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Redpill me on tiny homes.
Are they a meme?
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>>2504377
I've lived in travel trailers, yeah shit like this is a cute getaway for a couple weeks. Living in them is ass though. You are extremely limited on modifications, storage, etc.
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Real standalone residential structures on their own parcels that happen to be small can be cool as hell.
Well designed travel and camp trailers built to roadworthiness standards can be too.
Anything that tries to straddle those two uses is almost always a joke, and the typical "tiny home" you see nowadays combines the worst of both.
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>>2504377
If they are on wheels or are a primitive cabin, they have a certain practicality.

If you have all the features of a modern house, It becomes a false economy to build one.

You do tend to have lower utility bills and taxes.
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>>2504377
I live on a 380 square foot guest cottage and I could half that space without even trying. I do not understand why people need so much space.
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Tiny home with a huge shop is the optimal situation.
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>>2504377
Luxury camper, nothing more.
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>>2504400
>I do not understand why people need so much space.

It's not a matter of "need", people have preferences and their own sense of what balance of pros and cons work best for them.
As you point out its not particularly hard to live in a tiny space if you are so inclined and lots of people who could afford not to choose to do so anyway for all kinds of personal reasons.
People who don't have those resources and those options are the ones who "need" to live in a smaller sized dwelling whether they like it or not.
That has unfortunately driven a trend to virtue signal about people who do have that choice and choose larger dwellings as having g a pathological "need" for "so much space".
Like most virtue signaling it's irrational and based in emotions, and ignores the fact that lots of people who live in big house with more than enough space have also lived in extremely small spaces and may choose to do so again.
They've shown by doing it that they can live in tiny trailers and boats and Vans, often for years...but if they move to a larger dwelling none of that matters and it's characterized as a "need" by people who want to claim moral superiority even when making that choice is something they have no control over because *they* actually need to live in a tiny (or shared) space because thats all they can afford.
It's not a moral stand, it's just being poor.
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>>2504400
For stuff, duh. Live in one place for years on your own property and you tend to acquire a lot of stuff. Easier to keep than throw away, or have a yard sale.
I was very into guns and shooting for a few years and got a ton of gun stuff that's not really worth selling so I just hang onto it because it's not trash either.
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>>2504446
Imagine being a ham radio operator and wanting to mount antennas, or wanting a home office or place to host friends. These things are for pure loners with no hobbies or interests.
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>>2504446
>i am going to take what you said as literally as possible because autistic but not really, i just need to flex on the internet because it is all i have
When people use "need" in such a context they are not likening it to something like food or water.
>>2504449
I have lived in my house for 12 years now, you just don't buy things you don't need and don't keep things you don't need.
>>2504468
I have plenty of hobbies and interests. Never had issues hosting friends, most holidays I have at least two people staying a few days and generally a few more will be stopping by for a night, fairly common to have 5 or 6 people over. It is just a matter of space management.
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>>2504519
But I want things I don't need. I have a stock room for bird seed because I feed birds so much. Buy in bulk, buy when there's a good deal, etc. And a bunch of feeders I only use seasonally, a few that I don't have room to put out but keeping because sometimes weather/animals breaks one.
I don't need to feed birds, but it brings me happiness. And takes up a significant amount of space.

I don't need an electric blower, I could use a broom, but I got one and I'm glad I did because it saves a lot of time cleaning my deck and walkways and does a better job.

I don't need a 75" TV and surround sound speakers. I barely even watch TV! But when I do occasionally sit down for a movie I'm always glad I got a nice setup.

I don't need 30 bags of cat litter but my cat doesn't stop pooping and only likes one kind, I found a really good price on it and bought all they had. Speaking of which I don't even need a cat, or cat food, treats and toys, or vet bills... but again, it brings me happiness.
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Pic related is my friend's. If it's not mobile, then you're just really poor. Almost nobody would live in a tiny home if they had enough money to get a normal moderately sized home.

I prefer a house on the smaller side but I still want 3 bedrooms, a garden and a separate living room and kitchen. Living in a tiny home for more than a month is just objectively worse than having a bit more living space for your family.

I live in a less than 1000 square foot house (Europoor) and it's just small. It's fine but I'm not going to pass up on getting a 2000 square foot one if I can.

