll be happy!
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>>1822119
you'll probably be fine with just a tarp and bag, yeah. personally I always carry my tent, mostly so I have somewhere to store my bags and keep them away from the elements, but to each his own
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>>1821940
I don't.
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>>1822119
>I was thinking that a tarp and sleeping bag would do in August.
have you done that before?
consider insects

You might be ok with creepy crawlies on your face during the night but, mosquitoes or sandflies ? Some places are hell with them in summer. Even if you had a head net that actually worked which it wouldn't laying down to sleep the noise of them 10cm away from your face would be maddening.
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>>1822247
>Have you done that before?
Only over weekends when I was still with the boyscouts. Over ten days this might be more annoying than I could have anticipated, though I think mosquitos need fresh water to breed and would be less of an issue so close to shore
>>1822144
What sort of tent do you take with you? And do you tie it to your rig on its own or do you keep it wrapped up in a bag?
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how do you guys get the endurance for long touring journeys?
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>>1822364
just ride
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How do you wash your clothes at camp sites? I've been fortunate enough to visit major towns big enough for laundromats but I have no idea how to wash my clothes with just the basic sinks available at camp sites as I'm a bit of a noob still. Any tips?
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>>1822392
i never use washing machines on tour just to save $2
Handwashing is easy.
you just need a sink or a river. Put a drop of soap on each garment. Grip a side of a garment in each hand and rub them together under water. Then rinse them off. Cycle the water in the sink a few times. Improvise a plug with one thing kinda stuck in the bottom.

Then wring out.

You can start with a good clothes soap but refill it with anything like even steal hand soap from public toilets to refill your bottle soap is soap.

The trick is just not having much clothes so washing is never a mission, and always keep on top of it. Try to wash even just 1 pair of socks and 1 pair of undies each day. The things you have to be mindful of are washing your garments that take a long time to dry. Like merino layers take ages to dry, best done on a rest day in the sun. Keeping fresh smalls on hand is easy. Just stay on top of it.
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>>1822392
there's like a technique to joodging garments together when you handwash.

I can't believe no one taught you this. Or like that you've never seen anyone handwashing ever. It's only laborious when you're a 19th century women doing a week of washing for 5 people. It's easy doing a pair of socks.

Also wokr out a place on your bike to clip socks that are drying. Fresh socks every day. Live by that. Be comfy.
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>>1822396
Thanks for the solid advice, the path I'm on goes along a river so I'll buy some soap and try your method today. I've got the trimmed wardrobe part down so just a short wash each day will keep my clothes clean.
>>1822397
We are posting on 4chan after all, don't be too surprised if people are lacking seemingly commonplace life skills.
I've been drying my socks from sweat on the side of my big saddle bag and being bathed in UV light all day is enough to pass the smell test, but this time I'll be washing them too.
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>>1822144
>you'll probably be fine with just a tarp and bag
Death by mosquito it is, then.

>>1822364
Ride a bit.
Ride a bit more.
Ride a bit more.
Ride a bit more.
Ride a lot.

>>1822392
I have this:
https://forcesuniformandkit.co.uk/products/dutch-army-wash-bowl
And i bring a bit of washing powder with me. Dissolve some poweder in some water, soak and knead your clothes in it, say 5 to 10 minutes.
Wring, rinse, wring, rinse, wring, dry.

The bowl is also nice to wash yourself with absolute tiny amounts of water.
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>>1821814
Pic is my rig
I can ride it no handed without the bars wobbling or going off center
Just balance the weight on your forks well and it's fine
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Seen a second hand Ridgeback tour from 2018 going on eBay for 250 quid. Does anyone have any experience with this bike and would they make a decent entry level touring bike?
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>>1821968
What do you need the tablet for?
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>>1822324
>What sort of tent do you take with you?
something like pic related
>And do you tie it to your rig on its own or do you keep it wrapped up in a bag?
I usually have a rack on my bike so I just strap it on top, but when the rack is off I just stuff the tent in one of my bags and strap the rods to the bike's top tube
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>>1822711
Shitposting while riding. Am i the only one?

It's used for Osmand, a navigation app. You tap it, and it shows you in a sat view where you are and where you should go.
No, the battery is good for three to four days. Yes i have a solar cell to reload a powerbank as well.
Yes, my eyes aren't as good as they where.
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>>1816502
is that a friction drive on the rear wheel?
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anyone done a tour of the pyrenees? going from Girona to San Sebastian (and further on Spains north coast). What to expect? How is the traffic? Seems few people ride along the range, mainly through it.
going in less than a week and will probably wing most of it since i've hadn't have time to plan
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BTG, does anyone have any experience of the Genesis croix de fer? Looking at picking up one second hand as a tourer/gravel bike and apparently it's a good mix of both.
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>>1821814
I have a wheel stabilizer, which helps a lot. it's just a spring with a mount between the fork and downtube, and they're cheap
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Considering getting into bicycle touring.

Anyone here done it before? Are routes available online?

Is a 90s steel frame bike with bags ok or will I need an aluminum/carbon fiber?

