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File: oh geez.jpg (85 KB, 804x802)
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Is there any way to mention Ulysses, or even James Joyce in general, without coming off as some try-hard? Any time I mention him or his books in real life it's met with "oh lah-de-dah" or a similar kind of defensiveness, no matter the tone in which I present it.
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>>15745658
sounds like a you problem
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You may be talking to the wrong crowd.
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>>15745658
>it's met with "oh lah-de-dah"
Probably because you're a city slicker pulling up with your fancy Irish writer.
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>>15745658
I've got the same problem but with having Infinite Jest sincerely as my favorite book. Like I just prefer to not talk about it because of the perception of college-aged DFW """readers"""
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>>15745658
Because hes a fucking shit writer
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>>15745864
take it back brainlet
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Ulysses is a book which pours along for seven hundred and thirty-five pages, a stream of time of seven hundred and thirty-five days which all consist in one single and senseless every day of Everyman, the completely irrelevant 16th day of June 1904, in Dublin — a day on which, in all truth, nothing happens. The stream beings in the void and ends in the void. Is all of this perhaps one single, immensely long and excessively complicated Strindbergian pronouncement upon the essence of human life, and one which, to the reader’s dismay, is never finished? Perhaps it does touch upon the essence of life; but quite certainly it touches upon life’s ten thousand surfaces and their hundred thousand color gradations. As far as my glance reaches, there are in those seven hundred and thirty-five pages no obvious repetitions and not a single hallowed island where the long-suffering reader may come to rest. There is not a single place where he can seat himself, drunk with memories, and from which he can happily consider the stretch of the road he has covered, be it one hundred pages or even less… But no! The pitiless and uninterrupted stream rolls by, and its velocity or precipitation grows in the last forty pages till it sweeps away even the marks of punctuation. It thus gives cruelest expressions to that emptiness which is both breath taking and stifling, which is under such tension, or is so filled to bursting, as to grow unbearable. This thoroughly hopeless emptiness is the dominant note of the whole book. It not only begins and ends in nothingness, but it consists of nothing but nothingness. It is all infernally nugatory.
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>>15745824
>but with having Infinite Jest sincerely as my favorite book
OH NO NO NO
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>>15745936
>Jung
He is correct about the "no oasis" at least
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>>15745658
Get better friends.
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>>15745824
Ironically, the type of people who DFW was lambasting against in IJ we’re the very type who wouldn’t read it. He didn’t want everyone to read it. That’s why it seems so long and inane to most people. Unfortunately, it had the opposite effect, so it found its community among those college-ages DFW “readers” you mentioned who read it in the same way that someone views a sitcom: purely for entertainment, without any deeper insight into what the author was actually saying. So try to educate people when it’s brought up in conversation to give them a better idea of its overall message, themes, and place in modern society.
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>>15746507
But I think it's a really funny book
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>>15745658

what is the context in which you mention him? if it's during discussions of modernism, of c20 lit, etc. then you're dead right to mention him and it sounds like your friends are fools

but maybe you find yourself shoehorning jj into conversations where other writers/books/ideas would be more appropriate? if this might be the case then i guess be more selective with which literary touchstones you use
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>>15746519
Think about why DFW called it Infinite Jest. Read the excerpt from Hamlet, act 5, scene 1. Hamlet is openly mocking Yorick, a jester who made everyone laugh, or as Hamlet would have it, who everyone laughed at.

The comedy in IJ is meant to criticize that sense of irony that pervades society, as typified by Hamlet in that scene. While IJ may have comedic moments, it’s not meant to be comedic at all. DFW himself never regarded it as such.
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>>15746557
Hahaha, funny junkie do gross thing!



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