However if you're using it to actually live a lifestyle of adventure, and it's worth the tradeoff for you between space and mobility so you can move around and be 'free' of being tied to one job or area by your property - It's pretty cool. Modern gypsies can have very good caravans.
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>>2504377
They're a waste of money. And they're probably illegal where you live, people just look the other way. If you're willing to submit yourself to those shitty living conditions, then you probably have the endurance to do the Mr money moustache thing, or the Dave Ramsey thing or go to college and get a stem degree or buying a 20k house in Michigan
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I think for the price of a new tiny home you can probably just build a regular cabin and put a full size wood stove in it.
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>>2504519
LOFL, calls other people autistic for taking words at face value and not inferring his own personal spin that's impossible to decipher from context-

>When people use "need" in such a context they are not likening it to something like food or water.
-then tosses out the same word again-
>I have lived in my house for 12 years now, you just don't buy things you don't need and don't keep things you don't need.

Nobody said anything about virtue signallers likening a "need" for "so much space" to something like food and water, those are ACTUAL NECESSITIES, dumbass.
The people in question use that term to liken a perfectly normal desire for more than a bare minimum dwelling space to an addiction or compulsion or a selfish indulgence rooted in poor character or inferior emotional development.
As in "nobody *needs* to drink alcohol"...it's a negative character judgements against people who make that choice.
You can't help yourself and go right ahead and do the same thing by telling people who find YOUR personal preference and size standard unsuitable for their own lifestyle that the *real* issue is that they buy and keep things they don"t "need".
Bottom line is that there's no point or legitimate purpose to making the statement-
> I do not understand why people need so much space
unless the purpose was to declare that you aren't too bright and lack empathy, in which case mission accomplished.
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>>2504377
>Are they a meme?
Kinda.
Firstly, tiny homes conceptually has its own pros and cons. Small space usually means lower utility- and some places tax-bills, but having less space means less room for stuff. Built-in furniture is the norm in tiny-homes which saves space but makes rearranging furniture akin to moving walls. So on and so forth.
If you're ok with the inherent tradeoffs, your locality allows for a tiny home, and especially if you build it yourself, it can be awesome for a single or young couple and relatively cheap.

The meme part comes when you make it a trailer. Making it a trailer cause you want to travel is fine, thats what trailers are made for. Making it a trailer despite intending to be stationary just to skirt regulations or taxes is setting yourself up for either never expanding or getting a fucking by the long dick of the law when you do.
A tiny home built as a house can be expanded in time to meet new needs as time goes on, its like expanding a normal house but smaller. Expanding a tiny home built as a trailer is severely limited by legal limits for trailer height, width and weight. Because if you make your home a trailer to avoid building permits, then park it and eventually add a new room or a new storey which makes it road-illegal and essentially a stationary building, local government inspector can pop by and go 'Can't move legally makes it a building now, one illegally built without permit at that. Heres a fine, a tax bill and an order to tear it down or get more fines'. This literally happened to a friend of mine.
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>>2504400
I used to live in a trailer bro, I get it, you're poor.
>guest cottage
Yeah you're poor and live with parents. Once you're older and have your own place you'll realize a more reasonable but modest 1,200 sqft and the ability to shower for more than 5 mimutes is a blessing. I couldn't imagine submitting myself to that again unless I'm on a short vacation.
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>>2504601
Well, when I want to expand, maybe I'll just build several tiny homes on trailers, then connect them all with clear hard plastic tubing. My own little hamster cage setup. What now tax man?
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>>2504535
that looks so fucking ugly bro wtf
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>>2504601
Given how tiny homes usually use the same materials as a regular house, their weight for the size is insane.
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>>2504377
Stayed in one for a couple nights, had a blast. That being said I couldn't imagine living in one with another person or a dog or anything like that. You'd be in each other's faces night and day.
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>>2504377
Yes.

They arent legal in places that the "tiny home" meme is popular. The only way it would work for a while is if you had a place to put in at someone else's property that already had power and water. Most are built like shit and heavy as fuck and cant be moved.

You would be way better off living in a camper. Its already set up to be lived in and to work off extension cords and a garden hose. Easily movable and somebody might actually want to buy it when youre done using it. Its also less embarassing to live in IMO.

