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old thread
>>78813926

What are you working on, /g/?
>>
>>78818904
>Plenty of people can't even read "f(a)<0<f(b)" or know what "a zero" means
>msfw in this moldovan shithole i still have better education than 'muricans
makes sense why y'all fell for the globohomo low effort mass manipulation lol
>>
Seriously what the fuck did Python do to you because you fags are TRIGGERED as fuck. Seeing you Redditors talk about Python is like seeing SJWs talk about White men.
>>
>>78818975
(You)
>>
>>78818975
I do not mind Python. Like Java, Python is a mediocre programming language for mediocre programmers. Something has to fill that niche after all.
>>
>>78818975
Python killed my grandma.
>>
>>78818922
ETL tool basically
>>
>>78818975
Have you seen how Guido talks about White men?
>>
>>78818975
shut your mouth whiteboi
>>
>>78818975
kek, im still using 3.5 when i use it, but ive seen a lot of complaining about it too
>>78818997
its a good high level intro language, and the main thing my liberal shithole taught. im ready to move onto something lower, and really want to get a ceh one day. what language would you suggest
>>
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>>78818975
>Seriously what the fuck did Python do to you because you fags are TRIGGERED as fuck. Seeing you Redditors talk about Python is like seeing SJWs talk about White men.
>>
>>78819026
assembly
>>
>>78819043
This.
>>
>>78818975
This but Rust
>>
>>78819033
>counter argument is random dude with open mouth
>>
>>78819069
yes it is
>>
>>78819021
how Guido talks about White men?
>>
>>78819043
>>78819049
on of the teachers tried to cover it but we had immature bird people in the back of the class who kept interrupting so he actually skipped the unit and just gave us the materials. its assembly that uses the move command isnt it? thats the almost lowest language there is if im remembering right
>>
>>78819094
one*
lowest level i mean
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What am I doing wrong?
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>>78819078
Well at least you admit you're stupid.
>>
>>78819110
You did not implement replace method.
>>
>>78819094
it's basically machine instructions for humans
>>
>>78819118
not stupider than you
>>
>>78819110
>windows
>discord
>>
>>78819151
Convincing yourself of a delusion isn't a healthy way to cope.
>>
>>78819138
thats what i thought. i tried a little bit on my own but with the other actual homework it wasnt high on my radar. what would the use be? basically, and correct me if im wrong, but that goes below all the other languages correct? its what makes c, py, rb, and all the rest operate?
>>
>>78819170
cool but why are you telling me this
>>
>>78819110
Not rewriting this in Lisp.
>>
>>78819110
>developing without using virtual environment

Really, install your dev shit in venv
>>
>>78819186
I'm telling you because you lack self-awareness.
>>
>>78819173
yes, for every language, the last compilation step is the assembler.
>>
>>78818975
Python bought programming to the masses and that pisses off the hermits on /g/ because normies have invaded the last hideout nerds had.
>>
>>78819250
ill have to dig into that then, thanks fren. is there an extension assembly specifically uses?
>>
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>>78819300
>>
>>78818367
Use join when the tables relate to each other in some meaningful way, otherwise use union.
SELECT
`cname`
FROM
`enroll`
GROUP BY
`cname`
HAVING
COUNT(`cname`) > 4

UNION

SELECT
`cname`
FROM
`room` = "R128"
>>
>>78819488
Last two lines should be
FROM
`class`
WHERE
`room` = "R128"
>>
>>78819300
the most common one is .asm
>>78819460
?
>>
>>78819285
Nerds still have HAM radio
>>
How does languages that claim to be as fast as c like crystal, zig, nim etc compare to rust? do they offer some nice stuff like borrow checker, prevent programmer from making errors or something like this or are they just another generic languages with nothing new to offer?
>>
>>78819549
id like to get into that too, you need a license right? or is that just rumor
>>
How difficult is JavaScript if I already know the basics of Java? I am able to write a small, simple to-do app with a GUI in JavaFX but I still feel like a complete brainlet who stands zero chance against actual CS graduates when it comes to finding a job.
JavaScript, for all the hate it gets in the programming world, seems to maintain its popularity and is widely seen as an 'easy' language. But how much of that is true? I am also considering Python but there aren't that many jobs available which require it and if there are they are very often connected with devops (again difficult to get into for someone without a cs degree and/or experience) or data science (same).
>>
>>78819622
If you already know Java then you will only need to learn the script part
>>
>>78819622
JavaScript and Java, despite their names, are completely unrelated languages. That being said, they are quite similar in that they're both C-style languages. If you already know Java picking up JS shouldn't be that difficult since it's the decidedly easier language of the two.
>>
>>78819572
The license guards it against the normies
>>
>>78819622
js and java have almost nothing in common
>>
>>78819674
they're both garbage
>>
Guys is it possible to code an entire project on git through code suggestions? aka no IDE, no notepad, nothing. Just git & applying code suggestions in commits.

For a master they wouldnt be hindered at all in the first place.
>>
>>78819662

Well, I meant the difficulty and complexity rather than similarity. I know about the name thing.

BTW does anybody actually believe the story behind the 'JavaScript' name? it's fucking retarded. I don't believe it. Never have, never will.
>>
Can someone explain the tower of hanoi recursive algorithm in tardman's terms?
>>
>>78819723
It's definitively on the easier side of things. The only "difficult" thing about JavaScript is learning all of its weird rules: abstract equality comparison; default sort behavior; when to use var (never), let, and const; array "length"; this bindings; implicit type conversions in places you didn't expect and so on and so forth.

>the story behind the 'JavaScript' name
It being a marketing ploy? Honestly wouldn't surprise me.
>>
>>78819783
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SUvWfNJSsM
>>
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What is everyone's opinion on GUI programming with Python?

