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Graphic Design student here, loving the work and the subject but just I cannot get my head around typography. What makes a good font? What makes a bad one? Is it all personal preference? Like, I get that comic sans looks shit on a funeral card but beyond that I’m fucking lost. Pic related, my work for a staircase in student accommodation.
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>>392268
get an old sign painters lettering book from the web- like internet archive or wherever hosts pdfs - and spend some time looking at it. find some old US survey maps and look at the legends. look at old treaties signed and sealed by kings.

then soend some time looking at interior design / environemental stuff. every place has a feel, a continuity, things work together, from floor to counter to wall texture - start thinking of a page as a space - a mental space - and then go learn about proportion somehow.

youre skill as an illustrator (which is obvious - good for you!!) has nothing to do witth this tho.
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>>392268
typography is a meme, there are two fonts and both have different uses, Serif and Sans Serif, which serif or sans serif you use it's a personal preference, 90% it's default fonts unless you design a specific font for a brand
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>>392271
Yeah mate. Ok. So basically just research more and get a feel for what the fonts are saying?

Would you say there’s such thing as a true font? Like helvetica and futura seem to be lauded above all others on my course and I just do not see what is so special about them. Would a free font of dafont be frowned upon even if it fits or looks good in the setting?
Thanks for the reply btw
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>>392273
Do you think it’s all just personal preference then? There’s no set rule that specific fonts have to be used? Hand made fonts are just as “valid” for want of a better term?
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>>392275
Go look at websites, books, on tv, whatever, it's all the same font basically under different names. Legibility = default font. If you are asking if free fonts are just as good to use, yes, no difference
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>>392274
id never say 'saying'
id say feel or vibe or something touchy feely like that, because thats the intangible youre struggling for until it becomes tangible - and feel , resonance, connotation, implication, has a lot to do with the body of knowledge history association you have around certain aggregates of shape.

so its not so much 'do research' - its go be a part of and digest your art.
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>>392274
well, helvetica and futura are really fucking good.
there 's nothing 'off' about them
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>>392278
op, go look at some old maps - i have a few from 187x - the combination of fonts is fascinating - the use of san serif fonts is interesting, like modernism hit letterforms before modernism existed. you look like you need a good dose of modernism,
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>>392273
>typography is a meme
Laughably untrue. And, serif and sans are two *styles*, there are plenty more, like italic, blackletter, cursive, monospace, etc.
But an autist larping as a designer would think it's a meme, for sure.
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>>392275
No, there are no set rules, but long existing conventions, like block letter sans for headlines, and serif for block text - which has more to do with legibility, AND design aesthetic. I have to wonder how far along in a design course, or if it's even true, to not have a fundamental understanding of typography. It's a topic that comes up pretty fucking early.

But, if you're serious, and for whatever reasons you'd have not to ask your teachers, get a copy of The Elements of Typographic Design, by Robert Bringhurst. It's as close to a "bible" on fontography as you'll get.
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>>392274
No, researching old fashioned fonts won't do shit, especially as most of the references that anon gave were hand lettered with a pen.
Modern typography is dressing up a visual medium. Design is not art, it's stylizing information. Your task as a designer is to organize and style information for the viewer, whether it's a billboard, or a newspaper page. Communication is first. Style is second. Except in edge, outlier cases like death metal band logos, which are purposefully designed to be illegible.
There's no 'true font", it's choices made for aesthetic or functional needs. Future and helvetica are used frequently because they're simple, work well in most contexts, and have been designed and tweaked for decades to be that way - and are easy to read. Same for Garamond and it's endless versions.
The simplest font is a monospaced, like courier. Open up a raw text document in Notepad with no stylizing, that's as baseline as you'll get in a GUI. Or a raw block of HTML in a web editor. Your job as a designer is to make it easier to read, in an overall page layout. Over the decades people have found that certain fonts work really well in certain contexts, and font designers have made variations, like italics, bold, and extended fonts to cover more ground.
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>>392287
youre ignorant
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>>392285
keep coping, the $100 font you bought needs it's cope
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>>392313
My clients and my work pays for fonts, retard. At my job I have the Adobe Font Folio to work with, and other collections. Learn how real designers work, instead of stuttering and jabbering at us like a waterhead.
Besides, you think $100 is a lot of money? LOL. I spend more than that on ink refills for my inkjet. Get an income, loser.
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>>392268

papyrus and segoe script
idk man, as long as it looks good and it's readable, it's ok.
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>>392348
thats trash
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>>392348
>>392352
The Segoe works but not the Papyrus
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>>392346
you sound like a faggot, you probably need a macbook pro to be a designer
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>>392268
https://youtu.be/_cPJO9njZBs

There's a section in this great video regarding antique lettering, typography, and it's place in past industries. Enjoy.
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>>392268
maybe pursue illustration
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>>392356
misc sign painting stuff

