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I don't think you'll find anything dumber than Thessaloniki subway: it starts at railway station which is also a terminus of commuter rail.
The only sane solution is to extend commuter rail service via the same route and upgrade commuter rail to Tokyo/Keihanshin standard.
>>
The Honolulu rail.
>>
Post soviet romania when they were building their underground subway

And for some reason the wife of the dictator thought that it was a stupid idea to have a train station in the centre of the city where the university was. She thought that students were getting fat and that they should have to walk a kilometre from the nearest train station

The engineers built the station in absolute secret pretending it was storage, but the stattion today is way too small because they couldn’t build it properly
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>>1702308
fpbp
>>
Perhaps not the dumbest in intent, but absolutely the most useless American transit project in practice.

It was meant to be the central hub for a regional transit network in Detroit, but absolutely none of the spoke lines panned out. They decided to just build it anyway, so the city and state pay $12 million a year for this trash to go around in a 3 mile loop.
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>>1702243
>Originally part of a multi-line project that extends across the city to fill necessary transit gaps
>Shortened to a single line along a corridor covered by a bus route
>Line terminates near Union Station but requires riders to exit the station and walk to the back of the building to board
>Came in over budget and has to remain free to compete with Metrobus service
>Unlike bus, it can't move around parked cars which are a frequent problem along this area of the city
>Stuck in traffic unlike Metro options

I'm usually one of those guys that advocates for rail over the bus, but the DC Streetcar was so poorly done and underdelivers that they really should've just built a bus lane or something else. The only benefit is that an already gentrifying area of the city gentrified somewhat faster.
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>>1702381
In a somewhat rational world, there would be talks about extending it so it would have better coverage outside the downtown. However, it costs the city and state more money to operate it than not and Detroit's a city still losing people to the suburbs.

Out of all the cities that really fucked itself by ditching it's old rail networks and never building a new one, Detroit really did fuck themselves on that one.
>>
Dublin's tram service. €1000 for a year ticket
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>>1702412

DC Streetcar is so funny, it's like they didn't even know what a tram is
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>>1702523
Obama Street cars were all a big grift.
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This is the dumbest: a 6km national rail single track ring line that barely touches the city center with one station and completely ignores the central station.
They're building it because half of it was a freight line to the port that got converted to passenger services in the 90's and they really wanted to expand it but the new section is useful to no fucking one. It also won't have through service to the north-south line that goes to the central station that is just south of the historical city centre.
>>
>>1702381
>>1702417

People movers were almost exclusively paid for by the feds when they got put up in the 70s and 80s. It's not like Detroit is the only city that has one. There is a reason it was never expanded and that is because it fucking sucks no matter what it's coverage looks like.
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https://www.looptrolley.com/

I used to live a short walk from this. I saw it run like 3 times.
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>>1702507
yeah that is pretty crazy if it's only for the tram, a 1 zone monthly pass in vancouver is pretty expensive at 100 CAD but still way less than that
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>>1702570
>Yellow line commits interlining with dark blue line

The absolute state of North American transit planning, same shit with the DC Metro Yellow line.
>>
>>1702577
and keep in mind vancouver is one of the better planned for transit in most of NA, I've heard from some people that MBTA is the best, maybe NYC
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>>1702577
strangest complaint I've read about any transit system
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>>1702577
Why is that bad
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>>1702567
Long story short it was sold as a transit project when the capabilities of the trolley are terribly outdated in comparison to modern trams, and is really just a tourist attraction that (slowly) links a popular dining/shopping street to a history museum and the northern end of Forest Park. It's of no use to commuters or residents, and they actually restricted car/bike access in the process of rebuilding the street.
And this isn't even including that it is in one of the few parts of St. Louis that already has non-bus metro coverage, including two light station lines that intersect with the trolley.
It was really only sold as a transit project to get the funding and approval required to build it.

If they had built something like this in Forest Park, I could actually see it getting use, since it is a large park with great museums, features, not too much parking, and already has dedicated roads around the greenery.

https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2018/3/27/when-your-transit-isnt-actually-meant-to-be-transit
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>>1702562
Feds paid for the construction but the city and state have been on the hook since, which is the problem.

