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File: VenusWithWater.jpg (385 KB, 1920x1080)
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Imagine if you will a world like ours that is in a binary planetary system with another world just like ours about the same distance as the moon at least visually.

They both develop life and both develop a sentient, human-like species. They both evolve and progress at similar rates and for a long time they each stare up at the sky and see a blue and green sphere like we would the moon.

Eventually, they would develop telescopes and be able to look far close at these respective bodies and see cities and roads and canals and other evidence of a people like them.

But they would have no way to reach them for centuries, nor communicate in any meaningful way. Assuming both these people's on both these worlds are effectively just like humans, what would they think of one another? How would it change their course of histories respectively? Would space travel become a more pressing concern earlier? Would they live in awe or fear of one another? It's like the opposite of the discovery of the new world where you know there is an entire world you haven't discovered but are powerless to reach it in any way and can only watch and wonder... What would they wonder?
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>>>/sci/
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>>10841530
I'm asking about the humanities aspects of cultural and historical signifigance.
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>>10841487
>r communicate in any meaningful way.
How would they not be able to communicate with each other
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>>10841609
No radio technology. I guess they could try to make huge drawings in the ground like the Nazca but that's very limiting
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If it happened here, the Brits would have probably thought "We better conquer those moon niggers before the French or Dutch do." and then they would have done it and today the moons flag would have a tiny union jack in the top right corner.
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they'd both begin a herculean effort to build weapons capable of wiping out the other, either to destroy the other before they launch theirs or out of revenge having seen the other launch theirs
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Thats a really cool notion thats hardly worth the time of the shitposting autism that goes on here.
This board sucks, I just lurk less and less now and occasionally find a thread that reminds me of the better days.

Been
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>>10841635
Same, but it makes the good ones more worth it. I try to effortpost now and again, at least this one got a few replies.
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>>10841620
You think people would cooperate more towards that uniting goal and thus there would be less war on the home planets? Why would the immediate reaction be fear do ya think?
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>>10841635
Complaining about board quality isn't positive contribution.
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>>10841487
I'm curious if binary planetary systems are even capable of stable orbit around a star on the scale of billions of years, my intuition is that one planet would decouple from the orbit relatively quickly on a geological timescale.

Putting the orbital issue aside, it's vanishingly unlikely both planets would develop the industrial society capable of producing telescopes and radio at the same time. One could have civilization like ours while the other wouldn't even have eukaryotes, nevermind any species capable of sentience or civilization. You would have colonization into a vastly different ecology with the associated mass extinctions.
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>>10841616
My thought to, i'm thinking find he palest desert and line up tranny heads in their day glow drag queen wigs to spell out words
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>>10841616
they could just get a can on a piece of string and toss it to the other planet

easy peasy
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>>10841682
pic related
>>10841660
Of course, a lot has to line up here and the odds of it actually happening are insanely low, but I like the idea as a philosophical question about how we'd react to effectively viewing ourselves in a mirror that we couldn't reach out and actually touch.

Honestly, it kind of got inspired by The Martian Chronicles and how the Martian inhabitants watched as the earth was destroyed by nuclear war and were powerless to do anything and could never go back all the way out on Mars.
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People thought there were canals on Mars in the late 1800/early 1900s. Advancement in telescopy wasn't sound enough to conclusively demonstrate or refute the presence of life on a neighboring planet until the middle of the Industrial Age. It didn't have that much of an impact on public discourse - Wells' The War of the Worlds is about the biggest contribution to culture that this idea produced. Basically, by the time your hypothetical sapients had the capacity to refute or demonstrate the idea of life on a neighboring planet, they'd have the capacity to broadcast radio as well. The War of the Worlds was 1898. The Marconi Company was founded in 1897. The first transatlantic radio message was 1901. The 'canals' were soundly refuted as an optical illusion in 1903. We're talking about a very narrow window for any potential freakout, here. First contact (through longwave radio) would likely happen within fifty years of demonstration that intelligent life existed on a neighboring planet, not centuries. Actual first contact would follow within a generation (imagine how much funding NASA would get if sapient life on Mars existed...). Waging war would never happen. The ludicrousness of trying to manage a logistical chain between planets using atomic age technologies puts that idea right out.
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>>10841487
My favorite space-related Imagine:

Imagine if life had developed on the far side of the moon. For millions of years they're looking out at the sky, totally unaware that there's a giant fucking planet behind them. Then, they start to circumnavigate their world, and that first person rounds the corner.
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>>10841709
Mars is significantly further away than the moon. If there was life and a sentient race with civilizations on the moon we'd have known about it far sooner than if it were on Mars.
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>>10841717
Not to mention they'd have month-long day-night cycles. That would be a pretty funny thought too.

