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Post packs. Day packs, Assault Packs, Rucksacks. All packs welcome.
A general thread for showing off your packs, questions on choosing a backpack, what to pack and what not to pack, sleep systems, and other related things.

Basic information on choosing a backpack, backpack fitting, what to pack, how to pack efficiently, and more
https://pastebin.com/DDCA9Z4N

Ol' reliable edition

Previous Thread:>>50381384
>>
Just bought this 14L daypack for EDC
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>>50459398
Are there actually mag pouches in the pockets or did they just jam mags in for the stock photo?
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>>50459546
I'm sure they just jammed them in, I'm still waiting on the bag to come in the mail, so I can't say for sure. But there are plenty of molle/hook & loop inserts on the market, LBT even makes a couple: https://lbtinc.com/products/2876b
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>>50459578
Ah okay, I was going to give you shit for being a grey man larperator if they were built in mag pouches, but if not looks like a nice pack. Those insert options look pretty cool though.
>>
>>50459622
No, I got the pack for EDC. But I like the minimalist approach with the option to make it tactical if need be. For normal use, I typically carry:
>Coveralls + work shirt & socks
>Food & snacks
>Nalgene
>Phone, charger, wallet
>Flashlight
>Nicotine pouches/cigs
>Lighter
>Notepad + 2 pens
>Knife
>Poncho or windbreaker
Probably some other stuff too but that's what sticks out.
>>
What did you guys get, if anything, for labor day sales?
I got a new pair of boots, hiking shoes, a few pairs of socks, new boxers and a pair of snowshoes.
Im excited for winter.
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>>50462705
Anywhere in particular have good sales right now? I'm not sure what to buy anyway.
>>
>>50463187
Moosejaw, Backcountry, REI, and Outdoor Gear Exchange.
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>>50462705
I think I'm good right now, it just needs to drop in temp and I can really test out what I have.
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>>50459398
Link?
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>>50459306
I own a goruck gr2, an MR 3dap, and a kelty redwing 50.

I use the GR2 to carry 10 days of clothes and a spare set of dress shoes. I use it for when I travel the world on business. It fits in every airplane compartment and under every seat, and its durable as hell. Plus it looks like a normal backpack. Negatives are that it doesnt breath on your back.

3dap is comfortable as shit, and almost perfect. However the material is thin and rips easy compared to the GR2 which has thicker fabric.

Redwing has great adjustments and is comfortable for hiking. Negative is that the material is too lightweight and you need to really pack and organize your shit more balanced.
>>
>>50463467
The mystery ranch should be 500d cordura, does it really rip that easy?
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>>50463646
Cordura 500D is tough, maybe what ripped before was the stiching.
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I got an old 85L Lillsport backpack from my dad and this weekend I went innawoods with it. Not far, but with the full equipment of tent, bag, pad etc. Lillsport is a Norwegian brand which produced many sports items but went defunct. The brand was revived but doesn't sell backpacks any more, and if they did it would probably be chinesium.

I wanted a huge pack to test out how the concept works for me, and this is a huge pack for sure? 85L? I would have guessed 110, because the pack can be rolled up and up to the point of ridiculous. I could literally have hidden a shotgun and a hunting rifle inside. The frame system is very adjustable so I wore it just fine, but it's hardly a handy way to go about things. There is only a single pocket, which is in the lid. A novel solution is the zippered lid on the lower SIDE of the pack, allowing you to move a sleeping back in and out without emptying the pack. There's also a divider between that and the upper compartment but so far I haven't managed to get the zipper to work - the pack is at least 20 years old and I'm reluctant to use force on its thinnest part.

Pic: identical to mine, but not same sample.
>>
>>50465737
You could probably lubricate the zipper to get it going
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>>50466052

Yeah, I'm not worried about the zipper itself - I'm worried about the seams it is held by. I'll probably give it a shot. It will be the first time I need to get so deep down a pack that I'll be wearing a headlamp.
>>
What's a decent backpack for around $50? I don't have anything other than my camelback for hiking and a few old ones from highschool.
>>
>>50459306
Why did you post this pack? Is it a quality rig?
>>
>>50463402
LBT
>>
>>50466219
How big are you looking for? I have a few used packs I could sell. Not sure you'd find a good unused pack for $50
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>>50459306

Kelty's quality has gone to shit since those old early 00's versions.
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>>50466365
Basically every big name manufacturer in the US sucks ass now
Cottage industry is where it's at, although you have to give your left nut to afford it
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>>50466227
Coyotes are kind of the standard entry level internal frame pack, yes it's quality, there are others that are better but they usually cost double or more.
>>
>>50466219

Depends on you being a murrican or yuro. It's a weird divide but fact is, tastes here tend to be quite patriotic.
>>
>>50466361
It'd basically be a fanny pack replacement. So I'm not looking for something large.

>>50466590
'Murrican
>>
>>50466869

With those two parameters and 50 bucks as the limit I'd be looking for a surplus US Army Molle pack or a new Brandit copy of the same.
>>
any good water filters that are small? sawyer seems to have failure breaking issues and i don't want to spraying out my ass for days.
>>
>>50466980
Butt sprinkler
>>
We've been talking about sleeping pads in some earlier threads. I have always been using the normal foam types, but this weekend I used a self-inflatable one innawoods. Got a secondhand cheap one, which didn't matter - the concept is standard by now. My results were mixed.
- damn is that thing hard to deflate.
- weight is higher than a foam one, but it's not a brick either. Acceptable.
- rolled up volume is comparable to maybe three foam pads combined. Big minus to me.
- sleeping comfort is great. It's nice and soft.
- appears to isolate well from the ground, but in September that doesn't say much. Needs testing in far colder weather.
- slick surface. I made the mistake of pitching tent on a slight incline and kept worming my way back up the whole night. Mayor annoyment. Why couldn't there have been anything in the way of resistance?

I probably won't take this pad, or another pad like it, on a hike again unless it is winter and my alternative is a stacked pair of foam pads, or if the camp site is a stone's throw from my car. It's just too voluminous.
>>
>>50467816
Bought a Klymit one. Was getting sick of my foam catching on shit and wanted to use my ruck with an H Harness sitting on top of butt pack.
Packs down to a big can size in theory, so it fits in my bag pretty well. In reality, it is hard to deflate enough to get that small unless you're in your house. Weighs more than a foam pad, maybe over twice as much. More cushoin than my thermarest, I can side sleep on it no problem. No clue about heat insolation, can't remember the rvalue claimed, bit it is advertised. Just enough friction to keep me from sliding
Maybe 7/10, where thermarest was a 5/10
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>>50467816
Put little dots of seam sealer on that shit to help with sliding
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>>50468325

Might be the solution for that issue. I'll look into it.
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>>50467816

I guess I should add that the brand is Fun Camp, possibly Funcamp, and obscure as hell as far as I can find out. This model is not likely to be in stores any more.
>>
>>50467816
I have always hated self inflating pads but that's all I've used. Just got a tiny blow up type and am excited to use it. Weighs maybe a pound and is teeny tiny.
>>
>>50468795