Thanks
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>>1823229
routes are everywhere. ridewithgps has a ton. your local cycle club has some. there's probably some oldhead cyclist blogger somewhat near you that has routes. 90's steel bike is perfect.
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>>1823095
well it's like a classic touring bike but with slightly larger tire clearance (and slightly more aggressive geo). if you're just looking for not super rough gravel riding and some touring it'll do fine. 40-45 as max tire clearance is not super much though if you're gonna go on singletracks and big rock roads
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>>1823229
steel frame is fine
the bike is going to weigh a ton anyway so its more important to have very good brakes and gears
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>>1823229
Steel is fine as long as it is structurally sound. Also what
>>1823313
mentioned. Have your drivetrain in order and it is fine. I would add one more thing for tours: Most important are wheels, especially for rim brake bikes. They should be robust enough to handle you and all the extra load.

Regarding routes, if this depends on the lengths you want to go. Long distance use https://www.adventurecycling.org/routes-and-maps/adventure-cycling-route-network/ for the US and the eurovelo routes for europe https://de.eurovelo.com/#routes-and-countries. But i would just see these as inspiration to find a starting point.
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So guys, I've bought my first touring bike now, getting a second hand genesis croix de fer. What advice would you have for people first getting into touring? Obviously I want to get the gear slowly but surely. However, in the meantime, should I start going out on some longer rides and possibly doing some camping too before moving up to the bigger and more ambitious journeys?

What tips and advice would you have for a beginner?
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>>1822897
>Seems few people ride along the range, mainly through it.
Because it really isn't a sensible thing to do unless the Pyrenees themselves are your goal.
>What to expect?
A fuckton of climbing followed by downhill rides and more climbing and more downhill rides and more climbing etc. It's not like you can cycle the ridge. I'm not sure why you'd do this to yourself considering you could easily avoid most of this mountain fuckery.
Also expect generally high temps. In Spain it's mandatory to wear a helmet.
>How is the traffic?
Low. It's a sparsely populated area far from the main transit routes. Only Andorra has a comparatively high amount of traffic - lots of border traffic from Spain and France for duty-free shopping - but the main road across the tiny country is mostly wide enough to make it bearable.

t. crossed the Pyrenees on a trip from Germany to Tunisia this year
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>>1823962
>What tips and advice would you have for a beginner?
Pack light.

>However, in the meantime, should I start going out on some longer rides and possibly doing some camping too before moving up to the bigger and more ambitious journeys?
Do a one-week tour not far from home and find out how you do, how you cope, what you like, what you don't like, what you need, what you don't need. If you can ride for a week straight without ever thinking "yo this shit kinda sucks" you're probably safe to go for bigger adventures.
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>>1823962
If you're camping take a nice candle. You can light it for morale and to form a protective aura around your campsite in lieu of a fire.
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>>1823962
Start with overnighters, and close enough to home to ride back on the same day if it turns out you forgot something critical or that some part of your setup is simply not working as you expected and you have no way to spend the night in relative comfort.
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I'm gonna pack my shit on the bike and leave home to find work in a different country wherever the road takes me. It's probably a retarded decision but I've been a neet for too long and it's time to try something new. Fuck it
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>>1824183
fuck yeah!
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>>1823993
mountains are fun man thats how you get the good views! Why go through on one day and just get the views of some mountains when you can see loads of them for weeks? I don't understand tourers who hate mountains and hills. sure it's lots of work but holy shit getting to the top is one of the greatest feelings. but thanks for the info! will probably skip andorra then seems kinda... not good? actually found some (non-waymarked) routes too traversing the pyrenees on the spanish side, will be winging between them, probably dodging most hike a bikes as although it's usually worth it it's too slow and i wanna ride.
will prolly post some pics
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>>1824002
>Do a one-week tour not far from home and find out how you do, how you cope, what you like, what you don't like, what you need, what you don't need. If you can ride for a week straight without ever thinking "yo this shit kinda sucks" you're probably safe to go for bigger adventures.
my first tour was on iceland solo for four weeks and I was absolutely miserable for most of the time but I still wanted to do it again. I think you have to be a bit retarded to enjoy touring
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>>1823993
Dumbest question: what bottle cage do you have that can fit those big SIG bottles?
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>>1824448
Get an aluminium one and bend it till it fits.
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>>1824448
not him but blackburn, king cage and velo orange make cages to fit large bottles.
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>>1824408
>will probably skip andorra then seems kinda... not good?
It's kinda shitty (lots of traffic and crowded) but it's cyclable enough. Andorra is a sovereign country though so that's kinda cool. And it does feature the highest paved pass of the Pyrenees fwiw.

> Why go through on one day and just get the views of some mountains when you can see loads of them for weeks?
Personally I usually have a goal in mind that I want to reach when I'm on a bike tour. I don't mind climbing but I don't go out of my way to fuck around in the mountans either.