Tiny homes are just a cope for city dwelling leftist hipsters that love the government and jewish banks but want to skirt both because they think theyre special.
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>>2504663
a lot of that depends on location/ climate and lifestyle...
if you're active and in a decent climate with room around you you dont spend that much time actually *in* your box...I did in a 90 sq ft RV with a wife and 75 lb dog and we all loved it, but we mostly just slept inside and it was in a place that rarely rains and never snows...we had a huge awning room and between working and doing other stuff it was fine, plus I customized the interior for that use, which is one benefit the custom tiny homes on wheels do have over RVs with generic interiors.
Had we been retired orcworking at home and in a remote area with snow and rain or where we couldnt thow everything open and have that screen room it would have been miserable.
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>>2504593
Sorry for calling you autistic, I see now you are just on the dim side.
>>2504619
Nah, bought my house when I was 20 and I am pretty much able to retire now at 32, will probably do that in the next year or two. The house which this was the guest cottage for burned down so it was pretty much sold as a vacant lot. If I ever need more space than I will put on an addition.
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>>2504699
Says the sperg wo makes up his own definitions for words and expects others to know WTF he means, and can't understand why other people CHOOSE a larger house than his, even when half a dozen people exain it to him.
Enjoy your troll hovel.
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>>2504703
Maybe you are autistic, I honestly can not tell.
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>>2504377
There's this new lake side community near my hometown where you can buy small pieces of land for like 12k because it's in a very small town.
I thought about putting a tiny home there and renting it out or living in it in the event me and my gf break up.
Thoughts? It'd cost 50 grand tops for the whole thing. Viable? Yay or nay?
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>>2504815
Tiny homes can be great as an Airbnb, since when I travel someplace, I generally only need a place to sleep and shit. If you've got some woods, then cut those requirements in half.
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>>2504712
You don't have to keep reiterating that you can't relate to other people or understand what's happening and why, it's quite obvious at this point.
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>>2504377
I think they're fine as long as you own the land it's on. Otherwise it's just a cuckshack.
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>>2504815
If I had the money to spare, I would.
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It's literally a trailer home with a hipster name. I can't understand why people can't all what it is, a trailer home, camper, etc.
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>>2504377
I imagine they're pretty kino if you live alone
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>>2504377
Great to live in, terrible to work or have any hobbies or interests in. If you are comfortable being a human sardine and doing literally nothing every night it's a perfect accomodation.
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>>2504434
This. There's a guy in /o/ who has a 40x60 shop and was living in a trailer parked next to it.
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>>2504377
>Are they a meme?
I had fucked up my credit and genuinely never believed I was going to own a house. I obessesd over building and owning a tiny house.

Did a bit of work, with the bank giving me direction to fix my credit.
I bought a 1200sq ft house with a single stall garage, with no basement, because I dont need a lot of room.

It feels cramped with just 2 people living here.
A tiny home would be hell, especially for any /diy/er
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Is a log cabin technically a tiny home?
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>>2504377
Sounds terrible. I would much rather have 1500-2000 square feet in a house way out in the woods.
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>tfw you live in japan and normal houses would be considered tiny houses
1000sqf and bigger are considered huge here
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>>2505704
yep
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>>2504377
you VILL live in ze pod
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>>2505898
why?
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>>2505904

I'll wager a dime to a dollar that this house was designed on a computer, and they used the same layout on the left as on the right, and didn't notice that it made no sense on the left side.
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Uncle Ted enjoyed a life of freedom and knowledge in a one room shack ahhhhhhhcomfy
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>>2504377
Something twice the width and double the height would work
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>>2505911
More likely that the original buildcwas symmetrical and the part on the left that tucks under the eaves was an addition and modifying that existing eyebrow would further expose the new roof to wall seam below it, which are always potentially problematic in additions.
You can see there's some weird stuff going on at that junction where flashing would go which is further evidence its a newer modification.
Also, especially on a log cabin it's unlikely that they missed a totally unnecessary structure in the design phase *and* went ahead and built it in anyway.
It would be simple to eliminate on the fly during any stage including framing, but a major PITA to retroactively eliminate without opening a can of worms after it's weatherproofed.
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>>2505409
>"less racist society"
>rich white people "downsizing" to live like coloreds and hoarding the spare cash instead of giving resources to poor brown families

