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File: 1976nl_07.jpg (249 KB, 1045x1200)
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do you guys like older bikes? please post them, talk about them.
>>
>>1719081
Some of them look nice. I like them until unracers start pretending that old = good, at which point, I would rather see them all in a landfill where they belong
>>
I love early mountain bikes and all terrain bikes, in particular those from the early 1980's to the mid 1990's, and the reason is quite simple, the best of those bikes are peak bike, they may not necessarily be the absolute best bike for any one particular role, for example technical downhill riding or road racing, but they do excel in pretty much any role you wish to name. They really are Jack of all trades.

The frames in particular, because they came into being when bikes were all about road racing or BMX there's this wonderful blend of cutting edge materials and technology fused with fun and innovation, the sport of mountain biking was a relatively new phenomenon and it exploded into the mainstream before the industry was ready, so you had all these little workshops trying out new and interesting ideas, I don't think cycling ever had a time like it in terms of pure invention and revolution.

Some of the bikes from that era are truly works of art, not only aesthetically either, no, the beauty comes from the balance between form and function. As bright creative minds raced to express what they thought a mountain bike should be, and as the established component manufacturers too funneled massive amounts into R&D budgets and tiny garden shed genii churned out incredible pieces of art an entire industry was transformed, it got to the point where in the mid 1990's mountain bikes were pretty much the most common and popular bikes around the world., eclipsing road racers and BMX combined.

Picrel is just one example, a master frame builder working with riders and custom component manufacturers in an effort to perfect the machine, like other design classics it looks great because it is great, there's nothing showy about it, they didn't approach the design process thinking about how it's going to look, they were interested only in performance and the results by default delivered a thing of visual splendor.
>>
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>>1719081
I have plenty, used to work at my LBS and people would often just give them to us when they came in to buy a new one, kept the ones that fit and refurbed the ones that didn't. Usually ended up giving them to friends or selling one every once in awhile to finance more bike shenanigans. Started snapping up 80's mtbs about a decade ago when they were still relatively cheap; a lot of the larger size bikes tend to be in great shape, like the owners only rode them a few times and then hung them on the garage wall. One you don't see very often, esp in this condition, Diamondback Ridge Runner.
>>
>>1719081
these peugots have horrible derailers simplex is dead for a good reason these where absolute bottom bin derailers, looked pleasing on a retro bike
>>
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Barn finds are fun, thought this one might be beyond saving, but it turned out better than I expected, makes a decent klunker. Was covered in several coats of blue house paint, took a can or two of oven cleaner and a few sessions with the power washer at the car wash to get most of it off.
>>
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>>1719109
i didn't know these were old, i had assumed this was a retro modern look that took after harley davidson and co.
what's the 'kind' of these bikes, so that i can look them up?

>>1719097
>>1719098
pretty interesting, i didn't know that
i found an old peugeot here that looked like pic related, with its awesome yellow tires, and it made me want a VTT.
the issue is that i live at the sea, with 0 forest, and 0 hill, such is life
>>
>>1719109
>>1719116
nvm, it's called a klunker, right?
>>
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>>1719118
Yes, it was a typical 50's cruiser bike, switched out the old stem/bars for beefier ones, used an old metal springer seat in place of the quilted one. Pic is what the bike would've looked like new; this one was pretty trashed out when I found it.
>>
>>1719081
yes 90s especially
I want to pull the trigger on a 90s trek oclv road bike
>>
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Is this the most beautiful 90s MTB frame?
>>
I want to like them, but I hate the brake cables and the downtube shifters are just ridiculously impractical
the old sti era bikes are great
>>
>>1719099
Dem butts doe...
>>
>>1719098
Buy my 1984 stumpjumper?
>>
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>>1719116
lovely, one of the advantages of these early mountain bikes is their versatility, you don't need mountains or hills to enjoy them, they make excellent road bikes, you'll never win the tour de france on one but in terms of balance between speed, comfort and durability they are unsurpassed. Keep the knobbly tyres and find some dirt or gravel tracks to really understand what these bikes are all about, or stick on some semi slicks and enjoy a near perfect commuter capable on and off tarmac. Potholes, cobbles, curbs, grass, dirt, snow and ice etc, any type of surface conditions and most minor obstacles are all in a days work for these light and agile yet robust steel beasts.

Modern hybrids are basically soulless mass produced imitations of these overbuilt beauties.
>>
>>1719099
>lined ornate lugs
>hand painted model name
>high flange hubs
>dem bullmoose bars
>silver thumbies
what an absolutely beautiful bike.

What the FUCK is going on with the derailer though lol. I get how it must work but that is bizarre. Were they like:
>derailers can only have 1 piece of housing so with these thumbies we have to rethink the other end
>>
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bros i've been fetishizing old bikes for more than 10 years now. Buying, riding, restoring.

My perspective has changed.

I no longer want to draw a hard line in the sand between old bikes and 'new' bikes. What is really so different about pic related? It's still a fundamentally simple, beautiful feat of engineering, that you can have a lot of fun on. Does a sloping top tube really ruin a bike? Or do black components? Or not having a steel frame? I don't think so. Sure there are a lot of modern bikes that don't ride very well or have ugly design but that's true of old bikes too. Most old bikes don't have a classic status. And there are a lot of good looking modern bikes.

In terms of ride quality, the most important things are having the correct low enough gearing, high quality tires, and most important, a good fit for your body.

I feel personally responsible for the classic bike dogma on /n/ having posted a lot about them but I feel like it's wrong now. I still love classic bikes, and rather ride them, it's not that i've changed what I ride, but exclusionary bike fetishism, a kind of bike love that says 'im superior because these are superior' it just annoys me a bit now.

Peak bike is a lie.
>>
>>1719277
>Does a sloping top tube really ruin a bike
kind of messes up the handling desu
>>
>>1719279
how
no it doesn't
>>
>>1719280
its more of a co morbidity than a causation
>>
>>1719291
hmmmm
>>
>>1719280
your likely overly used to MTB Geometry
>>
>>1719300
Nah I mostly ride road bikes
>>
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>>1719308
modern road bikes ?
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>>1719336
No but i had a carbon meme machine for a couple years a couple years ago and it was nice
>>
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>>1719272
Not sure what they were thinking, don't know of another rear d setup like it, but it is super smooth.
>>
>>1719397
dank, a shame suntour dissipated
>>
>>1719407
damn that looks nice
>>
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>>1719081
>better times
>>
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>>1719081
>Single speed with dropper bars you say?
>useless modern trends

really want a old NSU Bike, the really old ones from the 30s are all bought up by boomers that have 25 bikes rusting in their shed.
the last german made ones from the 60s can still be found cheap some even have cantis instead of the stem brake.
after the 60s the name was rebranded to shitty BSO Bikes.
>>
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>>1719407
x2
>>
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>>1719132
No, it's lovely and indeed soulful, but the most soulful 90s mtb frame is picrel
>>
>>1719490
That's a 1988 tho
>>
>>1719491
yeah, but its soul is eternal
>>
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>>1719490
>aluminium
>>
>>1719493
Nah, that's fillet brazed steel at its finest
>>
>>1719491
late 80s mtbs are 90s mtbs and late 90s mtbs are not 90s mtbs
90s mtb is the period from 1986 to 1996

from when a true mtb group, indexed XT, came in, to when top of the line rigid steel bikes disappeared.
>>
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>>1719495
>90s mtb is the period from 1986 to 1996
Yeah, of course you're right, I was just being pedantic, in fact some of those mid-late 80's bikes are peerless, the Fat Chance's, Salsas, Chas Roberts' et al.
>>
>>1719499
threadless was an imporvement desu
>>
>>1719490
can you recommend me a few nice ones I'm currently crawling through the German equivalent of craigslist and can't find anything in my size (XL)
I can think of Diamondback, Marin, Cannondale
>>
>>1719572
It's not helpful to restrict your search in any way
there are a lot of good bike brands and many of the obscure/niche brands made the best bikes and many of the best deals are poorly listed with no keywords or size given.