>>1824448
It's from Zéfal. It's bretty good.
The bottles aren't SIGGs. I bought them at Intersport.
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>>1816502
>Unintentionally
Seems pretty intentionally funny to me. He seems like your average based stoner.
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>>1824412
Yeah I'm on an indefinite tour of Canada, USA and maybe Mexico right now and just had a day where I started out pushing my bike up a 30% incline on am ATV trail in the rain and then spent all day in a headwind with fatigued legs.
Sometimes you just have shit days on long distance tours and you can sit around twiddling your thumbs waiting for things to get better or you can just ride your bike and hope tomorrow is better
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>>1817525
And I've had an Ortlieb's mounting system fail on tour, and a riding partner experience the same, in under 10 tours.
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Just got this looking to do some touring on it. What would you guys add/change? Thinking about doing the classic fender/lowrider/pannier thingy, not sure if i should get a road handlebars if i manage to get some cheap shifters or some kind of special handlebars. Dont want to keep the gripshift
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>>1826811
Change saddle also, get something modern with a hole in the middle like a "selle italia" type.
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>>1826811
more hand positions
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>>1826811
i fucking hate flat bars but might just be me, either alt bars or drops. jones bar is a good bar with a lot of positions or the vo crazy bar.
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>>1826846
>t. doesn't ride a bike
can you even pass the Turing test?
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>>1826811
>Triple gear
>Excellent mounting options
>Steel is reel

Looks pretty good to me.
Only changes needed are for personal preference or comfort (different bars, saddle, etc)
You can easily start touring on that frame and parts as is
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Pay attention to aerodynamics. Like weight, it's energy saved, faster travel and easier on the body. Try to resemble a teardrop - wear a tight shirt, arm sleeves and leggings instead of flappy clothes, use a frame bag or saddle bag or rack bag, not panniers, and train yourself to ride in a more aero position. Look into aero bars - I don't use these any more as I do a "faux aero bars" tuck on drop bars.

Drop bars are my favourite, gives great control in the drops when descending and lots of hand positions. Consider a moustache bar if the tour is slower. Riding on the hoods (slightly tilted inwards) is the most aero position after the preying mantis TT tuck.

get a narrow bar. You can go really narrow and still have control, even at 28mm. Biggest aero benefit.

alternate your leg muscle use. "Lift and drop" your legs when they get tired from pushing, aka swap from quads to hammies to adductors. Only aero tuck on the flats to save your back muscles, relax when going downhill.

Forget a suspension fork on all but the nastiest routes. Ride like a mongolian horseback archer on rough terrain, and keep your feet at parallel levels when descending bumpy roads.

You can do really bad terrain on slick skinny tyres. I ride 28mm-32mm and wouldn't want anything else even if the route was 50% off road. Tread is a meme for most scenarios beyond thick mud and WILL slow you down on the road, despite marketing. Choose a tough rear tyre and a fast front, nearly all punctures happen on the rear as it gets most of the weight.

Use gel gloves with ulnar pads or bar inserts if you feel nerve pinching coming on in your hands, these will also reduce fatigue.

Nothing wrong with a disc rear and a deep (50mm-70mm) front if you're a heavier or strong rider. On crazy high wind days I just take a break, wouldn't want to ride on any bike on those days.

If you're doing long dull road stretches learn to skitch and draft trucks. Good channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vO54JAeIOHQ
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>>1827838
*28cm bars
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posted this in /out/

Last year I realised I've toured for 40,000 miles. Here's a few tips.

ignore anyone saying weight doesn't matter, unless you're touring on flatlands. Yes a bike is a fraction of your body weight but going up hill, the difference between an 8kg bike and an 18kg bike is really big.
Go light. You'll burn less energy, your body will recover faster, your bike parts will get less cumulative stress (1000x bumps later and that extra weight will take a serious toll)

choose as simple a system as you can manage. Older gearing is usually more robust. 8x,9x,10x are all better choices than modern gearing as the chains stretch slower, the sprockets wear slower and the derailleurs need less precise tuning, and parts are more available in the sticks

Choose standard, easily available parts. 700C wheels are way more common than 650. Shimano is sold in just about every corner of the globe. Shimano is a huge company which means you can get very high level tech for cheap from them compared to a local smaller brand.

For world touring mid-range shimano cup+cone hubs with a steel axle are superior to even the highest grade cartridge bearings, which all have a much shorter shelf life and, due to their construction, can't have the same long reliable axle as a C&C hub.

Carbon is fine for:
Seatpost (in fact, the best option as it'll absorb vibrations and tire you out less)
Saddle
Derailleur cages
Fork
Spacers
Cranks
Brake levers
Rims (but don't go super light)
I'd go for an aluminium or titanium frame+bars, as carbon will be untrustworthy after any crash or ding when handling. Carbon fork is a deal with the devil I'm willing to make as I like the road-buzz reduction and weight loss.

If you opt for disc brakes, get cable, not hydraulic. Much easier to fix.

I use stiff carbon shoe insoles with flat pedals for more energy return, and either crocs or sandals with warmer socks+breadbags in cold.

T shirts are lighter and often have odour control. Polyester jerseys STINK.
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>>1827847
>T shirts
Any suggestions?
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Camping:

a six sided pyramid tarptent is the most wind shedding, lightweight option. I use a clone of an MLD trailstar tarp but I've also got a lot of use from a $40 chinese "knot" pyramid that weighed 320g and was fine in 50mph+ winds. S2S nano bugnet and polycro ground tarp, carbon fibre rod tent pegs plus the pyramid fly weighed 550g total with a 70g carbon tent pole. I used to use the bike as a support but who wants to sleep with their head next to dogshit on the tyres. Lots of "bikepacking" tents/tarps are sufferfest coffins for no discernible reason.