How is it to blow up? Pump of some kind? Care to share brand and model?
>>
>>50467816
>rolled up volume is comparable to maybe three foam pads combined
I was confused how this was the case for a bit. That's a "self inflating pad". They don't compress nearly as well as you'd expect from something inflatable and tend to be about twice as heavy as the more modern inflatable pads. While I do exclusively use the modern type of inflatable pad, I agree with you on the self inflating ones. They're bulky but without the toughness of a foam pad. Comfy but not exceptionally so compared to a normal inflatable pad. Heavy and bulky and difficult to inflate is all the downsides together at once. Also concerning taking a while to inflate, that's why a lot of pads now use baffle systems like pic related. Decreases the inside volume and therefore time to inflate while still keeping you off the ground just as much.
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>>50468759
>the brand is Fun Camp
Similar to this one maybe? That one is 3.7 pounds, just slightly less in weight than 3 therma-a-rest ridge rest foam pads. For comparison a klymit pad like above is around 19 oz for the insulated static v lite. Less than 1 ridge rest in weight, takes up much less volume, and has about twice the r-value. Durability is a concern of course, bring a patch kit always, but at least it offers something over 2 stacked foam pads unlike the self inflating ones.
>>
>>50469322

It's probably a close match except mine has a surface so smooth you can sail on it. Plus it is grey. And I weighed it just now; it comes in at 1798 grams. Not a candidate for the long uphill marches.
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>>50469413
>1798 grams
Literally heavier than the "Rubber Bitch" US surplus inflatable air mattress, and soldiers hated carrying that in the 70's.
>>
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>>50466361
Different guy, also looking for a good, used pack for a deal. 45-60L. What do you have for sale?
Currently rocking a CFP 90 that I picked up from goodwill for $25. Huge, durable, but 8 lbs empty. Need something lighter, durable, and can handle 45lb+ loads
>>
>>50471870
The Kelty coyote 65 is the "budget" pack I recommend. It's 4 lbs 10 oz, 65L, and still has a listed weight capacity of up to 60 pounds. It's around $130 depending on where you get it but that's as cheap as you can go new while staying with a known brand. You can try to get lucky with the more respectable cheaper brands like teton sports I guess but their stuff is very hit or miss. Some packs are good, some packs are bad, and the company doesn't seem to have a good understanding of what makes a pack good or bad. Used kelty packs are even cheaper.
>>
Looking for a am/fm/noaa and maybe sw radio that is a solar/handcrank all in one that is small and light to do long hikes with and still listen to transmissions around. Does anyone have any they have used and can recommend? Looking at this right now. https://www.infowarsstore.com/preparedness/radios/solar-crank-portable-radio
>>
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Well lads, after Philmont, glacier, and nearly a decade babbys first pack finally threw in the towel.
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>>50473117
The frame stays have breached containment and it's not carrying weight on the hip belt anymore, I might try and fix it but I don't even know how to get to the back of the hip belt without cutting up other parts.

As far as replacements I'm between a new Osprey or the granite gear chief, they aren't exactly the same but I've always coveted the AG back ventilation thingy and the chief just looks like a really good pack for what they're going for. Decisions decisions.
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>>50472673
All the crank radios I have tried haven't been super durable. I have my baofeng set up for all the noaa weather radio stations though and bring a cable to charge it from my battery bank. If the trip is long I have a solar panel that I can lash to my pack and charge the battery bank over time.
>>
>>50473153
>Osprey or the granite gear chief
The osprey will be a bit more comfortable and will be lighter, the chief will be a bit more durable and will have a higher weight capacity. Both are good packs. I have a preference but neither is bad.
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>>50473153
Makes sense that it broke there I guess. The stays take a lot of weight
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Oh anons, I wish I could go backpacking everyday...
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>>50474843
I believe that's called being homeless
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>>50475439
sounds based
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>>50476701
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Kelty Red Cloud 110: I have since lightened the load in order to not be carrying an 80 pound kitchen sink, but challenged myself to a 10-mile hike with said 80 pound kitchen sink beforehand just because.
>>
>>50459306
>Kelty Lakota Pro 50L
Cant fit as much as i want to in it but its durable and has lasted me a couple of years with minimal wear and tear. Mostly on the inside.
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>>50477516
Great choice.
>>
bump
>>
Are FILBE rucks decent? I feel like the ILBE and Chief get talked about a lot but rarely the FILBE. Anyone have one and can report?
>>
>>50479393
Dont have a ton experience but the filbe is more comfortable with armor, that was the whole reason for upgrading but people tend to find it less good without armor and also tend complain that the filbe's plastic external frame breaks more easily.
>>
>>50473157
>>50473157
>>50472673
which ones have you tried? heard eton is a good prand. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Eton-FRX2-Hand-Turbine-AM-FM-NOAA-Weather-Radio-with-USB-Smartphone-Charger-and-LED-Flashlight/5000309971 thinking of that
>>
>>50479687
A whole host of no name brands honestly
>>
>>50477516
>>50477871
>>50473117
Whole lot of kelty posting recently
>>
Are Brandit backpacks any good for day hiking/overnight?.
Never used one but looks like chink stuff as mil-tec.
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>>50466407
why the fuck is a map of israel on your wall
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>>50483503

Sure it's chink stuff. Good enough for what it's made for. If the country of manufacture makes it useless to you then go buy something else.
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>>50483567
Gb2/pol/
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>>50482808
Yes because Kelty is based
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>>50477516
110L seems really big. How does it hand slightly more reasonable loads like 70L? Does it compress well?
>>
Reposting a question from /out/, maybe some people here can advise.

I'm looking for some system to cover 3 usecases:
- carry my shit as I travel to a destination/base camp. This is usually trains/overnight transit buses and walking to a hotel in cities, so what I need is a lot of (hard to access) storage (think luggage/duffel type thing) for multiple changes of clothes, all my hiking and general travel stuff, and then one or two easy access pockets with travel snacks/documents/laptop that I might need on the train/bus.
- serve as a small (25-30l) daypack as I go on 5-8h hikes, with no sleeping /out/. Carrying hydration, food, IFAK, GPS, rain jacket, knife, maybe phone+powerbank, that's it.
- serve as a large pack as I go on multiday treks, carrying all that a daypack carries, plus tent, bivy/sleeping bag/ground mat, days worth of food, probably a water filtering setup, trowel, and whatever else

Having three unitasker bags for something like this feels stupid. I'm imagining some kind of small pack with a very comfortable padding/strap rig (for the "daypack" role) and a lot of molle, and then variety of pouches that can expand it to a multiday hike/travel setup.