It's relatively straightforward to gauge the quality of a bike by the components on it, or the tubing used, and it's also relatively straightforward to guess the size of it by eyeballing.

also, as well as rigid mtbs, you should be looking for classic canti brake touring bikes, which fit a very similiar niche.
>>
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>>1719572
The best thing to look out for is a few simple names. For frames you want steel, look out for Tange, Prestige, Reynolds, Ritchey tubing.

Groupsets wise you want Deore DX, XT or XTR, or Suntour XC-LTD, XC-Comp or XC-Pro.

Avoid V-brakes, there are some excellent bikes with V-brakes however there are many many more bad ones with V-brakes, they arrived on the scene in the mid 90's at the time the multinationals began to finally take control of the industry and they herald the beginning of the end for the golden era, so they serve as something of a marker. The same with 27 and 29 inch wheels, there are some great bikes with those sized wheels, but if you're looking fro a classic mtb from the halcyon age then it has to be 26''.

Also avoid suspension, 30 year old elastomers suck, finding replacements can be an awful drag and expensive, plus servicing and maintaining the forks is a ball ache, they weigh too much and just sap energy.

TL;DR
26'' quality rigid steel frame with mid to high end groupset from 1985-1996.
>>
>>1719709
>at the time the multinationals began to finally take control of the industry
Dude what. The majority of the nice rigid 90s mtbs were Specialized/Trek. A Stumpy or Singletrack 990 is a pretty damn desirable bike. Sure it's not quite as nice as something boutique, but it's pretty damn nice. Giant and Cannondale were both highly relevent too.

Lots of good bikes had non-descript chromoly house tubing and there are other common mfgers like Oria, True Temper, Columbus, that you didn't mention. It's another thing not to look for specifically.

And I wouldn't look past good nic Exage or STX or many other things at the right price either. I almost think someone on their first project is better off buying a lower end (of good) bike for less money and learning some stuff with it, especially in a tight market.

Hell, even the 26" thing, i disagree with. Lots of companies in the 90s put out good 700c hybrids alongside their mtb lines that filled very very similiar niches and are often just as good buys, as often are sport-touring bikes

And avoiding v-brakes doesn't make sense because they're an extremely common retro-fit.
>>
>>1719135
>downtube shifters are just ridiculously impractical
How so? Somehow cyclists survived them for roughly two decades.
>>
Any other manufacturers sell new retro bikes?
>>
>>1719722
Besides Wilier?
>>
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>>1719722
yes, when i started to look for old bikes, i went to the surviving brands first
they still make those but they're over my budget

i'm curious how good they are, considering modern technologies

i should look to mbk, mercier and other interesting makes
>>
>>1719135
most of the time 80s bikes have perished hoods or shitty brake levers that warrant an upgrade and a set of aero brake levers for them with cables under tape is a sensible/easy/cheap upgrade which looks fine period-wise, so that's a non-issue
and dt shifters are based and fun
>>
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>>1719722
State and Linus do ok cheap faux-retro bikes
>>
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>>1719722
both of pic rel are like $600

i'd like to think it was possible to shill newfags on /n/ into buying something like this but i don't believe it would be because newfags on /n/ are dumb faggots
>>
>>1719732
That is cheap. The Wilier is 3,200 EU or 3,700USD at current conversion rate.
>>
>>1719730
>perished hoods
I have an 80s bike with this problem. Are hoods difficult to replace? Can you still find them?
>>
>>1719738
eh, maybe? it depends on what they are. also not worth doing if there's a lot of slop in them.

imo just buy these
they come with new cables too
>>
>>1719721
they “managed to survive” much longer riding fixies with townie bars, that doesn’t make the bikes any less impractical
>>
>>1719788
What is so impractical about dt shifters?Last year i rode at least 600 miles on an 80s bike in hilly terrain and never had an issue
>>
>>1719798
are you pretending to be retarded now?
>>
>>1719798
people rode much more than that in tdf and sans roads on the aforementioned townie bar fixies, are those practical bikes?
>>
>>1719135
>>1719788
>>1719802
you still haven't said what's impractical about them
>>
>>1719804
they’re on the downtube, you fucking retard
>>
>>1719803
>townie bar fixies, are those practical bikes?
yes? why wouldn't they be?
>>
>>1719494
>Cannondale
>fillet brazed steel
No.
>>
>>1719805
And? Are water bottle cages impractical too?
>>
>>1719808
if you changed gears with them, yeah, you imbecile
>>
>>1719805
>>1719809
still haven't said what's impractical about that
adding an insult at the end of your empty posts doesn't make you right by the way
>>
>>1719809
That doesn't make any sense. Downtube shifters might have fallen out of practicality in racing now that everyone has integrated shifters, but no one is showing up to their local parking lot crit on the bikes posted in this thread. Perhaps you have a narrow view on what a bicycle should be and will argue with any opinions that fall outside of your blinders?
>>
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>>1719805
not him but that's not it anon. They're not inherently hard to use or sketchy, you just need practice using them. This only says something about you.

The real major downsides are specific things.

And there are specific major benefits too, like that you can soft-shift the front (shift the FD to a position where the cage would rub, then shift it over a little more when the shift is completed), so you will never drop a chain.
And that you can swoop the entire cassette with 1 throw of the shift lever.
And that you can shift front and rear with the same hand if you're holding food in the other hand.
And that you can switch from indexed to friction mode for the rear if your derailer/hanger is bent in a crash.
And that they stave off RSI and hand pain generally from giving you more different things to do with your hands.

The main downside is you can't shift riding out of the saddle, or really, when you're muscling the bike around at all. This badly affects sprinting, and carrying speed up the base of a climb. Which is a major downside.