If you're bivvying, make sure you can dry out your insulation at some point in the day. Even the best bivy materials (eVent) trap some condensation in the insulation over time which gets mouldy and degrades loft. Bring a tarp with your bivy for camp chores in the rain and waiting out storms.

Foam pads kick ass if you can get comfy on one, as you can just throw them down, they weigh less than an insulated air pad, and pack up in seconds. If you're a side sleeper, adjust your lying position - tilt your pelvis forwards and roll your ribcage til the pressure is more evenly spread. I use a torso-length Zlite underneath a generic 6mm evazote foam pad, which is far comfier than either by itself or two layers of flat foam. Stored strapped to the top of a saddle bag, i like to imagine the pads actually increases my torso's teardrop aero shape by acting like a fairing (albeit kammtail)

arm sleeves, cap and buff over sunscreen any day, spray water on your wrists, neck and thighs in high heat

simple 700ml aluminium cup+spoon and a little popcan stove and you can cook hearty stews which only requires a rinse. Use a foam mat as a windbreak. I cook once a day at most. Rest of my meals don't require prep.

>>1827849
Rab Pulse (size down), Patagonia Capilene Lightweight (not daily or trail), OR Echo. These are truly featherweight (50g for my medium), odour treated and still block a lot of UV. I take two.
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>>1826811
Get trekking bars for more hand positions. I'd also check the gear ratio (you don't need to be fast, but you'll need to climb). Rebuilding that rear wheel with the proper spokes might also be a good idea, depending on the weight you want to put on there.
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>>1827838
>>1827847
>>1827850
>>1827852
blessed quality posts
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>>1822648
how much of a pain is it to convert an MTB to drops? you had to swap out the entire drivetrain, or?
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What is best/least of a pain to lock up my road bike during quick pee breaks/coffee stops/bakery stops in italy?

Abus bordo lite, link lock
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>>1827973
orrr

ABUS combiflex
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>>1827974
looks a little too easy to snip with side cutters
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>>1827973
for that amount of time? just a cheap cable lock, wrap it in a layer of foam then bright coloured tape to make it look much beefier without weighing half the weight of the bike. If you dont gaf about your bar tape and saddle, flip the bike upside down, anything to make the thief think it's too much of a pain or slow him down.
in my cunt it's usually fine to take the bike into the cafe entrance or round the back of a shop, or eat outside in view
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>>1827940
It was pretty easy for me.
Just swapped out the bars, shifters/levers, bought mech brake calipers and ran a bunch of new cabling.
Kept the cassette, chainrings and derailleurs.
Probably very easy to do these days, now that there are so many gravel groupsets and sti hydro levers available.
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>>1827973
ottolock
or you can just "lock" the frame to the front wheel with your helmet straps, of course it's almost no security but at least it prevents someone from just jumping on and riding away
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>>1828042
I do this for trips into the coffee shop,
store, depanneur, etc. where I'm only going to be two minutes.
For grocery shopping or something where I'm go na be away for like 10 mins I usually lock up
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>>1828074
same
though lately more and more stores have started letting me carry my bike inside
small stores of course, not supermarkets.
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>>1828042
I shift from the highest gear to the lowest gear so there is slack in the shifter cable then pull it out of the shifter. pretty much disables the bike and takes a second to fix.
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>>1827940
the key point about converting a mtb to drops is you add ~100 mm reach

That's the distance from the centre of the flat part of a drop bar to the center of the hoods which are the main grip position and where you are braking or shifting.
It's less because having wider bars, which mtbs do, also adds reach. But it also can be -more- because many mtb bars have backsweep.
Bike sizes go up in 20 mm increments. +100 mm reach is like the difference between a small and an extra large bike.
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>>1827838
>Ride like a mongolian horseback archer on rough terrain
how is that
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>>1828140
Unweight your saddle he means so that the bike is free to bounce around without being slowed by the movement
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>>1828141
Yes, your bent legs become suspension just like on a hardtail.
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>>1826811
very nice pickup.
You could do inner bar ends like pic rel. Gives a good position for riding into headwinds or covering ground fast on the flat.

lowriders are a great idea seeing as you have the mid-boss for them.
How much clearance do you have? Fenders are an option but you also just go bigger tires to make it better offroad.

Service the bearings.
I'd upgrade the pedals and brake pads.
And delete the dynamo and kickstand. If you want a dynamo invest in a modern LED hub motor one.
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>>1826811
Here's another style of trekking bar on another bike i built. It's a 1 piece ITM scorpion, which is like having std outer bar ends.
I've ridden this a bit and find the outer bars are useful for leverage climbing steep hills. Inner bar-ends are useful for riding fast on the flat.

