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File: Popular sovreign.png (56 KB, 892x885)
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Out of the English Civil War, American Revolution, and French Revolution, which did the most to promote the idea of popular sovereignty?
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>>9176233
In my frog opinion, it's the english civil war
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>>9176233
French revolution. English civil war promoted the idea that you had rights that the king couldn't violate while the American revolution promoted the idea that a republic based on enlightenment ideals could work in practice.
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>>9176899
I would argue that whilst the English civil wars did the most to destroy the concept of the divine right of kings, the French Revolution's Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was THE document for the idea of citizen rights and sovereignty.
US shouldn't be up there with the others though as it only gets massive press due to USA's current hegemonic influence on media.
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>>9176233
Russian Revolution
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>>9176916
>Hurr durr the American revolution wasn't ACTUALLY influential. The first country in modern history to have a totally secular government isn't a big deal.
Why do Eurofags do this?
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>>9176916
>I would argue that whilst the English civil wars did the most to destroy the concept of the divine right of kings, the French Revolution's Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was THE document for the idea of citizen rights and sovereignty.
Yeah I think you're right about the fact that the french revolution was a big promoter of the idea of popular sovereignty by codifying it into the Declaration. But a big inspiration for it was the English civil war, Montesquieu really took note on what happened in England and brought it to France.
>US shouldn't be up there with the others though as it only gets massive press due to USA's current hegemonic influence on media.
I do think it deserved to be on the list. Major french political figures at the time were very inspired by the American Revolution and the idea of the declaration was inspired by the US constitution.
I can't think we can really "rank" them. They all complete each other.
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>>9176233
The best revolution of that period was the Glorious Revolution and the 1689 bill of rights is the most just and moderate constitutional act in modern history.
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>>9176233
As someone from none of those countries, it's the US. The very idea of government deriving from the governed depended on them.
The English get bonus points, but they didn't really enshrine that anywhere. Whenever popular sovereignty is challenged, Burgers can point to the Constitution.

Though if we are talking strictly about dissemination, it could be the French. After a they forced it on all of Europe and consequently the colonies. But republican government would've hardly gotten off the ground if not for the US.
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>>9177068
>The very idea of government deriving from the governed depended on them.
The US didn't start out that way though, only white male landowners could vote initially and there was an obvious aristocratic attitude among the founders concerning "the masses" which they viewed as unable to govern themselves. The French were the ones who really invented the concept of "mass politics" and political parties as we understand them.
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>>9177068
>The very idea of government deriving from the governed depended on them.
Issue with that sentiment is that not all those governed had a say in government. As >>9177113 said it was basically aristocrats who could vote like in the UK. Then you have the issue of "all men are created equal" but USA still had slavery which was irreconcilable and became the issue that would lead to the civil war.
I think France and the Levelers had a greater impact.
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>>9176916
>>9176233
The American Revolution hands down. Legitimacy proceeds from the people. The English just states the obvious, that we're all beneath God, and the French is just a massive equivocation fallacy using the ephemeral and shapeless device of "the nation" as if it were a concrete and defined thing, which, especially at the time it was written it was not. Ultimately in France the will of "the nation" was turned into
>whatever Paris fags say is French is French and everyone else is not being French and are going against "the nation" by which we mean Paris.
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>>9177576
>The English just states the obvious, that we're all beneath God
The English one literally says that it's ordinary people that are the source of government legitimacy



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