What you think is the downside, that it sucks taking a hand off the bars to shift, can actually be a positive thing, because it's fun, and quite a natural movement when you're used to it. It can also be a good thing being limited in when you can or should shift to retain full control of the handling. Shifting less and just riding the gear you're in can be a good/fun habit.
>>
>>1719813
>The main downside is you can't shift riding out of the saddle, or really, when you're muscling the bike around at all
Because they’re on the fucking downtube. No one ever said they’re difficult to use nor sketchy.
>>
>>1719804
they are awkward to use
indexing makes them only slightly bearable
>>
>>1719705
>>1719709
>>1719714
Thanks all of you, what kind of search terms can you recommend? Over here in Germany people are very careful to not sell something under value. In the US you can find Herman Miller Aeron office chairs for $150 because boomers just list them as "office chair" while over here in Germany even a 23 year old Aeron chair is at least $600 and you will never find a listing where someone mislabeled it. I've been searching for "retro bike" "retro MTB" and then specific brands but it's really hard to find a good deal like this.
>>
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>>1719731
>tattoos
the bike sucks too
>>
>>1719824
>No one ever said they’re difficult to use nor sketchy
>downtube shifters are easy to use and safe
glad we're on the same page
>>
>>1719705
>It's not helpful to restrict your search in any way
>there are a lot of good bike brands and many of the obscure/niche brands made the best bikes and many of the best deals are poorly listed with no keywords or size given.

>>1719827
>Thanks all of you, what kind of search terms can you recommend?


are you retarded?
>>
>>1719829
>dt shifters are impractical
>ummm ackchuyallee they’re not really hard to use or sketchy
>nobody said that
>oh so they’re easy to sue and safe hohum~
they’re impractical, you stupid fuck
you yourself said as much
>>
>>1719831
No but there are good search terms to find listings without any brand mentions you retard
>>
>>1719834
> many of the best deals are poorly listed with no keywords or size given.

can you read? You even explained the concept yourself with your office chair example
>>
>>1719832
There are impractical things about them but they aren't broadly impractical they are broadly highly practical.
Do you think they are easy or hard to use?
Because people without much experience using them find them hard to use, even if you understand they're mechanically simple and know how they work, it's still relatively difficult to shift, but that changes once you have practice.
>>
>>1719834
'retro' and 'classic' and any such term is useless because far more people use those terms when they shouldn't than use them when they're appropriate so you'll still be searching through shitters and won't see a bunch of good listings, likely cheaper, because the seller isn't fetishizing what they have or trying to scam someone with meme buzzwords or sell you the money they wasted on it because they believed their own hype

And no descriptor like 'rigid' or even 'steel' or 'chromoly' is helpful either. Most of what you'll find it people who are savvy enough to want to get paid more for it and you're filtering out the good deals.
>>
>>1719836
the only thing you can claim they have going for practicality is friction and weight, both of which is true for any friction shifter not on the dt
hell, the only worse solution are stem shifters
stop trying to move goalposts
>>
>>1719836
They’re “broadly highly practical” i the sense that you can shift with them as opposed to without any shifters, they are broadly impractical in the context of widespread integrated shifters. What you’re doing is like arguing horse carts are highly practical in a world where cars and highly developed car infrastructure exists.
>>
>>1719838
>the only thing you can claim
Why don't you run the other things I already said through your brain and explain why i'm wrong if you'd like, rather than saying I can't even say anything.
>>
>>1719841
I've ridden a lot with various integrated shifters on bikes i've owned, ergos, STIs, I happily go back to riding DT shifters and have them on a couple of my bikes. Obviously they're shit for serious road cycling but they're great for fun bikes, tourers, beaters.

If a horse was cheaper than a car and I didn't have to pick up its shit or feed it or anything complicated it was just a bit tricky to get my head around riding I think i'd have a horse too and that would be fun as fuck.
>>
1) you guys are retarded, dt shifters are impractical because you take your hands off the guidon, stop trolling and pretending
2) you are exasperating, when you argue stupid shit instead of posting cool pictures and telling interesting stories
>>
>>1719845
>the guidon
What fucking language are you speaking
>>
>>1719847
das french it means handlebar
t. google translate
>>
>>1719843
>noooo let me move the goalposts
you finding something fun doesn’t make it practical, retard
>>
>>1719849
expect I explained 5 real things.
>>
>>1719850
*except
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>>1719850
except no, you didn’t, you said things that pertain to friction shifters, not dt shifters
the only thing specific to dt shifters is that hurr durr you can do it with one hand which is utterly irrelevant if you can do it without moving your hand off the bar in the first place
the downtube is a shitty place to have a shifter, period
>>
>>1719854
Aren't we comparing downtube shifters to modern STI/Ergos?

And you also have to move your hand to shift all other forms of friction shifters (or friction front + index rear), bar-end, thumbies, or stem shifters.
Personally I much prefer DT shifters to stem shifters, or even bar ends on a road bike. I find them more natural to use.

It's interesting that bar-end shifters never took off in road cycling. Why is that? You can see old photos of riders using them, Eddy Merckx used them for a while. They simply weren't popular.
One reason would be shift quality is better with less housing/friction, which makes DT shifters better than all other common types. Another, weight, which is marginal and likely irrelevant.
It's my opinion that DT shifters are nicer to use on a vaguely aggressive drop bar bike, than other classic shifter types, and I think that is widely proven by history.

Bar-ends are really only good on upright tourers.
>>
>>1719854
>which is utterly irrelevant if you can do it without moving your hand off the bar in the first place
Untrue. Say you're holding a hotdog and riding along eating it and you come to a hill. With downtube shifters, it's easy to loosely grip the corner of the bar with your non-hotdog fingers in the hotdog hand, and reach down to shift both front and rear with the other 1 hand. With STI shifters you likely have to switch the hotdog between hands to use both shifters and then you could get mustard on your other hand as well
>>
>he hasn't taken the DT front/STI rear pill
lol!
>>
>>1719862
I always wondered if the main reason they did this was really weight, or if it was because you could guarantee you wouldn't drop the chain
>>
>>1719861
Anon, STI shifts by pushing a lever inwards, you literally don’t need to let go of the hotdog, just extend one finger and push the lever
>>
>>1719864
then you got mustard on the STI
>>
>>1719865
STI cleans easier than the tape. Checkmate, downniggers
>>
>>1719861
but what if you’re eating chinese food, it’s easier to push the sti with the chopsticks because it’s hard to get a good grip on the dt lever
>>
>>1719863
As far as I know the lore said it was all about weight, but IME it's nigh impossible to drop a chain going from big to small with a friction shifter so I assume that might have had some influence on the decision. At least to the point where it wasn't any less reliable than indexed front shifting.
>>
>>1719871
>At least to the point where it wasn't any less reliable than indexed front shifting.
so uh, in the future, when di2 has AI tech?
>>
>>1719877
I'm not sure what you mean. What I was trying to convey was that it didn't perform worse than a left STI shifter, and by most accounts it performs equally well if not better. Given that it didn't hinder mechanical performance, making the change for weight savings was a no-brainer.
>>
>>1719879
oh hmm
>>
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How much should I offer for this bike? It has a very pretty color and seems to be in very good condition but it "only" has Altus A10 derailleurs
>>
>>1719866
Honestly if you don't lick every inch of your bike clean after a ride you're just not going to make it
>>
>>1719813
Nice write-up. I found the hand movement of DT shifting akin to changing gears in a car. Another advantage is simplicity and ease of service.
>>
>>1719871
Yeah, I didn't even know that you could drop the chain shifting in front or that front shifting was unreliable until I tried STIs. Never had a chain drop with downtube shifters or bar ends
>>
>>1719922
That's a cool old GT. Will be heavy but indestructible. I'd pay up to $250 for it but my local market is fucked. Depends what other bikes are going for in your area
>>
>>1719931
he wants 130€ for it.. I wish it had better derailleurs though, I'd pay more if it had LX

I'm really considering it because it feels like the retro MTB market is not very large over here in southern Germany (minus the ones from professional resellers)
>>
>>1719837
I just type in "road bike" and my size. In America it is easy to score nice stuff on Craigslist from ignorant boomers but in the EU not so easy. Seems everyone knows what they have and what it is worth.
>>
>>1719932
150€ actually
>>
>>1719922
It's not that low end
it has quick release hubs (not nutted)
likely a cassette
chromoly tubing I would strongly guess.
chainring bolts not chainrings riveted to the cassette

the matching stem, gt frame, visually very nice condition.