You can have both if there's space and good old mtb barends are a cheap/free pickup from any parts bin.
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What software do you use for planning tours?
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>>1829091
i buy paper maps at petrol stations in areas i ride into and then ask random people i meet about the route
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>>1829092
I want to plan ahead a bit, to find a good compromise of least hilly, shortest, and best landscape/cultural sights along the way. It would be nice to have some map tool to load gpx files for official bike routes into and adapt them to my likings.
For example if I wanted to go across europe (which is way beyond the length of my tours) I would look for some rivers, chain them together and take some shortcuts in between when its worth it.
For on the road I use paper maps too, but it's not ideal for planning imo
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>>1829091
i just input my start and finish points on google maps then modify the route according to my liking
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>>1824033
The ABSOLUTE worst thing you can do is light a fucking candle, unless you want every skeet in the area to home in on your camp, holy shit you need shooting anon. No fire after dark, no light at all except IR. If you aren't fed, cleaned, watered and ready for the hammock by sundown you are doing it all wrong and should probably go back to all inclusive package holidays with the other plebs.

Candles wtf?!
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Bought this primarily because it was minty and cheap and I knew some folks will pay 5 or 6 times what I paid for it, but after riding it a few times I started to love the fucking thing, especially with a wider tyre, it's very light, stiff and super responsive, amazing at climbing, that's not an exaggeration, it feels so tight and efficient and is so much fun on and off the road.

It also has rack/fender eyelets and mounts for three bottle cages so I got to thinking about kitting it out for a camping trip. Front and rear rack, fenders and maybe a custom made frame bag leaving space for the seat tube bottle cage to go with the underside downtube one.

What thinks /n/?
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>>1829231
>light, stiff and super responsive
>tight and efficient
what absolute marketing guff. nae cunt gives a shit about you're "only ridden once (w- well uh actually 5 or 6 times)" fashion accessory from 30 years ago.
nice to see you memed it out with """"""slicks"""""" though. contishit at that, I'm actually impressed.
>custom made frame bag
damn I forgot this whole thing is bait and I'm a retard for falling for it. keep it up, proud of you.
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>>1829231
Kleins have some value if you want to build a singlespeed MTB, but you bought one of the few with vertical dropouts, so it's pointless.
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>>1829229
>skeet
are you talking about bums or mosquitos

>no activity after dark
fuck off cunt i often don't even get to camp before dark riding at night is comfy when it's hot
>no fires while camping
wtf am i reading do you really not have campfires if you can?
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>>1829378
*do you really not have campfires sometimes if you can?
obviously not every night as it's quite a lot of effort
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>>1829267
>>1829241
t. niggers seething
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>>1829267
>Kleins have some value if you want to build a singlespeed MTB
lolwut
why would you ruin a great frame with such a meme build
where's the "value" in that
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>>1829544
there is none. ol buddys jlein just makes that idiot seethe so hes trying to misdirect him into a retarded "build" in a machiavellian try at sabotage...
>>
>>1829231
looking good-
>>
just bought my first tent
thing looks huge when packed where does it even go on a bike
a rack is probably necessary for this huh
>>
>>1831641
why did you buy such a big tent
>>
>>1831643
it's 2 person
isn't that what you're supposed to get for one person
>>
>>1831641
>>1831643
>>1831644
>buys a bog basic tent-shaped-object from a department store
>noooo why is it bulky and difficult to transport nooooooo
if you want compact get a foil blanket or be prepared to cough up big time for a meme specialist backpacking tent
>>
>>1831645
that's not what i asked
>>
>>1831641
>>1831645
order this
cheap, packs tiny, light (340g on my scale), pitches quick and in small places, well made, will hold up in horrendous storms
add a polycro groundsheet for wet ground and a S2S nano inner net for bugs
pitch with a bamboo or folding carbon pole (bamboo pole is good angry-dog-repelling stick)
mini groundhog stakes or 6"x3mm carbon rods+a single titanium nail for pilot holes in hard ground

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32792126989.html?spm=a2g0o.detail.1000014.7.37923f90qEeq06&gps-id=pcDetailBottomMoreOtherSeller&scm=1007.40000.267768.0&scm_id=1007.40000.267768.0&scm-url=1007.40000.267768.0&pvid=42467ca7-a79d-4619-8d23-1aad484bb176&_t=gps-id:pcDetailBottomMoreOtherSeller,scm-url:1007.40000.267768.0,pvid:42467ca7-a79d-4619-8d23-1aad484bb176,tpp_buckets:668%232846%238109%23244&pdp_ext_f=%7B%22sku_id%22%3A%2263748875771%22%2C%22sceneId%22%3A%2230050%22%7D&pdp_npi=2%40dis%21GBP%21%2141.34%21%21%21%21%21%400b0a2e9c16588481014007619e4a3d%2163748875771%21rec
>>
>>1831656
that's... a tarp
>>
>>1831658
What do you think a tent fly is?
Double wall is too hot in summer and just gets soggy in cold conditions and never dries
>>
>>1831644
not all 2 person tents are the same
I bout a 2person igloo tent like pic related
the whole thing fits inside my handlebar bag, except for the rod which I strap to my top tube. if I'm using panniers, the whole thing fits inside one of them with spare room.

maybe it's not that big and you're exaggerating.
>>
>>1831706
hurr durr
>>
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>>1831684
>Double wall is too hot in summer
Then open the door. Double wall means no insects, you dingus.
>>
>>1831646
>where does it even go on a bike
>why is it bulky and difficult to transport
it is LITERALLY (but not actually literally) what you asked, you dribbling brain dead cunt.
>>
>>1831739
That's why I suggested a bugnet you double dingus
>nice spikeman kitty
>>
>>1831706
>>1831707
yeah it's similar almost 60cm long when packed
how big is your handlebar bag
>>
>>1831756
you having your period?
>>
>>1831769
Fair enough. But if you bring a bugnet and a tarp, you might as well bring a tent.
>>
Experiences with external ht2 bbs? Does their longevity match that of square taper bbs?
>>
>>1831978
It doesn't. Especially all weather.
But it's not terrible and you can change them pretty easily and they ride fine in rough condition. I wouldn't worry about it too much.

