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duck with duck helmet edition

Ask bike questions
post photos of your issues

youtube.com/c/RJTheBikeGuy/videos
parktool.com/blog/repair-help
http://sheldonbrown.com/

Previous: >>>>1731531
>>
>>1733365
When it's reached bump limit and is no linger on page one seems like an appropriate criterium for making a new.

Also I like this duck. It's a very appropriate image for a /bqg/.
>>
>>1733305
w2c
>>
BROSKIS MY BIKE GAVE ME A DAMN HEMORRHOID WHAT DO
>>
>>1733446
bruh that's on you for not eating enough fiber and hydrating and making your shits hours-long asshole destroyers
>>
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>>1733446
Cutout
>>
Can I use a 10 speed chain on my 9 speed bike? Somehow all the 9 speed is out of stock at the shops in my area
>>
>>1733506
you can. it won't work as well though because it is narrower.
I would suggest you buy one online, and a chain tool, and change it yourself. it's not that hard.
>>
>>1733506
yeah. you'll have to adjust your FD limits a little bit to account for the narrower external width of the chain, RD won't care
>>
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I did a buy of these Chinese brifters and they look pretty good. however the left hand brifter seems to be made for four gears(?) it shifts 3 times up and twice down. I don't know anything about brifters I use friction shifters. do they all do this? the right hand one clicks 10 times up 10 times down as it should.
>>
>>1733416
I too like this duck, so I'm alright with duck with duck helmet edition
>>
>>1733526
I'm not a brifter user either, but I'm fairly certain I am correct in saying it's just to prevent the chain rubbing on the front derailer when in a higher gear in the rear. There is a specific name for for this but I cannot think of it for the life of me.
Correct me if I'm wrong.
>>
I'm really fucking fat and bent my saddle to its side, is it dangerous to re-align it or should I get a new one?
>>
>>1733530
trim
>>
>>1733531
You did what?
>>
>>1733531
this dude so fat he bent his seat post lol
>>
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>>1733538
See how it's bent to the side
>>
>>1733532
thank you! this was the key
>>
>>1733305
This duck is clearly gay. Jannies, clean it up.
>>
>>1733540
>>1733531
Maybe you should stop being fat first
>>
>>1733540
So the plastic part is damaged, not the steel rail? It's fucked, get one that isn't so cheap and fragile next time.
>>
if I have side pull normal rim brakes and a carbon fork, that bolt where my calliper attaches to the fork is that going straight into carbon? or is there metal for it to bolt to?
>>
>>1733540
Can't really see what's going on in this pic, but it looks fucked. Even if you do manage to fix it you will just fuck it up in the same way again. Like other anon said, try to find something sturdier.
>>
>>1733549
depends on the fork, a lot of the time it just goes straight into carbon but sometimes it goes into a metal condom that still goes straight against carbon
>>
>>1733562
ok great so by tightening it up by hand I've ruined my fork
>>
>>1733563
They make an extra long nut for carbon forks.
>>
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>>1733565
I just tightened it til it was tight
>>
>>1733416
>criterium
"criterion"

>>1733424
Look for "duck bike bell" on Amazon, etc

>>1733568
>white bar tape
No one has time to keep that shit clean.
>>
>>1733575
>being filthy is ok as long as I can't see it
>>
>>1733578
Either way is fine, really.
>>
Where to cop 29x2.25 road slicks in Australia? Can't seem to find slicks in that size
>>
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>come back to bqg
>thread is about ten replies lighter than it was last time I checked
Guess janny was itching to do some deleting but just couldn't figure out a reason to be offended by a duck.
>>
>>1733617
ok so what's your bicycle-related question
>>
>>1733621
How does janny cope with xis mom being the town bicycle?
>>
>>1733627
probably by deleting your retarded posts
>>
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Is he right? With the obvious exception of professional athletes, or those who need a very specific type of bike for a very specific purpose, does any cyclist on the planet need more than a couple of hundred dollars worth of retro steel mtb?

With some very minor adjustment they can be adapted to suit pretty much any style of riding on any type of surface in any conditions, be it commuting by road, touring, cruising around for pleasure, trail riding etc, you name it these beasts of yore can do it with ease, plus they are light, comfortable and built to last, renowned for their durability the components from LX upwards and equivalents are robust, light and easy to maintain.

So when that anon says that they are all the bike you'll ever need, is he wrong?
>>
>>1733634
>With some very minor adjustment
I think in reality it's several hundred dollars of parts and a lot of work
verging on uneconomical unless you do it yourself, and you won't do it well your first time.

Short of a competent full restore such a bike is rideable and good but not superior or even equal to something new, just cheaper.
>>
>>1733635
I bought a lovely Marin Bear Valley (I think it's a 1990) for £150 last summer, I paid for a full service, plus it needed new cables, brake blocks and tyres, so in total it cost me around £230, I use it every day for my 12 mile commute and it's honestly the nicest riding bike i have ever owned. I bought it to replace a much newer bike that was stolen and decided to get a used bike in the belief that it would be less appealing to thieves and I'd be less likely to feel the same pain if it was ever stolen, but the truth is I wouldn't swap this old marin for any other bike, why would I? It's absolutely ideal for my fairly average needs, anon is right, but you need to get a good one that's been lightly used, if you do that you won't need anything else for years.
>>
>>1733634
Yes, with a "but". It's the best bike to start on, and it can dabble in most riding disciplines with a few cheap parts swaps. If you find you just like doing a little of a particular style, it's all you'll need, and will last decades with minor maintenance. If you find one particular area of riding to be your jam, then you should get a bike built towards that.

>>1733635
> it's several hundred dollars of parts and a lot of work
No way. You can set a 90smtb up to do a lot of shit for ~$100, if you buy used parts or raid LBS parts bins. There's work in fitting them but the tools are reasonably cheap (free if you live near a co-op), and tutorials on how to do it are widely available.

>>1733637
>Marin Bear Valley
>£150
Damn nice score. Had one come up near me but dude knew what he had and wanted multiple hundreds of burgers for it.
>>
>>1733634
I don't "need" any more than my two feet, but I "want" something that weighs under 40 pounds, doesn't rust, and isn't built out of ugly narrow circular tubes.

My hypothetical "The least I'll be caught dead on" bike still has a carbon fork and seatpost with full Claris/Altus.
>>
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>>1733645
>>
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>>1733645
25lbs

without even trying to make it light
>>
>>1733646
You managed to find the photoshop tool to rotate it, why couldn't you find the tool to skew it so it actually fits?
>>
>>1733649
noice boike
>>
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This is begionning to look like a based Marin thread, allow me to present my own soon-to-be home brew tourer
>>
>>1733649
*seatstays randomly snap in half from rust*
>>
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>>1733654
nuh uh

i sprayed fish oil in there
>>
>>1733654
Nah, if you keep a bike well maintained that is never going to happen, I flush all my bikes internally with engine oil every 3-4 years when I strip and service them, linseed oil over any chips or scratches is plenty to keep water off, there's a fella at work who rides a BSA from the 1920's, all steel and no rust to be seen. You are falling for the consoomer memetics dreamed up in the board rooms of plastic frame makers which is fine, chinks gotta eat too I guess, but you don't need to advertise your gullibility online dude.
>>
>>1733575
>>white bar tape
>No one has time to keep that shit clean
Microtex stuff is very easy to clean, I just wipe it with some Meguiars vinyl/leather cleaner and it looks nearly new.
>>
I'm looking to put bar end shifters on my drop bars.

I want to go full friction, however nearly all models are friction for the left one (FD) and indexed for the right one (RD).

Can't I just... get two left ones? Provided the shifter routes the cable forward (along the drop bar), what else could go wrong?
>>
>>1733659
The thing's visibly rusty inside and out.
>>1733656
>>1733649
>>
>>1733665
What brand? The cheaper Suntour ones are indexed only, but the nicer Shimano ones can be turned to friction mode. I think that's true for most Microshift ones as well.
>>
>>1733665
look at microshift ones on aliexpress, or otherwhere.
Reasonably good quality and i'm pretty sure most have a friction mode. That, or, 9spd shimano, and earlier, do friction.
>>
>>1733667

Ideally I'd get barcons but they're hard to find round here. I was thinking two of these: https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-shifters/3-speed-sturmey-archer-sls30b-thumbshifter/

Basically it's a "cheaper" derivative brand of Sun Race. Since it's just friction, it being "3 speed" doesn't matter, right? Or won't it have enough pull to make the RD move the whole range (2:1 pull ratio).

also the point is to remain low budget (some "higher end" barends are about the price of brifters, lol)
>>
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How do I deal with rain? I use my bicycle for my daily commute, and it's beginning to rain here in Europe. Also, will it ruin my bike?
>>
>>1733671
Head to ankle in close fitting goretex with gaiters over your shoes, fenders are for cowards.
>>
>>1733671
Make sure all the weak spots are well greased, especially around bearings and whatnot, where possible store your bike indoors, or at least under cover. Also >>1733683
>>
>buy park tool chain cleaner
>have to do like 200 revolutions to clean chain
>sprays grease everywhere
>take chain off and spray with simple green
>scrub and rinse
>cleaner in a fraction of the time

i feel trolled
>>
>>1733689
you were
chain cleaners are an absolute retarded meme
>>
>>1733689
That's the way I do it. Fucking love the smell of Simple Green.