130euro is fair. It's a good bike. But i'd haggle down if the chainring teeth are badly worn, or the wheels are out of true or with loose spokes, or the rim wear is bad or the hubs are very rough.
>>
>>1719937
*chainrings riveted to the crank
>>
>>1719922
like yeah I would guess the condition is very good but price for a bike like that heavily depends on condition and you can't really tell with a photo or a description, you need to see in person. Take all the money and haggle if it isn't perfect.
>>
>>1719940
*if it isn't perfect
mechanically i mean, some scratches are nothing
>>
should i get a silca frame pump for swag purposes
>>
>>1719126
my brother has one in bright ferrari red. it's pretty great. he treats it like absolute trash, uses it as a city bike all year in boston, and generally neglects it. it's held up admirably.
>>
>>1719709
for a little reference, replaced the fork on BSO
suspended no brand fork 2.2 kg
rigid steel fork 0.9 kg
5 dollars at a fleamarket, too bad it doesn't have fender mounts, but then again neither does the frame
>>
>>1719732
you mad about a 500 usd downtube shifting bike but in the end someone who buys that has more fun on it than a trek marlin
>>
>>1719494
lol no
>>
>>1719993
Only if it's old Silca. That dumb engineer faggot ruined them.
>>
>>1719494
>fillet brazed
only Schwinn and Garry Fisher bother with that bullshit
>>
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>I sure do wish shifting were more difficult
>>
>>1719723
best looking bike I've seen today. I want something like this except very cheap
>>
>>1719732
what bike is that in your picture there
>>
>>1720171
I already said
>>
>>1720173
maybe this attitude is why no one listens to you and you get mad about it
>>
>>1719469
>>1719407
>>1719397
It should be illegal to post such nice things ;_;
>>
Info on this? Such as year and if the price is realistic?

https://milwaukee.craigslist.org/bik/d/east-troy-colnago-master-piu-20-speed/7390319218.html
>>
>>1720300
>I am a professional cyclist, bike mechanic and recently built this as a retro mod restoration.
He didn't even line the tire labels up with the valves. Tell him I said he's a fucking hack. It's a cool bike for sure, but $2,900 for a bike with a drivetrain that's at least 13 years old?
>>
>>1720300
>double brake leavers
HOW DID HE DO THAT O_O
I really like the seat post also. Nice bike.

You should ask him if he's willing to trade for a $200 rigid 90s MTB just to see what he says.
>>
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>>1720448
>but $2,900 for a bike with a drivetrain that's at least 13 years old?
NOS record is very desirable though. It's not just old. Arguably that's the most modern classic groupset it could have. You're certainly not losing out on performance in any major way. It looks better than new campag like pic rel. Although pic rel is a much nicer build overall.

>>1720300
Personally, I think it's hideous. Those high end neo-retro campy builds are very hit and miss for me and I hate that one. It's worth that amount of money but I wouldn't buy it.

You've got the black hubs clashing badly with the chrome, awful white matchy and awful white tires, a fucking quill stem converter and horizontal dropouts, voekler-meme tier interrupter levers completely out of place, the bars are hideous, it's a rich man's folly. I even like garish bikes but that one is not garish in an aesthetic way.
>>
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>>1720300
I also wouldn't ever buy a mint paint colnago. You can get a nice high-end classic frame for sub $500 if you don't need the paint to be perfect or a meme-tier marque.

You can get a nice complete high end classic bike for
sub $1000 in most markets, it's just not immaculate. Why is having an immaculate bike desirable, at all? It just means you don't ever ride it. The new groupset/build is desirable because it'll work better, but the mint frame? Nah.
>>
>>1720300
Also that bike is pretending to be like 10-20 years newer than it is. If you want threadless that money gets you a more modern classic.

Otherwise it deserves a quill stem and classic cockpit.
>>
and if you're gonna blow 3k on a steel bike, do you really not want something that atleast has a foot in the unracer door?
>>
>>1720459
if your'e going to have a stem that tall go with one that slopes up imo. nice other than that
>>
>>1720451
>HOW DID HE DO THAT O_O
called interruptor levers
>>
>>1720465
I agree
>>
>>1719277
I'd argue that "peak bike" continues until the late 2010's. Why?
The industry rallied around good standards;
Square taper 68mm BB's, 1 inch or 1 1/8 headsets, 100mm Front axles, and to a lesser extent 120/135 rear spacing. All of these remained largely unchanged from mid 80's-early 2010's and provided enough room to grow new tech on. That new tech could easily be put on, well just about anything until they started getting crazy with carbon frames and proprietary & poorly adopted standards.
Sure you had italian and french BB threads, 73mm mountain spacing, oddball headset and stem diameters, and older axle standards wheel sizes. But those key drive train components were never that far removed to be in compatible.

If I had to pick a Peak from those years I'd say the 9 speed era was king. Every thing compatible with everything. Sti with mountain derailleurs? on a touring bike? oh you wanted indexed paddle shifters, my mistake. Hell they still sell 9s touring bikes today. 2021 disc trucker has it.

/Rant/
Too many of the high end (and even mid range bikes) have proprietary standards and tech that wont be supported in 5 let alone 10 years time. I've seen too many carbon frames from the 00's with fatigue cracks, too many failed specialized future shocks, too many cracked rims, and too many damn recalls Feels like bikes are becoming more of a commodity to be sold off than a functional repairable /rant/
>>
>>1720471
there is a lot of truth to this, however, the progression of gearing for road/road-esque uses, not just pros, but all the runon tech regular people ride, has been a story of wider range, specifically wider low end range.

Your 'std' road gears with every gen have gone lower.

Which is a wholly positive thing.
>>
>>1720456
>Arguably that's the most modern classic groupset it could have.
How do you determine that though? To me, it's not old enough to be "classic" or "vintage". And it's not NOS anyway. I'm also just skeptical of the seller and why they felt the need to note that they're a "professional cyclist" and a mechanic. No self-respecting pro OR mechanic would put those shit tires and dumbass in-line brake levers on a bike. Sorry, I'm a little sour.
>>
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>>1720475
It's still normal looking. Just with some carbon parts mixed in. Derailers having some black plates was an 80s thing though. It looks nothing like the crazy space age shit we have now.