The bigger question is don't you want a triple crankset. In which case there are WAY more good square taper options.

Beware that many hollowtech road triples have a meme 94bcd granny size which is unsuitable for touring as it limits you to a 29t granny.
>>
>>1831788
certainly not that long lol
you don't need to pack it on the same bag it came in, like I said, I individually roll both layers and chuck them inside my handlebar bag, and strap the poles to my frame. it's the poles what make the bag so long.
>>
>>1831996
why wouldn't a HT2 BB last as long as a square taper one? are you talking from personal experience? because I've had plenty of square taper BBs die on me while my old BBRS500 still spins smoothly, I'd still be using it if I hadn't switched to campy
>>
>>1832028
personal experience and commonly accepted fact.

>why
It's open, the axle passes through it. And the bearing adjustment/running depends on the alignment of the frame and the installation.
Square taper unit is sealed far better and the bearing adjustment is self contained.

This is for good cartridge units though. Low-end cartridge and oldschool loose bbs wear out quickly.
>>
>>1832028
>switched to campy
A triple? Those centaur cartridge units don't last that long either which is bullshit for how much they cost.
>>
>>1823229
>Anyone here done it before?
....The thread you're posting in is "bike touring general".

>routes available online?
Check out crazyguyonabike. The site has a bunch of sections, but the ride journals and map are what I'm recommending. Especially if you're just getting into it, seeing a bunch of pictures, reading about other people's setups and habits is useful.
>>
>>1831957
>if you bring a bugnet and a tarp, you might as well bring a tent
No, this doesn't track. It's like saying "If you bring waterproof socks AND trainers, you may as well wear a waterproof boot"

A tarp or tarptent plus a bugnet can be less than 300g total and is much more compact than a tent, plus cheaper too. You can use the net alone on dry nights, and the fly alone on cold, low bug nights. The net can be worn as a garment during stationary camp chores with a lot of bugs. When pitched you get a lot better air flow and less condensation with this system too. Most serious distance hikers swap their tents for tarps+nets/bivies. Tents are the first thing people are encouraged to try when they start camping, the same way most people start with tough boots instead of trail runners, or feature-rich hybrids/mtbs with kickstands and lots of panniers instead of simple randonneur touring bikes and decalleur bags / bikepacking stuff / racks.
>>
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>>1832138
>A tarp or tarptent plus a bugnet can be less than 300g total and is much more compact than a tent, plus cheaper too.
Doubt and doubt. But i'm willing to be educated if you can provide links.
>You can use the net alone on dry nights, and the fly alone on cold, low bug nights.
I can do that with my tent.
>The net can be worn as a garment during stationary camp chores with a lot of bugs.
Fair enough, i have never done this with my inner tent. However, once i opened my jacked to reach to the GPS i had in an inner pocket. The old Garmin eTrex had a very sensitive display that became unuseable at very low temps. Anyway, my hands went numb and i couldn't close my jacket! Here i was, with an open jacket and cold hands that lost dexterity, in Scotland, in the cold and heavy wind. I wrapped my tent around me until i got control over my hands back. Does that count?
>When pitched you get a lot better air flow and less condensation with this system too.
I guess so.
>Most serious distance hikers
Fuck them. I do this for fun, not to impress nor to become a thru hiker.
>>
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>>1832160
>https://sectionhiker.com/zpacks-pocket-tarp-with-doors-review/
170g pyramid tarp. Smaller flat tarps can be considerably lighter. 3 season only really, but you can get cuben pyramid tarps that survive 60mph+ winds at around 250g. Going to silnylon or silpoly would add 100-150g for a lot more durability, cheaper price and smaller packsize.

https://seatosummit.com/products/nano-mosquito-pyramid-net-with-insect-shield
80g net

Add in a 50g polycro groundsheet

>Does that count?
Of course, that's pretty clever, making your own bothy bag. Good thinking. If you wanted to take it up a notch, carrying a little beeswax candle and lighting it in your cookpot inside your tent-cloak would make a palmar furnace and you'd have been sweating in no time. That's also why I carry paper maps in ziplocks, for heavy rain, dead-battery and low-dexterity use.