>It's not like Detroit is the only city that has one.

It's not exactly widespread either, I'm fairly certain Miami and Jacksonville were the only other two cities dumb enough to hop on the UMTA people mover program.
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>>1702562
>There is a reason it was never expanded and that is because it fucking sucks no matter what it's coverage looks like.
People movers in general?
While I guess they are generally best served for airports and other areas involving a small, fixed circuit, I used to commute on the Brown Line in Taipei and never had an issue with it. It was slower than the non-automated lines, but for something which runs a good 15 miles on tires and was originally made in 1996, I was surprised at how well it measured up, and was a smoother ride by far.

Never tried the Detroit mover, but I assume the two biggest differences would be even a more built-out mover not being a convenient route for most commuters over cars (same with light rail, though that is cheaper and faster), and simple lack political will in Detroit.
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>>1702243
Former Parisian here.

Gotta be the T3 ringroad tram

Paris innermost non-highwaylike ringroad was becoming oversaturated both transport and car wise and things became pretty hectic so something had to be done. The retards in charge of the city decided it was time to build a tramway line on the ringroad's entirety as a "ecological" and "progressive" move.

The thing is, not even 50meters from the ring road stands pic related(thic black circle line), which is a heavy rail, state owned and disused circle line connected to the wider suburban railway network which has been sitting unused for decades. It cost next to nothing to retrofit the line. Worse still, bit by bit they are removing the rails, selling some of the land to be built over or turning these into parks wand walkways DESPITE THE FUCKING UNFINISHED TRAM LINE NEXT TO IT ALREADY BEING OVERSATURATED.

It's been mind numbingly painful to pass through this abandonned gem everyday while watching the tram line being built next to it. And nothing's being done despite groups lobbying to reuse the line.
>>
That retarded cable car boris built over the Thames.
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>>1703361

Rode it a few times, was confy, also didn't undertant the point of its existence. Like if it connected on the right DLR line at least you could say it was marginally useful (also the name AirLine would make a bit of a sense.
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Las Colinas APT in Irving, Texas
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>>1702243
Porto's metro has been a cluster fuck
>only 2 lines in the city, 5 to the suburbs, where noone uses them
>there are no plans to unite the 2 lines in the city, making the metro actually more useful than the bus, since you always have to go downtown to change lines
>future plans include irrelevant line in the city centre where there are already good metro connection, suburb extension, and new suburb line
>the interchange station should only have 1 floor where both lines would cross at, but they decided to make the metro come up and go down again, do there's 3 floors, with a line in the top one and another at the bottom one (there's another station where they decided to have the line pop up only for no reason other than to make it harder to access the other platform)
>in the surface parts, there are areas where walking is just as fast as the metro, since theres a 20km top speed
>most surface stations are in open fields, with no one living in a 1km radius
>the uni campus stations are nowhere near the uni campus (in one of the campuses, in the other there are no lines nor is there a plan for them)
>2 train lines were destroyed for this, 1 of them reconverted to something much much slower and with far more stops in the open fields slower, and the other still without plans (thankfully them fucking this one up was a good thing)
its honestly baffling how much they keep fucking up
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>>1703579
picture with some explanation
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Milan metro/s-bahn network will take decades to patch, probably will never be completely fixed.