Protip, if you coil the chain in a magnetic parts tray, it makes scrubbing and rinsing ezmode.
>>
Best way to ckean a chain, or any component for that matter, is in an ultrasonic cleaner, they can be bought very cheap and they will get any chain looking like new with virtually zero effort.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5nYYZlWgzo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6Gz4_2a_T4
>>
How do get college kids to stop honking and sneering at me on way back home from work?
>>
>>1733540
it's dead, Jim.

it looks like you bent the right seat rail, which in turn bent all the foam, leather, plastic etc.

good news is your seat post (clamps the saddle rails and other end nests into the seat tube of the frame) is fine.

I would try to look up the model of your saddle and see if the mfr or any sellers list what the rails are made of. for instance my saddle was available in both cr-mo and titanium rails. if yours is just cheap pot metal or alu, try a steel or crmo one.
however, where material is stronger, mfrs use that to use less material; in other words, ti may be the same strength but just lighter than steel since you get the same strength with less material. so I'd research that.

obviously, avoid garbon fiber.

also, this is a great opportunity to measure your sit-bones and select a proper-fitting saddle. see pics
>>
>>1733722
pic 2/3
>>
>>1733723
pic 3/3
>>
>>1733634
I think it can basically serve any *needs* one would have for a bike (quality, reliability, gearing for any situation, lighter than previous utility bike styles) but want and need are not always the same thing. but if you're a noob, it will work for whatever and after using it you will become aware of any further wants for specialty riding
>>
>>1733634
He's a overblown shithead, but he's not completely wrong. Keep in mind that the old steel 10 speed meme fits everything that the old mtb does except offroad.

>So when that anon says that they are all the bike you'll ever need, is he wrong?
He's wrong about that statement. N+1 is the rule for a good reason.

>>1733635
>>1733644
Also, consider that many places don't have old steel MTBs at affordable prices anymore. The low end is old AL hardtails, which are heavier, but good enough.

>>1733653
90's as fuck with the friends font on the TT, but keep this thread for questions.

>>1733656
I had cats following me for months after using htat.

>>1733669
I have NEVER seen a friction shifter run out of range. I don't know those shifters at all though.

>>1733540
I'd just get a new one. Used is fine. I'd go with steel, any non racing saddle.
>>
>>1733666
>visibly rusty
>inside

shit, I didn't know Clark Kent lurked here.

there's a little surface rust from normal scrapes. can be sanded off and covered with e.g. nail polish. it's fucking nothing
>>
>>1733671
raincape + full fenders. and no, but you either have to replace drivetrain parts more frequently or you have to service them after riding in rain . full fenders greatly reduce the road spray (gritty, dirty water) onto the drivetrain and therefore greatly lengthens the service interval. the rest of the bike is pretty unaffected by rain
>>
I have and old frame that I need a seatpost binder bolt for. The frame clamps measure 26mm outer and 14mm inner. Not sure what length bolt I need to order.
>>
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How do I calculate my gear ratio?
What do the numbers mean?
Is it the numbers of teeths? What does the T mean in tha number like xx/yyT is xx the front teeths and yy the back?
>>
>>1733738
Mechanical advantage. If you have 40 on front and 20 on back you have a 2:1 gear ratio. Further if your wheel has a circumference of 400 that means every time you do one revolution of the crank you travel 800.
>>
>>1733749
what if other numbers? different not same?>>1733738
>>
>>1733750
Just do the math, front/rear == gear ratio. So if the front is 40 and the rear 10, you now have a 3:1 ratio, the rear wheel goes around 3 times for every revolution of the crank and you now travel 3 times Circumference of the rear wheel for each full revolution of the crank or 1200 in the previous example.

Knowing this is not incredibly useful, first hand experience will teach you more but it can guide you in regearing a bike. Just need to remember that the larger the gear ratio the harder you have to pedal but the further you travel for each rotation of the crank.
>>
>>1733738
If you turn the cranks one full revolution the chain will have moved by as many links as the number of teeth on your chainring. At the same time the rear sprocket will have turned by as many teeth as the number of links the the chain has moved. If you divide the number if teeth the sprocket has turned by the number of teeth the sprocket has, you get the number of revolutions the sprocket has turned. Note that this does not have to be a whole number. Observe also that in a scenario where the freewheel is fully engaged the rear wheel turns as many revolutions as the rear sprocket turns, because they are statically connected. Therefore the number of teeth on your chainring divided by the number of teeth on your rear sprocket describes the number of revolutions your rear wheel turns for every revolution of the cranks. This is your gear ratio.
>>
>>1733752
what if the numbers are different again?
>>
>>1733738
https://www.gear-calculator.com/

there's drop downs that you can scroll through and find damn near every ring, cluster, and model number so it's easy to input what you have, then you can try other stuff and see what you want to try next
>>
So it's that time again when I go to work at night and come back at night. I need proper lights, the ones I've been using are some basic Decathlon ones and they are terrible, I don't feel safe at all. However I don't want to spend 100€ plus on fucking bike lights. Are there any cheap options out there that are actually good?
>>
>>1733777
You get what you pay for.
>>
>>1733777
These are not bad for how much they are, certainly not 5k lumens of course.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B08S3H5FWD?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

Not sure about rear lights as far as cheap ones go.
>>
>>1733779
Oh, my mistake. Didnt notice the euro.
>>
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>>1733778
yes but lights are literally cents to make, how come you need to spend almost as much on decent bike lights as you spent on your bike? It's ridiculous. I have an old Nokia 1208 that has a flashlight more powerful than any bike light I've ever purchased ffs
>>
>>1733777
The 100€ lights are worth it, I went cheap for years and finally upgraded, they last far longer and do great.

>>1733786
What sort of bike lights are looking at? You can get bike lights which are as bright as car lights. Try Leyzne, got some very bright options and hold up very well.
>>
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>>1733777
get some random chinkshit from scamazon, it won't cost all that much. if you're really hard up return the empty boxes for a refund. (you should do this anyway, fuck amazon)

I know you deleted my other post, trannyjanny...
>>
>>1733777
Rear light any cheap 5 $ ones will do.
Front light. You need to spend at least 40$ to have some serious lumen and battery. you need 600 Lumens for at least 1 hour if you ride in pitch black countriside road.
Also have an headlight might help in case you have a small accident or tire puncture.
>>
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>have two shiny 5mm red headset spacers I want to put on top of my stem instead of the black 10mm one there now
>exactly 5.00001mm of steerer above the stem, meaning one spacer isn't enough but adding the other spacer on top of that doesn't really sit in place properly
>feel like a fucking retard going to a bike shop and asking them to cut 1 mm off my steerer tube
the fuck do I do?
>>
>>1733807
frogposters are always retarded. you get a couple 1mm or 2mm spacers. now go kys
>>
>>1733807
cut it off yourself you worthless fuck
>>
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>>1733822
t. only has basic-bitch black spacers
>>
>>1733807
Cut 2mm off the steerer tube. Actually for that amount you can just use your belt sander or grinder
>>
>>1733735
I'll just try the 21mm and if it doesn't fit right return the empty box like other anon said
>>
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>>1733807
how many spacers is too many
>>
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>>1733851
You need enough so in the event of an accident it goes into your torso instead of your crotch where the damage would be more severe.
>>
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If i sell a bike to someone, cheaply, with a 8 speed (not stretched) chain that I have broken and re-connected just using the pin in it already, should I... tell them their chain might explode? I know it's possible but I also worry that telling someone that will make them unfairly paranoid.
>>
>>1733857
Those are geese, man
>>
>>1733853
jesus christ
>>
>>1733777
If you can wait, Aliexpress has some decent lights for cheaper than brand name. Look for the "EasyDo EL-1110" which is a clone of the lezyne power drive 1100i
Available for around 25€ https://a.aliexpress.com/_mqrskXG
Also available with rear lights as a package deal for a few euros more.
If you want something better look for Glaciron V9 1600 or V9 1800, but those can cost up to 75€ https://a.aliexpress.com/_msP9mvC

If you can't wait Amazon is probably your best option for cheap lights, but many lights on Amazon are just marked up Aliexpress and Alibaba items. Anything under 20€ is probably no good.

>>1733778
>>1733790
>>1733806
These Anons are correct, but there are good offbrand lights for decent prices if you know where to look and what to look for.