>not to impress nor to become a thru hiker
I wasn't suggesting you were, just that these people happily adapt to these tents, and they need proper shelter from weather and bugs and recovery sleep a lot more than the average meandering biker tourer.
On my tours I found a correlation between bike weight, recovery speed and enjoyment. Simpler gear dried and packed up faster too.
>>
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>>1832163
Ok, it's light. What do the tent poles, pegs and lines weigh? Surely you would get into the 700g range all things accounted for.
Anyway, if it works for you, nice. I could see me using something like it too, if i was a bit smaller.
>>
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>>1832165
light is might

a trekking pole adds 150g for a sturdy enough one (negated weight if you were already using poles)
or about 60-80g for a dedicated folding carbon tent pole
or nothing if you find sticks or tie the peak to a branch above you or use your bike as a pole/tieout

1.5mm dyneema or 2mm polyester cord can't weigh much, it's very very light stuff
Pegs can be very light and still work really well. I use 6" 3mm carbon rod off fleabay with little eyelets and string loops glued on, and a single titanium nail as a pilot hole, and a little lacquer on the tip (and on the tent peg tips). Tutorials online "myog carbon tent pegs". All 7 pegs weigh 27g total.

I'm 6'3" and use that chinky tent I linked earlier with buckets of space, just not great canopy space when sitting up (so I wear a hat if it's condensating)

A tip to you gentlesir
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>>1832171
Intradesting all in all.
Maybe one day you can show your setup with bug net and all.
>>
>>1832177
sure, if thread's still up i'll post a campsite pic on me trip next week
nice msr that's a goodun
>>
>>1832030
no, veloce double. BB is still running fine after about a decade.
>>
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>what are you plans for the summer
I'm going to do this trip in September, the Hebridean way combined with a bit of the north coast 500. Its ~1000km and I've allowed just over 2 weeks for it. I'm going with a friend who has never done any cycle touring before. Hopefully the Hebridean way part should be a relatively gentle introduction before we go back to the mainland. Going to mainly be camping but will probably have a couple of nights in hostels too. Cycled up to Oban from Carlilse last year and loved it, so looking forward to this a lot.
Has anyone on /btg/ done any of this route and have any advice?
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>>1832326
Are you gonna stay in some bothies? I've always thought that's such a cool system.
>>
>>1832326
pack midge headnets and something you can wear to protect your hands and bare skin
make sure the midgenets are fine enough, not just mozzie nets - same goes for any tent netting
>>
>>1811503
Depends, but packing food and cooking supplies is most likely overkill if you're anywhere semicivilized. Eating with the locals and making friends is half the fun. Water, on the other hand, is always good to have extra, so two bottles in cages and maybe even a spare bottle with a secure seal in the pack. Aim for about 100lbs of weight including bike
>>
>>1813095
Good luck in the desert, don't piss off the locals, and try to detour once in a while
>>
>>1827940
Never tried this, but a change of handlebar and maybe recabling could get a somewhat dropbar with good hydraulic brakes.
>>
>>1827850
Do you use any sunscreen at all? If not, how are you protecting your feet in sandals or legs?
>>
Any recommendations for rear racks?
>>
>>1833523
tubus cosmo

or something else with parallel top rails so you can run a pannier lower and it doesn't mire the racktop
>>
I will be riding during a religious holiday and I need to prepare for 2 days without being able to restock food. It also might be during a heat wave so I need to be cautious with perishables.
I'm thinking of taking pasta, dried sausages and dehydrated spaghetti sauce, other than that maybe some pumpernickel and/or tortillas but I don't know what to eat them with. If it's really hot I might not feel like cooking and will just want to eat something filling and go to sleep.
What are your go-to touring foods?
>>
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>>1834418
some of my favorites are
bagged dry soup mix (pic related), you just plop it in a pot with hot water and it's done, nice hearty meal for cold weather
ramen noodles, same as above pretty much, quicker than regular pasta
oats and jam/marmalade for something quick, sweet and filling
pate or some other form of spreadable meat
pita bread or some other form of flat bread
>>
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Is sleeping in public restrooms a viable strategy?
>>
What do you guys think is the best saddle for touring? Are brooks worth it?
>>
>>1836779
why would you want to do this?
>>
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>>1836844
It's free and provides protection from the elements. Toilet and sink available.

>>1836841
>Are brooks worth it?
Absolutely. It's a life-time investment.
>>
>>1836779
absolutely disgusting
>>
>>1836779
i guess if it's this clean
>>
>>1836779
That's a hotel room, public bathrooms look nothing like that.
>>
>>1836841
wtb volt
>>
>>1837431
yeah I use this on my touring bike and its pretty decent
>>
>>1837416
there's no shower though, and hotel staff doesn't leave cleaning supplies in the room
>>
>>1836858
redpill me on touring with a single grip position
>>
>>1837576
you just get used to it
>>
>>1837592
but that's suboptimal
>>
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>>1837576
What's there to redpill? Never felt the need for a different grip.
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>>1837609
sweet.
Appalachia?
>>
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>>1837623
>Appalachia?

Kek. Canton 10, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
>>
Can anyone help me out, I want to get into touring but would like to try a couple of short weekend trips first, what I'm looking for is some decent but affordable starter kit, what exactly will I need? Would it be a good idea to buy used?
I'm guessing that I'll need the following -
>Tent
>Camping stove and gas cannister
>Pot and/or pan plus cup/mug
>Sleeping bag
>Camouflage webbing (To hide my camp so I can go exploring without baggage)
>Basic tools and a decent knife
>Some packs to store it all in
>I'm quite interested in getting a small lightweight trailer

What else bro's? All I have right now is a bike with a rear rack.
>>
>>1838123
Tents and bicycle bags are a good idea to buy used, buy the rest new.
>Tent
>Camouflage webbing
Get an olive green tent and pick your locations intelligently, camouflage webbing is really bulky unless you buy expensive stuff. Use terrain and foliage to your advantage, tent between bushes or just inside a small forest adjacent to a meadow is invisible unless someone is looking for it. Hiking is a minority free activity so you don't need to worry about opportunists stumbling upon your camp against all odds and taking your stuff if you're sufficiently rural.