Indurain's TDF win, the last win on a steel bike, was in 1995. That was on a modern campag group, with ergos. The 8spd ergos were a bit different but the new shape levers, the same as on that colnago, came in in 1997. That's basically 25 years ago, which is broadly when things become 'classic'.
>>
>>1720484
Like yeah, polished metal. You see it on the crank too. That's classic.
>>
>>1720475
>No self-respecting pro OR mechanic would put those shit tires and dumbass in-line brake levers on a bike. Sorry, I'm a little sour.

Interrupter levers are more relevant for racing than anyone else. Voekler used to use them (pic rel at Paris-Roubaix where he placed 4th). It's for when you're riding rough ground and the tops are good for planing and taking shocks, but you have to ride close and might have to brake.

the white tires are ugly/dumb, yes, but anyone is prone to go overboard on matchy crap.
>>
>>1720486
>>1720475
Being a pro cyclist or master mechanic does not necessarily have any relation to having good tastes and sense of aesthetics I'm afraid.
>>
>>1720492
it would pretty unhelpful to be an aesthete bicycle autist if you were a pro cyclist or a mechanic because it would be constantly triggering what you have to ride/work on
>>
>>1720486
>Interrupter levers are more relevant for racing than anyone else.
No, they're not common for pro racing. That's literally the only race where they use those pieces of shit.
>>
>>1720496
I didn't say they were common and I think they're horrible on that colnago.

and it's not 'literally' the only race. Lots of races have similar conditions and they make similar sense and it's totally possible a pro might be fond of them for riding such things.
>>
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>>1719723
For me, it's Cherubim
>>
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>ex-pros bikes
>>
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>>1720501
lol racerfags BTFO
>>
>>1720501
looks like he's having 1000x more fun there than he ever did while working as Lance's bloodbag
>>
>>1720459
why is the stem so tall on this bike? is it intentional? sorry am newbie
>>
>>1720522
tall guy wants comfy upright position. It's touring bike logic.

It's also a way of setting up road bikes that I think makes a lot of sense. Think about this:

On most modern road setups, riders spend 95% of the time on the hoods. The bar height is set so the hoods are as low as is tolerable. The drops are then a near redundant position, basically only used for aero/control when descending, or sprinting and they are uncomfortable to ride in for any period of time because they're lower than the lowest the rider wants to spend time riding.
Having the bars high like in that pic just moves that semi-aggressive hoods position to where the drops are. You still get a similiar position to what roadies ride 95% of the time in. You can still get aero. And the hoods become a comfy upright position.

Lower than 'as low as possible' isn't helpful but higher than 'just high enough to be comfy' is very comfy and very helpful.
>>
Also, descending in the drops makes sense, because if you hit a bump at high speed, you have a better grip on the bars.

But getting very aero to descend probably does not make sense unless you are racing or riding into a headwind or riding on a very high speed road with traffic that has a smooth surface, wide lanes and cambered corners. Why does a regular road cyclist want to descend at 80km/h instead of 60km/h on a regular mountain? You just have to brake more and it's scarier.
>>
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>>1720471
Bikes are now disposable items to be re-consoomed every 12 months.

The only thing the industry rallied around after the golden age of the 80s to mid 90's was how to churn them out faster for cheaper and how to sell less for more.

China's economy did well out of it while cyclists have been getting stiffed ever since.

No, bring back the days of mad white visionaries inventing new tech in their sheds while component manufacturers competed to perfect those new ideas and strike the perfect balance between lightness, durability and functionality.
>>
>>1720528
you're always riding into a headwind when descending anon
also going fast is fun
>>
>>1720544
This, going fast is exhilerating, what some people call scary real men call fun. Pussies can pootle about if they want to but don't ever say speed is scary, it's better to just say you're a cowardly faggot.
>>
>>1720542
>white people solely drive cycling innovation/ components/ technology

oh fuck right off cunt. Atleast give the japanese some credit. I don't think Italians or french would like being dumped in as 'non-specific white mutt' either, they have their own real identities
>>
>>1720548
Everything shimano and suntour made was based upon some european or american design, nobody takes anything away from them, they took great ideas and improved upon them, made them affordable and accessible and they made them to last. Nobody will be saying that about chink shit in 30 years time no matter what western brand they slap on it.
>>
>>1720546
>>1720544
please... i've ridden more mountain passes than you

you still could get relatively aero on that bike too.
flat back with bent arms.
>>
>>1720554
That's not true.

don't tie classic bicycle fetishism into your inferiority complex around race, it's fucking insufferable.
>>
>>1720556
Considering the Africans never even stumbled upon the wheel until they were loaded into Mediterranean european slave carts let's not pretend all races are created equal in the mechanical engineering ingenuity stakes shall we?

All you have to do is study the history of the bicycle and you'll see the truth for yourself, it's you who is painting the world in lies because for whatever reason you can't bear to see the world as it is.
>>
>>1720558
Based and truth pilled.

The bike is a European invention, that's just a fact, imagine being so triggered by such an obvious statement of truth. The Japs did great work and contributed enormously to the advancement of the bicycle, but beyond that they were just polishing another mans sculpture.
>>
>>1720558
>All you have to do is study the history of the bicycle
Or the car, plane, helicopter, computer, atomic bomb, internet, telecommunications...
>>
>>1720548
this is the funniest thing about the American settler state white nationalist - the fact they only have a generic overarching idea of "white" is because they aren't white themselves. I wouldn't consider any American living today white.
>>
>>1720542
late 1980s the big old European brands got btfo by the economy of scale and lax laws in Asian countries, esp when it come to frame building
Taiwan is a big player internationally but their domestic market is a bit strange
>>1720554
for sure there was a massive amount of French influence in the early japanese bike industry, (aside from gunsmiths having nothing else to do)
Suntour has allot of their own designs but they kind of fell flat on marketing and remained a niche brand
Shimanos early Derailleur are of a simplex type sensibly made of steel, but I feel like shimano is about to fall into the trap of using too much plastic, where in the past they have showed great restraint
with the prevailing market conditions and favourable exchange rates Japanese brands offered a high quality at a lower cost, while also gaining a sufficient level of refinement
meanwhile Italian brands stagnated in terms of design if not quality
and French brands either went too far or not far enough in terms of technical improvements, they racked balance
Shimano scooped out allot of the mass market "rip huret", but could not quite be taken seriously in the racing market, although they still caused a minor kerfuffle
presently China has taken over most of the BSO market, and will eventually make significant gains in the mid range,
but they need to step up their game when it comes to material selection and quality controll
>>
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>>1720595
Don't forget great old British brands like Sturmev Archer who were making thumb shifters in the 1960's and BSA who were making under bar trigger shifters before that.
>>
*Sturmey
>>
>>1720572
and don't forget to ignore every chink invention
>>
>>1720599
The balloon and gunpowder, both great discoveries, and great big walls. But let's not talk about the blonde haired blue eyed mummies found in Chinese caves.
>>
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mfw it's fucking real.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_mummies
>>
>>1720601
yeah I'm sure it was those guys who invented them
probably also taught them metallurgy, pottery, engineering, and everything else
HEIL
>>
>>1720597
iirc they have been doing that pattern since at least the 1930s
there is an older version from 1902 that is also handle bar mounted tho the top tube mounted Qaudrent shifter is more common