Mods, please don't ban me for naming specific items and posting links. I am not a shill.
>>
If I went out on road tyres while the roads are wet will I slip?
>>
>>1733575
>No one has time to keep that shit clean.
I don't understand how this meme got started. I've never had trouble with my white tape getting dirty.
>>
>>1733885
Depends a little on the tyre and a lot on whether you're riding like a retard.
>>
>>1733895
I have red foam grips on my mtb. Looked really nice when they were new, but that didn't last long. I can only imagine white bar-tape must be even worse.
>>
>>1733903
Foam's probably way more absorbent.
>>
>>1733885
good road tires the the absolute most grippiest thing on wet roads
you'd be far more likely to slip with mtb tires
>>
>>1733654
>says the carboned advocate
>>
I just love bikes bros
>>
>>1733906
Than what? I have black foamy bartape on my drop bars.
>>
>>1733954
cork
>>
>>1733958
Almost all modern cork tapes (possibly all) are cork and foam (mostly foam). I have not seen the old fashioned cork tape in ages, someone probably still makes it. Foam tapes are of the closed cell type, so not particularly absorbent, open cell would be insufferable because they would become sodden in the rain or from sweat on long rides and likely become very hard on the hands like wet socks on a long walk.
>>
>>1733961
then cloth, or some synthetic material. anything but pure foam.
>>
>>1733962
Cloth and leather are more absorbent than closed cell foam, cork possibly is depending on the binder which I assume is just linseed oil but probably just enough to stick everything together and not enough to completely water proof which would kill its cushion. Closed cell foam became the standard for good reason, gives some cushion, is not absorbent and holds up very well to the elements, certainly better than cork or leather which both do absorb water and become rock hard when it drops below freezing.
>>
>>1733954
The black foam tubes they only put on the truly garbage-tier bikes aren't "tape"
>>
>>1733972
Do they still do those? Can't recall seeing them on anything since the 90s.
>>
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I ran over a patch of what looked like rail ballast and got a big ol puncture today. Is this tire kill or is there a way to repair it?
>>
>>1733975
fubar

not all bad, getting new tires is fun
>>
>>1733975
side wall repair is not recommended
esp it will be harder on a thin tire
>>
>>1733972
Those are not what I meant.
>>
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>>1733975
>It is omegafucked

I've had one tyre that had it's sidewall punctured and kept on riding it, at some point the tube burst through the tyre. Now I needed a new tube and tyre.
>>
>>1733975
hey are those contis
>>
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Any tips for a beginner fat cyclist?
>>
>>1733995
stop being fat immediately
>>
>>1733994
Yes, I think they're the first ultra sports. They're the bike's original tires and they've got ~1500km
>>
>>1734005
thought so tranny. nice tranny bike you fuckin tranny
>>
>>1733995
get the widest tires your frame will fit
>>
>>1733975
yeah, that's fucked
the line for me, is, a sidewalls that's cut up but is not actually badly buldging, just, a little, and has not burst yet, can possibly be repaired. But I imagine that caused a flat and the tube would push straight out at high PSI

the repair i've done is cutting a piece of sidewall off another tire and gluing on the inside. It held up well.
>>
>>1734010
Is 700x28c enough? It's what I have currently.
>>
>>1734019
I have those same ultra sports and they turned me gay so might be worth checking yourself over
>>
>>1734019
for perfectly smooth tarmac, sure
anything rougher, expect some pinch flats
see if you can fit 32s in there
>>
>>1734021
I'll see if I can find on my local bike shop
>>
>>1734022
25, 28 and 32 are all the same size. Try actually measuring one day. They are all 26mm wide. Different size bike tires are just one big industry con
>>
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>>1733995
wider tires
smaller wheel diameters
wider hubs
wider seats
in terms of gears, more teeth = more strong .eg 42x11 will wear out much faster than 61x16 or 65x17 (tldr if you can get the same gear ratio while using more teeth do so)

you might not be biking very fast but consider better brakes
rim brakes with a high mechanical advantage, being careful not to over heat the rims or wear though them
or
a good brand of hydraulic brake that support rotors 160 mm or larger

aside from not having very good brakes and being somewhat heavy, a beach cruiser fits most casual use
its not going to be fast or anything like that, but its simple, comfie and durable
>>1733998
aqua jogging mite be a good starting point, being low impact on joints and enjoying cool water is nice
just dont over do it or ye drown
>>
>>1734023
I have measured both my sets of 28s. One is 27 mm wide, the other is 29 mm wide.
>>
>>1734025
exactly.
>>
>>1734023
inflated size (allegedly) depends on rim width and inflation pressure and tire materials
>one big industry con
probably
>>
>>1734024
I'm getting a road bike.
>>
Do tires and tubes bond with the aluminium rims over time if you don't use the bike?
Usually it takes me like 10 minutes to change tires but this time on my bike that I haven't used for 2 months it was nearly impossible. It's like everything was super glued together. Literally took 4 tire leavers. Almost just said fuck it and cut them open with a knife.
>>
>>1734029
no dude you're doing it wrong
>>
>>1734029
was the bike exposed to the sun?
>>
>>1734028
my apologies I have over estimated what you meant by fat,
in any case bikes are very good at supporting weight.

deep dish double walled rims with a high spoke count like in your pic should be fine even in 622 rim diameter, just keep tire pressures on the higher end of things
many road callipers have trouble with tires larger than 28 mm
callipers that can take wider tires tend to have longer arms that may flex a little more, maybe not too important
canter lever brakes have a wider tire clearance while avoiding being overly flexible, although brake boosters maybe called for, same for Mini V brakes
disk brakes require stiffer forks and put a twisting motion though the spokes, but they keep heat away from the tires, and the wheel can be very buckled
>>
>>1734033
No but I did wash before leaving it for 2 months.
>>
>>1734040
maybe the aluminum corroded and bonded with the tire's wire bead, assuming it has a wire bead
or something
>>
>>1734022
Don't size up if you're not sure if it'll fit in the frame. Use a 6mm (better yet 8mm) hex key as a feeler and probe everywhere the current tire comes close to the frame or anything else. Change the non-fucked tire onto the other wheel to check if you can't inflate the bad one anymore, and when you check the brakes do it with the brakes closed. If there's any spot you can't fit the hex key then bigger tires won't work.

>>1734029
Before you start with the levers push the sides of the tire off the rim and into the middle as best you can. The rim is deeper there so you'll get more slack and it'll be easier. Trying to get it off with the tire still attached to the rim is absolute worst case.
>>
>>1734031
>>1734043
That's what I always do. 1) Deflate 2) Push both sides of the tire towards the middle.
2) Was impossible even with a lot of force.
>>
>>1734047
If it was off the rim already how could it be 'bonded'?
>>
>>1733807
take a fucking file to it, retard
>>
>>1734039
When I actualy have the bike I'll take to the bike shop and see if they know the widest one I can have it on. I'll have to take there to assemble it anyway. Thanks anon.
Just one last thing, the website says small = 53cm is for (1,65-1,73m) I'm 1,67 so I did get the right size, right?
>>
>>1733885
for any road hazzard, just turn exaggeratedly in advance to set your line (if necessary) so you can cross the hazzard completely straight and therefore upright. it's not the hazzard that gets you, it's leaning. in the case of ice or like wet, slippery leaves, or just as a precaution on anything, get your speed up prior to crossing (if necessary) and coast over/kill freewheel/super soft pedal.
>>
>>1734054
*just freewheel. I was going to write "kill crank" and didn't erase my full edit
>>
>>1734019
sure, for some values of "enough."

but if you can fit bigger, then do it. you can measure with a ruler at your fork crown. measure sides of current tire but also the top. the daylight on either side add together and then see if the daylight above is greater or less. the smallest number add to current width, that is clearance for widest tire. be a little conservative since mfrs claimed width can be different irl. then you need to measure the back wheel at the narrowest part of both sets of stays and under the brake bridge if you have one.

also will want to ride under max recommended pressure at least for a while and then play around with how much less you can get away with.

when crossing bumps, stand a little on the pedals to lift your ass out of the saddle and absorb the shock with knees and elbows (everyone should do this, but the stakes are higher for you).
>>
>>1734057
>under
*ride AT max pressure
>>
>>1734053
>see if they know the widest one I can have it on
only way to really find out is to try it
if the frame its self has enough clearance, the next thing is to use a larger brake calliper
https://blackmtncycles.com/clearance-pt-ii-road-frames/

>so I did get the right size, right ?
there is no standard for this, only general guide lines but it sounds about right,
the sloped top tube geometry gives plenty of stand over hight + reach and stack can be adjusted by using different lengths and angle of stem, or by seat post set back, not ideal for geometry but its workable
https://www.bikeradar.com/features/your-top-tube-length-is-irrelevant/

there are allot of measurements involved
here are mine
In-seam 78 Cm (ball to balls)
knee to foot 50 Cm
torso 51 Cm
shoulder to foot 150 Cm
arm length 58.5 Cm
elbow to wrist 35 Cm
foot to head 168.9
sternal notch to foot 142 cm
Shoulder Width 50 Cm