ok
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>>2506017
I want to get away from niggers but I don't have enough money to make a full sized home
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I have a 450 square foot Amish built trailer home. Solid wood round slab exterior. Tongue and groove knotty pine interior. Front door has a built in porch sitting over the tongue of the hitch. Enter a living room with kitchen. Small shower and toilet and sink in a corner enclosure at the far end of the room. Next room is a small office but we put a full size and twin combo bunk bed in there. Middle room has a small built it chest or drawers. Next room - end of the trailer - has a small built in double cupboard one over the other that work as closets. A small chest of drawers beside the cupboards. A platform attached to the floor that fits a Queen size mattress.

It’s a live-able house long term if you don’t expect much privacy and you don’t go overboard on stuffing the place with belongings.

I’m currently shopping for a larger new home in a second location where I can put a mother-in-law addition on because of parents growing old. Plan on AirBnB-ing it when I’m done with the original purpose because it will be outside of a college town with frequent sports games.
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>>2506407
Details I forgot
Bought the Amish cabin in 2013.
It was a display model purchased of the lot in Lancaster PA. Paid about $36k for it. Cost me $10k more to transport it 300 miles and sight preparation including bringing in utilities to the site. Two year after I got the cabin the wife bought a bigger doublewide. The guy who installed the doublewide offered me $70k for the cabin but I chose not to sell it.
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>>2506017
>thinking the Rich downsize
dohohohohohohohoho
middle class is dead idiot
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>>2504400
>I do not understand why people need so much space.
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If you want to live frugally these days one of the greatest resources you can possibly have is space. Space for spare parts and lumber, space for stored food, space for tools, space to make repairs on things, space for items you buy cheaply and plan on flipping for profit, space for adults to be away from each other in a way that their sanity requires, space for hobbies that don't cost much money, space to do things that you would otherwise have to pay to do in a public place (socialize with family and friends, work out indoors, be alone by yourself unbothered for a while, watch a movie on a bigger screen).

You might say
>I have enough space for these things since I manage my space intelligently and can just swap things in and out of my limited storage as needed

Ah, but that takes up a different resource: time. As well as brain power. Inevitably you will make a mess of things or not have the motivation to work on projects if you have to totally put them away and then take them back out again instead of having the space to work on them at your leisure and then come back and everything is where you left it the next day or week.

For a frugal person one of the best investments they can make is a house with a lot of extra space.
>muh energy bill
The cost difference isn't that huge, and is easily made up by the potential gains you get from having the space. It's worth it. And of course there are ways to mitigate excess heating and cooling costs on a larger building(s).

Buy a cheap big house. Old or new. Buy a half-rotten mcmansion if you get the opportunity. Don't spend a fortune renovating it. Just live in it.
It will serve a frugal person better than any "tiny home".
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>>2506785
People are frugal because they value money over time. "Saving time" is not a benefit you can possibly communicate to a person who places no value on their time.
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>>2504377
>>2504382
It depends on what you want and what you're looking for. I've lived in a 1br apartment in a city and I've spent a few weeks in an RV that was half the size of the apartment. Even though the apartment was bigger I'd rather have a tiny home the size of the RV if it meant that I also had a yard, trees, etc. So it's better than an apartment IMO.
If you have one that maximizes storage like in the ceiling and under the floors then the storage isn't going to be much worse than an apartment. Although it does limit your hobbies somewhat.

Overall though I'd rather just have an RV trailer instead of a tiny home, then it's at least mobile. Although then some zoning/HOA laws would limit where you could live.
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>>2506806
Well, to me you're not very frugal if you're not also valuing your time.
Sometimes there is rhetoric around tiny homes as being a way to embrace a simplified lifestyle.
That seems illogical to me.
A tiny home is going to create many obstacles and conundrums of practicality. You'll constantly be getting in your own way just trying to live your life.
And then there is the fact they are as expensive or more so than a normal small home in the range of 800-1200 square feet.

However, one person could probably get by living in a fifth wheel camper in a mild climate.
If they could find a way to make it economically viable compared to alternatives.