that aside the British had a thing for ultra durable long distance bikes, if you want over kill on hubs and bottom brackets they have the best (tfw BSA once made the words most expensive bikes)
IGH was the market leader, kind of snubbed the early British derailleur developments
>>
>>1720599
they made some wicked sick siege engines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_siege_weapons
kind of makes me wonder what happened maybe there were #1 for so long they lost touch
>>
>>1720572
>atomic bomb
you mean television rigth?
>>
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going to try to save this thread with some vintage bikes i've had over the years. this is an early 80s (maybe, feel free to correct me) fuji roubaix. original except saddle/pedals/bartape.105 7 speed group, ukai wheelset, fluted/paint-filled seatpost with height markings. great colorway/graphics on this, especially the "champion" color seat tube decal. the ride quality was wonderful - lively without any noodling.
>>
>>1720616
not allowed, that bike was designed and built by white Europeans who no doubt wielded their privilege in an unfair manner in order to manifest a wonderful piece of practical engineering. This thread is racist because it excludes POC's, especially those who have particularly low IQ's, and it oppresses minorities because they could have invented this bike if only Frenchmen hadn't exploited their natural resources and brought technology and infrastructure from the civilized world to the teeming hunter gatherer cannibal societies who would have eventually split the atom if only they'd been left alone.

Picrel shows what a Ghanaian plumber can do if he's just given the opportunity to express himself and shown how to use the tools of modern man.
>>
>>1720624
wow the parallels with extended swingarm hyabusas are unreal and only blacks ride them too
>>
>>1720616
this looks really great anon I love it
>>
>>1720604
We unironically wuz emperors. Read thread
https://twitter.com/Ketamazon/status/1355145835307171847
>>
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>>1720616
continuing with my early 90s giant perigee. nothing really special about this one. exage biopace group and unicrown fork. another one that i really appreciated for the colorway - hard to see in this pic, but the paint was wine-red and sparkled a little in the sun. the "festival marketplace" style graphics are hilarious. it was my gotta-go-fast bike for a couple years.
>>
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>>1720548
>>1720581
I love when midwits who just regurgitate their leftist professors bad faith bullshit think they're smart.
>>
>>1720616
Lovely bike anon.
>>
>>1720637
It's a lovely looking bike anon, certainly has some personality.
>>
I want to buy a vintage MTB or road bike but it should be able to carry my weight without collapsing. I weigh over 130kg (285lbs) currently but I need a fun bike that will keep me active and help me lose weight. I know that MTBs will carry my weight but not so sure about road bikes. Which ones can you recommend? I prefer drop bars.
>>
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>>1720699
An older road bike, 70's/80's lugged steel, should hold your weight with no problem. I'm about 250 lbs now, maybe 280 max before, and have never had a problem with the road frames that I've ridden. Find one that's more of a touring style, can take bigger tires; I've converted older frames from 27" wheels to 700c and usually ride 32-35mm tires. When I had an older racing style Bianchi that only accepted 28mm tires, I did pop spokes on bumpier roads, but have had no problems since switching over to wider tires. Pic is an old Bridgestone that I got free as a frame/fork and built up with spare parts as a single speed commuter, ride it on gravel and singletrack, too. Good luck!
>>
>>1720616
this one is my favourite, really beautiful, and nice pump
>>
>>1719081
8 speed Ti roadies
>not mine
>>
>>1720699
Get a rigid steel mtb of good quality, road bike will be hell for you comfort wise, although you should aim to reach the point where you can transition to a road bike.

You should look at mid range frames with high end groupsets, something like a Muddy Fox or Trek circa 1990 -1993 with DX or XT components.
>>
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What's vintage?
This is my '94 Raleigh. I love this bike.
>>
>>1720652
?? I don't think anyone disputed that European racist political movements were composed of morons
>>
>>1720742
ok that's hot
>>
>>1720759
very nice, love the simple color with destickered wheels, super nice look
>>
>>1720699
want some recs? link your local craigslist and height
>>
>>1720759
Vintage and lovely
>>
>>1720759
an odd blend of parts
but it works out
>>
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drunken klunker junk build in progress
4130 frame from the dump
weight currently 9.4 kg

wat colour grips ?
>>
>>1721007
>wat colour grips ?
orange or celeste green
>>
>>1721007
neon yellow
>>
>>1721007
>wat colour grips ?
Orange of course
>>
>>1721007
mustard / old gold
>>
>>1721007
green
>>
i'm a retarded and sprayed WD-40 "inside" my saddle tube inadvertently.

would a friction paste work? i'm ordering some either way
please tell me i didn't just commit myself to looking like a clown every time my saddle slides down, forever
>>
>>1721056
you're supposed to grease your seatpost
WD40 if anything is not slippery enough.

If it's sliding down when clamped it's probably the wrong size post.

you definitely do not need friction paste.
>>
>>1721058
i think it's the original saddle though, same brand, and from the 70's. so the size of the post is fine.

it wasn't slipping at all before i sprayed WD40 at the screw, trying to unlock it.
the screw still won't turn, but the saddle can be moved up and down by mere pull/push now

i'm reading that WD40 lasts a week at most
do you reckon i should wait without ordering friction paste?
>>
>>1721062
no lol you need to fix the fucking bolt retard

jesus

so what's the deal, the bolt is stripped? Soaking is the right course of action, then force it. If it strips, cut a slot in it for a screw driver or use vice locks if you can. Worst case and it really won't come to this, cut or drill it out.

You will not hold a seatpost in place for riding with a seized loose bolt and friction paste.
>>
if it's not stripped, make sure you have good tool purchase, and just force it until it breaks free

you could also try blasting it with a creme brule torch
>>
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>>1721067
thank you for your raw and wise advice
pic related is what's stuck, i used the wrong word. but yes it's already stripped courtesy of the previous owner.

many good ideas of yours but i'm limited in tools so i sprayed it again and i'll regularly try to force it unlocked
>>
>>1721007
Fucking based.
Post completed bike.
>>
>>1721073
good luck anon
do you have a hacksaw? You could probably just cut it in half through the slit in the middle of the frame with the post removed.

hell you could buy a hacksaw blade only for like $2 and wrap a rag around for a handle and do it like a goddamn prison escape
>>
>>1721073
Spraying it can only do so much. Just brute force it or cut it like anon said, then replace the bolt.
Make sure you apply actual grease (the slippery kind) down your seat tube after, like anon said.
>>
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>>1721073
you may need to use a second wrench to hold the bolt head still
either due to how seized the nut is, or to avoid damage to the frame if the bolt head has an anti rotation notch
>>
>>1719407
Incredible. A time when good engineering was at the forefront instead of just
>zomg this years consume product is 5g lighter than last years!!!
>>
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I have an unreasonable lust for Pederson frames
>>
>>1721077
>hell you could buy a hacksaw blade only for like $2 and wrap a rag around for a handle and do it like a goddamn prison escape
that sounds cool actually and doable actually