Hight 168.9
Sternal notch hight 142
in-seam length 76
thigh length 30.5
Arm Length 58.50
Shoulder Width 48
Foot Length 26

and the bike I like to use, as best I've been able to measure it
https://www.bikegeocalc.com/#1054+cm+bikea0b4c743.9802d270e586.09948f786.40457g942.41359h429.40273i340j340k1325.09445l799.12157m1125.44662n696.92239o1158.65315p946.1718q1176.93333r1310.21104s921.2224t31.8u33v18w5x5y270z40A0B150C35D385.88656E47.99999F172.5G30H30Z
>>
>>1734060
Holy shit, this is so complicated! My head hurts.
>>
>>1734062
Ignore him, he seems to be having an episode. 53 will be fine.
>>
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>>1733649
The stock eldridge grade is actually lighter. 10.3 kg for 1995 according to the catalogue. Probably for the smallest frame without pedals but still crazy for 90s mtb. I think you need to spend 4-figures to get a sub 10 kg ""gravel"" bike new.
>>
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>>1734062
dont worry about it, a bike either fits you or it does not
very little can be done about this
>>
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This thread is moving so fast that nobody will notice when I say Fuck cagers
>>
>>1734064
for that year they also have 10.2 kg bikes and one 10 kg bike
>I think you need to spend 4-figures
1995 Marin Eldridge Grade $ 809
1995 Marin Team Marin $ 1150
1995 Marin Team Titanium $ 2150
not to bad even when adjusted for inflation
>>
>>1733305
does it make sense replacing a nexus8 with an alfine8, that nexus hub is either a piece of shit or my lbs is a bunch if inept cunts
>>
>>1733645
altus is a really dogshit group, sure it's better than a tourney, but that's like saying something smells better than a septic tanks
>>
>>1733857
Never admit anything, it can only hurt you
https://youtu.be/d-7o9xYp7eE
>>
>>1734093
I don't have any personal experience with Nexus 8, but the current gen Nexus 3 is shit (rare for Shimano, but it happens), so I'd think upgrading to Alfine is a reasonable decision.
>>
>>1733848
this, a pipecutting tool probably won't even work since it doesn't have enough space on top of the headset to hold on, so a beltsander would work perfectly
>>
>>1734062
>>
>>1734029
Technically yes. Rubber vulcanizes against surfaces when left long enough.
Besides bikes my other hobby is reef aquariums, which involve rubber gaskets/bulkheads. A common rookie mistake when installing a rubber bulkhead, is using the silicone grease. It’s better to use no grease, because with no grease, after awhile the rubber vulcanizes (ie it kinda melts) to the glass
>>
>>1734064
Stop making me want this bike so hard, I'll probably never find one stateside for a reasonable price.
>>
how do I know what bottom bracket I need? all my spec sheet says is "cartridge, square taper". are all entry level mtb brackets the same?
>>
>>1734153
Measure shell width and spindle length. Or just roll into a bike shop and ask them to help you choose, might cost you an extra $3 to buy from them but it will save you a good number of headaches and doubt for the first time purchase. Most bike shops will happily walk you through the process and show you how to measure them.
>>
>>1734153
First, work out if your crank arms could stand to be slightly closer before they hit the chainstay, or if they are very far away already. Then, see if your FD has the limit screws maxed in either direction. Or if the chainline is off. Ie, is it the correct bb, now.
This is only possible with the crank installed, and it's worth checking roughly, because you might not find the same length, and often it's ok or even good to change it.

remove it and measure the spindle length
That's the size you want (roughly)
122.5 mm etc

then measure your bottom bracket shell width
It will probably be 73 but maybe 68.

Those are the 2 important sizes.
It will be BSA/ENG not Iso.

Now you look for the shimano item. The high quality one has been discontinued, but try find one, it's the UN-55. If you can't find an UN55, UN300 is the new version, acceptable. If you want a fancy one look at IRD.
>>
>>1734190
>often it's ok or even good to change it.
*but it's worth having a guess at which direction to change spindle length in, if you have to.

square taper BB fitting is also trial and error, and a range of things will work. The fit changes upon each install, as the taper wears it will sit closer. And BB tapers actually change between brands so the stock cheap one now will probably be different to anything else that exists and affect fit.
>>
>>1734162
>>1734190
yeah I reckon I'll just get it from the bike shop. maybe even have them install it. I was hoping it would be like headsets where there's 500 different standards but every single bike in the real world and built in the last 20 years uses a standard zero stack unit
>>
>>1734199
It's not that hard a job. Do try find an UN55. Call around.
recently discontinued, and much higher quality than other cheap units, and cheap.
>>
>>1734202
UN55 is discontinued.
>>
>>1734202
cheap isn't really a concern, if it's gonna last years I don't mind spending more.
>>
>>1734190
>discontinued
>>1734202
>recently discontinued

>>1734208
>>>1734202 (You)
>UN55 is discontinued.

That doesn't mean they cease to exist. Lots of shops still have some.

>>1734211
It's not about spending more. It's about finding old stock of a recently discontinued thing.
actually, unless you have a 68mm road shell, not 73mm mtb shell (possible, likely even with some older frames), you will not be able to spend more, as the better ST bbs except that un55 are 68 or the italian meme size only.
>>
>>1734218
the bike is a 2021. I don't think I will have to search around for cheap obsolete shit lol. price ceiling for the absolute most expensive BBs is what, $300? over ten years that's $30 a year. come on.
>>
>>1734221
square taper -itself- is obsolete.

the old generation of square taper bottom bracket is higher quality, because it comes from a time when it was high end equipment designed for nice bikes.
Many parts for old standards are like this. Say you want a 7spd derailer. The best one is old, it's XT, top of the line. The new one you can buy is Altus at best, or Tourney, low end. Cheaply made.
Now, the BB they make for square taper, is cheap, designed for cheap bikes.

>most expensive BBS
it's not an issue of price retard, those boutique BBs likely aren't in the right size for a mtb.
>>
>>1734224
I want to rebuild a bike on a twenty year old frame I have. Does this mean that I can and should use something else than square taper BB? What should I be looking to get, in that case?
>>
>>1734235
Just switch to a threaded external bearing sort. Ease of maintenance is enough reason to do so alone.
>>
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Lots of poor, and outright incorrect bottom bracket advice here.

>>1734153
>how do I know what bottom bracket I need?
Instead of listening to these other posters, please consider reading the ~4 related pages on Sheldon's site (search "square taper bottom bracket" on sheldonbrown.com).
Spindle length is largely determined by the cranks you're using--check the crank manufacturer's spec for a starting point.

>>1734211
>cheap isn't really a concern
Phil Wood, Tange Seiki, IRD (made by Tange), SKF all make good square taper bb's in longer spindle lengths. Whether or not they're in stock these days...

>>1734235
>I can and should use something else
Can? Yeah, there are several types of outboard bearing bb's whose cups have the same threading (Shimano Hollowtech II, for example).
Should? Who knows. Do you have some compelling reason? I just built up a '91 Miyata 914, and chose to install some Shimano 600 cranks w/ a square taper bb--works well, and it's beautiful.
>>
>>1734224
>high tier name more important than being made in the last 50 years and not being totally shagged out
this again. new altus pisses on 90s xt retard
>>
>>1734193
>as the taper wears it will sit closer
Are you greasing your tapers w/ grinding paste? What you are describing doesn't happen.
>BB tapers actually change between brands
If only we had standards to dictate the dimensions of these machined parts...

>>1734218
>the better ST bbs except that un55 are 68 or the italian meme size only
It's unclear what you mean by "meme size" (cup threading? taper standard? spindle length?) but you're wrong by any of those measures.

>>1734224
>old generation... is higher quality
I've used a bunch of different parts in the past 35 years, and modern high-end square taper bottom brackets equal or exceed the vintage parts.
>retard
You have no license to call someone else that name.

>>1734243
>Just switch to a threaded external bearing sort
Remind me, what's more expensive?
A) bottom bracket
B) bottom bracket + new cranks
>>
>>1734266
he's using 40 year old parts lol no wonder there's some weird wear
>>
>>1734266
>Remind me, what's more expensive?
He sounds like he is building up from the frame so cranks no matter which path. Either way, not everyone looks for the cheapest path and the cheapest path is not always the cheapest path in the long run.
>>
>>1733582
BROSKIS HELP
>>
>>1734262
so basically it's this one?
Shimano XT BB-MT800 68-73mm External Bottom Bracket
>>
>>1733582
>>1734282
Try searching for 700c x 55c or 60c. Pretty much the same thing as 29" x 2.25", slick roadies tend to use 700c designations while knobby mountain bikers tend to use 29er designations.
>>
>>1734284
thanks pal
>>
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>>1734285
No problem. People run slicks in that size mostly for novelty. If you want something more readily available, and if you just want to make your mountain bike better on the road there's no reason you can't get something thinner. The only limiting factor will be your internal rim width. 40c – 45c are popular sizes these days so I'm sure you would find something suitable at a reasonable price in that size. Rims with internal widths between 18mm and 30mm should be able to run those sizes comfortably. Just make sure the first measurement is 700c/29" as that's the rim size.
>>
>>1734262
>>1734266
You don't know wtf you're talking about. Anon with a modern threaded mtb almost certainly has a 73mm shell.
Show me an appropriate, good, square taper bottom bracket.