None of the above applies to living on the road.
That's a whole other discussion and my overall thought process towards it is: don't.
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>>2505409
>>2506017
it's a fake tweet to incite rage, hence "more diverse and less racist society
it's amazing how easily duped people are
more pertinently, when did the world economic forum become the n#1 target for anti-globalist schizos and not a more reasonable target, like the american government
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>>2506785
>If you want to live frugally these days one of the greatest resources you can possibly have is space.
Once I moved from an apartment to a house I realized how true this is. I buy food in bulk when it's on sale, I have space for tools to DIY, I cook more because I have a bigger kitchen + outdoor grill, and I can have the lads over instead of going out and paying $$$$$ at bars.
Even when I'm just chilling by myself I spend less on gas + other money because I can stand to be at home more. With an apartment I always felt the need to go somewhere because I hated being cooped up at home in my tiny apartment but now I can just stay home because I have space to enjoy myself.
>>muh energy bill
people just need to be smart about it. Cover vents and close doors to unused rooms, and use a space heater if you only need heat in one room (eg, my thermostat is 62F for the winter but my bedroom has a space heater). In the summer, grill outdoors so the heat is outside. In the winter, cook indoors so the extra heat goes to the home. Remember to turn lights off. Make sure you have good insulation around doors, windows, attic, etc.
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>>2506870
>t's a fake tweet to incite rage
I realized that after I made the post and went looking for the original URL

Tiny homes are still for uppity crackers who think living in closet spaces like niggers is cute and trendy. If you like the idea of building your own home on a budget, buy a plot of land and plans for a 1 or 2 story shed, get the majority of your building materials and furniture from Habitat for Humanity, then go from there.

It's still a smaller space, doesn't smell like BO and shit from your composting toilet, and you can actually have room for hobbies or a family

https://youtu.be/aV4tZfOlb7o
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>>2504393
Is this an exact replica of the Unabomber Shack? Color is a bit different
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>>2506785
This seems more an argument for land than a house. I dislike large houses but having a lot of land is always good.

From a personal perspective, if I had the money, I would design my "house" as a group of small buildings where outside and inside blend into either to an extent. Need more rooms? Build another small house or shed close by and connect them with a roofed outdoor walkway.
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>>2504434
Better is just a bigger shop with a bed, shower, kitchen and shithouse.
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>>2507060
In trendy circles we call this a barndominium
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>>2504377

Ultimately they are pretty dumb, and they (along with van living) are proof positive that America really fucked up big time in the 80's and 90's and cursed the current generation to be so poor we glamorize being poor.

Anyway when you own a home the costs are getting the land, the power, water and sewer/septic run. Then you gotta pay taxes (possibly HOA dues), and putting in the foundation is the most important part.

SO after all that you might as well put a full house in. Why go to all that trouble to live in something the size of a college dorm room? You're gonna outgrow it, and it's not a healthy long term life to live in one of these. Want to ever have a wife/gf or have kids? Or maybe a pet? Good luck in one of these.

Just do a real house. And if you are that poor, then buy a small home that's fucking run down. Then renovate it. You'll be much better off than being in a tiny home.
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>>2507042
I've lived in the set-up of small house + several outbuildings most of my life and in practice it still feels cramped because the buildings tend to get more junked up than a house would become, and they are not climate controlled and develop pests.
If a person took better care of them perhaps this would not happen.
I would rather have the bigger house and a small shed in the back for my lawn mower and a few tools. And a garage if possible.
But that is getting into more money.

Still, there are ways to get more storage space if you have land without spending a lot of money. Especially if you are willing to become a redneck with junk vehicles in the yard.
An old van or camper makes an excellent storage building.