Does anything like this exist, or am I just being extra autistic?
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>>50487340
Just get a big backpack that can compress down smaller when you dont need the full volume.
You could look at hunting backpacks for examples.
>>
>>50487340
You need 3 bags, there is no magic one use bag because of the hard line between a frame pack (necessary for multiday trips but excessive for day trips) and a non frame pack. Your best bet would be an osprey pack or ILBE that you can attach a daypack to and then a fuckoffhueg duffle to put everything in.
>>
>>50487340

What you describe doesn't exist. However. A small tubular pack, roughly of the size and shape of a duffle and with shoulder straps (see example in link), can be strapped on top of or below a midsized framed pack and greatly increase your total carrying volume.

https://www.prozis.com/us/us/prozis/army-deployment-duffle-bag-olive-green

Personally I prefer a solution with a small foldup backpack carried in a pocket in my large bag, because I already have a bunch of backpacks in different sizes to choose from according to my needs after a lot of secondhand purchases over the years. But I have done the dufflebag solution too.
>>
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>>50487340
My sabre 45 does all of those things for me. Compresses down decently small with not much in,
With the side pouches on its like 80 litres, more than enough
Not to mention the side pockets themselves can be used as a small pack using the harness you can buy for them. I usually use just one of the side pouches as a day to day day pack for water + snacks + camera and a jacket. It's about 15 litres. Strap both on and you've got 30. Whole setup together and it's definitely a full sized no bullshit pack setup with plenty of attachment points for extra gear / sleeping mat whatever you need
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Want to get into multiday camping but my only outdoors experience is making shitty patrol bases and sleeping in bags on inflatable mats during basic.

Thoughts on jungle hammocks? Seems like a lightweight way to get off the ground and provide shelter.
Also, what's the general opinion on MOLLE Field Packs here?
>>
>>50488408
>Thoughts on jungle hammocks?
The idea of a hammock or is that a specific model? Hammocks are exactly as you say, relatively light weight and they get you off the ground. A lot of modern ones come with an integrated rain fly and mosquito netting to turn them into a tiny elevated tent. I don't use a hammock but if I did I would buy a Hennessy hammock, the backpacker one. If you do go this route the stock tree straps are short and the rainfly is pretty small. They let you swap to longer straps for free and a bigger rain fly is like $10 more. No idea why they chose the smaller ones as a default.
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>>50488408
>MOLLE Field Packs
The short height and the large amount it protrudes from your back seems like it wouldn't be super comfortable. How heavy are they?
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>>50488612
Just interested in the general idea of hammocks, I'll look into Hennessy.
>>50488651
Heavy as fuck, probably close to 7-8lbs but I don't have a scale on me. Very simply to pack imo, the actual pack can be constricted to the frame with buckled straps. I also think the external frame is very comfortable but I don't have much to compare it to besides my Scree 32.
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>>50488212
That actually looks nice anon, thanks. Only thing I would maybe lack in this is MOLLE/PALS. If those side packs had it, you could definitely kit one out into a tiny daypack. Stick an axe sheath on one side, something like an IFAK on the other, shit'd be good.
Maybe anybody makes a similar system with webbing all over?

Also how does the yoke/harness for those side pouches feel in use? It does look kind of awkward on pictures.
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>>50489120
There's other side panel accessories available including a smaller capacity but better organised set of side pouches with pockets, and just plain bare MOLLE panels, if any of those float your boat.
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>>50489120
Also if you want a Karrimor about the same size with MOLLE there's the Predator 45
>>
When’s the last time you went /out/?
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Is there a good replacement for this? The Gamut Overland is what I'm looking at so far.
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>>50491323
Couple of weeks ago. The weather's been shit since.
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>>50491323
Having your gun attached to your pack around your waist is a dumb fucking idea.
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>>50491323
Last weekend actually
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>>50491323
ID on boots
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>>50491784
probably made by salomon considering they say salomon on the side
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>>50474843
id on boots?
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>>50491323
I go on a 6 mile hike everyday, does that count?
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>>50491422
Strong argument
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>>50491784
Salomons.
Deff quality name that they live up to. My last pair was a set of vasquez boots and those were quality too
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>>50491408
Where is this anon? Are you in CONUS?
>>
I cannot find a Karrimor SF Sabre 45 in Coyote and it's killing me.
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>>50489120
Molle makes it easier to attach stuff, but without it you can get along pretty well as long as you're inventive and it helps to have a bunch of buckles / slik clips and shit. You can however get those pouches with molle on, big market for anything British military style compatible here in the UK.
It feels pretty solid anyway, it's no framed pack so it's about what you expect. Any decent weight you'd just wanna put in the 45 liter main pack and sinch the straps down. But as a day pack it's fucking solid
I usually use a hpg kit bag on the chest for first aid and other shit you'd usually have in a molle pouch, less pouches stuck everywhere does feel quite nice
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>>50493111
Nah mate, Ausfag.
>>
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>>50491323

Last weekend. Nice weather. Slept in a tent, went fishing, made food and coffee on a stove, scanned for radio traffic without results.
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>>50491323
Every evening I squigger hunt
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>>50493512
what is that thing on the lower right between the two bags? is that some radio device or something with dials? hard to see as my screen is fade with hues
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>>50494286
looks like a camera
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>>50493512
how do you like your chest bag bro? i've been eyeballing them for a while
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>>50493116
Are you set on the sabre? Nightgearstore has thors and predators in 'yote
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>>50493864
Kinda what I was thinking didn’t look like the US but I wasn’t sure. What’s camping out there like?
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>>50494015
Gotta love it. Nothing better then a chill mountain morning just hanging out and relaxing
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>>50494286
Camera
>>50494329
Don't know how I went without one for so long honestly. Shit just works. Absolutely ideal for dropping pack somewhere and fucking off for a bit with everything you need right there
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>>50494607
I think I will make my own by rigging up an x harness to a molle lmg bag. Do people kvetch about the camo? You're Western so I doubt anybody gives a fuck.
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>>50491960
Spanish Army 2010s standard boots. Virtually a copy from the vietnam era Jungle Boots but with modern-ish components. Light, roomy and easy maintenance, no goretex tho.
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>>50494829
Goretex is a meme for eveeything but cold weather anyway
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>>50459306
Hit some local urbex spots with my molle patrol pack
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>>50496559
Fuck i forgot pic
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>>50496571
Baste
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>>50494648
I did have my own rigged up with some pouches, that works too. Especially when you see the price of these but fuck it. They're well thought out
As for the camo, nobody really minds. You don't see anyone else with anything camo but if they're looking at me funny I can't tell. Helps that I pair it with a retarded hawaiian shirt, might look a bit tacticool for some when I've got rain gear that also happens to be camo on.
But fuck em, they're wearing lime green what do they know
Gf doesn't refuse to come out with me if I'm using it so it must be fine
>>
>>50494455
Depends heavily on where you go- I live in a tropical part of my state so predominantly hot and humid and down near the coast likely to be rainforest; inland a bit turns pretty quickly to the kind of eucalypt bush you see in my picture. Usually not too difficult to kind decent places to hike and camp but it’s starting to get harder to find decent places to vehicle camp in isolated areas without either- someone camping on top of you, or it being a place my brother can’t bring his dog, or a place close to indigenous communities and consequently subject to alcohol restrictions, or a place subject to fishing restrictions… Rona has meant no overseas travel and people are making up for it by hitting local places harder.