I like it, even for larger applications, but people fucking shit on it all the time.
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what are some learning milestones that serve as good reference for how far you've come?
I only have the long term one of knowing how to interact with browsers and other applications and the short term one of opening a random page from the docs and understanding what the fuck I'm looking at
>>
>>78819663
kek, makes sense. whats the process for obtaining a license?
>>
>>78819816
>It being a marketing ploy? Honestly wouldn't surprise me.

it's like saying Coca Cola is popular so you name your drink Coca Cola Ice Tea
Wasn't Java copyrighted even then?
>>
>>78819878
gui applications are deprecated.
>>
>>78819878
>What is everyone's opinion on GUI programming with Python?
Which GUI packages? You won't want to mix and match them in any particular app unless you're totally crazy.
>>
>>78819878
Is that made with Tkinter?
>>
>>78819783
if you know how to move n (n>1) tiles from A to C using B, you'll know how to move n+1 tiles from A to C, by:
1. moving n tiles from A to B using C
2. moving the last tile from A to C
3. moving n tiles from B to C using A
>>
>>78819963
Just because Lisp is shit at doing them...
>>
>>78819173
Be careful anon, assembly is typically for a specific architecture. You might shoot your self in the foot if cross platform code is important to your. I would recommend c++. c++ has a large number of nearly optimal tools in it's Standard Template Library(stl), and some of which are optimal. It also has a more robust type system and template generation. Additionally, when relevant, you can use pre-processor directives to conditionally compile assembly code for different targets when/if it matters and that low level access becomes critical. Also, the C++20 standard has some really nice modern features. I recommend learning C++20, and you can always hand roll anything that needs to be optimized if it's in your critical path. Although, I will caution you that if you require true runtime reflection, c++ is not great at this, and you essentially need to design some pretty insane hacks to a point where my advice becomes learn c#, although c# does run slower, typically due to things like the amount of boxing and the garbage collector kicking in if you don't mitigate it with object pools. If you go the c++ route though, you can easily write in a c or assembly style to get that extra performance. In c# you can do similar things using unsafe code sections, but it really isn't what the language was made for imo, and it feels like you spend a lot of time fighting the language to do things that are relatively trivial in c/c++. I don't recommend java as c# is just better imo since they went open source. I've heard good things about typescript in webdev, but honestly I'm hoping webasm compilation for c++ becomes easier and more tooling is built around that. Though honestly, I don't really like any of webdev atm, just not fun at all to fight with the code. C++ is also the king of compile time static code generation via templating, though certain technologies for c# have made this more feasible of late such as Unity's new DOTS, but it is still very hacky atm.
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>>78818922
If structs already existed in C, why was C++ invented? Why was OOP even made popular?
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>>78820366
because structs don't solve the problems OOP was designed to solve
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>>78820366
C doesn't even have namespaces, so something like C++ was inevitable.
>>
>>78820394
name one problem that can be solved with classes but can't be done with structs
>>
>>78820486
Member functions, static member variables, private members.
>>
>>78820486
there is none. there is also no problem that can be solved with structs and can't be solved by flipping bits manually in memory with a needle and a steady hand, classes and methods just make it easier to solve those problems.
>>
>>78820366
I dont like oop, but I like that c++ offers lambdas and templates because it gives us autists something to jerk off to while getting no real work done
>>
>>78820486
let me be clear, when I said "struct's don't solve the problems OOP was designed to solve", I meant 'problems' in the human sense, not in the mathematical sense. OOP makes it easier to understand and operate on generic objects, as long as they're inheriting from a base class or implementing an interface.

you can, for example, make a widget toolkit in which all the widgets extend a base "widget" class and implement a draw() method, so they can all be put on a list and have draw() called in all of them in a single loop.

the best feature a language can have from the human perspective is to be as generic as possible. what makes assembly and C hard to work with is how specialized they are. I am aware that they're all turing complete and there is a performance trade-off, but it's still worth it to use a more generic language for many things.
>>
>>78819878
what gui libraries do you recommend?
>>
>>78820522
those are not problems. but let's see:
>Member functions
normal functions, pass the struct as the first argument
fn (&struct) instead of struct.fn()
>static member variables
static variables
>private members
private access literally only exists to provide encapsulation, hide the data. all the programmer needs is discipline, pretend they don't exist and only manipulate the data through the functions

>>78820523
correct
>>
and why does /g/ hate python so much
>>
>>78820639
I never said these were problems that you couldn't work around in C, but are some of what lead to C++. Especially member functions, so you don't have to terrible function names to work around the character limit and lack of namespaces.
>>
>>78820366
>member functions is the only feature C++ adds
>>
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cling has made my c++ dick 20 times bigger
thank you based cling
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>>78818922
what kind of games can I make with postgres and webshit?
>>
>>78820771
>>
>>78821118
kys retard
>>
>>78821118
Project euler problems generally are at their heart math problems solved using computer programming. Computer science as a discipline is really just applied math as well - so it could be either your programming or (imo more possibly) your math skills that need practice

>>78820652
Doesn't matter what language you pick, you will always find someone who hates it here
>>
>>78821118
the easy ones should take you 5 min, tops. even for the mid difficulty ones most of the times you can reuse code, because they are variations and finish them in 10m
>>
>>78820652
Some hate on it because they're shilling for something else.
Some hate on it because it makes doing many things easier than they think it should be (or conversely it makes something harder than expected).
Some are just shitposting for fun.
>>
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i'm new to programming and working on a small desktop app that will connect to a django site I have.