Makes me also think about exoplanets that are earth-like but far closer to weaker stars and are tidally locked so one side is baked permanently and another frozen eternally, but a band in between could be habitable with endless twilight.
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>>10841651
it wouldn't be the emotion of fear, it would be logic, they know their survival is guaranteed by destroying the other world and they know the other world knows this, thus the race begins to develop the means to do so and deploy it
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>>10841717
This also makes me think, wouldn't these two planets be tidally locked? You'd have one side of each permanently facing the other with the other sides looking out on the cosmos. Day/night cycles would depend on their orbit around each other rather than rotation and the side facing the other planet would be cooler than the other since its day would occur when it's father from the sun.
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>>10841735
Eh, distance from a star on that small a scale doesn't have too major an impact on how warm or cold a world is. Interesting video on the subject
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziqeZTruWMY
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>>10841734
>the logical response to learning about sentient life existing somewhere in the universe is to build weapons in anticipation of destroying said life
Interesting take.
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>>10841719
>If there was life and a sentient race with civilizations on the moon we'd have known about it far sooner than if it were on Mars.
Would we? The "Great Moon Hoax" was 1835. I think you're dramatically overestimating the capacities of pre-industrial telescopy. The telescope itself wouldn't be invented until 1608 and these were very primitive devices. Pic related is the first drawing we ever have of the moon using a telescope. As you can see, it doesn't tell much. Even in the 1800s believing in moon beings and moon lifeforms was not an uncommon thing - we didn't have the capacity to soundly refute the idea. Even with a closely orbiting body, we can revise our initial estimate for first contact by about fifty years and still line it up with how our own understanding of our celestial bodies evolved over the centuries.
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>>10841763
The moon is pale white and grey. I feel like it'd be a lot different if it were green and blue. And even with the naked eye you can make out some decent details of the moon, I'm surprised these drawings are so shit desu
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>>10841777
The Moon's surface is much easier to observe as it is not obscured by an atmosphere and weather.
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>>10841759
>>10841734
Waging war across orbit is a ludicrous idea reserved only for the softest of sci-fi. You'd be building defensive weapons and praying that no invasion force would come (no invasion force would come, because trying to put an invasion force across orbit is even more ludicrous an idea than trying to launch missiles or lasers across orbit). Watch less anime.
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>>10841487
>>10841702
I think I get where you’re coming from. Sometimes I imagine what the world would be like if there was more land in the southern hemisphere. The idea of a parallel world with similar settings and how it could diverge from our own history is fascinating. I’d assume it’d be easy to send and receive messages, but the difference in language and culture between two planets would be too great to overcome without contact. Assuming similar time scales it would also be interesting to see how the dynamic of another planet could influence local politics. I bet there’d be various strong countries that would be acknowledged by the other planet while knowing they aren’t its sole representative, not unlike how our continents have skewed importance towards certain countries in them. Food would also be interesting to think about. From the different plants to alien animals, or even if they’re similar. It would be funny if their animals also had carcinization. We could learn so much about the progress of life and maybe even discover new tastes. Imagine firing a rocket full of canned pineapple into space.
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>>10841846
>Imagine firing a rocket full of canned pineapple into space.
It's an oddly wholesome thought that we just send rockets full of cool foods we'd want eachother to try
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VGH...no marsian/venusian waifu
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>>10841717
>Then, they start to circumnavigate their world, and that first person rounds the corner.

That would be horrifying.
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>>10841487
How did the operation go?
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>>10841487
>tfw Venus would have been a fairly oceanic world, with island hopping communities everywhere
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>>10843753
Recommend some Venusian core books
>oceanic anarchism
>average temperature is 25 Cel.
>Post-2500s future, politics and economy
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>>10844080
>average temperature is 25 Cel

A planet wide Fort Lauderdale, Florida (during the winter, during the day)?
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>>10841735
Wonder what the tides would be like
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>>10841487

If want to read a cool alt-history where both Venus and Mars are habitable, check out S. M. Stirling’s “Lords of Creation” novels;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._M._Stirling_bibliography

“What if Mars and Venus really were habitable and inhabited, as in many SF stories from the early sixties and before? In this alternate history series Mars and Venus were terraformed a long time ago and "seeded" with Earth life, including several different human species. On Earth everything is the same until the start of space exploration, but then the Cold War dampens down into a real, collaborative space race which overtakes the military budgets of both superpowers.

The vast investment in interplanetary exploration has changed this alternate history deeply, in ways mentioned in passing, including the close alliance of the United States, Great Britain and the Dominions; but there are other changes: In the Suez Crisis, Britain and France receive American support and succeed, and there is no Sino-Soviet split in 1959. The Soviet Union does not collapse, and there are two competing space efforts: the Sino-Soviet alliance and the US-Commonwealth alliance. The European Union is led by France, since the United Kingdom did not join it, but their space effort is considerably behind the others. The Sky People is set on Venus, while its sequel In the Courts of the Crimson Kings is set on Mars.”
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>>10845148
There wouldn't be variable tides
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>>10841487
imagine the huge deadly global pandemics caused by just one fag travelling from his planet to the other



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