>>1721078
>grease
ok then
i really thought friction paste had its use here but it was short-sighted

>>1721080
>second wrench
yes that's the second step of the plan, i'm still at the first step)))

thank you guys
>>
>>1720837
>>1720837
Thanks man. It's a little more than de stickered. I removed the fender mounts and extra bottle cage mounts and then paid a Mexican paint shop to spray it I metallic white
>>
>>1721093
What the fuck
>>
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>>1721174
The bike was designed to have a hammock seat instead of a traditional saddle, and they wanted the frame to be as stiff and rigid as possible while allowing the hammock to move freely.
>>
>>1721179
Not sure if based or very stupid idea, but I'd certainly try this if I ever get a chance.
>>
Is it worth replacing the rear derailleur on my early 1980s road bike? It's an 8SIS Alivio that I suspect someone swapped in for the original at some point.
>>
>>1720601
There's also paper, (woodblock) printing, paper currency, rudders, the compass, rockets, trebuchets, guns, bombs, porcelain, silk, crossbows, civil service, horse collars. Ironically, all inventions that Europeans adopted and improved.

Fact is that most innovation happens in places where most economic activity takes place. China (or the land identified as such) held that title for much of history until maybe about the mid to late eighteenth century; mid 19th century at the latest. Europeans only caught up partly because they took over maritime trade on a global scale, partly because of slavery, and because of the latter two factors, early industrialization.
>>
>>1721684
>China number 1 until mid 18th century
wow I haven't seen an actual paid still post in months
>>
>>1721673
wiggle the cage
there's probably a lot of slop in it
a new unit would work better because of that

but even a sloppy af derailer works well enough on lower-speed setups if everything else is setup well. It's not what i would ever focus on servicing first.

overhauling the jockey wheels, recabling it, and putting a new chain/cassette would make more of a difference.
>>
>>1721687
>>doesn’t say bad thing about china
>must be a still
>>
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>>1721673
is something wrong with it ?
>>1721691
add to the wiggle of the parallelogram pivot pins there is also the rare potential of worn a out B pivot Bushing
more rare still is worn out springs that have lost their tension
failure of the B or P spring will make the chain too slack

parallelogram spring failure is more of a problem for high normal rear derailleur
but its such a rare occurrence that I dont think its even available as a replacement part any more

>overhauling the jockey wheels
sometimes the pulley wheel closest to the sprockets has a steel liner and a thicker and wider bushing.
more heavy duty and with a larger degree of float, the other weaker pulley is sometimes called a tension pulley.
the names for slightly differing are not widely known or used
>>
>>1721705
I like G pulley and Centurion pulley
>>
>>1721691
>>1721705
>is something wrong with it ?
Not as such. It seems to shift okay, not counting problems that may be attributable to the shifter instead (i.e. difficulty settling after going down multiple gears at once). It seems pretty firm, particularly when compared to the Tourney on my old CCM before it sheared its plastic stop. Jockey wheels are worn but not quite shark-toothed yet.

Dunno about the condition of the chain, though I am looking to replace the freewheel.
>>
>>1721710
based and 1970s pilled, also the correct term
its effects are chain wrap and chain aliment
from time to time I call it the B pulley due to its proximity to the B pivot
Tension pully does not normally effect shifting or chain aliment unless something else is seriously wrong
>>1721713
>problems that may be attributable to the shifter instead
super unlikely but maybe the shifters index points do not work with the parallelogram curve of that derailleur
or the spacing of the Sprockets does not match the index points

but worn out pivot points along with pulley float make this kind of problem harder to identify (hit bump, bike changes gear)
have apply occams razor and start with the least complex thing that could be causing a problem

cable tension too low or too high
pivot points bound up with gunk
parallelogram spring worn out so that although the derailleur may shift down there is nothing strongly forcing it to do so
>>
>>1721722
>cable tension too low or too high
Don't think so. Taut but springy on both ends.
>pivot points bound up with gunk
Could probably use a disassembly and clean.
>parallelogram spring worn out
Could be a bit stronger: it doesn't fully return to the original position when I try to pivot it forward on the hanger. Maybe it's another sign that it needs cleaning.

That said, the thing about the shifter is that it's definitely not the original article: it's an SIS MTB lever shifter that can switch between friction and index. I operate it in the former mode because it seems more reliable that way. The bike was clearly originally built for downtube shifters, as it has stops for a shifter clamp.
>>
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>>1720616
>>1720637

here's the fuji espree i commuted on for a year or so. i put a sturmey archer hub on it to climb the bitch of a hill to city college. eventually i got tired of the hub leaking everywhere so i gave it to a friend.
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>>1719081
what does /n/ think about bicycles from the 30/40s
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>>1721849
I dig them. Pic related is how I found it, the only true "barn find" I have so far.
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>>1721860
After some resto magic, it's a '37 Colson long wheelbase frame badged as a Delmar, they were sold by a dept store based out of St. Louis back in the day.
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>>1721849
picrel is a wonderful steel framed masterpiece, comfy and quick, built like a tank but surprisingly weighs less than 25kg, thinking about upgrading the drivetrain and braking system though to a nice suntourXC pro mk1 set i have laying around, will require a bit of welding and cutting to make it fit though.
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>>1721882
Holy fuck, are you from China? If not, how'd you get it?
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>>1721862
How's it ride? Looks like it would be unbelievably stable/comfy but handle like a boat
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>>1721893
It's really smooth and not as trucky as I thought it would be, get lots of stares when I take it on the local singletrack. Some CX guys have a makeshift cyclocross course set up and they always quiz me about the bike. I have some other ballooner cruisers that are significantly heavier than this one; I switched out the original wheels, they were probably the tankiest part of the bike, like old wagon wheels.
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>>1721093
>>1721179
I dislike ultra vintage bikes but this made me coom my pants.
Imagine how much fun it would be to ride that.
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>>1721882
>weighs less than 25kg
lol
24kg?
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>>1719081
Yes and no.

I enjoy restoring them to 'good shape,' and admit they're technically usable in dry conditions, and even very enjoyable to ride. Overall I found them to be superior in a lot of ways (comfort, ride position), especially while my back was recovering from a surgery (tumor removal).
They're amazingly beautiful bikes, and somehow the vintage hi-tensile steel frames are lighter and seemingly stronger than the modern Chinese branded chromoly. Love the look of lugs, too, and if you do inflation calculator, you'll see they never were much more expensive than Chinese/Taiwanese-made bikes, which is nifty.
Some of them include lots of neat features that are long-since absent (e.g., fork locks, fenders with light-mounts), even though we've since made adaptations to make these innovations even more practical (LEDs, capacitors with stand-light capabilities).