I have a question about authentication... If i want a user to login to the app, do I just have the app send an HTTP request for a token? I'm not sure how I should go about doing this.
>>
>>78820652
mostly purists post here: either cniles, functionaltards or rustrannys. obviously languages that have no charisma get shat on
>>
Easiest way to edit html on websites? E.g. find a certain element and remove it or change the text inside it, but the page still loads and runs normally on your browser. Like how adblock removes ads but more general.
>>
>>78820652
classic 4chan arrogance
>>
>>78820652
I use it almost every day. Not having a typing system is retarded 90's early 00's shit; mypy is a very shitty hack; async/await is a shitty solution, but really all it could do to scrape by since they didn't design it into the language; and it's fucking slower than shit, but at least it's quick to write. However that's not my choice is it, it's PMs. I complain about it because I know there can be better, Python is outdated, all it takes is one modern language that is nearly as quick to write and it will disappear quickly. Perl was abandoned because of how unmaintainable it is. The same will happen to Python.
>>
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>Tfw semi decent at programming
>Tfw shit at math
>Tfw need to learn math to be able to learn DS&A
Any math book you would recommend to a math brainlet to learn the most relevant math topics(Calculus, Discrete Math, Probability, etc)? I may be dumb, but I don't want to stay dumb.
>>
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>>78821118
The difficulty of Project Euler varies wildly. The first 50 or so you should be able to bang out because they're all well within the range of a brute force solution. The later ones go up in difficulty and will probably take you a lot more time. I haven't done any in years, good luck.
>>
>>78821552
What makes a language quick to write?
>>
>>78821556
discrete math is, as far as I know, the kind of thing you pick up naturally if you learn programming. it's just a formalization of the kind of thing we do. calculus and statistics are very useful and important, and you should learn it if you can
>>
>>78821570
Easy abstractions. Things that many statically typed natively executing languages don't do for "muh performance". So instead we have to write our programs in languages where type errors aren't checked and it runs slower than dogshit? It's pathetic.
>>
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Bros... I don't think he's going to finish it...
>>
>>78821590
Yeah, I realized that if I ever wanted to create anything worthwhile, I need to learn higher levels of maths. So I gotta hit the books like no other.
>>
>>78821556
Something like Fundamental Concepts of Maths is what you're looking for. With no formulas, but focused in history and famous problems, try your local library
>>
>>78821696
as if you've even read a single volume
>>
>>78821696
Who is that? Serious question because they look familiar but I cannot think of their name.
>>
>>78821750
Sounds interesting. Is this the book you speak of? https://www.sciencedirect.com/book/9780080216652/fundamental-concepts-of-mathematics
>>
>>78821696
Has anyone ITT read one of the volumes? Are they worth it?
>>
>>78821778
knuth
>>
I don't want to start a flamewar, but I do want to know:
What editor did you stick with?
VSCode is nice and what I use at work, but my autism is telling me to learn something else.
I'm between nvi and joe after having used both for a day or so.
I know there's nothing perfect - so tell me what you settled on.
>>
>>78821780
I wasn't referring to any in particular, because I don't know any in english, I just know something of the kind must exist. That one looks interesting.
>>
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What regular expression algorithm (NOT regex) is superior, Thompson's construction or Glushkov's construction? Does it matter once the NFA is turned into a minimized DFA? Thompson's construction looks far simpler to build, but does this mean the equivalent DFA will take longer to minimize?
>>
>>78821832
I see most people use Atom/sublime text for windows dev at home. they're pretty aesthetically nice.
>>
>>78821933
>sublime text
this one
>>
>>78821832
emacs!
>>>/g/emg/
>>
>>78821832
I realized that I didn't need anything more than NPP. I've been using it exclusively for 2 years now for all types of development.
>>
>>78821832
>>78821933
>>78821965
>>78821984
>>78821993
Is sublime text superior to VSCode? Also, for some reason when I try to use Sublime text on ubuntu, it doesn't let me scroll with my mouse pad or mouse. How do I fix that bug?
>>
>>78822079
>Is sublime text superior to VSCode?
You don't have much experience with text editors, do you?
>>
>>78822079
yes, it's lighter and aesthetically superior. even the good integration with dev tools vscode has, can be configured in sublime text with a tiny bit of work. In linux, I'm not sure how to make it work, if I don't have a windows option, I use nano to get by
>>
>>78822127
I don't. I am pretty new when it comes to actually writing code.

>>78822183
Sweet, thanks for the explanation.
>>
>>78821816
I've read 1 and 4. Its got some good content, some ancient content that no longer applies (like the fictitious decimal(!) assembly languages used for pseudocode in book 1), but its mostly an encyclopedia of algorithms to solve certain types of problems.
>>
>>78822196
VSCode has massive first party and third party support, you won't find anything similar to it in other text editors.
There are specialized IDEs that do a better job than VSCode at specific environments though, like Visual Studio (C++, C#), IntelliJ (Java), QT Creator (C++), Android Studio and XCode (mobile shit).
But other text editors won't offer you anything. Maybe less memory usage.
>>
>>78819568
Crystal uses a garbage collector, like Go does.
Zig and Nim don't offer the same safety checks as Rust, but please correct me if I am wrong.
>>
>>78821650
Would you mind giving some examples? I'm interested in programming language design
>>
Bjarne and the rest of the faggots attempts to modernize C++ are pathetic, they are removing every little bit of likability the language had. And in the end it will be neither a good systems language anymore nor resemble a modern language in any kind of sense
>>
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shit language
>>
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Any good graphical debuggers for C++?
>>
>>78822886
A terminal emulator is a graphical program.
>>
>>78822886
visual studio frontend, gdb backend
>>
>>78819285
>programming to the masses
It's literally BASIC for the modern era. Nobody bitched about how stupid BASIC was or how retarded BASIC programmers were. So why the Python hate? Is it the Mayan symbolism?
>>
>>78823037
>Nobody bitched about how stupid BASIC was or how retarded BASIC programmers were.
Really?
>>
>>78820632
I like dat pyside2 (qtwidgets with better license)
>>
>>78819723
>fucking retarded. I don't believe it. Never have, never will.
Clearly you weren't there. Sun owned the server market, but Netscape owned the browser, they had something like 98% share, they was the only standardization body for HTML that mattered in an era where html was moving rapidly. Sun threatened to make them a footnote in a matter of months, the hotjava browser was written in Java and completely portable, in an era where that was a rarity, and binary portable in an era where that was almost unheard of, and had java plugins that were also binary portable in an era where that was simply inconceivable. Netscape had to do something - anything - to keep sun from cornering both server and client sides of the internet, and had to do it fast and had to knock java's legs out from underneath it. Their new scripting language was something, and it was available in just a few weeks, all that was needed was to kill java's momentum somehow. Naming their new scripting language javascript did that nicely, the retarded magazine and newspaper writers assumed javascript was simply Netscape's implementation of java in a lighter scriptey form, only now available in the browser with 98% market share. Javascript won overnight, all the java hype transferred from Sun java to Netscape java with very little awareness of the magnitude of the error.
>>
>>78823037
>Nobody bitched about how stupid BASIC was
yes they did. Even the creators were self-aware and named it accordingly
>>
>>78823037
>Nobody bitched about how stupid BASIC was or how retarded BASIC programmers were.
You don't know that.
You're so self-centered you don't even realize other languages get as much hate, if not more than Python. Why would you know about Basic?
Try to talk about JS in a non-web dev thread, it's nearly impossible, doesn't even matter how you're using it. Meanwhile you can ask about Python on /dpt/ and you will easily a couple of anons helping you, it's only when pythonistas start being too obnoxious that they get shit.
>>
>>78819816
JavaScript was developed in the 90s by Brendan Eich (in a total of two weeks actually) for the NetScape browser, and was originally called NetScript. Because Java was insanely popular at the time for web-based applets, they decided to latch onto the marketing hype and rename it "Java"Script.
>>
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Scala is the only good language on the JVM
>>
>>78820366
You can kind of implement object-oriented programming in C with structs and function pointers but it's really clumsy, C++ makes object-oriented stuff way with features like inheritance and polymorphism.