For a 73mm shell.

Or are you saying anon should be spending hundreds of dollars on a bottom bracket for his cheap piece of shit bike and running it ghetto with spacers and shit that isn't made to work that way.

>What you are describing doesn't happen.
the hole in the crank i mean
that wears

>If only we had standards to dictate the dimensions of these machined parts...
yeah you think we do but we don't. I have a bunch of 'JIS' tapers that are quite clearly different. It's ballpark. Iso isn't standardised in reality either.
>>
>>1734266
>>the better ST bbs except that un55 are 68 or the italian meme size only
>It's unclear what you mean by "meme size" (cup threading? taper standard? spindle length?) but you're wrong by any of those measures.

the same thing as I meant by 68. Did you understand that? Italian bb shells on italian frames are 70mm and one of the cups is threaded the other way.
>>
>>1734262
>w/ a square taper bb
what one
>>
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New question for you guys. Whats this bike worth as-is vs built up on the cheap.

I picked up this 2016 carbon trance frame and shock quite cheaply hoping to use the rear triangle on my 2015 trance - but I'm a retard and didn't look close and see that it's 12x142mm thru axle when my 2015 is QR. So anyways, I've thrown some parts i had sitting around on it, a reverb dropper in need of a rebuild, a stock giant front wheel, a fox34 160mm and some spare bars and stem. I could probably get it up to being a rideable bike for another $500 - but that would be buying the cheapest rear wheel, putting second hand tyres on it, old 2 pot brakes, cheap crank, grips, pedals etc. So it would be a pretty shit build of what would have been a good bike in its day.

So my question, do i try to sell this bike as-is, try get $800-900 for it and let someone else build it up as an actually good bike, or do I spend another $500, get it rideable and capitalise on this ridiculous bike market and sell it for $1500, which seems to be what even the shittiest full sus bikes are selling for at the moment.

What do you think /n/?
>>
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>>1734300
I would build this up and ride it myself but my other trance is an XL and this is a medium so the fit just wouldn't be right.

I also did consider building it up for my girlfriend using parts off her current HT but she doesn't want me butchering her bike which I guess is fair enough
>>
>>1734295
xt bottom bracket for 73mm shell is 30 American dollars or am I missing something
>>
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0Bw5OnHQrM

Ok but seriously how is literally any "fit" cyclist unable to hit 1k wattz? I hit 1k almost without trying just by standing up.
>>
>>1733305
about how much would it be to replace my handle bar grips?

left mine too close to the sun and they're all 'melty' for lack of a better term. they feel soft and rub off on my hands any time I touch them. stain anything else that touches it.
>>
>>1734317
>t. Icarus
>>
>>1734317
https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/mobile/en/grips
idk bro
>>
>>1734312
prove it
>>
>>1734266
I need new cranks anyway. Almost all components on that frame were kill and have been thrown away. If I'm replacing everything anyway I just thought there is no need to limit selection to type stuff if there are better alternatives. Don't know if it makes economical sense to build the frame back up again though.
>>
>>1734312
Peak power is not the same as average and sustained power. Do an FTP above 200W and then talk.
>>
>>1734312
How would I even know? I, like the vast majority of cyclist, don't have a power meter, nor do I care to have one. Guess I'm just not "fit".

Also, like >>1734330 says, hitting peak for a picosecond is meaningless.
>>
>>1734302
not square taper.
>>
>>1734317
the best way to install is with isopropyl alcohol
cut the old grip off.
clean the bar with a little iso on a rag

put your thumb sealing one end of a grip
pour a little alcohol into the grip
put another thumb over the other end
shake it
pour out
quickly slide and wriggle into place on bar
>>
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>>1734322
>>1734330
Not even saying I'm good, just that 1kw is nothing. I don't even do "sprinting" and I end up hitting it about half my rides at some point.

Also have the 1,500w achievement in zwift but I uninstalled it.
>>
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>>1734338
219 is way more average power than I put out in the road. I usually sit around 160-190
>>
>>1734338
one of these years I'm gonna get a pm, I swear
>>
>>1734337
I used hand sanitizer gel from my bathroom to install my grips. Worked fantastically.
>>
>>1734300
>try get $800-900 for it and let someone else build it up as an actually good bike, or do I spend another $500, get it rideable and capitalise on this ridiculous bike market and sell it for $1500
Seems like the net profit is basically the same in either scenario, except one requires way less work.

Also ngl I'd totally have sex with that frame.
>>
>>1734300
>$800-$900
>5yo carbon mtb frame

really? I don't know about it and all power to you if you can, but, really? I would imagine that's like not desirable at all.

how much did you pay for it anyway
>>
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the madlads actually made titanium M9 nuts that would fit on the front axle on a track bike to save weight vs steel track nuts
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003410996109.html

these M10x1.0 would fit on the rear
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003509392404.html

just wondering if you see any real problem with using this type of solid nut without a washer? my frame has chain tensioner bolts so i'm not worried about it sliding forward in the rear because no serrated washer. it might scuff the paint in the fork dropout but nothing too bad? would you put grease where the nut contacts the dropout or add a washer?
>>
>>1734388
I'd put thin steel washers under them, the weight difference is negligible
>>
>>1734397
ok sweet thanks for the tip! i asked the seller about the flange outer diameter since it could go either way like 17.9mm or 21.8mm if the M9 is based on an M8 or M10 hex flange nut. some track nuts say ~22mm outer diameter for the M9 but my dt swiss ones are smaller in the front.
>>
>>1734312
fitness != strength
the guy who doesn't even ride has a higher peak power than the presenter, that should explain a lot
>>
>>1734312
W/kg
strength/endurance
>>
>>1734408
and some say 19mm
>>
What's you EDC like?
>>
>>1734430
1. Pump (these days that's a Lezyne pressure drive)
2. Tube
3. Park MT-1 (my favorite multitool - simple, light, no moving parts)
4. Phone
5. Extra food/kit depending on the weather and planned ride.

That's it. If I'm going on a long ride far from home I'll add an extra tube, patch kit, ID and bank card. For commuting I have big panniers and don't care about weight so my normal EDC plus wallet, keys, U-lock, cable lock, lights, bungee cords, lunch and more depending on the day).

I hardly ever get flats and keep my bikes well maintained, so I pretty much never use my EDC stuff.
>>
>>1734430
Wallet, keys, pocket knife (single bladed sort).
>>
>>1734430
spare tube, patch kit, valve adapter, multitool, minipump, pocket knife, 14/15 spanner, ulock, lights, phone, cards, keys, weed, paper, lighter, sharpie, ballpen, 10L mini backpack
all inside a frame bag
>>
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Is there any harm if I accidentally bump the rear derailleur cable sometimes when I lean my bike on a wall? New bike so I'm rather autistic about protecting it (I know it's futile)
>>
>>1734472
No, that won't hurt it at all unless you're snagging it on something. What you do need to be careful about is bashing the derailer itself on things and bending the hanger inwards.
>>
>>1734472
>lean my bike on a wall
>autistic about protecting it
Well, which is it?
>>
>>1734472
no but you shouldn't be leaning the drivetrain side to the wall anyway
>>
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>>1734472
just dont kink the housing and it should be fine
>barrel adjuster or the threaded part it screws into may also snap off on cheaper RD
>>
>>1734478
Drive train side is better against the wall, it is protected from anything catching it or hitting it and if the bike does fall/get knocked over it falls on the side which is away from the wall.
>>
>>1733305
how do I secure my duck so it doesn't get stolen when I park my bike? Or should I just bring my duck with me?
>>
>>1734472
get a stand?
>>
>>1734408
the Director Identification Number can sometimes help to find the information for a specific type of nut
>>
non serrated nuts have a diffrent DIN
as do nuts with a nylon insert
>>
anyway allot of sellers will not list accurate detail
>>
>>
>>1733305
how important is a coaster brake for riding a fixed gear in wintery conditions?
is it needed or would I be doing most of my braking with the front brake?
>>
>>1734492
Coaster brakes are incompatible with fixed gear.
Now when you say "fixed gear", what do you actually mean? Single speed?
>>
>>1734493
yes you're right I mean single speed
>>
>>1734492
Rear brake is pretty handy year round but especially in winter, any time things get slick the front break loses effectiveness, completely useless if things get icy and you will likely go down quickly.
>>1734501
Single speed without a rear brake is just stupid. I would avoid coaster brakes in the winter, in icy conditions quick movements like a hard back pedal to engage the coaster brake can send you down, not to mention they are not the best for just applying a bit of pressure to slow you, which is what is needed if you find yourself on ice.
>>
>>1734492
>>1734493
In any case, it is highly recommended to have both front and rear brakes when riding in icy or slippery conditions. It's easy to lock up your front wheel under hard braking in icy conditions, which in turn means you will almost certainly wipe out.
Also for riding in icy conditions I very strongly recommend studded tyres. Studded tyres make absolutely the most difference.
>>
>>1734505
>they are not the best for just applying a bit of pressure to slow you
This is not what I remember from my childhood. As I remember it coaster brakes had excellent modulation. Haven't ridden one in a long time now though.
>>
>>1734510
they're a cost cutting cope on cheap casual commuter bikes with internal gear hubs. all performance oriented bikes use rim or disc brakes.
>>
>>1734512
>cheap casual commuter bikes with internal gear hubs
For which they are quite sufficient.
>>
>>1734510
depends on the condition of the metal brake pads that are inside of the coaster brake
when they are old the pads are smooth (have lost depth in their corrugations) so their is not much bite
I have taken an old worn out coaster brake apart and filed the pads to have a rougher surface and that make it lock up super hard for a while,
but a few 50 kph down hill runs was enough to smooth out the pads again