Water quality where I am is usually excellent though if you’re not in hilly areas you need to be mindful of crocodiles. Snakes aren’t a huge deal cos all bar about two types of them will nope the fuck out of there if they sense you coming; snakes don’t bother me anyway though big spiders scare the shit out of me lol and while there are some gnarly kinds of those you tend not to see too many if you don’t search them out. Again where I am is tropical so weather wise cold is not much of an issue but if you go in the half of the year subject to monsoon rain you have to be prepared to deal with it.

Scenery can be magnificent, though once you go a ways inland it gets pretty uniformly eucalypt bushland. There’s also quite a few uninhabited islands you can camp on up and down the coast and they’re fucking spectacular if you can get there.

From a /k/ perspective obviously Australia is pretty shitty overall, while my state has some of the less restrictive restrictions one of the cunt moves of our state government is unlike some others they don’t allow hunting on public land so unless you have private property to camp on, firearms are a no go.
>>
Anyone else Belgian paratrooper bag? Honestly one of my favs. Definitely my favourite for the money and I have a lot of bags and I grab this one 9/10 innawoods
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I had to go buy a tent today.

This tale starts last year or so, when I bought a tent because I wanted to try out a new concept. I already had lots of tents by that point, but they were all A-frame or tunnel tents. What I wanted now was a dome tent; it seemed more comfy and more lightweight too. I bought the one in this picture here, and I have been using it on some occasions until the weekend that was. 30 bucks including shipping from China... but it worked, and it worked well. It was just two pounds, took less room than my fishing rods, could be raised and taken down at great speed, and performed very well in wind. It met its demise this weekend because I managed to rip a two foot long seam in it. I'll try to sew it back together and might perhaps use it again, but the incident made me accept that perhaps something a bit less flimsy would be a good thing. Some of the innawoods places and temperatures I go hiking in will be pretty bad to experience a broken tent in.

1/2
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>>50496828

2/2

I knew one thing though; my next tent was definitely also going to be a dome tent. Being able to sit in a tent is awesome, especially when the evenings are long and pitch dark. Weight was also a priority, and material strength, but sadly so was price.

After looking at the selection available from one local sports store, two local tool stores and the local equivalent of a dollar store - I didn't want to shop online for this one - I ended up spending about 70 dollars on what claims to be an Xplor product and probably is Chinesium. Depicted here in some of its glory, pitched in my living room. Welcome to my world.

Gone is the simplicity of the little one, which consisted of little more than a single compartment and some poles plus optional ground poles. This new one has an inner tent which consists of about 40% mosquito net, and an outer tent which seems more or less slapped on top and held in place with ropes. I don't like ropes; that was part of why dome tents became attractive to me in the first place. Also this new tent weighs a whopping 5 pounds which is a big step up from 2. But I do accept that thicker materials mean more weight; it was lack of strength that brought me here.

There are some bonuses. This tent is rather a lot bigger in all dimensions; unlike the old one this actually has comfortable room for two people. Maybe that will become useful some day. And it is more than a foot taller which is pure luxury. There's a rain level of 2000mm and an awning you can't see because I didn't think of pulling it forward that acts as a windbreaker.

I'm pretty sure I would get a better tent if I put down 1000 dollars instead of 70, with lower weight and higher strength. Maybe some day. I won't know how good it is until I've camped with it a few times.
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>>50496807
Almost bought one but already got a pack that fitted the role. That cammo is sick as heck.
>>
Fellow Euros, have you heard about Mokkimies? I never even noticed them until today. Looks like they are Finns, and unlike Varusteleka they calculates in VAT for non-EUs which is a huge thing for me. It means I don't have to worry about being ruined by customes fees. I'm going to look through their stuff now.

https://www.mokkimies.com/start
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>>50496571
That looks so much better in M81 wow
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>>50493512
You run a great setup anon, honestly the more I think about it the more comfy it sounds. Thanks.

> it's no framed pack so it's about what you expect
Karrimor's page says it does have some kind of frame.
>The removable F-Format internal frame can be shaped to conform to the user’s back profile.
it any good?

Also how to you carry the camera when /out/? I don't have one but it's primarily because I can't think of a scenario when I wouldn't be paranoid about dropping and breaking it or when it wouldn't be too clumsy to carry and whip out on the go or both.
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>>50497664
The main pack is framed but not the rocket packs on the day yoke
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>>50497664
What he said >>50497829
The frame of the main pack is nothing special but it's a fucking comfy pack even loaded up, no problem putting the weight on your hips. Last trip I was mind blown by the fact my back didn't ache once

I've fucked with about 100 different ways of camera carrying, peak design capture clip or whatever its called is really awesome. Just have to put it in the right place, my camera is too heavy to mount the way they show it done on their website so it takes some playing with. Get a good camera, too. Pentax are fucking rugged, smashed it about tonnes and no problems. Lives inside the main pack in a dry bag most of the time but gets clipped to the waist belt if I think I'm going past anything picture worthy
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>>50494329
I use a FHF binocular harness and I like it a lot, mostly because of the ability to attach it to the backpack instead of having to wear it underneath. Their chest rig can also do the same thing if you buy the adapter. That said it would eliminate the ability to do this>>50494607
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>>50497985
>gets clipped to the waist belt
As in the belt of your pants or the waist belt of the pack/yoke?
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>>50498463
Pack. Shits fucking heavy and youll need padding in between it and you
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>>50459306
I need help for my gf. She is very small framed and frail but in spite of that she ignores her body and comes out on many day hikes with me.
Problem is she does not know anything about gear or ergonomics. She has like seven backpacks that she bought because they look cute but they have shit ergos and even just carrying a small amount of stuff in them hurts the fuck out of her lower back. If we want to bring food then her lower back plus her shoulders get hurt.
I want to get a small and ergonomic backpack for day hikes but it seems those almost never really go together. It's either that the backpack is small but lacking anything to protect your lower back over long hikes. Or it does have stuff for your lower back yet is way bigger than we would ever need it to be. I look up 'small womens ergonomic backpack' and this is all I see.
Does fucking ANYONE make a small backpack that also has ergonomic straps and stuff? I can't find shit.
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>>50498672
The miwok 24 has a foam back panel like this and is a good day pack. It's not a rigid back so if you pack really badly stuff can still stab you but it's a lot better than most frameless packs while still being light and a reasonable size.
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>>50498954
The maya is the women's version of this
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Thoughts?
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>>50499138
A relatively affordable light weight pack with a decent weight capacity that comes in non-neon colors and is made by a reputable manufacturer. It is the pack I would pick if I didn't want molle.
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>>50499160
Any recs for a good EDC bag?
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>>50499287
I don't have any experience with edc packs, sorry. With daypacks or larger hiking packs they're something I use so I can determine what makes them good or bad. For EDC stuff I don't have a metric like that. Something that doesn't fall apart, obviously. Maybe a thin plastic frame? But frames tend to be good for transferring weight to the hips and a lot of every day backpacks don't have hip belts.
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>>50499287
lbt low vis day pack
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>>50498954
>>50499111
>>50498672
THANK YOU. I don't know why that never showed up in my search.
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>>50499462
You're welcome, as long as she's not carrying an excessive amount of weight that pack should be fine. Either have her watch a video on pack adjustment or help her out. I believe that both the maya and the miwok have an adjustable torso length so make sure to get that right along with everything else.
>>
bump
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>>50496753
Damn dude. I always pictured Australia to be more likeNZ when it comes to public land. What a shame, seems you guys would have some pretty comfy spots if it weren’t for your overbearing government
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>>50487340
Get an external frame and attach bags to it at your leisure is what it sounds like you should do.
>>
>>50497985
>Lives inside the main pack in a dry bag most of the time