Honestly, I'd probably blame the explosion in popularity of OOP on the popularity of Java.
>>
>>78819110
Not using Rust
>>
>>78821418
I guess depends on your use case - if you want to just get an edited version of a web page, you can do some webscraping shit with Python and BeautifulSoup to edit the HTML. If you're trying to do this interactively or an every webpage you visit, then probably using some JS to make a browser plugin would be best.
>>
>>78821401
Use 0auth
>>
>>78823356
Have you ever heard about user scripts?
>>
>>78823196
will there be a day where google, facebook or chrome are a thing of the past like netscape, myspace or altavista? will people look back and wonder how the heck they were market leaders, almost monopolies?
>>
>>78818922
I want to make a dungeon-crawler game for the linux terminal in C, but I can't figure out how to get live user input without it pausing the program waiting for me to press something, how do I do this?
>>
>>78823037
Because there wasn't a culture of elitism around programming back then cause it was new
>>
>>78823391
you stop using a terminal because terminals aren't for real-time applications
>>
>>78818975
Personally I find Python to be incredibly useful for everyday file management tasks at work.
>>
>>78823411
What should I use then? SDL2? I don't know how to draw, I'm thinking of just installing gentoo because someone said that would fix the problem
>>
>>78823414
this seems like kind of an unnecessary use for python, why not just use bash/powershell if you're just managing files?
>>
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How does image hashing work for lossy images like .jpg?
Am I going to get a different hash every time the images degrades slightly?
>>
>>78823467
>Am I going to get a different hash every time the images degrades slightly?
Yes
>>
>>78822412
I hope at some point the ISO recognizes that legacy C compatibility is holding the language back and get rid of that sack of shit, especially legacy "arrays" and preprocessor support
>>
>>78823467
they don't degrade by themselves kek. obviously if you change the file, so will the hash
>>
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How would I capture parameters passed in function calls?
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>>78823502
what does make them degrade?
moving them from one drive to another?
uploading them online and downloading them again?
just time?
>>
>>78823391
The typical solutions (besides using ncurses) is to either use poll() or select() on stdin/tty. Having a second thread running to do input can also work.

poll() based solution is stop-the-world too, but with a split-second timeout. You can't detect keydown/keyup events without roit access (or an xserver running as root) BTW.

ANSI/terminal escapes might need to be handled... One recommended library to use. http://www.leonerd.org.uk/code/libtermkey/
>>
>>78823487
I hope they change the name too. C# nowadays is more worthy of wearing the C name.
>>
>>78823524
What do you mean by the C name?
>>
>>78823516
>moving them from one drive to another?
No
>uploading them online and downloading them again?
No
>just time?
No

Decompressing the image and recompressing it will cause it to degrade, it's what happens when you edit the image.
Also you can resize the image and normalize the noise to find matches of JPG images with different hashes. I don't know much about it, but you can check some reverse image search source code, like iqdb.
>>
>>78823516
lel, are you joking? it's a compression algorithm. from normal image goes to .jpg, much smaller in size but also with degradation, and then it stops.
>>
>>78823514
lambdas, if your language doesn't have it, you are out of luck.
>>
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>>78818922
Just added UI layout logic to my game framework in Rust. Pic related is the component hierarchy and the produced output.
The first and second rectangle are programmed to expand to take up all the available space, with expansion factors of 1.0 and 3.0, hence the second rectangle taking up twice as much space as the first.
Other components take up their minimum space.
The idea of here is pretty much stolen from Godot Engine and Flutter's Expanded widget, and it works quite well.
>>
>>78823539
C++ wears the C name because originally was the same language with a few extensions
>>
>>78823605
Couple of notes here:
Yes, it's Component + Send because this is multithreaded. Rendering and game logic happen in separate threads.
The code to build the hierarchy is quite verbose, and that's because Skia is a complicated bitch. This should be fixed with just a couple of ::new methods.
>>
>>78823514
I dont understand the question, capture what? can you post an example?
>>
>>78823614
>C++ wears the C name
What does wearing the C name mean?
>>
>>78823604
>>78823633
Sorry, in linux, how can I capture SYSTEM CALL parameters using C
>>
>>78823649
Isn't it just the two arguments that the main function receives?
Usually name argc and argv.
>>
>>78823649
you mean kernel calls?
hackers use a tool called tracers which will tell you what kernel functions a program makes in it's lifetime. I think strace is one, but I don't know how easy it is to use or whether it is the best.
you still need to explain your question better.
>>
>>78822369
I tried typing out a response and 1800 characters in hit the escape key by accident so, quick recap.

> Natively executing. AOT or JIT doesn't matter. Heavy optimizations don't matter either, just being able to run natively will be a huge performance jump for free.
> Statically-typed, heavily-infered, generic-by-default type system. So it "appears" dynamically-typed, until the compiler can't figure it out
> Easy concurrency. Something fool-proof as possible. Go's system is probably the best. If not that, PLEASE don't do that async/await garbage. consider all code in a coroutine context and have call/yield semantics like Lua
> Automatic memory collection. Must be a fool-proof as possible. Immeasurable time is lost hunting for leaks and fucking with some formal proof system like Rust's. Just use a GC goddammit. Performance isn't king.
> MODULES
> STANDARD LIBRARY
> PACKAGE MANAGER

Basically, if there is some low-overhead way of avoiding bugs or unmaintainable code, do it. Static type system: good. Automatic memory management: good. Concurrency without race conditions and manually managing locks: good. Other design choices that reduce the production of hard to maintain code: good.

