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Was he retarded? Why would he trade his kingdom for one single horse?
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>>21029865
who?
>>
>>21029883
Dick 3
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>>21029865
Because he was a discerning equestrian. It is recalling his first last words, the end of Act I Scene 1

>The which will I-not all so much for love
>As for another secret close intent
>By marrying her which I must reach unto.
>But yet I run before my horse to market.
>Clarence still breathes; Edward still lives and reigns;
>When they are gone, then must I count my gains

He knows that he will not be whole without a horse to run to market with. Its a natural feeling for some men, especially the ones that grew up around horses like Richard would have. For a townsman that would have seemed silly.
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>>21029865
One of my law professors used this as an example of an unenforceable contract. No common man could expect to receive an entire kingdom for a mere horse.
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>>21030063
I'd trade my horse for a kingdom.
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>>21030063
It's not an unenforceable contract. There is no contract. It is mere puffery.

t. anglo lawfag
>>
>>21029865
who?



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