I have been wondering about that. How dry bags are at protecting electronics like cameras and radios. Obviously it protects against external water but can it collect moisture and humidity?
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>>50502552
I suppose they can, you'd want to take your shit out and air it out. Not just leave it in there for days. Chances are a camera will get slightly wet anyway, if it's raining you're not going to stop using your electronics. Just turn your dry bags inside out overnight and microfiber dry them off when possible
>>
Opinion on best place to put a tent on a pack? The four obvious choices are horizontally on the top, under the lid, under the pack, or vertically inside the pack.
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>>50502761
Vertically inside the pack is my choice. You can use a lighter stuff sack rather than one tough enough to resist the abrasion. Also it's nice not to feel the tent flopping around as you move or getting caught on stuff. The width of my tent poles even in their folded up position can make simple things like doorways a lot harder if they are attached to the bottom or under the lid.
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>>50502948

I've been trying just now. When I put the tent on the underside it gets so low that it touches my ass, which won't be comfy on the march. Vertically fits, it's a 75l pack so there is room, but it is going to eat a lot of space. I'll try the other two as well but the pack is tall as it is and I don't want to keel over.

All of this wasn't an issue with my old small tent which could go anywhere. This new one is bigger and heavier so I need to reassess.
>>
>>50502761
Remove stuff sack and just jam it into main compartment, takes up less space and fills all the corners of pack
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>>50496807

I bought ten of these back in the late 90's from some Rwandan guy. Had a few bloodstains on them, but they washed out.
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>>50503012

That sounds like a recipe to get the parts damaged while in the backpack though. I'll be stuffing what remains of space with stove, cooking gear, food etc and I'd rather not risk ripping up the tent fabric on a random sharp point or edge.
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>>50503241

I keep mine in the stuff sack, but it lives in the sleeping bag compartment on my Osprey Aether. The pole bag runs up and down the inside of the main compartment.
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>>50503241
What kind of random edges do you have in there
A stuff sack probably wouldn't make the difference, better off wrapping possible pointy things using extra socks or whatever.
Anyway, just do what that anon said, poles vertically in pack. Tent stuffed in so it fills space efficiently.
Stuff sack or no stuff sack anything is better than having it outside
>>
>>50503407
>>50503444

Diverting the poles and the fabric is an option I had not considered. And the poles are in a separate bag already. I still need a sleeping bag and a sleeping pad, but it makes further juggling and compressing possible. Well done.
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>>50503581
Sleeping bag on the bottom, tent in its stuff sack vertically along the right side (the whole thing making a backwards L) and then different stuff sacks for fire, power, water, and food stacked on top is how I organize things. Medical and toiletries goes in the side pouches and the hydration bladder is in its sleeve. Everything is either in a waterproof stuff sack or a freezer bag.
>>
>>50504949

There is still the sleeping pad. But it can go on top since it weighs nothing.
>>
anyone else find "Hydration packs" just don't feel "right"?

9/10 backpacks feel good right off the bat, and in wide range of adjustment and weight.

The Camel Back things, all 3 configs (stand alone thin straps, mini-backpack, or inside normal pack) just all feel wrong and not "painful" but "sure wouldn't want to do this all day or everyday".

I"m I doing something wrong?

>>50503135
>>
>>50507118

Never tried one, and probably never will. I'm not tacticool and the chance of me being in a situation where I need to sip from a straw because I can't find time to drink from a canteen is so infinitesimal that we are talking about negative spacetime. I consider the whole thing a military fad.
>>
>>50507118
>all 3 configs (stand alone thin straps, mini-backpack, or inside normal pack) just all feel wrong
Are you talking about a hydration bladder or the hydration carrier itself? You probably don't need to use a separate carrier if your backpack has a bladder sleeve. I don't use a hydration carrier because all of my packs just have a sleeve that I slide the bladder into. My pack is already adjusted for me and while just the hydration carrier is probably lighter, day packs are light enough already.
>>
>>50507188
like I said and in thread I linked, all 3 feel 'off' and "is it supposed to be like this???"

maybe because its Ebay China stuff and I'm a big tall dude, but other cheap shit feels fine.

just unsettling to have round object pressure in middle of back but nowhere else.
>>
>>50507480
I can't help you on why the other two ways fell off but I've never had that problem with the hydration bladder inside a pack. If I had to guess you're using a frameless pack, most likely one without a padded back panel? What kind of bladder are you using? Which camelbak model?
>>
How do I repair a broken buckle without sewing cos i'm a retard, /k/?
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>>50508782
Which side? Can you take a picture?
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>>50508792
The female side of a side release snap buckle. I've found replacements but like the OEM one, the female side all need to be sewn in not fed through the buckle like the male side
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>>50507118
I don't like the carriers that are literally just a bladder with straps but I really like my old CamelBak backpack, it's huge, probably the biggest backpack CamelBak has ever made (32 liters iirc) and it's great, good ventilation, stiff plastic framesheet, a little padding on the hip belt, very comfy.
>>
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>>50508809
Get one of these in the right size/color. I've heard them called repair buckles or quick attach buckles. There's also another kind that I cannot find a picture of where there's a little arm part that snaps down to attach it.
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>>50508985
The other kind snaps on like this
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>>50509013
>>50508985
Oh shit hot, thanks anon
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>>50493864
Are you even allowed to go outside lmao
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>>50507118
Yes, I've literally never had a problem with mine. And it's been through extensive hiking and dirt biking
>>
Where should a sternum strap sit on my chest - i get what it's named after but where's the optimal place to have it, how tight should it be?
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>>50511072
Like right above your nipples and just tight enough to pull the shoulder straps slightly inwards to reduce rubbing on you.
It isnt meant to hold weight really, just make sure you dont get irritated by the shoulder straps.
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>>50499138
take the orange tabs off
>>
This is a standard loadout for camping anywhere from 1-3 days

Hammock
Rain fly
Sleeping bag
Underquilt
Pillow
Change of clothes
Tp
Axe
.22 w/ 2 mags + 100rd casette of ammo
Fire kit
Headlamp+spare batteries
Knife
Food+water for amount of days planned
Water filter
Compass
Binos
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>>50499138
I really love the frame shape, and wish more manufacturers did more natursl frame shapes like that
>>
ammidoinitright?
>>
>>
>>
>>50511290
I kinda like it
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>>50511129
Thanks anon
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>>50511290
Fucking based, frankly
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>>50508782
get a speedy stitcher. i used it to build the straps in >>50511301
I do need to refine it a little. the off brand shoulder straps losen up and send 60lbs+ flying left or right at random depending on the moon. i used a seatbelt for the waist, the original was like this weird dusty nylon that started ripping and flaking away.
>>
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>>50511290
Test it and tell us the results anon.
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>>50511593
What's the learning curve like on those, I hear good tihngs
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>>50508782
If you've got a fine toothed saw you can make your own split bar with a spare buckle like pic rel. If they're good buckles like the ITW ones made from Delrin it only reduces their strength by about 10%.
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>>50511769
will do
>>50511813
simple. You poke holes and poke string through loop. I figure next time ill have to pin some parts in place to keep the lines straight.
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>>50508985
>>50509013

