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What are the biggest Transportation fails?

>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNSmjNsCe8M
>>
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>>1716654
The 3 major opponents of the FED all died on Titanic
>>
>Costa Concordia
>Korean ferries
>Spanish HSR crash
>Titanic
>Hindenburg
>That plane that got shot down over Ukraine
>That freight train that leveled a town in Canada
>Basically every human-error caused train crash. It should not be this easy to crash a vehicle you cannot even steer
>>
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>>1716669
yep, that's a pretty big /n/ fail
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>>1716668
WE GAAN
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>>1716662
Whom?
>>
>>1716668
Not sure I'd put Hindenburg on the list. Around 2/3 of those aboard survived.
>>
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Challenger or Columbia, which one was worse?

>being aware of potential O-ring sealing issues and deciding to launch in record low temperatures anyway
>being aware of damaged heat plating but deciding to return and reenter the atmosphere in the craft anyway
>>
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>The Eastland, docked at the Clark Street Bridge, never left the Chicago River. Tragedy struck as the ship rolled over into the river at the wharf's edge. More than 2,500 passengers and crew members were on board that day – and 844 people lost their lives, including 22 entire families.
https://eastlanddisaster.org/
>>
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>>1716624
Boiler maintenance? What's that?
>t. crew of the Sultana
>>
>>1716924
>>being aware of damaged heat plating but deciding to return and reenter the atmosphere in the craft anyway
What would have been a good alternative to you? Quick stop at Mars for a mechanic?
>>
>>1716924
I would better be onboard Columbia than Challenger as they later found out the breathing apparatus was used, so some 5 members of the crew lived until the impact... What a shitty way to go.
>>
>>1717080
>What would have been a good alternative to you?
Nasa contemplated on sending up some supplies with the Soyuz or something that was available at a short time but then they decided against and told them to come home. It could've been done though but now we know the extent of the damage (gaping hole on leading edge, funneling plasma into the shuttle) and it is debatable if they could've done something with it. Maybe ditch the shuttle and return on Soyuz.
>>
>>1716924
challenger by far, should never have happened. Bureaucracy and politics took precedent over safety which is a damn embarrassment
>>
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Quintinshill, 1915. The UK's worst ever train crash.
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>>1717080
At least picking up the astronauts one or a couple at a time with other vehicles before a controlled burn of what even later proposals recognized as an irrecoverably damaged Columbia.
>>
>>1716924
>>being aware of potential O-ring sealing issues and deciding to launch in record low temperatures anyway
This one. It was purely political.
>>being aware of damaged heat plating but deciding to return and reenter the atmosphere in the craft anyway
It was a guaranteed LOV and LOC regardless. The crew didn't have provisions to wait it out for another vehicle. The orbiter had no provision for fully automatic return, landing, roll out, and stop. The gear extension was manual.
>>
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The Kaprun funicular disaster.
A protacted legal investigation found this was caused by the installation of a cheaper electrical heater intended for domestic use, improperly maintained. It subsequently ignited in a tunnel section and 155 died. Most on an acending train.
>>
>>1717371
Imagine suffering a fire in an inclined tunnel and walking uphill to escape the smoke.
>>
>>1717373
>>1717371
The heat was so high the wheels welded themselves to the rails and had to be plasmatorched to get the remains of the cars out of the tunnel
>>
>>1716624
cars.
/thread/
>>
>>1717080
Docking at ISS and waiting for a Soyuz capsule. Don't know how much oxygen they had on board.
>>
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The Lathen train collision
>the maglev train hit the maintenance vehicle at a speed of 162 km/h. The aerodynamic design of the Transrapid train caused it to dive under the 60-tonne maintenance vehicle, ripping off the roof of the maglev train. The wreckage continued for another 300 metres on the track before coming to a halt.
>>
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zeebrugge disaster

>popular british newspaper offers weekly travel coupons
>affordable to middle/lower class so its very popular
>the week of the disaster the coupon was for a weekend trip to Belgium
>the travel accommodations consist of a ferry departing from southern england and docking in the belgium port of Zeebrugge
>passengers get out and spend the weekend in belgium
>at the end of the weekend they return to the boat and go back home to England
>standard stuff

>since the port in Southern England is quite far South for the people who bought the tickets, a lot of them will be driving down
>so the ferry is one of those boats outfitted to accommodate passenger vehicles and quite a few passengers board this way
> that way they can also spend some of their weekend doing some driving in Belgium


>fast forward 2 days
>trip was completely sold out
>great success
>passengers have enjoyed their weekend in belgium and return to the boat to head home to england
>they drive onto the boat or otherwise return to the boat somehow
>the way the cars get onto the boat is through the back
>at the back of the boat there is a big door which opens up
>when the door is open, the back of the boat is completely wide open and exposed and the cars drive straight into the boat
>when this door is open, i really mean its exposed pic related
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>>1717497
>fast forward, preparing for takeoff, all the passengers are on now
>the ones who have driven onto the boat are out of their cars now and probably in the cafeteria having a cuppa, waiting for the boat to leave, reminsicing on their adventurous belgian weekend
>now the captain is prepared to leave, so he does what is standard procedure and lowers the boat to sea level by letting off some weight
>previously, the boat was at a higher level to allow passengers and cars to board the ferry
>so the captain lets off ballast, the boat is at sea level, and he leaves
>before he even gets out of the main port area, he realizes something is wrong
>suddenly the captain is notified
>the back door of the boat, the ones that allows the vehicles to drive onto the boat, and the one that leaves the back of the boat wide open?