>no direct s-bahn connection between Garibaldi (regional commuter) and Centrale (long-range), the two busiest railway stations of northern Italy, passengers are forced to take the subway between them
>no direct connection of any kind between Linate airport and Rogoredo station, the biggest train station of the southern quadrant and mandatory stop for all trains coming from the south of Lombardy and Emilia where 7 million people live
>no interaction of any kind between s-bahn and Malpensa airport, Italy 2nd biggest airport can only be reached with a change in downtown Milan
>connections between line 3 and 4 at Missori-Politecnico is an outdoor walk in a fucking cold rainy city
>generally speaking, subway lines carefully avoid train stations whenever possible
>proposed circle line from Rho fiera specifically designed to fix this clusterfuck will actually be a half loop ending in the middle of nowhere in S. Cristoforo
>>
I present to you the Milwaukee "Hop".
The city got a nice grant to build a better public transportation system than their bus system. Naturally the it was decided that a trolley/streetcar is the best balance of being not-too-expensive and being a big, impressive thing for the city. Contrasted to literally any other light rail system, it holds no separation from the rest of traffic at any point in its 2.1 mile loop which connects one side of downtown to the other side of downtown. It has the advantages of running on overhead 750VDC electric lines, and requiring the city to add rail to their streets, all while making sure local traffic stays the course of our streets' speed limits. With regular service taking half an hour to go about 2 miles, contrasted with walking the same distance in about the same time, what's not to like?
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>>1704838
Why does this seem so common? At this point federal transit grants should come with a "don't build a retarded mile long trolley line for nostalgia" stipulation.
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>>1704850
This confuses the average murrican libtard mayor
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>>1704850
Because dumb ass urbanists jerk off over old streetcars and believe they were ripped away by a george koch conspiracy and not that they died because they were just as pointless as these things
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>>1705000
trips confirm
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>>1705000
streetcars are not pointless, many cities don't have the space for light rail right of way and subways are super expensive, for it to work, streets that trolleys go on need to either have no cars allowed or cars must yield to trams and or trams have signals that cars must stop for when they go through
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>>1704850
The funding grants were usually only enough for a short starter line, essentially a demo, with the idea that they would kickstart the construction of larger systems. Problem is, there hasn't been much funding, and a short mile-or-two-long line or loop isn't as useful as an actual network, so the stumps that were actually built struggle to get the support needed to grow to a useful size.
>>
The US interstate system
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>>1702353
Are all /n/iggers people who blindly repeat what they see in a youtube video from two channels?
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>>1705261
NUMTOT zoomers who can't think for themselves love to come here and regurgitate other people's opinios
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>>1705155
I thought that outside of cities the interstates were supposed to be a great system.
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>>1705349
It was, and is. Bulldozing through downtowns was bad, but overall the interstate system is one of the greatest infrastructure projects ever.
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>>1705353
Even going through downtown is OK. It's that everything changed around driving.

Japan is perfect because it's somehow ok to drive in, good walking neighborhoods, and excellent mass transit.
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>>1702243
The Milwaukee streetcar, without a doubt.

>2 mile loop
>shared traffic, zero signal priority
>slower and less adaptable than a bus
>gets stuck any time someone parks too close to the tracks
>goes nowhere anyone needs to go
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>>1705427
Kek didn’t see >>1704838
>>
Atlanta Streetcar
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>>1705147
Plus the politizing of it. Cincinnati's street car project had everybody up in arms about the funding for at least two years, and now it's a short loop from the fancy farmers market to the bars downtown and only has 2-3 cars running at any given time.

There's just so much hate here in the mid-west for anything that encroaches on the car's territory.
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>>1705597
>There's just so much hate here in the mid-west for anything that encroaches on the car's territory.
Yeah couldn't be that everyone knew ahead of time what a waste of money it would be and then once it gets rammed through and built, ends up being exactly the waste of money everyone knew it would be
>>
>>1705622
>transit gets proposed
>politically roadblock as much funding as you possibly can until only a completely neutered version of the original can be built
>use neutered version as proof that all transit is a waste of money to block future development