Last thought: there's a certain social credential that comes from having a bigger home that will influence the way people see you, and this is to your benefit.
Even from your immediate family.
People tend to see a person as more grown-up and successful if they have a sizeable house even if that house is not in great condition.
Compared to a tiny house which is rightfully recognized as a meme that is probably not going to be viable for long term living.
People, even your parents and siblings, do not feel inclined to "invest" in you living in this by assisting you in significant ways.
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>>2504377
For the price you'd easily cover a down payment on something 1,200sqft with a modest 5k sqft lot. Maybe a 2 car garage.
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>>2507114
by the way here is that house for sale
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/298-E-Church-St-Marion-OH-43302/97159590_zpid/?
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>>2507118
That house needs a vacuum, some pine-sol, some paint, and whatever cheap vinyl you can find to put down in the high traffic areas. There's a place called Ollies in Ohio that has discount rolls of the stuff.
After that I'd just move in.
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>>2507112
Much of the current generation is doing fine. I don't count the bottom feeders because they've always been bottom feeders and I've lived through multiple generations (which are an artificial construct in the way they're used as memes).

Why are there so many poors on 4chan? I'm on all sorts of fora and this place has by far the most whining, as if it's populated by the young and stupid who lack life experience.

Tiny houses are best as codebeaters for people dreaming tech success in cities they are unwise to want to live in. Elsewhere a single wide you can pay off on several acres of land or a small house on several acres is the wise move. The land gives you a buffer, you pay everything off as development grows toward you if you bought wisely and you either win if you sell or when you retire and don't have to move.
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Traval trailers/RVs are simply better then the ones build on trailer frames.

The ones built as permanent structures can be cool, especially as a way to test alternative building techniques and ideas in a functional way.
Premades and kits are overpriced as hell though. It's only really makes sense if you are building one yourself or having one built by a buddy with some crazy ideas they want to try on your land.
Seriously, they try to sell those little shits around here for as much as a regular sized house.
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>>2504400
>I do not understand why people need so much space.
Because I do more then sit on the computer and sleep at my home.
I for example build things and 3d print, as well as work out.
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>>2504535
>Almost nobody would live in a tiny home if they had enough money to get a normal moderately sized home.
I would live in one I built myself in the backwoods.
Building big out there would be impractical and disrupt the very nature I seek to be among.
A small house built in a way that doesn't impact the surroundings too much would be lovely.
Only hard part would be staying supplied with outside food.
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>>2507112
>And if you are that poor, then buy a small home that's fucking run down.
Such buildings basically can't be financed.
How many poor people you know with 50k just sitting around to buy a broken rotted out shell of a building, then have money left over to rebuild it?
That shit is only something the upper middle class can do, not the poor.
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>>2504377
yeah unless you own the land its on
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>>2507176
Owner financing with a low down is typical.

It's a great way to buy if you're me since it doesn't show on any credit report being a private transaction. I bought my first small, cheap house on ten acres owner financed. Then I got orders and got a VA loan for the one I live in today and kept both. They're paid off but owner financing let my bros on disability buy their (also paid off) homes.

Poors buy homes all the time, some wisely some not.
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>>2507217
>Owner financing with a low down is typical.
No the fuck it isn't.
What fantasy land do you live where owner finance isn't exceptionally rare?
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>>2507118
Maybe 25k from wholesale mats and a few months to fix up assuming the foundation isn't shit or has water problems
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>>2507124
It is a crime to cover a hardwood floor with crap modern shit.

Those wall cracks imply serious problems that need to be understood before proceeding.
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>>2506785
This guy gets it

t. Supporting a family of 6 on a single income of 60k

50 acres, 1100 sq. ft single level house, 24x28 garage, 20x16 shed, and I'm building a sawmill right now because I need a fuckhuge pole barn to put all my tractors and equipment in, and the garage is getting cramped for some of my projects
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>>2507218
I'm not the guy you were responding to, but it's not that rare in my region either. (southeast USA, Georgia-Carolina)

The problem with owner financed properties is that there are only two reasons that people bother to sell and finance it themselves:
-they want WAY more money than a straight cash sale would provide
-the property is in such bad shape that it wouldn't work out financially to fix it up and then sell it to someone using conventional financing

The only way that this is appealing to you is if you are okay with the "indoor camping" lifestyle for a long while until you can get it fixed up enough to be comfortable.

These houses are either going to be in absolute shit neighborhoods or else in rural or peri-urban areas. Often like 20-30 minutes drive to the nearest grocery store.

Theres a pattern where a lot of poor neighborhoods were historically kind of locked into a cycle where they couldn't sell their house for over a certain amount of money. In recent decades, this price ceiling makes it where older dilapidated properties don't get repaired or maintained because doing $40k worth of work on a house that can't increase in saleable value by $40k doesn't make sense. So instead the houses just kind of get left to rot and get worse and worse.