I have never seen these before. Now I'll have to find some. Well done.
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>>50508782
>>50512020

Another method that works just fine is this. These things are called molle t mounts and are fucking useful for just about everything
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>>50512037
Anon that's fucking genius
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>>50511268

Do you fell large trees on your camping trips?
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>>50512064
No, I get wood for your mom
>>
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Any recs for cheap hiking/outdoor shoe that's water proof or resistant. So I can step in mud or be in the pouring rain and not get fucked feet?
Not trying to spend more than $100-150.

Also, anyone have any experince with the company Snowpeak? It's US based but apperantly is run by Japanese. Just spent $100 on a basic titanium mess kit, wonder if it's gonna fail me in hard times.
>>
>>50512238

Rubber boots. Goretex is great but there is a difference between getting the boots wet and wading through water. You want the high shafted hunter's boot type. With good socks they give good ankle support too.
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>>50512305
I meant more as in rain resistant, not really wellies and puddle jumping.
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>>50512305
>>50512406
Nvm I'm a retard. Gore-tex is kinda what I'm looking for.
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>>50512238
Snowpeak and evernew make the best ti gear, it wont fail unless you don't know how to use it.
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>>50512064
Splitting wood with a larger axe is easier than a hatchet
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>>50513026

It certainly is. Do you do a lot of that on your hikes? Personallly I carried a hatchet for some years, then switched to a folding saw. The weight win is enormous and I still get firewood.
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>>50513057
This is the real pro gamer move imo. I carried my gransfors bruk small axe for a while but found that some of the super hard wood I found in the forest is just easier to saw into pieces then chop down. I just keep my folding axe now and it works so much better for me.
>>
>Any recs for cheap hiking/outdoor shoe that's water proof or resistant. So I can step in mud or be in the pouring rain and not get fucked feet?
Theres a section in the book "fixing your feet" where the author talks about goretex shoes. He says something like "Are you under the impression that waterproof shoes will keep your feet dry?" His point is basically that feet sweat and in the rain and standing water your socks will eventually get wet so gortex boots are mostly just good for walking through snow and the freezing cold. That goretex boots take longer for the inside to dry out as well so you have to be pretty careful to avoid having your feet stay wetter for longer. Wet feet over time is a big deal, masceration weakens your skin and no one wants trench foot. I'd recommend having lots of socks, completely drying your feet out at night, removing any taping or bandages on your feet while sleeping to let then air out if you can, and applying some kind of climbing salve to you feet before you sleep to help them both retain their own moisture and repel excess. That's what I do anyway.
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>>50513702

It's not the only way to dry feet either. I do fine with my all leather, non-membrane boots as long as I wax them up before next hike.
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>>50513702
Well my current shoes get wet simply from walking in wet grass after a rain, so gore-tex is what I'm looking for
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>>50496753
>people are making up for it by hitting local places harder

damn that sucks
>>
bump
>>
I feel like such a boomer, I tried not the shoes insoles for the first time in my hiking shoes and they feel so nice.
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>>50519952
What kind of insoles?
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>>50519952
We're all gonna be boomers at some point. Don't worry about it.
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>>50466407
good rucksack. how many years are you going to camp with it?
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>>50491375

osprey? so you like low quality chinese stuff?
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>>50492411
>6 mile hike

it is calling walking. not a hike. hike is when you do two day..
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>>50493102

hahaha. what the fuck i am looking here at? terrorist camp? fucking cartel shit?
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>>50502668

damn what county is that? it looks like some savage just wasted whole forest and the shit is going down in next two decades. if you want to do the favor to mother nature start planting bushes and trees there ma nigga.
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>>50520220
Just super feet, I've started developing foot pain last week so I figured better get them before things get bad.
If they dont work its onto sheeps feet and if those dont work then off i go to the doctor.
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>>50521729
Last I checked hiking is walking outdoors, you sure showed me, stupid faggot.
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>>50521733
Depending on what side of the American political spectrum you ask…. Maybe a terrorist camp but in reality it’s just the northern fork ridge line in WV
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>>50521729
You're a faggot.
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>>50521729
>t. Autist
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>>50513057
No, but i didn't say i did much hiking with this, its for camping where im not hiking much with it
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>>50492411
Very mountainous oh yes. Hike that trail bro, what pack do you use to carry your food and water?
>>
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>>50524592
Well if you know who to complain to about there not being enough mountains in the midwest I'm open to suggestions.
I use this but its just full of my 3 seasons gear, water and lots of sand.
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>>50459306
Recently (few months ago) picked up an east german assault pack. Thing is durable as hell and waterproof/stormproof, only issue is the shitty AND I MEAN shitty suspension system. Other than that ran some tests on it and it'd be a solid system to bring in for that specific purpose- 24 hour possible assault mission.

Any anons have good ideas on how to make it more bearable?
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>>50525035

This is the situation, right?
>>
>>50525072
Yeah standard suspension system, belt included. Even with the belt weighed down its still a pain in the ass
>>
>>50525201

Mhm. There are things you could do to improve the rig but I don't like to ruin old things even when they technically aren't worth much. So I'd unhook the entire Y-straps and save them for a larping occasion, and make new shoulderstraps entirely. Then make new ones, maybe from some random wornout civilian backpack, and clothe them entirely from some garment that color matches the pack. Dark grey, brown, black, even denim from jeans. You have four nice points to strap them onto. Maybe add a chest strap with a nylon or metal clasp to anchor the pack a little better.
>>
>>50525072
I can't say for certain since i don't own one but try using a medium size key clip. I've used one on my sidor haversack during a summer hike because my hands were to sweaty to undo the sternum strap quicky and it got the job done. If that works it might be worth to stitch in a couple of loops for it
>>
>>50525035
>>50525072

literally any modern backpack will be better.
>>
Most of the packs here are a bit too autistic for me
What's a good incognito tier EDC MOLLE type of bag?
>>
>>50525322
>incognito
>molle
The ultimate incognito pack is a jansport. But check out LBT's 20L daypack. I like it, would've bought that if I hadn't just bought their 14L daypack
>>
>>50525316

That wasn't the question, was it? And it isn't entirely useless. It's basically plastic on the inside making it near water tight, it is compact, and it is meant for being used with a battle belt. Not all modern backpacks can say that. Incidentally I also think it would work well with a PC with a little molle improvisation.
>>
>>50525316
Find me a modern backpack that isn't china-ware and can stay water tight in a rainstorm or while crawling through mud bro. Have you felt the weight of the canvas on the outside of one of these things? All that for 20-30 bucks is a pretty solid deal. Probably though taking some modern straps or even alice straps would work well. If there was a way to get some waist suspension as well it'd be the dream day pack for what it is.
>>
>>50525450