wow transitlibs BTFO
>>
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Looking at this thread, anons might think that stupid ideas are exclusive to burger cities with no prior experience. To that I present Warsaw
>new tram line to Gocław
>red is how it will go
>to get on the other side of the river trams will go to the busiest part of the network that is already over capacity
>the Poniatowski bridge has a tram speed limit
>city cheaped out on the modernisation and trams now make more noise than in the last forty years so locals flooded the hall with complaints
>blue is how it should go
>that stretch sees 3-4 filled bendy buses/minute in rush hour
>the bridge was designed to let tanks from a nearby base to cross the river, so it will support a bunch of trams easily
Yes, the bit for getting off the carriageway at Plac na Rozdrożu would be tricky and expensive, but that's the cost of building good public transit.
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>>1705627
No, this is what happens: >>1705147
>>
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Correct me if I'm wrong but is there any transportation project America is known for? I mean, a mass transit system that has impressed the world and made them try to imitate? Has there been any?
From my recollection, there is none. Strange being one of the biggest and most populated countries in the world. It's almost like those sort of things are not allowed there... (((who))) could be at blame?
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>>1705761
The interstate system
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>>1705791
Which is the largest public works project in world history btw
>>
>>1705427
It's okay, fellow Milwaukeean. At least we have a bike highway (Oak Leaf Trail) through the East Side.
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>>1705761
building things is a disaster in the US, but for some reason it's only hard when it's new track for HSR or something, but if a highway needs expanding they will tear down hundreds of buildings in it's path easily.
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>>1705800
It is frustrating to see that the cost to build an HSR line (without electric) is really only about the cost of widening a freeway another two lanes in each direction. Doubly frustrating when realizing that it would probably make traffic move more effectively along the same route.
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>>1702582
The MBTA is terrible. The Red Line ends at Alewife for no reason other than rampant NIMBYism, the loop planned in the 1940s was never built, everything possible was done to sabotage connecting the blue line with the red line, and the green line, apart from the D, is an antiquated mess which should be turned into hybrid busways.
It's nice to fantasize about modernizing things, but they can't even get basic shit off the ground like using the BU bridge to let the B line connect to the red line over near Kendall/MIT so you don't waste time stopping for BU or grinding slowly through the 130-year old subway tunnels.
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>>1705597
the cinci line would have much better ridership if they sent it about a mile north to a large university with a lot of car-less students
i swear, it's like these systems are designed to fail
robert moses might have advocated for (gimped) transit if he realized how useful it could be to argue against transit
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>>1705017
You can just use a bus then
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>>1705881
if the busses are trolleybusses (electric is a good reason a tram is better) and cars similarly have to get out of their way or they have their own streets yes.
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my former city's tram "network": originally it was an interurban line between two cities that joined together since, so it has one veeeery long line, and a two stop branch to the former steel mill
the new leftist city council wants to cut costs on everything so they stopped running line 2 during covid and they "forgot" to reopen it; instead, the line no. 1 got a shorter sister line 1A, but that line stops before the western housing estates (at Diósgyőri Gimnázium, see map) and the part that it serves between the branch line junction and its terminus is just a bunch of slums with no real chance that they'll pay for the ride at all, yet the city still has to keep up the stops that are not served anymore
so the politicians managed to actually raise costs with a cost-saving measure, bunch of idiots, i'm glad i don't live there anymore
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>>1703474
Thanks for posting this. It absolutely is the single dumbest transportation project in America. Also, since it serves no one, doesn't have useful stops, and is underfunded, politicians in Texas continue to point to its failure as a way to attack saner projects, saying they will end up like this.
>>
>>1705761
Chicago L is a great system, but Dems and Unions are making it worse every year. Unironically, if you view all the airports in the United States as a transportation project, the US leads the world. Not in having pretty airports, China has us beat, but in the requisite physical infrastructure and technical behind-the-scenes stuff to support so much air travel, from ATC to the NTSB, the USA excels.
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>>1705261
then in your term, whats the dumbest transportation project you ever know about?
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>>1702243
Dubai Palm Monorails that connecting suburban house and mall.
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>>1706013
Probably British Rail
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>>1705000
I can sense the fear from you that you couldn't easily parking lot anymore, cagers.
>>
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>>1706023
Yeah actually privatisation was fucking dumb tbf
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Warsaw third metro line (green thick like) is even dumber than the tram line >>1705633
>the route study had conditions "find me the best route between Stadion and Gocław - no, you can't pick any other tnd stationthat actually makes more sense
>slower than a tram and more expensive
>bendy
>the politicians wont give up on it because they already spent millions on 2nd platform at Stadion
Stadion itself is terribly designed
>the 3rd line ends there - no you can't ride it directly west
>can't change lines on the platform either - have to go up and down some stairs
also the walkway between two existing lines ets overcrowded in rush hours even with just line 1 and a half of line 2. so of course they decided to dump even more people in the same junction
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compare this to the commie plans
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>>1702308
Honolulu needs it, but the state is so incompetent they can't get anything finished in a reasonable amount of time.
It should be a big asset to the island once it's eventually complete.
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>>1703344
who owns the railway?
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>>1706479
>the politicians wont give up on it because they already spent millions on 2nd platform at Stadion
Story?
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>>1705792
what about the chinese high speed rail
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>>1706499
station walkthrough: https://youtu.be/sAi_bwcOxG4?t=282 at 4:40
Back in the 2000s when the 2rd line was getting designed, it was supposed to be split-ended see pic rel
But this was mostly an accounting trick in order to extract more European funds because if it was separate they wouldn't get them
Eventually they scrapped the split-end idea but they kept the plans similar, and when building the 2nd line 2010-2014 they made 2nd platform on Stadion Narodowy station
which still stands empty and unused to this day and politicians felt forced to start 3rd line from there no matter what rather than admit they wasted money
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>>1706500
A much more apt comparison would be China’s expressway system, which started construction in 1988 after seeing the success of America’s interstate system economically. Just like America’s interstate system, it rocketed China into superpower status.
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>>1706505
>it rocketed China into superpower status.
Turbo delusion.
Or cagenigger propaganda.
>>
>>1706479
looks like if some politician got envious to Metro 8 in Paris
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>>1706507
Dude, it was absolutely vital to China’s economic growth just like it was in the US. Over 80% of all goods shipped within China are shipped by truck.
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>>1706509
quick rundown?
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>>1706510
> it was absolutely vital to China’s economic growth
...and nothing else, sure.