>that door was left wide open
>meaning when he lowered the boat, thousands of gallons of water instantenously flooded into the boat

>thousands of gallons of water are still flooding in
>no way to close the door because none of the crew realized until it was too late
>now that section of the ship is fully underwater
>it all happened within seconds, he is still within view of the port and if you were a passenger you could physically feel the boat sinking at this point
>captain abandons ship and swims for the docks, a few passenger emergency boats manage to get away but the boat capsizes within minutes
>but doesnt entirely sink, pic related
>long rescue operation goes on, some get rescued but ultimately around 180 die of drowning or other methods
>because boat was partially tipped over/submerged, a good portion of those 180 spent the night alive but in a freezing metallic shell of darkness before dying
>tfw just wanted some belgian waffles because the ones from greggs just dont taste the same
>>
>>1717498
Fooken hell
what a mistake to make
>>
Tax policies that resulted in numerous US railroads tearing out most of their double tracked mains and secondary lines in favor of a single main track with sidings.
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>>1717498
damn that's fucked up
>>
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shipper flipper
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>>1717498
>because boat was partially tipped over/submerged, a good portion of those 180 spent the night alive but in a freezing metallic shell of darkness before dying
I love boats until i'm reminded I don't.
>>
shit like this is why i get warm-n-fuzzies thinking about rescue teams
>>
>>1717324
>The orbiter had no provision for fully automatic return, landing, roll out, and stop. The gear extension was manual.
What did he mean by this?

And no, none were big transportation fails. Just expensive and a natural part of pushing the frontier.
>>
>>1716728
QUI?
>>
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>>1716668
>>
When I grew up there were:
1990 Scandinavian Star 159 dead
1993 Jan Heweliusz 55 dead
1994 Estonia 852 dead
>>
>>1717414
Nobody died to heat though. You die by inhaling CO and other fun shit, but CO ends you very very quickly. 99% fatalities on fire are suffocating with CO. Then your body gets crisped.
>>
>>1716668
>>Basically every human-error caused train crash. It should not be this easy to crash a vehicle you cannot even steer
everyone thinks this, yet it's exactly why it's so dangerous, there's no room to correct if something goes nuts

>two planes get on collision course
>one goes up, one goes down and everything's fine (except if the captain goes nuts, ignores the TCAS and does an Überlingen, then it's harder)

>two boats come against each other
>they just steer away from each other and everything's fine

>two cars come at each other on the road
>they brake and steer, no one gets hurt

>two trains come at each other on the same track
>???
>JUMP FOR YOUR LIVES
>>
carefully reading this book cover-to-cover
>>
>>1721004
The orbiters did not include automatic landing systems like an airliner has, even though it has most of the systems needed. The landing gear deployment was left as a manual activation, because you don't want it accidentally triggered by a bug since it has no retract system. So, the orbiter was a loss even if the crew could have been rescued somehow.
Several years later, NASA produced a set of cables that a crew could install to make an automatic landing, but it was never tested on a mission
>>
>>1716924
build up to the launch is long planned ahead of time but the launch window is short
so sometimes risks are taken, same thing happens with the Bonneville salt flats
there is allot of sunk cost on the line and having to wait another 5 years for another opportunity might bankrupt your efforts
>>
>>1723641
>how to avoid huge ships
If you torpedo them they can't hit you
>>
>>1723641
Thank god I kept a copy on my ship, there's one coming right at me .

Oh my god its 300 pages AAAAIIIEEEEE
>>
>>1723641
Oh fuck oh fuck what do we do? OK no wait the book, the book, let's check the book

*flipflip*

"If you have encountered a huge ship, turn to page 112."