You could have waist suspension. You just need a nylon frame going a foot or so down below the pack to put it and the straps and the belt on. Hardly cost effective but it's doable.
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>>50521733
You got triggered over a rifle and a hatchet, bro
>>
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I normally just use this. I retreated it to be waterproof and its good for my 2-3 day trips.
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>>50525345
>14L daypack
Their 14L seemed so small, like a child sized backpack. I'm glad I got their three day instead.
>>
>>50525769

Good one. Bundeswehr gebirgsjäger pack. How heavy is it?
>>
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Kelty gang
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>>50525450
>a modern backpack that isn't china-ware and can stay water tight in a rainstorm or while crawling through mud bro
I know what you mean but most modern packs solve that by relegating the waterproofing to the pack liner/compression sacks. That way as the DMR or whatever waterproofing that's used ages and wears you can easily replace it. Barring that, one of those roll down dry bags with straps will keep your stuff dry even when it's submerged and will even float.
>>
>>50525863
Not really sure, never weighed it. Probably altogether 20 lbs with everything stuffed inside.
>>
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>>50525839
I have their 3-day as well. Too big for an edc/day pack.
>>
bump
>>
>>50527354
That thing looks never used.
>>
Falling for the dutch army backpack meme. Just wanted a cheap daypack. Wish me luck anons
>>
>>50531739
The modern LBT looking one or the older boxy one?
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>>50531928
Older boxy one.
>>
>>50494863
My goretex boots are the only shoes I own of any kind that don't result in me feeling like I'm walking through a swamp and going to get trenchfoot. I live in the southeast US though.
>>
>>50532243
As soon as water gets in, it's not getting out. I envy your lack of sweaty feet, though
>>
>>50494863
>>50532344
The fuck are you talking about dude? Are you actually trying to pretend that goretex boots aren't the obvious and best choice for 99% of situations? Change your fucking socks if you sweat that damn much.
>>
>>50524883
I wonder this every time I see that picture, those things on the side are trekking poles right?
>>
>>50534535
Yep, I cant stow them away at the same time as ice axes though as they use the same top loop to secure them to the pack.
>>
>>50533194
>water gets in
>doesn't get out
>best
Been there, done that, moved away from it
>>
>>50535592
Water doesn't get in, it's waterproof, that's the point.
>>
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>>50535668
Different anon, he's right. Sometimes you have to do river crossings and you can't avoid getting water in your boots, then it might be a better idea to have something quick drying. However, I still use goretex boots and nothing else. In my terrain if its wet enough to get my boots soaked in a high river, my boots will stay wet regardless of if they are quick drying or not. Just take a fuck tonne of spare socks, maybe some hand warmers to put inside the boots to prevent freezing overnight
>>
>>50486413
I had no problems on the hike for my back, but I am tall (6'4" or 193 cm) so it positions to my spinal column and hips well. It also helps that I made an effort in weight distribution when loading the pack.
>>
>>50535953
I use water shoes.
>dry fast
>cling to your foot
>good soles for walking over rocks
>dry crazy fast
>super light
>can be used around camp to let your feet relax after all day in boots plus if it’s cold out you can just put socks on under then where as flip flops suck with socks

>pic related have lasted me three years, many river crossings and camp chores so far and are still in good condition
>>
>>50536080
Been kinda wanting a second pair of shoes for around camp or for river crossings but I'm not sure I want to carry them around, hell I need new boots before that. Mine are getting worn down
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>>50536590
These water shoes are dirt cheap and can be stuffed just about anywhere in your pack and weigh nothing. Trust me, they are a game changer.
>>
>>50536676
Sick. I'll put them on the eternally long shopping list of gear I want. Thanks man
>>
>>50536743
You got it homie, these are the brand if you ever get to it. Feels so good to get to camp and pop the boots off and these on

Mishansha Mens Womens Water Shoes Quick Dry Barefoot for Swim Diving Surf Aqua Sports Pool Beach Walking Yoga https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BTCK3M9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_Q97VNGV1BSMP8HJXYG4D
>>
>>50527354
>Too big for an edc/day pack.
I guess if you're a bitch.
>>
>>50459306
Are ALICE packs legit good?
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>>50538133
They're tough but heavy and uncomfortable. When they were cheap I think they had a place but now I don't see a point in them in terms of pure function.
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>>50538156
any packs that are just as tough and about the same 50L size
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>>50538169
The helikon tex matilda is literally the alice but lighter and internal frame or if you want a different shape but similar size you could go with the karrimor sf sabre 45 or predator 45 if you want molle.
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>>50538278
thanks
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>>50538278
This is the karrimore sabre 45
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>>50538278
I really like my Sabre 45, had it a few years now, have about 700 or 800km on it, it's been faultless. Still looks practically new, very rugged but I find it very comfortable. No adjustment for torso length though, so if you're very short or very tall I don't know if it would accommodate you but they're a good pack.
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>>50530647
I took this pic when I first bought it. It has since become an overnight pack for work

>>50537937
So strong
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>>50538360
wow definitely has me sold, How much is the base weight?
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>>50538734
1.85kg or a little over 4 pounds
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>>50536080
>>50536590
>>50536676
>>50536975
Just get a pair of crocks you cocks
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>>50539079
Hiking sandals are just crocs with better traction
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bump
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>>50538133
It depends. Problem is now sellers are considering Alice packs more like "collection" item instead of milsurp hiking gear (getting more expensive). It's still functional as long as you can endure basic ergonomy and heavy weight.
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>>50540720
I feel about the Alice the same way I feel about the mosin, cool but it just makes a lot less sense once it becomes expensive.
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>>50541393
Getting a medium Alice for a good price is still possible. Getting a nugget for 100 bucks is just a dream from the past.