I've learned to accept them as they are in some ways, because while some upgrades (LED bulbs in bottle dynamo lights, or carbon seatposts), when I lace up new alloy rims to the hubs, for example, somehow some of the ride quality goes to hell, even though the braking's now much better.
So, mixed bag OP. Comfort, style, beauty. Bit of a pain sometimes finding what is and isn't interchangeable (e.g., bottom brackets, cranks, 27" to 700c sometimes works, sometimes the brake arms won't reach, and then the super-long brake arms just flex instead of stopping you). It's a great life lesson, though, to learn that 'not all things go as planned,' and to simply accept things sometimes as they are.
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orange got the votes
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it just needs a bell
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>>1722211
are you trolling every bqg with gayfags? why are you doing that? It's very strange
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>>1720165
is he shifting by hand?
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>>1720459
>lanklet bike
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>>1722268
yes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQe0fLEQ2jY
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>>1722268
It's this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIZhSNdO_Zo

One lever unbolts the wheel, the other moves a cage around the chain to push it between cogs. The dropout is notched and the wheel slides back and forth to keep chain tension. Then when you're done shifting you clamp the wheel again.

This is what they raced at grand tours for decades.
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>>1722274
>for decades.
ok that part is bullshit

for a while
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>>1719081
I like high flange hubs. They look sexy. That feels weird to say.
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>>1719081
Guess I'm gonna find out, found a good deal on a couple vintage rides I'm gonna pick up this weekend; '85 Raleigh Kodiak and late 70's Skyway Deluxe. Hope I can get them rolling for lazy cruises around the park.
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>>1722395
obsolete tire sizes can be harder to find in low prices or high quality, shop carefully
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>>1722422
Good or cheap 27" tires are reasonably common.
Unless you need to buy everything from a lbs
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>>1719096
>>1720459
>unracer
We're not here to collect checks or anything. It's just... we heard someone use "our word", and there's this whole royalty thing. You gotta consistently police usage of the term, or lose your legal basis... yadda yadda.
Look, it's gonna be $70. A modest fee, really. Hardly enough for lunch, out here in Contra Costa.
But you do have to pay.
Otherwise you can expect us--and I mean both of us--to pull a S24O at mommy's house.
And you don't want that... do you?
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>>1722442
kek
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>>1722395
>>1722422
You can get 27" paselas
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>>1722395
very cool
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I ride a Basso from 1990 in the summer. Really fun and fast bike, quite light, comfy seat and good rolling wheels. The riding position is a tad long, and there's no room whatsoever for fenders, but no problems otherwise. It has an old Shimano 105 7-speed system and a cassette I just replaced.
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>>1722519
get a shorter stem dude. Or bars with shorter ramps.
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>>1722422
They're out there online, not going to be putting crazy miles on these anyway.

More concerned over swapping out the cottered cranks on the Skyway. Those never die easy.
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>>1722633
yeah lol. Good luck.
post some pics when you get em

I would half heartedly try to use the cottered cranks. Only trash them if the BB is pitted or it gets too hard. They do look cool.
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>>1722442
Grant pls no bully
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>found a great deal for a new commuter, set to check it out latter today
god I just hope everything is fine
rim brakes, fenders, new paint job, FUCKING TUBULAR ALLU RIMS FUCK YES
shit looks great in photos for 120$ tbqh
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>>1722720
anon what i'm seeing is a heavy shitter
>cottered cranks
>steel seatpost
>bolt on wheels, with rust around the hub seals
>claw derailer
>extreme retard brake lever location so re-wrap required
>awful ghost bike paint job

that's not a good bike.

Also lol, tubular, really? You do realise that's not the same as tubless right? With tubulars you need to get a new tire every time you get a flat. And glue it on. Why the FUCK would you want that for an old beater?
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>>1721058
fyi i drenched it in WD40 for a few days while amazon was shipping me the correct tools, and then it worked on the first try. it was very wholesome and now i can go back to planning my lonely weekend.
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>>1722724
I love tubulars, not a problem.
You're right about everything else. Fuck this shit, ill never find a decent cheap bike
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>>1722720
lipstick on a pig
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>>1722153
>>1722160
DUDE, NICE BIKE!
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>>1722395
The Skyway is certainly a clunker. As far as I could research they're a cheap department store bike with nothing remarkable about them.

The flipped bars and headlight give it a bit of a street fighter feel. Thinking I'll strip it, convert to square taper, and make a quirky single speed hooning bike out of it.
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>>1722160
>bell
Either a huge ding-dong bell, or pic related. Or both.
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>>1723336
no this
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>>1722519
Had the exact same model but with blue and white.
The model is called "Marino" and has Columbus Aelle tubes. When i bought it, in 1989 when i was 16 years old, i equipped it with a Dura Ace 7spd and matching rear hub and a mavic front hub combined with Open 4CD rims.
Crankset was Ultegra 600 and the brakes and levers were Ultegra 600 as well.
Sadly my frame got stolen when they broke into our basement and stole a shit ton of good old bike parts. I guess the dudes doing it, knew what was in there.
Seriously, i'm in tears now, since i have so many good old memories connected to this bike and frame.
Can't tell how many hours i worked in the supermarket filling shelves and repairing bikes in the shop to save up to it.
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>>1723319
: )
>>1723342
what am i even looking at here
>>1723336
i already ordered these for it. Could add more though lol
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>>1723361
damn dude
it's weird to think of bike nerds breaking into someone's house to steal parts.
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>>1723376
lel I was just looking at the duck ones for my beater. Post pics when you get them.
I have the ones on the right, they look nice and ring really loud. And they're nice and smol too.
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>>1723381
will do
i have to resist my urge to make this bike more and more stupid
i almost put a flag pole on it before
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>>1723361
Thanks for your story man, nice of you to share it. did not know the name of the model previously. Your build sounds awesome, shame it got stolen!
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>>1723377
Yes, i freaked the fuck out when i saw what happened.
I had a lot of other good stuff in there.
Such as Campy groupsets from the seventies through the eighties and up to the mid nineties. Most of them complete and NOS
One Shimano Dura Ace AX groupset almost all parts NOS.
The 25 years anniversary Dura Ace 9spd groupset NOS. And a regular 8spd one also.
A pair of Campagnolo high flange C Record prototype hubs with 8spd cassette body that never hit the market.
A set of Mavic Helium wheels NOS and a set of Campy Shamal 12 HPV NOS
A huge box with 12 AMP suspension forks, diskbrakes, matching AMP hubs and brake disks. All brand new.
Combined with a shit ton of service shims, axles, dampers and the pressing tool needed to service them.
An entire box filled with tune hubs of different models and colors.
Some Edco hubs, Hügi hubs and many other parts.
A set of prototype hydraulic V-Brakes in orange from Starbike
Frames from Guercotti, F.Moser, Colnago, my Basso frame i mentioned and a Lotus bike with the Mavic zapTronic shifting system.
An FES track bike and an FES road time trial bike with the Sachs New Success groupset and FES Trispokes.

For years, i raped Ebay and other platforms in order to find a trace of my stuff, but nada and niente. Nothing. Not a fucking trace.





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