One of the things python got right was the fact that many language features are instrumented in Python. There are no irreducible things in Python. coroutine objects are "objects" that carry around information you can introspect. Even types are "objects" so you can do metaprogramming in a way.
>>
>>78823605
rust code strucks me as odd. there's an aura of sexiness but it's also brutish at the same time. Looks clean, but also grim
>>
>>78823649
int argc, number of parameters and char *argv[], array of pointers to strings as parameters of main. The OS passes them to the program
>>
>>78823687
>but also grim
Rust is the most redpilled programming language. You get to learn a whole bunch of things many languages (like C/++/Python alike) try to hide away from you.
>>
>>78823703
can you give an example?
>>
>>78823686
Anti-features:
> more than one way to do a thing
> builtin documentation tool (just add a sphinx domain nigger)
> "build system" (the compiler should be sufficient to understand dependencies, interact with the package manager etc. You should be able to type "built it motherfucker" and it does the thing)
> inconsistent scoping rules

More good features
> scopes and syntax are arbitrarily nestable (I should be able to define a function inside of my function inside of my class inside of my function)
> opt-in "const"
> supports both value and reference types, user types can be *either*, not just reference types.
>>
>>78823736
Compared to C:
Rust doesn't hide that multiple mutable references in multithreaded contexts will create data races.
Compared to C++:
Rust doesn't hide template constraints. In C++ template typename "T" could mean anything, but in Rust it doesn't until you define the traits it implements.
Compared to pythong:
Rust doesn't hide away invisible exceptions. Error handling is opt-out in Rust. Also applies for C++.
>>
>>78823686
Rust
>>
Hey I have no experience programming.
But I picked it up because I think it can optimize a task I want to do.
I want to make a program that can read words and numbers from an image and store them into a .txt files.
I want to use this as an application and a learning task.
I just installed Python today and downloaded a pdf, I'm starting the get the syntax.
I want to know how I can make a program that can read text from an image.
please help.
I'm ok if this will take me a few months to learn. I've time.
>>
>>78823809
How complicated is the text on the image?
>>
>>78823777
makes it explicit, is that what you mean?

However, I remember learning the concept of data races while studying C.
>>
>>78823800
Rust is FAR from productivity oriented.
Honestly Go is closer to what I'm describing than basically any other language. It has most of the good major features I listed. Too bad Rob Pike got overly autistic about everything else in the language: "generic types bad", "exceptions bad", "immutability bad", "user-defined types bad", "type erasure as the primary mechanism of generic code good".
>>
>>78823876
>Rust is FAR from productivity oriented.
>what is not having to spend 20 years chasing shitty memory related bugs and deadlocks in Go because you forgot to unlock something
>>
>>78823930
>what is not having to spend 20 years chasing shitty memory related bugs
In a GC language? Are you retarded?
>>
>>78824010
Have you ever actually written something more complex than a fucking fizzbuzz program in Go? It is just as easy to incorrectly access memory and shit in Go, because it's literally nothing but C with a shitty inefficient GC.

And Go isn't productive either, it's just dumbed-down enough that code monkeys can understand it. Rob Pike is a fucking retard for exclusing stuff like generic types and actual enums, making the language a hellhole to work with. It's so much worse than Rust.
>>
>>78823686
your describing what makes a language attractive, not quick to write
>>
>>78824044
It doesn't have memory leaks.
And deadlocks are very unlikely, because you're supposed to use defer after acquiring a resource
mu.Lock()
defer mu.Unlock()
// code


And yes, I have used Go for commercial projects, you're the one who seems to not have written anything beyond a fizzbuzz with it.
Ironic from you complain about memory leaks, when it's Rust the one susceptible to memory leaks the instant you use RC.
>>
>>78823809
first step is reading the images themselves. pick the format(s) and then implement reading one image rgb into memory, for instance
>>
>>78818922
Building a bigass program in assembly for my university.
>>
>>78824110
>The only memory-related bug is memory leak
t. Go programmer
>deadlocks are very unlikely, because you're supposed to use defer after acquiring a resource
t. never wrote anything more complex than a deadass web server
>you're the one who seems to not have written anything beyond a fizzbuzz with it
I spent more time with Go than 95% of its users. Fuck off.
>what is Rust's Weak<T> pointer
>>
>>78824044
>>78824110
>Rob Pike
>excluding generic types

what's his excuse?
how does he expect people to work, implement dozens of vectors and hashtables, one for each type you need?
>>
>>78824133
>what is Rust's Weak<T> pointer
t. never wrote anything more complex than a deadass linked list

But keep working working on your spinning circle that takes 8 minutes to compile, I'm sure this will provide the productivity you were talking about.
>>
>>78824133
To elaborate on the
>t. never wrote anything more complex than a deadass web server
part, my point is that Go is fucking retarded with its mutex user interface. One includes a mutex in a struct's field, and that's where most people think the pain ends.
But what if you need to pass the struct onto another function after you have locked it, and another person is in charge of writing that function? Do you unlock before calling? Do you hope to oh your holy Rob Pike that the function doesn't lock it itself?
This kind of design makes no fucking sense. The Go author recommends you include the mutex as part of the struct, while the better solution is to keep them separate (which is still fucking retarded and error prone), and that makes you end up with 2 different structs for what should have been 1.
Reminder that if the same goroutine locks a mutex twice, it's fucked. You don't expect another bug to appear where another goroutine unlocks the lock twice, don't you, you fucking Golang code monkey?
>>
>>78824188
Vectors (slices) and hashtables (maps) are provided by the language.
But if you need more complex generic data structures then you're doomed to use codegen.
>>
>>78823819
I don't know the font. But it's just names and numbers.
>>78824123
what?
>>
>>78824190
Keep crying about linked lists, nobody gives a fuck.
Meanwhile I'll keep continuing work on my spinning circle, because it gets to spin without being fucked in the ass by the GC every 2 minutes.
>>
>>78824190
I heard go is very fast compiling. Does this feature scale well? Real big projects?
>>78824215
>>78824215
>Vectors (slices) and hashtables (maps) are provided by the language.
generic vectors and hashtable as in native types? uau, that's a first
>>
>>78824221
what what?
>>
>>78824252
mother fucking what?
>>
>>78824260
qué?
>>
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>>78823684
>>78823684
>>78823684
>kernel calls
yes
I need the PID, file descriptors, symbolic links, number of bytes read()/write(), ect... I know I can figure it out reading man pages long enough, but I was hoping someone here would know right off the top and give me a quick rundown.
>>
>>78824241
>I heard go is very fast compiling. Does this feature scale well? Real big projects?
Yes, but that is because the compiler does not do much at all compared to other languages. It's nothing more than a braindead compiler that doesn't tell you anything useful, but instead weeps and cries hard when and only when you make an obvious mistake.
>>
>>78824287
it's still appealing. I'm taking the memelangpill, but still didn't decide if I go for go, rust or even another language I don't know of. The main requisite is that is fast and I can do some ammount of low level shit with it.
>>
>>78824358
Rust, Zig, Nim.
Go is a hellhole and the GC periodically fucks your entire app over, and people who shill it should Go kill themselves.
>>
>>78823777
>Compared to C++:
>Rust doesn't hide template constraints. In C++ template typename "T" could mean anything, but in Rust it doesn't until you define the traits it implements.
? both C++ and Rust have constrained and unconstrained generics though. i must say i prefer the C++ concepts (or even good old type traits) to Rust traits for constraints, even though Rust traits provide interesting dynamic semantics that isn't easily doable in C++.
>>
>>78824392
Incredible, how can they be a Google product? Pretty much everything they do is good and market dominant
>>
>>78824543
>? both C++ and Rust have constrained and unconstrained generics though.
C++ introduced template constraints only in C++20. And the constraints are opt-in.
>>
>>78824543
Agreed, constrained is good, but being too constrained gets in the way. Rust has a shitton of boilerplate just to able add and subtract inside of a generic function. Do you also wanna assert that T is an integral type, for example? Last I checked you had to use an external crate for that.
>>
>>78824198
Thanks God Rust fixed this, right?
fn main() {
let mu = Mutex::new(0);
let data = mu.lock().unwrap();
other_func(&mu);

