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File: LSF.jpg (262 KB, 1200x783)
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Anyone have any experience with light steel framing? I'm trying to find some solid resources to design and build a tiny home using light steel on a pier foundation.
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The thermal conductivity would likely be a beating on your insulation. I wonder why one wouldnt stick to lumber in this case. A proper thermal break may be required if you live in cold climates.
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I might be a retard but this seems like it would be really difficult to fasten any drywall, outlet boxes, any other shit that you can normally screw to a stud quickly.
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>>2439501
I believe this is what the fine thread drywall screws are for.
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>>2439501
It's your typical commercial build pretty much.

Just as easy, if not easier especially the headers. They're all laid out with passthroughs and predrilled holes for outlets, ect.

Practically no insulation as most times the full front wall is glass anyway.

It'd work for a house, just have to keep in mind they aren't designed to last very long. Depends where you are I guess.
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>>2439203
>Anyone have any experience with light steel framing?
I'm living in house made out of it.
What can I say.
Thermal bridges are a thing, fastening heavy stuff is questionable sometimes, but in general kinda similar to wood framing, except you don't nail, but screw shit.
>>2439501
>drywall
They make special screws for shit, so it is not such big of a problem
>outlets
It might get tricky sometimes.
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>>2439479
External insulation
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>>2439714
How? Sip panels? Where is the connection to the frame? Where is the thermal break? You can't just say "external insulation". Most of the time these steel structures have a ton of glazing in conjunction with concrete precast panels and very little insulation on the outside of the metal.
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>>2439479
Just coat it all in a few mm of spraycork, ez thermal break
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>>2439710
Bridging is easily fixed with Spacetherm CBS strips
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>>2439873
Dunno, I think external insulation is kinda better.
But in my climate it is ok
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>>2439877
I meant between the beams, and along the roof trusses, it's only a few mm thick rolls
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>>2439780
Can't you just put rigid foam panels on the outside of the steel
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>>2439922
Condensation
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>>2439923
On what? The rigid foam produces a solid water proof barrier...
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>>2439925
Do you understand what condensation is?
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>>2440312
No I am stupid
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>>2440320
Obviously
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>>2439203
Who ever thought this was a good idea was an absolute retard.
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>>2439923
>>2439780
>Most of the time these steel structures have a ton of glazing in conjunction with concrete precast panels and very little insulation on the outside of the metal.

For residential, the entire frame is supposed to be inside of conditioned space. The residential design guides for LGS use shear members or shear panels to get rid of need for structural skinning,then wrap frame in non-permeable barrier, then use something like semi-rigid rock-wool or foam exterior bats to get full R-value on the outside of frame, and then seal and skin over the insulation. the connection to frame for the skinning varies system to system, but you're right, it's much more complicated and fiddly. anything you save in labor and complication by going to a Track-and-rail system gets eaten up by your exterior assembly.

Some of the prefab-panel companies recommend the R-20 ZIP panels, so you end up with an OSB exterior anyways. I've seen a few projects go with rigid foam overlaid by DensGlas; some of the rigid foam panels come with plastic inserts on the on exterior surface for attachment to a skinning system and apparently GP has a couple product lines and partner firms that they recommend for residential, but it's such a marginal market for them you generally have to chase down the info from their reps.
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Personally, I'd just build it out of wood.
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>>2439203
enjoy
https://cssbi.ca/assets/resources/Design_Manuals/CSSBI-59-05.pdf
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>>2441229
yup wonder how many times more expensive it is compared to wood, that's allot of steel
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>>2442503
Prolly the same price
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>>2442503
Under normal conditions the structural LGS members - like 16-14 gauge - come in about 15% more than comparable wood in similar dimensions.

Haven't been normal conditions for the past 2 years now, so who knows. Spot prices for lumber are still up from 2019 and Steel is about even.
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This is a great idea. If your house burns down, the structure will remain and you will be able to rebuild quick, unlike with a wooden cardboard house.
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>>2442881
>16-14 gauge
They are usually 0.8 - 1.2 mm which is more like 18-20
>>2442885
Shit is cold-rolled, you're fucked basically, it will lose strength.
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>>2443140
But but jet fuel can't melt steel beams!
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>>2442503
>how many times more expensive it is compared to wood
25-50 percent more
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>>2443140
>Shit is cold-rolled, you're fucked basically, it will lose strength.
It'll be fine, stop listening to the screeching enginiggers who say it'll LE FALL DOWN ON YOUR HEAD!
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My grandparents built a new home with a steel frame in the 90's. Don't have to worry about termites or rot but you'd get fuck all reception for mobile phones, cordless landline phones, radios, and later wifi inside the house. Drove them nuts so the next place they built in the late 00's they went back to a wooden frame.
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>>2443664
>you'd get fuck all reception for mobile phones, cordless landline phones, radios, and later wifi inside the house
Can confirm, my garage is built using steel framing and it absolutely destroys my cellular signal inside. Like 1 bar, or sometimes zero, where outside the garage I get 3-4 bars. And that's just a simple 4-walled building. I can't imagine if it were a house that also had a bunch of interior walls with steel in them too.
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>>2439203
METAL YES

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV5JNT_dCaA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LI6r9gP1KU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvo1-RW-hxQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6XVqx7DT-s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xizWztwsPW8
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>>2442885
>>2443211
>>2443650
A fire will cause the whole structure to flash rust, and they studs will probably fall apart with how thick the rust will be and how thin the steel is.
>>2443584
>>2442881
Steel has been cheaper for very long stretches since 2020 stud for stud, and are roughly the same rn.