a slightly better system is roller brakes they have proper pads, and some cooing fins, common on basic bikes
https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/technologies/component/details/shimano-inter-m.html

I've also quite liked expanding drum brakes on the few bikes I have tried, smooth and only just sufficiently powerful, not to sure how well they fair long term
contracting band brakes on the other-hand are not so good, not many things still use them
>>
>>1734506
Studded tires can be terrible on some roads, we have some brick roads here which studs just slide around on and you might as well be on ice without studs. I did one winter with studs, not a fan, they don't always bite in effectively which gives a false sense of security and they loose their studs too readily. Fine for occasional winter fun but not great for daily commutes.
>>1734510
They can be OK but your ability to modulate is completely dependent upon crank position, when horizontal you get good control, when vertical not so much. Their biggest issue is that any sudden change in movement when on ice can send you down, best to keep pedaling and use the hand brake.
>>
>>1734519
>your ability to modulate is completely dependent upon crank position
this is the main reason not to use them, as you have to be in the habit of maintaining a certain cadence to coincide with when you plan to stop
alike to timing to avoid pedal strike when cornering hard on a fixed gear bike, its a bit too much to keep track of
>>
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>hit bump, apply brake
>apply brake, accentually change gear
love/hate them 2 speed kickback hubs fun once you get used to min maxing
>>
>>1734519
>brick roads here which studs just slide around
Yeah, I've come to understand that studs are supposedly very bad on concrete road surfaces. Makes sense the same would go for brick. I don't really have any first hand experience with that. I don't experience particular traction issues with studded tyres on tarmac.

>I did one winter with studs, not a fan,
>Fine for occasional winter fun but not great for daily commutes.
My experience has been the complete opposite. First winter tried studded tyres, more than a decade ago, was a revelation for me and I've been a fan ever since. I commute on them daily every winter. For me studded tyres are the difference between riding with confidence and not riding at all. I commute on them daily every winter.

>they don't always bite in effectively
On ice they always bite effectively compared to not having studs. Obviously they're not magic. One has to be mindful of the limitations and compromises of ones equipment and not ride like a complete retard.

>and they loose their studs too readily
Never had a problem with this.
>>
>>1734530
>studs are supposedly very bad on concrete road surfaces
Our few concrete roads are grooved slightly so the studs were ok on them but I have heard the same.
>compared to not having studs
My problem is that I found i could not rely on them because sometimes they didn't bite so I always rode as if I did not have studs which defeated the purpose of having studs or the added expense.
>Never had a problem with this.
Every time I climbed the hill I would lose studs, if the tire slipped, studs would be ripped out. Winter roads means sand and salt on the roads so tires will slip no matter what you do. Locally, I do not know anyone who uses studs for commuting, they just do not work well here.
>>
>>1734523
Aren't those automatic gearboxes out of production?
I remember the Ikea stopping production of its bicycle for that reason
Anyway, I don't see the advantage over a manual internally geared hub. I mean, it's not like there's a clutch to operate
>>
>>1734539
I've had days when it's been safer to ride my bike than to walk, just because I had studs on the tyres but not underneath my shoes.
Obviously there are shoes with studded soles, but I don't feel a need to get them because I ride everywhere. I very much rely on the studded tyres during the winter.
>>
Anyone here have experience overhauling Ergo levers? I have a left lever that doesn't hold the cable securely - if I pull the cable hard enough it releases one 'click' at a time, as if I were depressing the thumb button to release one it. I took the lever all the way apart and all of the springs seem fine, no obvious wear to any of the ratcheting parts. The whole mechanism works fine most of the time on the bike unless I'm in the big ring (cable at max tension) and riding hard enough to flex the handlebars, then that will pull the shifter out one step. What should I be looking for inside the shifter? It's not a specific detent/tooth worn, I can pull the cable free from any position.
>>
>>1734542
probably out of production yes, same with Sachs, since sram bought them
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRAM_Corporation#Sachs_Bicycle_Components
Sturmy Archer skill persists, but probably not for much longer, anyone who would have bought an IGH now buys an E Bike instead
https://www.sturmey-archer.com/en/products/2-speed

>Anyway, I don't see the advantage
no cables lmao, not that the tiny chains or link levers on most IGH are a big deal, tho they sometimes cost allot
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYpZNdZZuFM
>>
>>1734549
i've encountered that, it's annoying.
Try emailing or calling Branford bike for advice. They're the ergo-rebuild specialists.
>>
What are some good city riding bikes for like idk $500
>>
>>1734582
trek fx 1
trek fx 3 disc
>>
>>1734582
Kona Dew
https://konaworld.com/platform_urban.cfm

Presidio 1
https://www.marinbikes.com/bikes/type/fitness-transit

Both about ~600. It's worth spending that much or a little bit more to get some better spec, like on above, nice tires and hydraulic disc brakes respectively.

If you go for absolute bottom end 7spd bikes with tourney just avoid suspension forks.
>>
Is gravel bike with good quality MTB platform pedals a reasonable idea or pointless?
I'm thinking of getting some better pedals but I'm not confident on going clipless since always used flat pedals plus I like to use whatever shoes I have
>>
Are snow tires considered necessary for winter biking?
>>
>>1734430
lights
mini pump
bungies
ziplock full of sani wipes
bandaids & ibuprofen
cable lock 'cause it's light and my bike doesn't appeal to thieves

tool roll from the dollar store (which is supposed to be for computer stuff) containing:
>tube
>spare cables
>patch kit
>batteries
>multi tool
>playing card for emergency tire boot
>greasy bandana
>zip ties
>tire levers
>chain tool
>pair of rubber gloves

when I commuted I would have a raincape and stuff for work, too
>>
>>1734630
Depends. Some summer and touring tires just don't work if you have lots of snow and slush. Small tread patterns get packed with snow and ice easily and will be just as slippery as riding on ice. Deeper treads and knobs have better penetration and shedding to keep the treads clean and give some grip. On ice it doesn't matter what tire you use, it will slip.
>>
>>1734630
Winter tires are retarded, you just run gp5ks until you can’t anymore then switch to studded.
>>
>>1734630
For actual snow I jump on the fixed gear with its skinny slicks pumped up hard, they cut through the snow and down to the pavement like nothing is even there. Rest of the time I use my standard Marathon Mondial.
>>
>>1734630
If it routinely gets below freezing overnight and your local DOT a shit, then yes. Don't listen to the idiots telling you to ride summer tires in traffic on patchy ice, it's not their body that will get crushed under the wheels of a box truck because your front tire slipped at the wrong moment
>>
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>>1734630
As others have said, it really depends on your local conditions. For persistent ice nothing compares to studded tires - but unless you're on ice they're noisy and slow you down a lot. For just a little snow on pavement or dirt, you don't need anything special at all - even road slicks are fine. For conditions somewhere inbetween I really like Conti's Top Contact Winter tires, they stay flexible in really cold conditions and do give a little extra grip accordingly.

>>1734626
Perfectly reasonable, use whatever kind of pedals you like best. And getting a really good pair of platform pedals is a fine investment - you can always move them other bikes if desired at some later point.

>>1734582
Just go to a bike shop near you and ask for a basic hybrid - every big brand has a decent one (Trek FX, Giant Escape, Specialized Sirrus, etc.) and they're all quite similar.
>>
>>1734634
>Winter tires are retarded, you just run gp5ks until you can’t anymore then switch to winter tires.
What?
>>
>>1734626
That's an excellent idea. It's what I use.