println!("{}", data);
}

fn other_func(mu: &Mutex<i32>) {
let data = mu.lock().unwrap(); // lol same shit

println!("{}", data);
}
>>
>>78824590
>Agreed, constrained is good
agreed on what exactly? :) i don't use Rust

>>78824583
yes, but before that you could use your own type traits (which basically are the same as concepts predicate, just a lot shittier to write) to constrain a template parameter.
admittedly the syntax was clearly not as readable as it is now with concepts.
>>
>>78824583
>>78824633
correction : i should have said yes and no. C++20 introduced concepts, which is a much better way to constrain templates than what we were doing. constrained templates have been possible since templates exists.
>>
I just want a fast simple language without having to worry about my mistakes allowing attackers to execute code on people's machines.
It seems like a language has to either be slow, unsafe or unreadable.
>I like C syntax and performance , I hate its memory management hell
>I like pythons syntax and safety, I hate its performance
>I like rust's performance and safety, I hate its syntax

God, Why can't we have all 3 in one language?
>>
>>78824633
Generic constraints are not only a Rust feature. You said
>i must say i prefer the C++ concepts
which would lead me to believe you prefer constrainted templates, which I in turn (partly) agreed with.
>>
>>78824604
Nobody writes this kind of Rust code, only Golang niggers like you. Go learn some actual Rust before shilling for your shitty language that a thousand services already abandoned.
use std::sync::Mutex;

#[derive(Debug)]
struct A {}

fn main() {
let x = Mutex::new(A {});
// y is now a read guard, it automatically unlocks when it goes out of scope
// this way the programmer can expressively define when to lock and unlock
let y = x.lock().unwrap();
// you can dereference a read guard to get a reference to the data inside,
// which you can pass onto other functions, which don't even have to know or
// care about whether the data is locked or not.
// this neatly and effectively prevents them from fucking with the locks
// in the first place. this BTFOs the golang nigger.
other_function(&y);
println!("{:?}", y);
}

// I am a very dumb function and I do not have the slightest idea about locks.
// I can still work because all i need is a reference.
fn other_function(a: &A) {
println!("{:?}", a);
}
>>
>>78824656
that language, my friend, is C++
elegance, safety, and efficiency, all in one.
invest in C++ now
>>
>>78824633
>>78824654
C++ constraints are still opt-in.
>>
>>78824127
Why? As in, why not just write it in C? The C compiler probably knows how to optimize way better than you.
>>
>>78818975
>>>/toy/
>>
>>78821556
Just learn the math it requires, as it comes. Discrete math is a shallow view of random stuff that tends to relate to CS, calculus doesn't really come up d when it does you just watch a stupid video and do some integral or derivative, and lastly probability can just be searched for easilyz

Don't read a math book, don't get distracted and fall for a meme book list, just stick the main goal imo
>>
>>78818922
My neural network can now identify handwritten numbers 41.61% of the time over the MNIST data set.
>>
>>78825134
wait no, I mean it has a 41.61% error rate, 58.39% correct.
>>
>>78825134
witchcraft! how you made it?
>>
For the people here with compsci or related degrees, what'd you guys do in-between semesters? Just trying to make the best of my time. Already have a part-time job.

Because of covid I have like 2 months until my next semester.
>>
>>78825200
I paired randomly generated neural networks with a fitness function and an evolutionary algorithm. The networks are fed the data, and every generation the best one (fittest) is cloned and mutated, the current generation is # 434. The network takes in the pixel data of the compressed image, and generates 10 outputs, that are normalized to sum to 1, the highest output is taken as its answer. The fitness function rewards the proportion of correctness to prevent them from ignoring certain digits.

https://github.com/Packmanager9/Handwritten-numbers-neural-net
>>
test
>>
>>78825338
Dilate.
>>
>>78825238
post in /dpt/
>>
>>78825238
fap
post in 4chin
sports

in that order
>>
>>78825238
if you don't already know what you want to do during holidays, just end your pathetic sad existence right now.
>>
>>78822886
https://remedybg.itch.io/remedybg
>>
>>78825238
Write a program that helps you in your parttime job.
>>
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I am trying to scrape shit from online shops (mainly the PC parts) so that I can create a website like pcpartbuilder but for my country, compare prices from different shops, build your pc by looking at what is available on local market etc
1 . This one particular website used marked list, how can I trim all this shit so it is on the left side?

2. What would the best way to create classes for such a website? An abstract class Products with inherited classes as GPU, CPU?