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-meet-norm-painter-for-hire-beloved-las-leading-artists
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>>392355
Snivel harder.
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>>392274
>>392275
The problem with handmade and downloads off Dafont if that they’re less flexible than fonts made by established type foundaries - they’ll almost definitely lack ligatures, alternate characters, punctuation marks, non-English glyphs, and most importantly they don’t manually design the proper kerning between each letter combination. You can get away with this in some instances like the headline on a poster, but if you tried to do a magazine layout using a serif font you downloaded off Dafont it’ll almost certainly look like shit.
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>>392377
I came here to post this. Adobe Typekit, classic well-known fonts, and select fonts from quality sources will be all you ever need. Dafont shit is broken and only kids use it.
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https://www.typewolf.com/
Really good resource to recognize the patterns of what makes good type, and in a pinch just a place to find good fonts and inspo for font pairings. Highly recommend.
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>>392377
>but if you tried to do a magazine layout using a serif font you downloaded off Dafont
You would be fired, in my experience. Magazine layout is insane in terms of deadlines, and if multiple pages have to be reflowed and kerned at the last minute, you're gone. Simple as.

(Besides, in magazine layout, you work off the style guide that's in place, and use what the art director tells you. Even Wired, who abuses fonts obnoxiously, has standards.)

When i used to work in agencies, you could only use and buy fonts from the agencies library, or approved vendors, for this very reason.
Back when i worked prepress it was soul killing to see big money jobs come in from some freelancer hack with shit free fonts that had to be re-kerned and reworked with a real version of the font so it wouldn't clog up the typesetter. Which would fuck the imagesetter up anyway because it was a TrueType piece of shit.
The only time I've seen autistic attention to fonts is in museum and academic publishing. Their world is such a bubble that they have the time to get all autistic over it.

I have around 100 fonts I've used for years for my own work. I have more at work, but i don't pay for them, so I get the real deal. I got tired of weeding through shitty, incomplete TTFs years ago.
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Typography is just black blocks and white space.
If you can get over reading the text when first formating youll be better of in the end.
If you're new to typography print intermediate steps out, another medium or resolution helps to break the way you've been looking at your typography on your screen.
Zoom far out and look at your type. Squint your eyes and look at your type. You gotta trick your brain sometimes so it doesn't try to read specific words and instead you can focus on the form of your rows your black to white ratio etc.
That's the macro approach to it.
Then zoom in to specific words and repeat the process from above but now the letters are the blackboxes and your letter spacing is whitespace.
Or just copy, who tf cares.
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>>392275
The only rule is the feel you wanna communicate.
Just try to immitate what you want to communicate.
If you wanna create the "30s' musseum look" you have to use a Serif type, but if you wanna create a "MOMA style musseum", you better choose sans-serif and modern colors.
It's all about the setting, that's the thumb rule, there are cultural codes already out there, you just have to use them.
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>>392850
And the most important thing is your body text, that's the hardest shit to settle. Always use common fonts, because they usually come all set up to use them.
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>>392268
Elements of Typographic Style, bringhurst.
Stop stealing sheep.
megg's history of design.

Typewolf good too.

Best practice: If you don't know what makes a good font or a bad font yet, go for a classic. Look at Vignelli's list.

Print everything off and look at it. Never be satisfied with the details - if it feels wrong, follow that feeling. Sharpen it.
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>>392896
im curious, what makes thse books good?
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https://fontsinuse.com/
Think about the image or subject you're addressing with your font. Then work on finding a font that matches the mood, texture, and geometry. You can scour galleries and find our how simple the modifications to the type usually are.
A good practice is setting up a timer and making typographic pieces the same way you would do figure drawing.
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>>392901

Elements of typographic style -- the only english book (the germans and dutch have others, better ones) that talk about the details of typography and the more technical parts.

Stop stealing sheep -- the opposite; the broad 101 class that every "typography 101" medium post rips off. Unfortunately in North America this is about as "deep" as type talk gets.

Megg's history -- really shows you the evolution of type through time, the context surrounding it. So you can make some better conceptual choices about what type you want to use.
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https://practicaltypography.com/
Checkout this site OP
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>>393017
i have the sheep book, but ive never finished it


thanks for the reply
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>>393026
no problem.

Type is a lot about practice. Mine's still shit too.
Best thing to do is to keep pushing - lots of options at different scales, sizes, etc. Take a walk, come back to it, challenge every decision again and again.

Other books - Emil Ruder's "typographie", Muller-Brockmann's "grid system" also good.
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>>393031
my background is design - but not type - so proportion / grids / space etc are already second nature. the specificity of type though is new
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>>392313
>>392355
major poorfag copes
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>>393056
fuck off dumb cunt
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Fonts have personality. Here's a start on picking fonts for the kind of look you want to portray.
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>>392268
You have to expand your typography culture in order to have a feel for it.

It's not (only) personal preferences. It's about readability, It's about the message and feeling you wanna convey.

Two Sans Serifs can be drastically different and convey a different message with your design.

If you want to find a good type for your design i'd suggest planning it beforehand and trying many things while keeping in mind the context of your project.
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good font for what
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>>392268
go to netflix.
watch Abstract: The Art of Design season 2 ep 6 "Jonathan Hoefler: Typeface Design"
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>>392346
LMFAO this LARPer is getting toasty.
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>>392412
This is fucking hilarious, why would anyone slave for such a "business" in the first place then?
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