IF you can find one on a nice piece of land or halfway acceptable neighborhood, then it can be an opportunity for a poor person who can't get a conventional mortgage to buy a house.... But the problem is that they will usually get a stinker deal that winds up being more expensive in the long run than just doing a cash purchase.
Just like buying shitty cars at a buy-here pay-here car lot, this is the price you pay for being poor.
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>>2504444
Checked
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>>2504601
What country did this happen in?
Don't doubt it but I'm from Appalachia/America and everyone here gets a trailer then over the years builds onto it when they can afford it/have kids. Everyone I know pays taxes as if it's a trailer.
Also have never seen one get inspected though.
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>>2507388
>Those wall cracks imply serious problems that need to be understood before proceeding.
My sister's house has looked like that in a room upstairs for 20 years and nothing has happened or changed.
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>>2507880
It would be prudent to look into why there are settling cracks before buying, especially on the ground floor.
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>>2506879
There is at least one business that makes replicas.

(no, it is not Ted's Sheds)
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>>2505916
its the nature that provides freedom and peace not the shack the shack just enables living in nature
one room shack in the city would be torturous
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>>2508069
I may have ideas.
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>>2508113
The questions are "What is going on, will it get worse and how much to fix it? If it is reasonably stable, then it isn't much of a problem.
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>>2504377
Depends where you live. If in cold climate or place with high taxes or just wanna go camping then go for it (with wheels). Otherwise i don't see a reason
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>>2504446
>>2504468
>>2507168
You know you can always just build additional structures on your property and expand on existing structures, right? It's not like you sign a contract with the devil that forces you to never ever expand beyond or leave your cuckshed. In fact, unless you're some mentally ill meme minimalist who insists on forcing yourself to make do with the tiniest cuckhut possible (or you intend on moving your house a lot), this is what most people who build cabins/tiny homes do (and it can also be a means of getting around building permits as long as you keep each structure under a certain square footage).

I don't know why autists get such tunnel vision when it comes to the idea of small homes and cabins, like the retards who insist you're a fraud unless you go full primitive with no electricity or whatever.
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>>2508226
Yes but if it's on wheels, it's hard to expand. And even if it's not, it saves money and time to just build one house vs multiple small projects
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>>2508264
>Yes but if it's on wheels, it's hard to expand.
Yeah, fair enough. I'm not fond of the THoW/van life/other minimalist mobile living concepts myself, but I don't knock anybody who's into that.

>And even if it's not, it saves money and time to just build one house vs multiple small projects
Not necessarily. A storage shed is a storage shed, regardless of whether or not your main dwelling is a tiny house or a sizable family home.
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>>2504377
>are they a meme
Yes, but they're not evil or anything. The problem is that a tiny house costs more than just buying a much larger and much more comfortable mobile home or just buying a camper/Rv, and the land beneath it will be just as expensive as building a larger home, so why go through with all the downsides of a tiny home for no real bonus?
>>2504400
I like keeping tools/repair stuff/kitchen stuff that requires storage space a small apartment is miserable for. I also have my own server that would be annoying to keep in a closet rather than easy access.
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https://vimeo.com/151916585?embedded=true&source=vimeo_logo&owner=5471946
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>>2508226
I responded to someone who asked why people need space.

I wasn't condemning tiny homes whole cloth, only explaining why people would like, want, or need bigger dwellings.
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>>2507176

The fuck are you talking about.

You can't finance a tiny home at all. They are generally a cash purchase. And a tiny home runs for $35k to $75k.

A run down home could be bought for $150k, and right now there are zero down loans available through the government. So there might be some closing costs, but no money down. Person moves into it and fixes things up as they go
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>>2504525
What a completely reasonably adult response to his post
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>>2504468
>Imagine being a ham radio operator
No.
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>>2507114
Acreage is also relevant. My whole property would be a "man cave" if it were enclosed. Shops, vehicles to drive/ride and room to shoot with neighbors who like things as I do.