>Trailer
Complete meme, everything you need can be contained in frame mounted packs even if you're packing heavy and as a beginner.

>Basic tools and a decent knife
Get every tool you need to fit every screw on your bike and know how to adjust your gears and seat positioning. Add a mini pump, replacement tubes and tire levers and you'll be able deal with 90% of mechanical issues on the road. Knife isn't too important and i managed just fine for a month with a swiss army knife.

Some additional equipment that I think you lack are
>Sleeping pad
>Electrical tape and inelastic adhesive thick tape
>Emergency space blanket
>Bandana
>Cable lock for short shop stops
>Head torch

These always find a good use on each of my trips, I'm sure other anons know of more things to add.
>>
>>1838123
Hiding your stuff really depends on your location, but normally you can just follow what
>>1838639 said and just use the environment to hide it. In my case (central Europe) people don't care about a tent being setup somewhere, at least for sleeping.
Tent, sleeping bag and mattress is highly dependent on the climate in your location, so please think about the conditions in which you will use it.
Buy some used ortliebs as panniers, they work. I personally use only two rear panniers for short trips.
If you are in Europe you can also just check out gear from decathlon and upgrade later in the places where you need it. Their panniers for example look really decent.
>>
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>>1838123
>>Camouflage webbing (To hide my camp so I can go exploring without baggage)
This one is actually really tricky on a bicycle touring setup. It means you can't have any reflective gear at all on your bike or you have to be hyper aware of what it is and to obscure it.

It's nice to have a green tent for a little more obscurity in daytime but beyond that imo it's not worth keeping reflective gear entirely off your bike/ gear. Don't be too paranoid about people wanting to steal your camping gear. You have to be pretty brazen to unzip a tent to steal probably not much. Keep valuables to a minimium and take them with you. Also it's pretty easy to have a quick chat with locals, in homes or buisinesses, gauge if you trust them, and ask to leave your whole rig there for a day. I do that fairly often.

my tent pic rel
>>
>>1838639
>>Head torch
Agree. This is a huge thing you have to have. Make sure it takes AA or AAA batteries and isn't rechargeable. Being able to do stuff in the dark and have your hands is vital.
>>Electrical tape
this too. Also zip ties.

>>Trailer
>Complete meme
They're not. The road ones are pretty fast because you're cutting aero by not having panniers. It's a good alternate system. They even can work for off-road touring. I met a guy in the middle of nowhere on some mtb trails who had a hardtail and a 1 wheel offroad trailer it actually seemed really good.
>>
>>1838776
>They're not.

They're a complete meme bro. Barely anyone uses a trailer setup. Shit sucks for a variety of reasons.
>>
>>1838639
>>1838644
>>1838774
Thank you, I will pretty much follow this advice, I am looking forward to my first trip which will be in a few weeks. I am considering taking a very basic fishing kit too, and I know how to passively catch crayfish using a net, also I can forage and know what to look out for.

I am woried about rtheives because I live in England and sadly we have allowed ourselves to become flooded with absolute trash from the arsehole countries of the world. Don't get me wrong we have plenty of our own scum, but they are our scum and the numbers are modest, now however it's almost impossible to find a quiet spot without seeing at least one group of third world men (I include eastern Europeans in that category) roaming around looking for an opportunity to steal and even rape.
>>
>>1838989
just camp away from civilization. the undesirables fear nature, hardly anything to steal out there.
>>
What bike racks would you recommend going for? I am looking at tubus cargo racks but wondering if there are cheaper, higher quality alternatives out there.
>>
>>1839748
>cheap
>high quality
kys
>>
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>>1839748
the critical thing for a rear rack is that it has dual top rails
so you can run panniers lower and they don't mire the rack top.

Also, absolutely avoid the 'disc' racks that have bolt holes through sleeves, unless you have discs and need them (you don't even need them with every disc setup). They make it much harder to check torque on rack bolts and you can't tighten them with multitools.

Almost any rack is fine. Although racks do break and they do flex which sucks, you don't need 'high end' racks.

>cheaper alternatives to tubus
of course and you should get that if you want to save money
>higher quality alternatives to tubus
l m a o
>>
>>1839760
>disc' racks that have bolt holes through sleeves
like this.

I would also avoid racks that have adjustable lower arms (also pic rel). Just another point to flex more, be heavier, and maybe fail.

adjustable upper arms are obviously good.
>>
>>1839760
>>1839750

Okay, so get a tubus rack then? I'm fine paying the higher price but with certain items, you get businesses that rely on brand name and past prestige but aren't actually all that good. If tubus racks are actually worth the money, I'm fine paying it
>>
>>1839763
Tubus is legit man. Get it if you can afford it.
>>
>>1839763
they're the gold standard. they'll last forever and they won't go down in value. good investment.



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