3. How the fuck do I seed the database with scraped data?
>>
>>78826347
you'll need either a limited schema (i.e. you decided for a limited number of properties a piece of equipment can have) and toss the rest of the data, or you can try to save all of the data in a more sparse attribute based database. In any case you'll need to make and maintain a scraper for each website.
>>
>>78826433
>or you can try to save all of the data in a more sparse attribute based database
I was thinking about this, it adds much more work but then seeding the DB later will be much easier
>>
>>78826347
>how can I trim all this shit so it is on the left side?
string.Trim()?
>What would the best way to create classes for such a website? An abstract class Products with inherited classes as GPU, CPU?
If you _really_ need inheritance, sure.
>>
>>78826559
>>78826559
>string.Trim()?
tried, not working
>If you _really_ need inheritance, sure.
I don't know myself, this is literally my first project and it feels like I am trying to bite more than I can chew
I just want a fucking job, but it is almost impossible without a portfolio I guess
>>
Hi /dpt/. Pointers to functions. Is there any equivalent to it, outside the C world?

    (*samplefunc) (int *a, char *s) {
....
}


An if so, which language(s)?
>>
>>78826719
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_function
>>
>>78826719
Pretty much every language has some equivalent.
>>
>>78826719
type TFunctionPtr = procedure (var a: integer, var s: string);

var samplefunc: TFunctionPtr;
>>
>>78826719
Yes, it's a common feature. Most languages generalise it to first class functions or lambda functions.
>>
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>>78823333
based and checked
>>
>>78826719
>(*samplefunc) (int *a, char *s)
what is that
>>
>>78826885
retarded C syntax
>>
>>78826778
Damn, C is hideous!

>>78823333
Checked and true
>>
>>78826903
>Damn, C is hideous!
is this ironic or something

>>78826893
yeah but syntax for what?
>>
>>78826922
Why don't you read the whole post, and not just the code >>78826719.
>>
>>78826922
>yeah but syntax for what?
It's a type signature for a function pointer
typedef void(*samplefunc)(int *a, char *s);

would create a typedef for a function which takes an int pointer and a char pointer returning nothing named 'samplefunc'. You can use it like this
void dostuff(samplefunc f) {
int *x;
char *y;
samplefunc(x, y);
}

void foobar(int *x, char *y) { ... }

dostuff(foobar);
>>
>>78826922
>is this ironic or something
I am 100% serious. Why would that be ironic?
>>
>>78826962
>>78826977
i was missing the void before the (*samplefunc) so i was confused because there wasn't a return type, then my pascal example is correct: >>78826778
and so here is your function:
type
IntPtr = ^integer;
StringPtr = ^string;
TFunctionPtr = procedure (a: IntPtr, var s: StringPtr);

procedure dostuff(f: samplefunc);
var
x: IntPtr;
y: StringPtr;
begin
samplefunc(x, y);
end;

procedure foobar(x: IntPtr, y: StringPtr);
begin
...
end;

begin
dostuff(@foobar); // @ is `address of`
end.
>>
>>78827055
sorry
{$mode objfpc}

type
IntPtr = ^integer;
StringPtr = ^string;
TFunctionPtr = procedure (a: IntPtr; s: StringPtr);

procedure dostuff(f: TFunctionPtr);
var
x: IntPtr;
y: StringPtr;
begin
f(x, y);
end;

procedure foobar(x: IntPtr; y: StringPtr);
begin
...
end;

begin
dostuff(@foobar); // @ is `address of`
end.
>>
>>78826990
because you guys don't like shitting on C, especially how you were surprised that C can be made less ugly
>>
what if you limit pointers to only be obtainable from an allocating function like malloc, then pointers would be perfectly safe, no?
>>
>>78827149
That's too much of a restriction. You wouldn't be able to do this:
int x = 5;
int *p = &x;

Pointer ownership and ownership transfer is better.
>>
>>78827149
this does nothing to solve use-after-free bugs
>>
>>78827149
>>78827175
>>78827179
oh wait, references are a thing already
>>
>len(str) instead of str.len
>str.join(arr) instead of arr.join(str)
>self everywhere
It triggers me so much bros...
>>
>>78825134
You should get higher than that with just a linear classifier as I recall, maybe something is wrong

>>78827211
References don't solve use after free either

>>78827330
>"yes" if bool else "no"
pythonic
>>
>>78827330
memelang
>>
When would I not use Selection Sort?
>>
>>78827393
Because sleep sort exists
>>
>2nd year of CS
>haven't done any real programming project except for game of life in C
What tf do I do
>>
>>78827478
computer scientist don't do programming

they prove theorems and shit
>>
>>78827478
learn haskell
>>
>>78818922
EMBEDDING A FUCKING TEXT FILE TO MY C# PROJECT
>>
I am getting distracted and depressed again.
>>
>>78827362
Well since that post its up to 60% accuracy, its still evolving. I think the activation function was kinda messed up, I'm running a new round with ReLu also to compare improvement rates.
>>
>>78827478
you're attending the wrong classes!
>>
>struggle with a programming problem
>try fruitlessly for an entire day to fix it and get burned out on it
>take two days away from it playing video games and stuff
>come back at the problem the following day and immediately see the answer clear as day and fix it better than expected, even find other related problems and solve them too

Try to convince me that this doesn't count as 4 full days worth of work.
>>
>>78827478
>>haven't done any real programming project except for game of life in C
99.99% of cniles in /g/ summarized
>>
>>78827478
Read source code of other real projects.
>>
>>78827478
lmao. typical cnile.
>>
Has there ever been any studies of the average IQ's for users of different programming languages?
>>
>>78827748

Average is worthless metric since there will always be midwits fucking it up. If you want the highest average than pick some esolang that only a few people in the world know how to use.
>>
I love ruby! :3
>>
>>78827897
install crystal right now
>>
>>78827924
No repl :(
>>
>>78827944
https://github.com/crystal-community/icr
?
>>
>>78818922
> What are you working on, /g/?