> just like it was in the US
Do you imply that US had no economic growth before mass cagiefication?

>Over 80% of all goods shipped within China are shipped by truck.
I have no idea where did you get that bullshit, but chinese government statistics website says that 3000 billion t-km were made by rail, 6000 billion t-km by highway trucks and 10000 billion by water transport.
Source: https://data.stats.gov.cn/english/tablequery.htm?code=AC0L
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>>1706514
same curvy and useless shit
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>>1706516
Oh, so the train pulls right up to the store and they dump everything in? The boat pulls right up to the restaurant and drops off ingredients? It goes onto a truck, always. Use your brain.

The US interstate system had huge positive effects for the country and gave its economy the modern infrastructure to turn it into the world’s superpower. That’s precisely why 30 years later China copied the US and almost immediately rocketed to superpower status once businesses had access to reliable supply chains and intercity commerce was made magnitudes easier.

China LITERALLY has more highways than the US.
>>
The Chinese have an ancient saying, 要想富先修路

>if you want to get rich, build a road.
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>>1706517

Paris Metro is cute. It's badically just a bunch of underground trams but it's sweet noetheless.
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>>1706523
>Oh, so the train pulls right up to the store and they dump everything in? The boat pulls right up to the restaurant and drops off ingredients? It goes onto a truck, always. Use your brain.
and guess the distances railhead-to-destination trips take, retard
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>>1706516
>Source: https://data.stats.gov.cn/english/tablequery.htm?code=AC0L

Also you literal fucking retard, look at your source, it literally proves me right.

Total Freight traffic:
>4,735,564 10,000 tons

Railways:
>445,761

Highways:
>3,426,413

Waterways:
>761,630

Next time read what you're citing so you don't embarrass yourself.
>>
>>1706523
> Oh, so the train pulls right up to the store and they dump everything in? The boat pulls right up to the restaurant and drops off ingredients?
Derailment.
My questions were:
>Do you imply that US had no economic growth before mass cagiefication?
>Were highways the only thing that made China powerful?

>The US interstate system had huge positive effects for the country and gave its economy the modern infrastructure to turn it into the world’s superpower.
Advertisement.

>That’s precisely why 30 years later China copied the US and almost immediately rocketed to superpower status once businesses had access to reliable supply chains and intercity commerce was made magnitudes easier.
Wishful thinking.