>>2443841
>>2441380
>>2439203
Biggest problem stopping me from using steel is windloads in florida, specifically hurricane ratings is a lot harder to get info on with steel, where you can just screw studs together over and over again for strength to make a rated wall, steel is a giant headache
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>>2443664
Not much worse than reinforced concrete.
>>2443877
>A fire will cause the whole structure to flash rust, and they studs will probably fall apart with how thick the rust will be and how thin the steel is.
It is kinda made out of same shit as cars are made of (well, older ones, because this is just cold-rolled that was galvanized). So shit would be fucked.
But on the other hand, steel doesn't burn.
>Biggest problem stopping me from using steel is windloads in florida, specifically hurricane ratings is a lot harder to get info on with steel, where you can just screw studs together over and over again for strength to make a rated wall, steel is a giant headache
There are design manuals that tell you what kind of side load can shit take.
But lets be honest, RC is probably the best material when it comes to hurricanes. Steel is the best when it comes to earthquakes.
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>>2443904
>Steel is the best when it comes to earthquakes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVvll76OgmU
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>>2443980
no one is making 6 stories off fucking steel framing, people use fucking I beams at that point.
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>>2443980
It performed really well, what is the point?
>>2444085
Local steel manufacturer tells that light steel can be used up to 3 floors, anything above will require normal gauge steel or some shit like that. I live in seismic shithole.
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>>2443140
>They are usually 0.8 - 1.2 mm which is more like 18-20

We only worked with the 54 mil/ 63 mil C-series CD studs because our warehouse monkies kept finding ways to cripple the webs on anything thinner, but that was commercial. for residential you're probably right. Those would be even cheaper, then.
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>>2443877
>specifically hurricane ratings is a lot harder to get info on with steel, where you can just screw studs together over and over again for strength to make a rated wall, steel is a giant headache


Many projects done in hi-windload areas get put up with panelized systems. Those are LEGO-tier easy to put together. There were several companies starting offer residential panelized systems when I stopped working in it about 3 years ago, and I'm not talking about the FrameCAD/Volstrukt guys, though they might be decent too. I just wouldn't order a structure engineered for severe weather from Texas.
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>>2444394
>residential panelized systems
Way too much $$$
Stick frame is still the most economical and easiest way to get approved to build and for end users, IE Homeowners building their own home, Steel dipped below wood for a long period but still only made sense for interior walls, not saving much.
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>>2444537
Why not just pour concrete walls for windload
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>>2439203
>Anyone have any experience with light steel framing?
Yes.
>I'm trying to find some solid resources to design and build a tiny home using light steel on a pier foundation.
Why? Where did you come up with this genius idea?

Do you enjoy spending more time and more money on something that won't last as long, and is harder to repair?

If you have some weird thing against wood, look into ICF blocks. You can literally build your house with big boy legos.

Install rebar into the ICF blocks and pour concrete in the middle. Frame the interior with light gauge steel stud. Thank me later.

Another option would be to frame the corners and roof with heavy steel beams, then attach rows of purlin to attach Isowall panels.
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bricc
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>>2444839
too thicc
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>>2444553
>Way too much $$$
Have you people ever even heard of what money is? Christ, you know much fucking concrete costs, let alone the forming to pour a concrete wall?
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>>2444925
Thats why prefab concrete panels are a thing. Just put wall segments on a foundation, span steel beams across and youre "done". Alternatively you could build it up with concrete blocks and fill them with rebar (sticking from the foundation) and concrete.
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>>2444956
Pray tell, how much do those things cost? Is it more than 2x4s or steel studs?
Fucking retard
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>>2444960
Concrete itself is cheaper than steel, and you dont need steel for compressive loads. The only question is wether it is cheaper to build/frame on site or to have prefabricated sections made in a factory to reduce on-site work. That would be a question of labor cost vs. automation.
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>>2444993
You have never worked in construction and have no idea what your talking about. The materials needed to build a wall will be exponentially higher done in concrete, precast or otherwise as opposed to steel studs and conventional framing, stop being such a faggot fuckup. Please stop talking, your a fucking retard.
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>>2440676
That's putting it kindly. What an epic shit and water trap.
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>>2445145
Strong materials are much more expensive than insurance. A DIYer serious about hurricane protection would build a proper concrete dome or bunker but normals aren't serious about hurricane (or fire) protection.

Smart play is less square footage and stronger house but disposable homes are fine which is why everyone prefers them.



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