Trying to import 'ImageData' and 'CanvasRenderingContext2d' and I can't?
>>
>>78827748
No, but stackoverflow has breakdown by pay and years of work experience.
>>
>>78827956
Wtf? I love crystal now
>>
>>78823274
>two weeks
I can believe it. Syntactically its basically the toy language every 80's undergraduate compiler design student wrote a MIPS compiler for. swap out the compile time type checking for the simplest possible set of dynamic types, add a map type and the 50loc mark and sweep GC you wrote for extra credit, and voila you've got javascript 1.0.
which we've now spent hundreds of billions of dollars on, trying to desuckify that undergraduate hack job into something useful enough to build the web.
>>
>>78827977
ImageData is just a convenience wrapper for a Uint8ClampedArray. You can pull the current ImageData with getImageData and then set it with putImageData
>>
>>78828068
Not saying JavaScript is good but you don't need to put a lot of effort in to design a useful programming language
>>
>>78823318
interestingly BCPL (parent language of C) had subject-verb-object message send syntax using vtables back in the late 80's.
expr#method(expr1, ...)

was translated to
let tmp = expr
tmp!0!method(tmp, expr1...)
>>
>>78828110

It's not a lot of effort once you already know how to design a programming language, which takes a lot of fucking effort...
>>
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>>78828083
>>78827977
I have it like this and lib.rs window import doesn't work/register, straight from the web-sys crate guide.

https://rustwasm.github.io/wasm-bindgen/web-sys/using-web-sys.html

I guess I have some funny business going on with my project structure I need to look at. Every other import from Cargo works though..
>>
>>78828130
It really doesn't, if you think so you're probably a brainwashed CS student
>>
>>78823930
reminder that Firefox uses a GC written in C.
embrace the GCpill rustranny.
>>
>>78828166

Shut up retard, it takes effort to learn any language and you need to learn a least a few languages before you can design one.
>>
>>78828195
Well yeah obviously you don't design a programming language before you learn to program
>>
>>78828129
That's interesting. I suppose ! is an indexed dereference operator?
>>
>>78827175
>Pointer ownership and ownership transfer is better.
not until the ownership model can handle real world ownership models like joint ownership corporate ownership. Rust's single owner model is fucking ludicrous and kindergarten-tier shit.
>>
>>78828134
Oh ok.. well if you want to use Canvas API you're going to need more than just ImageData and CanvasRenderingContext2d to get it to work.
>>
I haven't been here for a few months and I come back and it's all a bunch of Rustfaggotry
>>
>>78828261
it's just the shills in overdrive, astroturfing. They come in waves.
>>
>>78828243
yeah ! is a combination of c's [] and *. !a === *a, a!i === !(a+i) === a[i] which is incidentally why in C i[a] === a[i], its one of many BCPL-isms that made it into C. BCPL had [ ] for indexing as well, but back in those days character set availability was a real issue - many computers had 6 bit character sets (which is why you saw all-caps programs) and meant that you couldn't depend on having characters available unless they were needed for finance or english. in particular curly brackets were uncommon, so you saw a lot of BCPL code that used the portable sequence $( $), and some installations repurposed the indexing operator [ ] to serve as { and } - the Xerox BCPL compiler that was used to implement their OS and bootstrap their Smalltalk and Cedar/Mesa systems did this, which is also why smalltalk used [ and ] for their block delimiters. The PDP had a full character set so C inherited BCPL's curly brackets and square brackets, but replaced the prefix ! with * (and replaced BCPL's use of * in writef with % in C's printf)
>>
>>78828261
there are a lot of recently-unemployed rust devs after mozilla fired them all.
>>
>>78828110
"useful" is an extremely low bar though.
>>
>>78828407
only bar that matters
>>
>>78828423
no, its merely the lowest bar that matters. quality matters as well, else the world wouldn't have spent so much money trying to make javascript tolerable.
>>
>>78828261
>NOOOO THEY USE WHAT I DON'T LIKE NOOOOO
let people enjoy shit
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>>78828432
usefulness IS quality
if it's useful it's quality, if it's not useful it's not quality
If a programming language does shit that makes it hard or bad to program with, then it's not being useful
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>>78828433
I don't dislike Rust, I don't care about it, but all you do is evangelize it, it's boring
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>>78828466
>conveniently ignores the several Cniles that spam useless walls of text and sourceless benchmarks in waves
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>>78828502
Nobody evangelizes C, it's just Rust posters and anyone who dares speak out against them is a Cnile
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>>78823930
> deadlocks
> So it's perfectly "fine" for a Safe Rust program to get deadlocked
https://doc.rust-lang.org/nomicon/races.html
>>
Anybody used qtquick? How is it? Is it viable alternative to GUI in electron? I want to make cool guis with transitions and shiet but most of desktop GUI frameworks look like shit from ‘90
>>
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>>78828433
sometimes it's pathetic, people asking questions non-language related get "you should use rust instead" replies. it's like the pathetic trannychilds that can't contain themselves until the entire world knows they're now a >she
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looking for sports betting resources, odds, history, schedules, teams etc. what's good that's free?
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>>78828565
>not all rust pro-
No, literally EVERY single rust programmer.
>>
What is the simplest web framework on Haskell? Something akin to Flask in Python.
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>>78828734
install Ur
It's an ML-like specifically for webshit
http://www.impredicative.com/ur/
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>>78828602

>>>/sp/
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>>78823649
either use a debugger, or web search for function hooking
>>
I do 90% of my work in interpreted languages but sometimes I need the extra speed so I want to learn some high performance language, I was thinking about rust or crystal. I like how crystal looks but rust’s compiler that helps write correct code is also cool feature. what do you think?
btw I know c and basics of c++ and I hate it
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>>78828534
Rust doesn't prevent sloppy programmers like you from being sloppy. If you're so fucking stupid to get Rust to actually deadlock, you will fuck up in pretty much any language.
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>>78828602
>>78828851
>>>/sp/bet/
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>>78828529
>Nobody evangelizes C
You haven't been lurking for the past few days on /dpt/, I see.
>>
help me with a kaggle competition please lads
the challenge is flight delays prediction and the dataset contains 500k flights with their arrival time and expected arrival time, etc

which algorithm would work the best?
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>>78829000
At least C actually solves problems, it a simple language that programmers use to create almost all software you use daily. Rust on the other hand is a solution waiting for a problem, with its users doing nothing but shill the language every chance they get
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>>78829009
I think Skiena answers something liek this in his book.
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>>78829069
>At least C actually solves problems
C is the source of the problems it supposedly solves
>>
new thread:

>>78829123
>>78829123
>>78829123
>>
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>>78829069
>I-I DON'T LIKE IT REEEE BECAUSE I THINK C IS BETTER REEEE NOBODY SHOULD USE IT REEEEEEE
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>>78821213
This is only true if you are already familiar with the problem. If the problem is a challenge you need to actually solve (not just code it up), its normal to be much longer.
>>
>>78823930
USE A GARBAGE COLLECTOR
>>
>>78822886
ddd is all you need



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