>>1706543
Even better, that shows that trucks are used for much smaller distances than trains and water transport.
On average, 1 ton of freight travels 175km by truck, 681km by train and 1383km by water.
Does average 175km trip justify large cross-country highway system?
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>>1703221
Every time the delmar loop comes up in the news it’s disappointing
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>>1706548
So why do you think that China built a system of Expressways larger than that of the US and are continuing to dump billions into expanding it further? Genuinely, why do you think they’re doing that?
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>>1706552
>So why do you think that China built a system of Expressways larger than that of the US and are continuing to dump billions into expanding it further?
Cargo cult.
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>>1706523
> gave its economy the modern infrastructure to turn it into the world’s superpower.
The Interstate Act was passed in 1956. The US was already a superpower by that point. The interstate was a product of wealth, not its cause, which is part of why the 60s onward are a sort of twilight of America as an unrivaled industrial colossus.
>China copied the US
China didn't reduce its passenger rail network to rump status. Indeed, its freight/rail network is still expanding.
>>
>>1705791
Was directly and deliberately inspired by the German autobahn. And outside of size (which is caused by the size and dispersion of the US population and land mass rather than any decisions or engineering brilliance), it's not even that impressive in international comparison.
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I really like trains and think they're very effective, but I have to wonder why so much stuff is transported by truck and I'm not going to buy into some conspiracy or start thinking that everyone else is retarded when I don't know too much myself. So I'm left with the question, what's with road transport that's so much better? Is the fact that rail transport is less flexible really that much of an issue when most logistics chains will probably settle into a pattern at a large enough scale?
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>>1706558
Actually, Europe’s intercountry highway system, the E roads, were designed to mimic the successful US interstate system.

https://web.archive.org/web/20120303113014/http://europe.aaroads.com/eroads/index.htm

>The system was originally discussed in the 1950s Marshall Plan era as something akin to the US Interstate system.
>>
>>1706560
Last mile problem
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>>1706549
The Delmar Loop is OK for what it is - one of the streets in STL with a selection of good-to-great restaurants, some novel businesses, and some art/media presence. It's got about the same issue with homeless and hooliganism as many other hangout hotspots of the city.
Also the University City government buildings on the west end of it are pretty neat.

The main issue with perception is that it's sold as much more than that. It was at one time, until the 60s, but that no longer really holds true. The streetcar is quite symbolic of that past image vs. present. There's plenty of places in other neighborhoods that offer similar or better experiences depending on what you're looking for, and also have less issues with crime.

Keep in mind I only went to those kind of places to have a good meal by myself or with others, so if the restaurants are good that pretty much checks out for me.
>>
>>1706560
>Is the fact that rail transport is less flexible really that much of an issue when most logistics chains will probably settle into a pattern at a large enough scale?
While those chains will settle into a pattern, the particular pattern varies on how individuals, businesses, government etc. realize a system that people participate and support in.
And in much of the world, >>1706562 is a problem because the pattern that emerged was one of (relatively) low population density spread across a large area. In that kind of system, road transport is both more cost-effective and efficient than rail transport. However, the pattern itself is costly and inefficient relative to a system where the propagated pattern is dense population density built-up over small distances.

For most of the USA, people are dependent on road systems to maintain their settled pattern. The pattern would have to change for rail to become viable, yet alone competitive.
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>>1706582
Density doesn’t even matter. Even if the shop is across the street from the rail yard, the goods still need to get to the shop. The train isn’t gonna move them across the street.
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>>1706583
Yes, and that's where you use roads to resolve that last-mile problem.
But the viability of using the rail as the primary means to bring the goods in at points before the last mile is very, very dependent on density. Consider how shipping containers are transported both on rail and by truck dependent on the logistics of shipping.

Also rail can be viable for the entire trip if transporting large amounts of something from one point to another with enough regularity to justify creating the rail connections. There's a coal mine near me that had a rail line installed 2 years ago for that purpose, and until recently there was a coal power plant near me that linked onto the same line (not sure of the full process for coal). And this principal is also the main determinant of whether rail transport is viable at all, with bikes/car/walk commute at the last mile.
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>>1703474
That’s… certainly something
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>>1706561
But they didn't actually build it as such, the next line in your link being
>Pared down and changed from a motorway system to simply route designations
i.e. pre-existing routes were simply given numbers which were meant to correspond to their positions in a pan-European highway scheme.
Even in the prior sentence, 'akin' would be in the "cross-continental controlled-access road network connecting all relevant population centers" sense, rather than "the Interstate, but inter-country." After all, the US Interstate system was still in the early stages of construction in the 1950s, and wouldn't be completed for several more decades.
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>>1703474
>Area Personal Transit
What does that even mean
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>>1705427
>>1704838
As if it wasn't bad enough, here's what the St. Paul leg looks like when crossing the Milwaukee River.
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>>1705999
>fund something retarded to use as proof you should never do something smart