>>1734632
>On ice it doesn't matter what tire you use, it will slip.
Quality set of studded tyres makes a tremendous difference.

>>1734638
This theory never makes sense in my mind. If it's cold enough for snow the pavement below will be icy and slippery as hell.

>but unless you're on ice they're noisy and slow you down a lot.
It's not like the same is not true when you're on the ice too.
>>
>>1734694
Last quote was from >>1734640
>>
>>1734694
>If it's cold enough for snow the pavement below will be icy and slippery as hell.
So you live somewhere not particularly cold? For ice to happen beneath fresh snow you either need ground temps warm enough to melt that first snow or air temps high enough to rain but already have frozen ground. In places where you stay below freezing for months at a time the frost line goes deep and the surface of the ground can not warm enough to melt the snow and it is unlikely to get warm enough to rain.
>>
not a question but heh I cleaned and lubed my chain (first time since buying the bike 350km ago) and the drivetrain clicking has stopped. gonna oil it again tomorrow when I get to work so the chain is hot from the ride and the oil gets in better and also has all day to drip on the ground somewhere I don't care about
>>
>>1734717
oil shouldn't ever drip from your chain, you're using too much
no need for the chain to be "hot from the ride" either
>>
>>1734719
lubricant gets into moving parts better when they're warm anon. happy to help
>>
>>1734720
oil has no problem getting in your chain, it doesn't need to "move better"
>>
>>1734721
lubricant gets into moving parts better when they're warm anon. happy to correct you
>>
>>1734720
>>1734723
are you ok anon? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm saying there's no need for you to do that
>>
>>1734725
sorry I misinterpreted your message. I don't see any reason to do it the wrong way if doing it correctly takes the same amount of time, costs the same etc but I just move the actual action to a different point of my day.
>>
>>1734717
If your chain is hot/warm at the end of a ride, there's no point in oiling it, something has gone terribly wrong and it should be replaced.
>>
>>1734630
high quality tires like gp 5000 and gp 4 season have tremendous amounts of grip. but it depends on your local riding conditions if you have to ride on literal ice with no salt/sand treatment and your riding skills i guess.
>>
>>1734730
all moving parts warm during use anon. it is the principle of friction. it's both our friend and our enemy as cyclists. or are you trying to be clever?
>>
How do I start with bikes as an autist that never learned to ride one as a kid? The dream is to eventually live in an area where I can primarily bike as a form of commuting.
>>
>>1734747
get one
put the seat down low
sometimes to teach kids you take the pedals off too.
find a small hill with a runout to roll down until you get the balance ok
then try pedalling
>>
>>1734749
>find a small hill with a runout to roll down until you get the balance ok
Thanks
I think not doing this part is why my terribly incompetent parents couldn't teach me to ride a bike when I was younger; I never got the bike up to speed to learn how to balance it without my parents yeeting the damn thing from behind me and making me lose all control.
>>
>>1734735
A chain absorbs about 5-7 watts. The sun shining on it heats it up more than that will.
>>
I'm hell bent on upgrading this entry level 2*7 speed (not worth the money but it keeps me busy).

I mean to put a 10 speed cassette on it, but the wheel is 7 speed and the hub is not "long" enough for the new cassette. Can I just buy a 10sp hub (see pic related) and put it on my wheel? Or will. Something else not work.

Thanks
>>
>>1734747
The magic key is to understand 'countersteering'. To turn right you have to turn the handlebar left for a fraction of a second first. This pulls the bike out from under you to the left slightly, allowing you to lean right and turn the bars right without the bike flying out from under you to the *right*.

Most people don't do it consciously (and even angrily deny it's a thing), but knowing it will hopefully help you skip the painful part of the process where your subconscious has to learn it by trial and error.
>>
>>1734754
eh
it's understandable
sending kids off down a hill is a bit counter intuitive
the flat seems safe
really though gravity is the smoothest most predictable way to roll

good luck lad
>>
>>1734760
you don't 'turn' the bars on a bicycle
you just lean in the direction you want to go.
there's nothing complicated about that and no way to get it wrong.

while yes, counter steering is a real and good thing, it's certainly not necessary. Next time you're riding a bicycle try turning without doing it and see how the bike doesn't 'fly out from under you'.
>>
>>1734760
like, the part of your brain that might tell you actually to yank the bars in the direction you want to turn, and keep your body stationary, so the front wheel skids sideways and flips you over the bike, that's just not part of your brain that anyone actually has.

That's not a real thing. Are you theorycrafting about motorcycle autist technique? Even then, is it real?
>>
>>1734759
If you put on a longer freehub (that thing) it would make the whole hub wider and it won't fit in the frame anymore. Afraid you need a new wheel m8. Theoretically you could buy a new hub+freehub+spokes and reuse the rim but it's not remotely worth it unless your wheels are super expensive.
>>
>>1734762
Turning purely by 'leaning' might be fine if you don't mind a 100 foot turn radius. The point of countersteering is to make the lean happen much faster without having to lurch your entire body to the side.

>>1734763
Go outside right now and extremely consciously and deliberately try to turn right by *only* turning the bars right and let us know how it goes.
>>
>>1734759
Do Sheldon's 9 of 10
Get a 10spd cassette, and just remove 1 cog. The shift over that spot will be slow because the ramps won't match up, and there will be 1 click in your shifter that does nothing, but otherwise, the cassette will fit on your 7spd freehub, and it will index and shift right for 10spd.

I run a couple of bikes this way (7 of 8 and 8 of 9, but it's the same idea).

OR just get a 8/9/10 or 8/9/10/11spd wheel.

What anon above says, that it 'won't fit your frame' is rubbish, as long as it's steel.
Freehub conversion would also work but it's too much faff imo.

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

Sheldon has all the goods on such things.
>>
>>1734767
no no no , you go outside first
go outside right now and report back
then i will go outside
>>
>>1734767
>Turning purely by 'leaning' might be fine if you don't mind a 100 foot turn radius.
You can literally turn riding no hands (this is not a theory, I do this). I have a sharp 90° bend i often turn no hands around on. This is a corner you have to slow right down on in a car.

It's not that the bars don't turn, they do, slightly, but simply leaning makes them turn. You do not turn them. This is the same when riding.
>>
>>1734759
1 note on 9 of 10

it's a bit less practical than it used to be because cassette design is more about carriers. It's harder to separate the cogs and when you do often it does actually make them flex more.

You'll always be able to remove the 2nd to top cog, but that's not the ideal cog to remove. So it will always work but not ideally with many cassettes, or atleast, not easily. Dissasembling many modern cassettes requires meme star drivers or drilling rivets.
>>
>>1734770
Maybe let him focus on riding normally without eating shit before trying the "throw your hips around the exact perfect amount so the bars flop over at the right angle on their own" stuff. Turning by countersteering is infinitely more controllable and effortless.
>>
>>1734770
>when riding
*when riding with hands/ normally
>>
>>1734772
>throw your hips around
no you literally can just lean your weight, riding no hands, and a bicycle will make a sharp turn. This is basic technique on how to ride with 2 icecreams. I'm surprised they didn't teach you this in motorcycle school.

Your idea you 'turn' the bars is wrong.
>>
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>>1734768
>just bend your frame to cram your frankenwheel in with a cassette with a missing cog instead of building a proper bike that actually fucking works
>>
>>1734776
the cassette with a missing cog is how to NOT widen the hub spacing or bend the frame.

bending the frame is bending the frame by 4mm. It's nothing. Many early 8spd wheels had angled locknuts to make it easier to do.
>>
>>1734775
>no you literally can just lean your weight, riding no hands, and a bicycle will make a sharp turn.
Congrats on mastering this pointless skill. This is not how 99.999% of the world rides a bike.
>motorcycle school
I've never ridden a motorcycle, but I understand it's the same shit except I imagine your "just lean bro" stuff won't work at all thanks to the weight.
>Your idea you 'turn' the bars is wrong.
Then why do they put them on in the first place?
>>
>>1734780
>Congrats on mastering this pointless skill. This is not how 99.999% of the world rides a bike.
Yeah no fucking shit. I only bring it up because it illustrates how steering a bicycle, normally, works.

>Then why do they put them on in the first place?
When you lean a bike the bars turn, slightly, of their own accord. You hold them to retain control.

the only major exception to this is tight slow speed maneuvering which is also not 'normal' riding and not something a beginner cyclist can even do.
>>
>>1734408
they didn't say the flange diameter but they did answer my question about the wrench size (across flats) which is 15mm, same as M10. seems like they just looked at my last message lol. i checked my fork dropouts and the paint was masked off with about a 20mm diameter so maybe i'll get like 18mm diameter washers to try not to flake too much paint off. in the rear, thin M10 washers with 20mm outer diameter seem like a good fit, hopefully it won't look goofy with the mismatch against the ~22mm nut flange but if i use extremely thin shim washers with like a 0.1mm thickness the gap between the nut and the track end might not even be visible to the naked eye in normal use.
>>
>>1734780
>I've never ridden a motorcycle
ok sorry last time someone bought up countersteering on /n/ it was a motorcycle autist.