Men enjoy it (my bros all wrench and shoot).
Women even like it as I keep chickens.
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>>2504525
based self-awareer
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>>2507465
>Often like 20-30 minutes drive to the nearest grocery store.

Which is nothing since wise shoppers keep a stocked pantry in city or rural areas. That permits opportunistic buying which saves money and involves fewer store trips which can be made incidental to other trips. I've lived at that distance by choice for many years. Shopping often takes longer in walkable urban areas and it's a bitch to carry large items on foot. That means driving and hunting a parking space... Fuck all that.

Of course most poors are poor because they're helpless idiots but many are just unlucky offspring of helpless idiots and given ambition they do well. Rural and peri-urban areas can be quite useful to the right people (and I don't want to live next to the others).

Poors who can't DIY are completely fucked, but anyone can learn if they have determination and self-discipline without which to hell with them.

>>2507879
Also normal in GA/SC/NC where I've been stationed and lived. I like the building codes so I buy property zoned agricultural and build my shops (steel building AKA "tractor shed" and High Cube shipping containers with power and light) accordingly.

Trailers are easy to add on to, often with another trailer.
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>>2504377
How much does one of these things cost?
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>>2508285
It's mostly this. Tiny homes don't have tiny expenses, and the "cheap" ones are still 80k without land, which is hardly any cheaper than a regular house (if at all) when you live in the sticks.
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>>2508676
>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyDWfFLQGMk
$3k-$6k if you build it by yourself.
>>
a small condominum in outskirts/small town are more affordable and practical long term if you want to downsize / live minimally. then if you want space/outdoors, buy land and build a 3 seasons cabin at your own pace.

Tiny Homes are good for homesteaders, and aren't practical for minimalist living unless you want to live like a hobo and have very low expectations out of life. you will go mad being stuck in the same small space day after day, especially if you're into FIRE lifestyle.
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I was thinking about doing this with eps foam board and structural fiberglass instead of wood or metal framing. Trailers are so expensive though.
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>>2504377
tiny homes are either
>expensive, fagged-up structures that combine the cramped nature of a travel trailer with the road unworthiness of a mobile home
>literal poverty cuck shacks
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>>2505409
>Black people can't figure out how to make money so everyone else should pretend they don't have any

Uhhhhh, WEF? .... Are you okay??
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>>2504377
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>>2511756
Looks comfy.
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>>2511999
Looks way too small. With a fold up hideaway bed it would be livable though.The desk location is poor since you'll be smacking the door into the chair all the time even if you try not to.
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>>2512233
It's typical for things designed by a NEET on here - it's a standalone version of their bedroom in their mommy's house. No efficiency, wasted space, with "comfy" elements like that retarded desk with a hutch. It's just their idea of a voluntary prison cell they can hunker down in and masturabate in all day, and never leave. He probably finished that in the free web version of Sketchup and thought "I am a master interior designer", on top of it.
A space that small needs to be efficient. Loft bed over the bathroom space, with a higher pitch roof, and the other end with a loft space for storage. Get rid of the 13 year old's idea of a desk and put in a desk surface along the wall with storage and shelves. There's tons of ideas of actual builds for spaces that small, that make way, way, way more sense from a practical, actually-have-to-live in it sense, where there's any idea of ever leaving the space at all, and it not being a hermit cave for an agoraphobic NEET. But this NEET, with all of the freedom to use the space at will, just recreated the bedroom in his mommy's house. Pathetic. I've seen bitch dorm rooms with a better layout.
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Is it possible to buy/rent an industrial space, and live in the back of that? Technically not legal... but it seems like the best option if you can't afford a full workshop space on top of a separate living space. Or if you are just cheap, or don't want to have to keep travelling between them.
I guess you could just go out to your car to sleep, but that's a pain.
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>>2512338
Used to be you could exceptions to zoning, something artists did to make work/live spaces back in the day, but at least in the US, they're really picky about it, because that opens the door to developers all of a sudden putting in "gourmet lofts" for rich assholes who want the "urban experience."
Location would probably matter here, and if you buy - I see way, way less problems. Renting, your landlord is going to be the roadblock, because they get the brunt of the county getting up his ass about it.
Possible, sure, but location, specifics, etc.
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>>2504446
Try vagina sometime. It will blow your mind.



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