I wish politicians and businessmen could think further than the tip of their own nose when it comes to long-term projects and goals. Projects that take years are left in the hands of those who can barely think in months, and who rarely consider needs beyond their own continued stay in power.
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>>1705597
ohio in general is trash in all transit departments, naturally the ones that are public will be even worse.
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>>1706874
>I wish politicians and businessmen could think further than the tip of their own nose when it comes to long-term projects and goals.
They usually only think as far as the next election. That's not totally dumb, but it's very myopic (especially if there's a 2 year electoral cycle).
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>>1706955
I mean that's kind of their job, they can't do too many things the public wouldn't like and the public usually does not really know too much about long-term infrastracture planning.
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>>1705761
I would be very afraid of slipping on those steps that come far out of the water, especially since you're likely already wet and thus prone to slipping.

As for transport, the DC Metro was ironically hailed as a great achievement when it was first built. It just is total shit now. And as other anons have said, america is incredible when it comes to private transport. A big part of that is due to the conscious decision to argue that private transport should be the focus point of the country pretty much as soon as WWII was over, and inordinate amounts of time, money, and resources was thrown at achieving this goal. Same can be said for air travel and for the rail development of the 18th century.
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>>1706955
>>1706956
Yes, I know. Just frustrating
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>>1706504
I second the Warsaw 3rd line as a fuckup.

Also the Swietokrzyska layout is a fuckup, how the hell someone designed such narrow corridors for the busiest interchange in 21st century?
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File: 3802-Mercedes-Sprinters.jpg (1.5 MB, 3202x1907)
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our public transport is far ahead of other countries, especially north-american countries, but provincial transport is a mess
>no rail connections
>only option is a bus
>bus is only scheduled a few times per day
>bus is entirely staffed by unpaid volunteers
>volunteers arent licenced to drive buses
>hence capacity is limited to 8 passengers
>this causes bus drivers to ignore passengers at bus stops
>bus drivers still manage to be late, so you often miss connecting transport
now, you might think this is all because of low demand, except these buses are always packed. way beyond the limit of 8 passengers.
the only reason this is the way it is, is because the provincial governments are too cheap to provide good public transport. this leaves national subsidies exclusive to a few private companies.
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>>1707149
i forgot to add, that if you need to go beyond your province, there are often no bus routes. you need to use national rail and often take massive detours
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>>1702507
That meme's expired, both luas lines intersect each other now.
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>>1706480
>1994
>communist

wut?
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>>1707342
you know that line 1 was designed 1982 and only completed in 2008 according to original "commie plans"
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the nazi 10 metre gauge railways
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287 KB JPG
>lets build an oversized F-104 with a passenger cabin and slap some off the shelf DC-10 engines on it
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>>1706491
honolulu bus takes like <2 hours to go from north shore to waikiki, wtf do they need a rail for? it's one of the easiest places to get around on foot.
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>>1708037
This was a pretty obvious "startup" scam
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>>1702243
Bur khalifa poop transport system
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>>1708195

Aerion actually managed to get surprisingly far with having a contract for GE for specially designed supercruise engines, contracts for the sourcing of fuselage and avionics components, and on top of all that they had 20 firm preorders valued at $1.5 billion.

They got VERY close to getting their prototype built. Boeing should have bought them when they ran out of funds, particularly because they already had a partnership with Aerion.
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>>1708196
Cringe, go back to r*ddit
That building is hooked up to the sewer system and has been for years.
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Any high speed rail project that doesn't create oppurtunities in smaller communities along the way.
Surely it's worth it to put a 3rd track for normal speed regional transit? Would be easier for communities to accept the entire deal if they got something out of it





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