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Why aren't guided busways more popular?
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>>1635089
because there are better solutions 99% of the time
if there is a long route that will be segregated then tram is better
if there is only short sections the outlay for guided buses and rails doesnt make sense, the money is better spent standard bus priority or better buses
tbf that even applies to longer segregated routes like transjakarta system
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They're too expensive to build. A normal busway, although unguided, is much cheaper.
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>>1635089
Because they're idiotic. What's the point in constructing expensive to build singular use infrastructure like that when you could have trams? Trams can be integrated into any road network and supplemented with regular bus lines.

These shitty things need their own space to accomplish less
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>>1635098
>if there is a long route that will be segregated then tram is better
>>1635119
>when you could have trams

Trams are a major cost item, both up front and in the long run. Many transit agencies can't afford them. The idea of guided busways was to get tram-like service without the cost, but guided busways in practice haven't been cheap enough to gain much acceptance.

I would argue a busway offer more flexibility than a tram if it can be used as a trunk line to/from an urban core. A bus can run a selected route on surface streets in the suburbs to attract ridership, then continue uninterrupted into the city (or a transit station) where its route would terminate.
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>>1635119
Guided busways use prefab block construction. It's significantly cheaper than a tram/rail network. Buses cost 1/10th that of a tram.
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Because trolleybuses are cheaper, lower emissions, and don't consume a traffic lane.
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>>1635089
Dynamic lanes are the future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dl0Q2bDnBUc
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>>1635264
And dynamic traffic lights:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng8Az2agkJI
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>>1635266
I KNEW THERE WAS SOMEONE CONTROLLING THE LIGHTS
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>>1635089
combines all disadvantages of buses and streetcars
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>>1635089
Ah yes, the 'ol Golden Grove to airport bus, a gauranteed way to see a hobo's balls at least once a week.
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>>1635089
Why have the bus be guided? Makes more sense to slap down just the tarmac and call it a day
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>>1635353
So they won't inevitably end up being converted into normal roads for all traffic due to political pressure
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>>1635353
Guided vehicles have a narrower loading gauge than steered buses that swerve sideways.
The first system in Essen was running in a tram tunnel and the one in Cambridge uses a former rail ROW with brit-sized bridges.
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There was at least one transit system that had a guided busway and tram tracks in the same ROW
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>>1635466
At least this is a smart way to reuse tracks.
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>>1635089
Buses are uncomfortable, as a result, only the poor and desperate will ride them. With rail you have a quiet comfy ride so that appeals to a larger base. If the only option is some shitt loud bus, then everyone will just try to get a car. Look what happened to american cities when they replaced streetcars with buses... when you just go for "its cheap!!" You sacrifice ridership
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>>1635511
It's too expensive to build extensive tram networks now anon. It's about $100,000,000 per mile for tram track in the US. A bus that has limited stops along its own busway is more appealing than a bus that has to use the same roads as everyone else (and thus get stuck at the same lights and sit in the same traffic as everyone else).
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>>1635524
We need to deregulate and figure out how to build rail at a reasonable cost like Europe or Japan. Until then, im keeping my car
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>>1635511
In NYC the buses are nicer than rail, but slower. I know a bunch of rich coworkers who commute via bus.
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>>1635511
You must have some shit buses.
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>>1635217
That's literally got all the negatives of both a tram and a guided busway and none of the positives of either. It's literally a "worst of both worlds" approach - just use a battery bus if you are so worried about the environment, or euro6 diesel.
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>>1635300
In Japan, it's a guy sitting literally at the side of the crossing doing it sometimes.
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I've never been on a guided bus line
is it still as uncomfortably shaky and impossible to stand without holding on?
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This one is in Nagoya it's so over built, whole line is elevated with metro size stations and they use small buses so the capacity is low what's even the point.
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>>1635527
They even reuse the street for the ballastless tracks instead of wasting tax money in a freemason ritual.
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>>1635089
The point of a bus compared to like a tram is that it can go anywhere and new routes can be implemented for incredibly cheap infrastructure-wise. This idea pretty much gets rid of that advantage and makes it about as expensive to construct as a diesel commuter rail line considering you have to acquire a right of way and build a concrete guideway.
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>>1635089
The city of Essen was pretty big on testing the system in the 80s. They built sections of different lengths in various areas ranging from just a few hundred meter long ones on inner city streets to multiple kilometers on converted former tram lines in the middle of a highway. They even introduced a line that was partial underground which got served with duo busses (diesel and electric as trolleys) as seen in >>1635466.

In the end the system proofed to be unsuitable for the densely populated area. For services on busy sections, even articulated busses are way too small. Aforementioned converted tram line on the highway is being served every 5 minutes nowadays, which makes service very uneconomical. Maintenance is quite expensive too since spare parts are rare. In suburb areas guided bus lines tend to be rather unnecessary. The amount of traffic doesn't justify the costs that come with the system.

Also said underground line got discontinued roughly after just 4 years due to its low reliability.

Today only the highway line remains - and only due to current lack of alternatives. The responsible company Ruhrbahn would like to revert it back into a tramline, but it's quite difficult since regulations for electric rail lines in the middle of highways have been tightened over the years. All other line sections got closed and demolished over the years.
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>>1635466
>>1635089

For some time there was also a one-way section in Mannheim, where busses used the track bed to circumvent a street section that is very prone to traffic jams, but it also got discontinued in 2005. Pic related.

Looking at the responsible company for the local service also highlights another problem, which is simply the width of busses. Both systems in Essen and Mannheim exclusively used busses built by mercedes. With the replacement of the bus generation at that time and introduction of gen 1 MB Citaros, they had to adjust the tracks since the new bus generation was wider than the predecessing one based on the MB O405 plattform, which is also the reason why Mannheim gave up their track section. Essen however went through the hassle of adjusting all remaining lines for the new busses at that time.
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>>1636561
>>1636566

Pic related is the former tram line in question. The MB Citaros you see recently got replaced by new C2 ones.
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>>1636569
Why are G*rms so autistic?
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>>1635539
>In NYC the buses are nicer than rail
I would be shocked if the buses were infested by rats, it's not hard to be "nicer" than the NY subway





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