At least the Alice has decent copies out in the civilian sector.
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>>50538133
In the past sure, today, absolutely not.
There are far better modern packs now.
>>50541614
>At least the Alice has decent copies out in the civilian sector.
That is a waste of time and money unless you enjoy larping more than going /out/.
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>>50538133
No, they're really heavy and uncomfortable compared to modern packs, if you want to larp go for it but if you actually want to go out there's dozens of better options at almost any price point.
>>
Nothing for Vertx or Cannae?
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>>50541765
>There are far better modern packs now
The combination of civilian designs with the tougher abrasion resistant materials favored by the military to produce tough bags that don't weight 10 fucking pounds, and market forces causing companies to actually offer these bags in at least a few muted colors is one of my favorite developments in backpacking.
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bump
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what kind of tarp can i get that's light weight, not too big and under a hundred bucks?
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>>50548782
Aqua quest guide tarp, 1.2 pounds and $99.99 for the forest green and olive drab 10'x10'. Cheaper for the 10x7 but you don't pay that much of a weight penalty for the slighter larger one so you might as well go larger in my opinion.
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>>50549065
looks pretty good. amazog doesn't list how waterproof it is. is it at least waterproof for 5000 ml? also is the camo one the same?
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>>50549204
Their website says the guide has a 5000mm waterproof rating and I don't think the guide comes in camo. The way their tarps work is that the guide is the their lighter weight (1.2 pounds for 10x10), the safari is their medium weight (1.75 pounds for 10x10) and the defender is the heavy weight (I don't know the weight of the 10x10 but 10x7 is 2.4 pounds). I would go with the guide because weight savings and most of the stuff I've seen about aqua quest tarps has been specifically the guide series.
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>>50549281
alright that sounds waterproof enough. i still feel like a 135 bucks (i'm a leaf) is quite a bit for a tarp. are there any other options you could recommend?
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>>50549376
There are definitely cheaper tarps but not that I can personally recommend, it's more an issue of not having tried most of them rather than knowing them to be crap. I do know that a surprising amount of them are garbage though. I did not think that people could fuck up a tarp but I have learned.
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>>50549376
>>50549424
My whole tent, Mongar 2, is only $170 usd for example. And while 2.2kg is more than the 1.2 pounds of the guide tarp, the mosquito mesh and having a floor makes it worth it to me. Tarps seem like they should be cheap.
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>>50549424
alright you've convinced me. i didn't think a cheap tarp could be that bad but then again chinesium can be pretty shit.
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>>50549453
actually that looks pretty good. my problem with most of these tents though is the bright fucking colours. plus i already have a ground sheet
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>>50548782
Snugpak stasha
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>>50549514
>bright fucking colours
A real pain sometimes. I have the light grey one. It sticks out a bit but it's not the worst and it doesn't bother me in the way that the super neon tents do. Also white or gray fabric means that it doesn't tint the light and do weird shit to your eyes. Try living in a bright orange tent, it will feel like living on mars when the sun comes up.
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>>50549538
where would this be available in leafland?
>>50549555
>checkem
kek i have been in a bright orange tent and it does fuck with your eyes. on another note, what kind of sleeping mat and sleeping bag do you use? my sleeping mat has an R value of 3.4 which i think is adequate, however my sleeping bag is not.
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>>50549638
>sleeping mat and sleeping bag
A thermarest xlite that I got on discount, I think from ebay? The older one with the 3.2 r value. The sleeping bag is a Marmot nanowave 35, the long version not because I'm super tall but due to the slightly wider shoulder part which I need. It's a fine summer bag in most of the country that's essentially year round where I live. No need to mess with down when it's this warm and damp either. Oh and I think if you make an account with marmot they give some kind of coupon for 10-15% off your first order. I remember the sleeping bag being cheap and I think that's why.
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>>50549752
ok i'll look on marmot. where do you live btw? im in the PNW
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Anyone recommend a good pack in woodland that I can wear with a plate carrier?
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>>50549773
The south, pretty far south and not that high elevation either. My thought process for the bag was that I already liked their rain coats so I checked to see if they had anything under a hundred dollars that I could survive in down to mid 30's with a comfort rating in the 40's. 20 oz weight and compressing to 8 liters at that price basically decided it for me. The included stuff sack is a bit big but it works fine.
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>>50549793
>20 oz weight
I just thought about it, there's no way in hell this bag is that light. Under 3 pounds sure, but not under 2.
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>>50549804
eh 3 pounds doesn't sound too bad but 8 liters seems bulky as fuck, i might look for something a less bulky.
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>>50549836
A 6L synthetic bag in the 32-35 range, quite good for synthetic, is at least double the price. My compression sack is at the bottom of my pack and I have it adjusted so it's a cylinder as long as the pack is wide rather than compressing it all the way into a ball that kind of sucks to pack. Stuff on top flattens it down. One of the reasons that a bigger pack is useful.
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>>50549896
yeah i've got an average size pack which is why i'm worried about bulkiness. maybe i should have gotten something bigger than a savotta jakkaari M
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Bop
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Backpack 2
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Kelty Coyote 65 or Osprey Rook 65?
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>>50552624
haven't used either, but imo the kelty because it looks like it has more separate pockets which is nice for keeping organized
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>>50552624
Just looking at the Rook the back panel looks not very padded. Reviews seem to confirm that the padding is thin and too firm on the straps as well. Its lighter than the coyote but I wouldn't take that over comfort. Either get the coyote or a more expensive osprey, something with the ag suspension like an atmos.
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>>50550062
You can work around a small pack, you just have to make intentional choices. Down instead of synthetic, that kind of thing. I decided at the beginning that the sort of trips my bag is set up for, longer ones, needs a larger bag. And then because I don't need a ton of different packs I just use that same bag for everything overnight and up.
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>>50538295
Went out earlier looking to pick up the Predator Patrol 45, but none were in stock. They had a few other packs on offer, so ended up grabbing a Karrimor Global 75+15 for £40 (usually £180) which will tide me over until I grab the Predator.
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>>50555087
Interesting. Just to let you know though that Karrimor Global is a different company than Karrimor SF who makes the predator and sabre bags. Karrimor Global being a brand applied to stuff produced by other, mostly chinese, manufacturers. Karrimor SF split off from the original Karrimor before they got bought up and was unaffected by that.
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>>50555282
The fuck are you talking about? Karrimor is the brand, Global is the name of the pack. The SF packs are just another range of packs made by Karrimor and marketed under Karrimor SF. Fuck me, you cunts really are dumb.
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>>50555419
>The SF packs are just another range of packs made by Karrimor and marketed under Karrimor SF
Used to be that way yes. Now some Karrimor branded stuff is sold through Sports Direct, like the global pack. And other stuff is made my Karrimor SF which is now a different company.
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>>50555419
"Karrimor SF a separate company to Karrimor and we operate under a license agreement. The designs are ours, we use our own manufacturing facility and we are regularly audited by defence departments to ensure our quality management systems meet their requirements."
Taken from their website under the faq section
>>
Skimmed the thread and saw some posts saying Kelty packs are cheaper than Osprey, but the Osprey budget options cost just as much as the Kelty ones. Which do I buy? The 65L Osprey pack or the 65L Kelty pack?
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>>50556287
Used kelty's, especially the older external frame packs, can be extremely cheap. For new stuff I personally think that the coyote is the better pack in that price range. The more expensive osprey packs are great but don't get the budget osprey. They're not terrible but the coyote is the better option.
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>>50539176
enojy your mossies and ticks on the toes bro. would be good to have if out bicycle touring but hiking off the beaten path well not so in my experience.
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>>50552292
wtf does ching chong say on your bag?
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>>50557111
ひだまりスケッチ
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Any opinions on the Alps Commander Pack?
My only experience in large packs is the molle ruck. All I know is that I want to replace it with something similar.
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>>50557111
the face should give it away
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Goodbye thread
>>
Got pic related recently. Have a pro deal with em so for it for over half off. Super durable and thick, water proof, doesn't stand out much at all, just looks like a normal day pack here. Also can fit a fucking lot of gear. Kuhl has been my go to for hiking pants for a while now so hoping the bags are as good of quality.
>>
>>50559731
Seems cool but the thread is almost dead, post it in the next one when it goes up



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