*flipflipflip*
>>
>>1724790
kek
its a realistic *pick your own adventure* book.
>>
>>1716924
they were both bureaucracide
bureaucrats saying "i could deal with this, or go to lunch, let them die, but at least it'll be someone _elses_ job to deal with it then"
>>
>>1717324
>>>being aware of potential O-ring sealing issues and deciding to launch in record low temperatures anyway
>This one. It was purely political.
not really
politics pushed it
but it was a bureaucrat deciding it was easier to kill people and move the work to someone else's job sheet than do the work themselves
it's like
> you have to lift your hand and make a call to stop a train
or
> do nothing, let the train crash, killing dozens, injuring hundreds, but it is someone's else's problem now
THIS IS THE FUNDAMENTAL MINDSET OF THE LEFT
>>
^ schizo post. lol
>>
>>1717373
>walking uphill
those were the ones who died, the people running upward away from the fire.
to go survive you would have to pass the burning wagon and run downward.
>>
>>1716624
>>
>>1727163
>>
>>1727166
>>
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Killed, maimed or directly lowered quality of life of billions.
>>
>>1716668
>Basically every human-error caused train crash. It should not be this easy to crash a vehicle you cannot even steer
what about when the human error is by someone who isn't the driver
>>
>>1717080
The real tragedy of Columbia is that usually a rescue wasn't possible, but this time it was:
>The CAIB determined that a rescue mission, though risky, might have been possible provided NASA management had taken action soon enough.[72][73] Normally, a rescue mission is not possible, due to the time required to prepare a shuttle for launch, and the limited consumables (power, water, air) of an orbiting shuttle. Atlantis was well along in processing for a planned March 1 launch on STS-114, and Columbia carried an unusually large quantity of consumables due to an Extended Duration Orbiter package. The CAIB determined that this would have allowed Columbia to stay in orbit until flight day 30 (February 15). NASA investigators determined that Atlantis processing could have been expedited with no skipped safety checks for a February 10 launch. Hence, if nothing went wrong, there was a five-day overlap for a possible rescue.
>>
>>1717476

>The aerodynamic design of the Transrapid train caused it to dive under the 60-tonne maintenance vehicle, ripping off the roof of the maglev train. The wreckage continued for another 300 metres on the track before coming to a halt.

Holy. Shit.
>>
>>1717449
Play some ksp
>>
>>1727665
because of this we do not have maglev trains in Germany.
1, One train got sold to china, hehe guess who makes maglevs nowadays.
>>
>>1716668
Gustloff
Steuben
Goya
>>
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>>1716712
>>1721074
Probably my favourite air disaster. Van Zanten did nothing wrong, the mad lad just wanted an on time departure.
>>
>>1726422
lmao. Corporate mindset.
>>
Capitalism has much blood on its hands.
>>
>>1717371
What a fucking rabbit hole. The Wikipedia article was longer than I anticipated.
>>
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>>1716624
You mean disasters or just shit that was developed andput into serivce, but never worked or was viable?
In the later case, Tu-144 is the king.
>>
>>1717498
>>1717497
>Herald of Free Enterprise
LMAO fitting name.
>>
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>river liner built in 1955, doing cruises in 2010
>under two subarendators, the later didn't even had a license for carrying passengers
>tickets to the cruises sold by yet another company, passengers aren't even being insured
>neither is the ship actually
>"refitted" with cheap plastic windows that don't open wide enough
>also no conditioning system inside so for fresh air old illuminators are kept open
>leaves Kazan with already dead left motor, on one engine of two, already listing about 4 degrees
>about 200 people on board
>in bad weather and storm, during making portside turn gets hit by wind, lists 9 degrees
>water flows inside through the illuminators
>in a couple of minutes ship takes about 175 tons of water
>capsizes and sunks in literal seconds, people are trapped inside
But wait, it gets worse.
>some people who were lucky enough to be on top desks scramble the washed away
>not one, but two ships pass them by like nothing happened (captains get trial later)
122 dead, 79 rescued
>>
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>>1723641
>>
>>1730143
Jacob “Get to the part where we depart” van Zanten
>>
>>1716668
Don't forget the mommy of them all 911 and it's kinda better sequel the Miracle on the Hudson/Sully
>>
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>>1730514
>t.
>>
43 people crushed in a cable car because a military airplane cut the cable
22 years later the same thing happened in the same place with 20 dead
>>
>>1733027
>n-no you can't just point out flaws within my kike system that I follow religiously
>>
>>
MS Estonia
>Cruiseferry
>Launched on 26 April 1980
>Capsized and sank on 28 September 1994 on Estline's Tallinn-Stockholm route.
>Wreck lies at a depth of 80 meters.
>Suspicion of an explosion.
>Of the 989 on board, 138 were rescued, one of whom died later in hospital.
>Eleven crew members including captain Avo Piht are rescued but then disappear.
>Swedish government took immediate control of all rescue operations.
>Decide not to try and recover the bodies of the 800 stuck on board.
>Relatives of the deceased hire professional salvage firms to organize the recovery of bodies.
>Swedish Navy harasses the rescuers, threatens to ram the diving boat.
>Swedish government later decides to cover the wreck with concrete.
>>
>>1727168
This is the one.
>>
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>>1723641
Totally overrated book.
>>
>>1734481
either that or a collision with a nato submarine. the most suspicious part was said government officials making a law that absolved them of any wrongdoing in this case.
>>
>>1734481
Crazy





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