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File: wata.png (580 KB, 704x882)
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Why is that americans think "watashi" is a "slightly" feminine form of "I"?
I have talked to multiple japanese (males) and they say that is not true at all.
Same with other phrases that americans think they are feminine but japanese see them as normal like using "nano"

What's going on?
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>>41272379
It seems empirically true that women tend to use watashi while men opt for other pronouns. But of course men do refer to themselves as watashi in some contexts, so it wouldn't surprise me if Japanese people didn't think of watashi as being specifically feminine even though the cultural expectation that women speak more politely leads to that outcome. I can imagine a very advanced English class teaching students that women should use the word "pee" instead of "piss" to refer to the act of urination, since the latter is somewhat unladlylike, though a typical English speaker probably wouldn't consciously think "pee = feminine."
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>>41272476
It seems true only in highschool like contexts. But in real life when work is 80% of your life then you use watashi 80% of the time. The "formal situations" is literally almost every facet of japanese life.
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8 years in Japan here.

I refuse to use "boku". Fuck that. "Ore" is fine but it can get you in trouble depending on where you use it. "Watashi" is simply the best and safest option.
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Animebrain
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Watashi makes sense in a formal setting but my admittedly deep experiences with japanese online communities tell me that it can be kinda off in informal ones.
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>>41273417
After boku no pico I just can't say boku to refer to myself lmao

>>41275545
I guess you can sound too uptight and distant but not feminine.
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>>41273417
I thought adults don't really use boku anyway.
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>>41287974
One of my co-workers is like 60 and use boku I wonder if it's because of his age
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I use ore whenever, wherever. Of course watashi is feminine, for it is subservient. Lesser men too can be feminine. If I think about it hard enough everyone is a woman to me. It would be a hassle expressing this sentiment overseas but in Japan? Who will question me? Certainly not women hahaha
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>>41272379
I'm going to use boku so that I sound peggable
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>>41288472
>ore
>not oresama
Woman.
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Because most men use ore or boku with friend and only use watashi at work
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>>41272379
>Why is that americans think "watashi" is a "slightly" feminine form of "I"?

two countries exist in the world: japan and ``america''.
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>>41272379
Because the Japanese says it’s a female pronoun.
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>>41287974
Dogen uses 僕, and he knows more about the Japanese language than actual Japanese people.
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>>41272379
Because it is?

And of course they say that. What else are they going to use? Ore? Boku? You don't use either of those in a professional setting. You use watashi or watakushi. Hang around japanese males out among friends at night, you'll hear 'ore' come out then. Not so with women who stick to watashi.
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>>41272379
please don't be swayed by anime
most japanese people use 吾輩(wagahai)
it's used in social/professional cases all the time
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It says it on wikipedia

Watakushi seems based desu
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>not using wagahai
roflcopter, lel even
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>>41273417
I just use 'ore'. I'm 6'4 so no one ever really bats an eye at it
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>>41316415
As for me, it's 拙者.



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