[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/lit/ - Literature


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.



File: questioningchink.jpg (234 KB, 1012x627)
234 KB
234 KB JPG
>writes harrowing account of industrial war in Russia despite being sympathetic to fascism
>follows this up with another masterpiece following the yankee invasion of Italy
>has books literally banned by the catholic church as heretical
>accuses Hitler of being 'womanly' (kek), leading to him being under house arrest for five years.
>barely anyone has heard of him these days, aside from a few literary critics that have read The Skin.


What happened anons?
>>
>>12577766
>Bonaparte(buona parte) means good amount/considerable part in italian
>Mala(male) means bad or evil
>>
He looks like a Metal Gear Solid character, like he's about to take off that coat and reveal he has some cool powers or he's some kind of cyborg

Or Resident Evil
>>
>>12577766
Writers can easily fall into obscurity for a number of reasons. I'll check him out.
>>
I watched Calvani's adaptation of The Skin. Pretty good, sprawling look at a war riddled Italy, probably more harsh/authentic than Rosselini. Plus has one of the greatest gay scenes in cinema tbqh.
>>
>>12577998
>In his youth, Malaparte was a fascist. Then he fell out with Mussolini and was sent into internal exile. After the intercession of Mussolini's son-in-law, Galeazzo Ciano, he was freed in 1938 - but was repeatedly rearrested. As a war correspondent for the Corriere della Sera, he covered the axis powers on the eastern front, and then the liberation of Italy. After the war he moved to Paris, where his politics became communist. Before he died in 1957, he was rather tempted by Maoism.
>Everyone, therefore, has a reason to hate Malaparte: you can hate him on the left, or on the right. And the following story perhaps demonstrates the deeper reason why.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/feb/28/adam-thirlwell-malaparte



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.