I do agree with you btw about countersteering being real and important, i just also don't think it's something you have to learn.
>>
>>1734759
yes you can, but you will have to change the spacer on the axle and the dish of the wheel
>>
When will cagers stop literally murdering us?
>>
I cut my chain 1 link too short. Will it cause any major problems?
>>
>>1734809
meaning what? the drivetrain binds up in big x big gear?
yes it means one day you forget or if you lend the bike and the drivetrain explodes breaking your frame and wheel too
>>
>>1734783
update for those who might be interested in trying the same or who are just curious
>>>/diy/2258162
>>>/diy/2258184
>>
>>1734760
>>1734747

eh, the counter steering thing is such a small amount, trying to do it on purpose is overthinking it and just distracting for a noob.

my two cents: actively use your arms on the handlebars to steer only when you're mounting the bike and at very low speeds. once you reach a few mph, the feel of the bike totally changes, it stabilizes and wants to remain upright under its own momentum. at this point, you need to start steering by leaning with your whole body. just a very slight lean will steer a good bit, so just practice slowly, steering a foot or two side-to-side of straight with the smallest lean you can do and increase the turning as you feel more comfortable; your arms on the bar are still part of your whole body's steering but they're much more "along for the ride" at this point. the counter steering effect is automatic this way. this is how come people can ride no-hands, they're minutely steering themselves upright by correcting their line via very slight leans one way or the other.
>>
>>1734837
cruiser bikes can be so slack that you won't turn adequately just by leaning so it can be a significant hurdle for a beginner to overcome if they have no concept of countersteering. it's a common cause of motorcycle crashes. it comes automatically once you've learned it but even as an experienced rider it's useful to know about it for dodging obstacles or taking corners fast.
>>
>>1734772
>"let him focus on riding normally"
>proceeds to try to explain counter steering, a thing nobody does consciously

take your own advice
>>
>>1734841
>it comes automatically once you've learned it

no, nobody ever explained countersteering to me until I was in my 30s. I had been riding bikes just fine since I was 6yo at that point.
>>
>>1734843
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect
>>
>>1734844
you're a fag and an autist
>>
>>1734845
t. rides with flat pedals and no helmet and thinks he's an elite cyclist
>>
>>1734759
I just converted a 6 to an 8 on a vintage build. It was freewheel so I didn’t have to replace a freehub, but I did have to buy a longer axle and spacers, then re-dish the wheel, then spread the rear dropouts (it was a steel frame).

It was a ton of work, but I like doing stupid things
>>
>>1734701
>air temps high enough to rain but already have frozen ground.
Yes. It's always very icy at the beginning and end of winter. Pic just doesn't happen where I live.
>>
>>1734757
I see, you're trying to be clever. I hope you aren't a bicycle mechanic anon or it would play even harder into the general public's opinion of them as having taken an afternoons college course to learn their trade. you should lubricate shortly after use if possible, though the earlier anon is right that it isn't critical. this is really basic mechanical knowledge and frankly I'm pretty shocked that anyone doesn't know it
>>
>>1734757
as to your comment about watts - meaningless. the figure you want is watts used to heat the pins and how it compares watts:grams to something like a pin on machinery steering/drivetrain etc. you'll find like for like the figures are very similar
>>
>>1734877
We don't generally get that either but the frost line is deep enough and it stays below freezing so ice does not form. Something has to be above freezing for there to be water to freeze.
>>
>>1734895
Or just water has to have a low enough freezing point. Sparsely salted paths, pavements form ice because the salt melts the snow then it gets diluted enough to refreeze again but now as an ice sheet. Sparse salting is also responsible for the pavement untimely deterioration so either commit to salting properly or don't salt at all.
>>
>>1734895
>the frost line is deep enough and it stays below freezing
What, all year round?
>>
>>1734940
It is a mix of salt and sand here, busy roads they dump more sand that salt, the sand under the car tires grinds up the ice before it can be come an issue. Lesser traveled roads get more salt than sand. They also spray brine when snow is predicted which works quite well, some ice often forms when they do this but it is just a thin layer which is not actually frozen to the road so it just crunches to dust under your tire. We get too much snow for the city to slack off.

>>1734943
No, but the time we spend bouncing around freezing tends to be dry, when snow starts coming we have generally had a good stretch of below freezing temps. We have not had a drop of moisture fall in nearly 3 weeks, only one day has been above freezing, ground is pretty hard at this point. We could still get freezing rain but we seem to be past that and are setting up for a fairly typical winter.
>>
>>1734842
If you don't know how to do it instinctively yet then you have to do it consciously. That's how learning works. The alternative is to keep falling on your ass for weeks until that moment that it "clicks", i.e. that you subconscious figures out how to fucking countersteer.
>>
>>1734963
sorry, I just ride my bike
>>
>>1734971
Which you are able to do because you spent weeks as a 5 year old falling over until your brain figured out countersteering.
>>
>>1734973
I'm not you.
sorry you were so awkward but you're projecting your bullshit onto me and the noob and at least one other person in this thread.
>>
>>1734977
Sorry, didn't realize you were the one toddler in the history of the world who was magically able to ride a bike the first time they ever sat on one. Were your parents recording this miracle when it happened?
>>
>>1734979
she was mildly surprised.
>>
>>1734971
you obviously don't have any remarkable skills when you get this uncomfortable and defensive about the topic of countersteering. it's not hard to ride a bike, any normie can do it. but they would not stand a chance in organized racing for example. they're the type of inept fucking dipshit who would take a turn wide on a 2 way bike path because can't countersteer and nearly get into a head on collision if the other rider didn't brake or take an evasive maneuver.

see how the fred has to slow down excessively and still has a fuckhuge turning radius to the point where he goes into the wrong lane to make the turn
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWURncxgm5I
>>
>>1734993
you replied to a six word post with a wall of text and I'm the one who's uncomfortable and defensive?
>>
>>1735027
>six word post
not him but you've been seething about countersteering all day
>>
>>1735028
>Like people with autism, people with Asperger's syndrome have a dreadful time understanding what is going on, socially

https://www.iancommunity.org/cs/about_asds/aspergers_syndrome_social_and_emotional_issues
>>
>>1735033
It's been 15 hours dude, let it go.
>>
>>1735033
>>1735035
I've been wondering lately why /bqg/ threads don't seem to last as long as they used to and I think I'm starting to understand that it's because of spergs like you filling half the post count with meaningless arguments.
>>
>>1735050
I bet it's the dude who has been "trying to learn" to ride with a city bike and failing to keep himself upright, for months. Also I remember him making claims that riding a bike is not real and cannot be done, making autistic threads about it.
Man I still laugh about his stupid ass
>>
>>1734768 #

Anon, I salute you!

I just tried it and it works indeed (it seems better to remove the second smallest cog, since if you take out the smallest one, you can't secure/lock the second well enough).

You just saved my little project :) I was ready to cut my losses and buy a new bike altogether
>>
I put some duct tape over some of the parts of my bike where the (cromoly) frame is exposed from scuffs and scratches to hopefully keep them from the salty snowy roads. Will this do anything good? I'm wondering if it would just make it worse by absorbing/catching and potentially keeping moisture under the tape and close to the frame.
>>
w2c anti seize for titanium bolts? normal grease not good enough to prevent galvanic corrosion against aluminium threads? the cheapest on amazon in my country is $6. aliexpress gives irrelevant search results. link something from aliexpress for less than like $6? i can use new user coupon on aliexpress.
>>
>>1736559
Probably make it worse. Clean the spot, steel wool to remove rust, touch up with a suitable paint.
>>
>>1736689
or galling or whatever
>>
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>>1733777
A single 18650 Lithium cell can support 600 to 800 lumen's of light output (somewhat like a torch)
more expensive lamps use two 18650 cells, and have lenses for both narrow beam spot light and wide beam flood light
High power LED elements and their power supply need cooling so often such Lamps are partly made of aluminium to disperse the heat
>>
>>1736559
yes I agree that will make it worse.

The easiest touch up is to clean the frame with wax/grease remover (a solvent) and then paint/spray on something like kurust rust converter on the exposed areas. You don't have to worry about masking, it will just wipe off paint, and it reacts with rust/ exposed metal to form a black hardened protective layer. That is porous so ideally you'd paint over it too, but even just the rust converter, is much better than nothing.
>>
>>1737591
the other thing you can do instead of painting over the rust converter, is scuffing it and around it a little with sandpaper, and doing a light spray of clearcoat over it.

Or, waxing the frame. Automotive wax is quite good for bicycles and easy to apply, you just make sure the frame is very clean, then rub it on with a wet rag, wait, then polish with a microfibre cloth when it dries.



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