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I tried to find last thread in the archives but have no idea how they work, sorry for that.

What do you make?
What woods do you like?
Hand tools or machines?
Favourite finishing?

I’ll start with latest tractor. Poor quality oak, cnc cut, hand sanded, finished with beeswax and burnished with denim
>>
Also, are these any good?
>>
why put the disgusting cat in the frame like an attention starved woman?
>>
I've just been given a bunch of 1/2" thick oak. Anyone got any project ideas?

>>2386710
>What do you make?
Whatever I need or want. Or whatever I think someone would want as a gift.

>What woods do you like?
Depends on the project. Hard to go wrong with Poplar though.

>Hand tools or machines?
Machines, mostly for cost reasons. Hand tools always seem to priced as luxury goods rather than functional tools.
>>
Made some barn doors today and yesterday, made a bolt with 1/2" oak dowel with 1/4" dowel sticking out to push it. It works ok but its either way too tight to push with 1 hand or way too loose and the doors wont stay closed. Such is life
>>
>>2386918
its a fur suit
>>
Customers want so many different cabinet options it makes your head spin. Then they don't want to pay custom prices.
>>
>>2386918
He’s nice, original background was less nice

> Anyone got any project ideas?
Cut tractors lol. Nah maybe a chess board? They look nice in oak and it stains pretty well. If you have spare rosewood or ebony for the black squares even better, but well stained oak looks just as good imo
>>
Is having a truck basically a necessity for woodworking? I'd love to do more projects, but there is like a $70 minimum charge to have lumber delivered, and I can't fit most common lumber in my car.
>>
>>2387529
Depends what you do. My Audi A1 fits about 12 8-foot 2x4s inside and 40 10-foot 2x4s on the roof rack (or 8 full size 1/4” MDF sheets). If you use slabs or bigger sheets of course it may be different. But a trailer is much cheaper if all you do is haul wood
>>
>>2387529
All the lumber yards near me will chop boards for free. Unless your projects call for 8'/10'/12' long boards, just chop them in half.
>>
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pg 10
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I was always in love with the idea of whittling and I want to give it a try.
But I dont want to dip yet into buying a dedicated knife so I figured I'd borrow one of my dad's many many knives the next time I'm over there.
What are the qualities of a knife well suited for whittling I should look out for?
>>
For anyone reading here, i suggest the INCRA measuring tools. Amazing stuff.

They are perforated to be able to mark accurately without parallax. They also have a protractor and centering rule aswell.

Their increments are in 1/16th, 1/32nd 1/64th inch for the normal ones. There is also the pro whose smallest increment is 1/100th inch.

I suggest checking them out.
>>
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Am I just wasting time trying to cut plywood with kugihiki? I know it's not made for the purpose, the whole blade is of the same thickness (including teeth) so I find it really hard to avoid jamming. I guess I'll buy the right tool anyway but I'm just wondering if given enough skill it could be done.
>>
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My laundry area is visible from the kitchen and after tearing the walls out to fix rotted studs and putting up new paneling, I'm not going to reinstall the cruddy wire shelves so I'm building cabinets to match what's in the kitchen, only without butt jointing absolutely everything.

Next weekend I'll paint and hang it.

>>2390149
>skill
Persistence, maybe. I know what you mean, though. My flush cut is especially prone to problems since it wants to bend so easily when used like that.
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>>2390524
Pic of the cleat I'll use to hang it. There's very little clearance on either side so this should make it easier to level and install.
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Do any of you guys operate a small(meaning weekends only) business doing woodworking? Wifey and I are buying a house with a sizeable detached garage and I love woodworking, but I've never had the space to do it properly before. I was also thinking if I ran a small business making some sort of wood nicknacks I could write off my shop/tools on my taxes, hence making Uncle Sugar pay me back for it. Has anyone done this, is it worth it getting an LLC together?
>>
>>2386918
cats are great
>>
>splittin' wood
>come across a really hard, dense oak log, seems like I could make something out of it instead of burning it
What can I make with no woodworking experience and basic tools (drill/driver and reciprocating saw)?
>>
>>2392003
I've been looking for someone who has a shop and would be willing to produce wood knickknacks. You won't need an LLC as you'd be taxed as a sole proprietor but if you register as one it will be tied to your home address and searchable
>>
>>2392591
Ah ok, I wasn't sure if there was a reason that having an LLC would be beneficial enough that it's outweigh the downsides. I'm mostly wanting to use it for tax purposes and side money, my 9-5 and small children keep me busy enough. I don't even know what I'd want to produce at this point, but I'd be really close to mid sized college town, so anything that would appeal to college kids is what I'm thinking. Some sort of high end decor for art hoe girls that I can mark up enough to make it worth my time without it taking my whole weekend. I'm going to cut my teeth fixing up the house we are buying(making built in shelves, etc) and after that I might have a better idea of what I'd like to produce.
>>
>>2389431
looks nice. love a good work bench, just looks productive
>>
>>2390149
im sure there is a jap saw style thats better for cutting plywood like this. I do it with my ryoba but it's a pain in the ass sometimes and takes a while. I dont have space for a table saw or id use that
>>
>>2392677
I didn't notice anything better when searching so I got ryoba and it's okay. It definitely is way better than kugihiki as it doesn't jam. Possibly the fact that it's 180 length might help (since pitch usually is proportional to length and I guess smaller pitch is better for plywood). At least it's good enough for now since I'm not going to make long cuts.
>>
Any tips for making chamfers with chisel beside patience and practice? I don't want to buy a plane yet because it's expensive for only couple small projects I have in mind.
>>
>>2387529
You can get a lot of utility with roof racks. Machines are a challenge but I prefer transporting lumber on roof racks to the bed of my truck.
>>
>>2392654
Small boxes are a big hit with dumb bitches.Get a pile of product together and try to get a table at a farmer's or art's market. I do a few of these a year to hand out business cards and it's worth it just for that.
>>
>>2392830
Take very small bites until you get where you want to be. You could rip a strip of wood, affix it close to the edge you want chamfered with double sided tape and use that piece as a reference to keep your chamfer consistent.
Or you could get a ten dollar block plane from Home Depot and do it faster and easier.
>>
>>2392007
sure if you love your home smelling like piss and shit i guess
>>
>>2392839
Thanks.
>Or you could get a ten dollar block plane from Home Depot and do it faster and easier.
I tried that but got into hurr don't buy cheap shit mindset and checked that "proper" ones cost upwards of 100$ (EU here). But now that I've practised a bit I find some calming aspect in meticulously carving a chamfer.
>>
>>2392654
> I don't even know what I'd want to produce at this point
That's where I come in. I'm looking for someone to make wooden products for my online store. Boxes/chests, and something as simple as a block of wood with a hole drilled in the center and a lid. I'm about to start making them myself since I can't find any locals
>>
>>2392568
Look up rithing, and post a pic.
>>
>>2392844
I was like you but I got a cheap ‘hobby plane’ for €7 and I’ve been using it a lot. It takes a kind of disposable razor blades that come with it. Works great for small chamfers and to flatten slightly curved wood. At times I can’t be bothered to sharpen my block plane and just use this one instead because it’s fast. It sucks in terms of ergonomics though but it’s pretty good otherwise
>>
>>2392844
Planes are very simple machines. Well made ones are nicer to use and less finicky, but you can absolutely get in the game and get good results with cheap stuff.
I use this little thing a lot. Make sure your blade is sharp and the bottom is flat and you're good to go. Get a nice flat sharpening stone and you'll be good.

https://www.amazon.com/Great-Neck-Saw-LSO-Maker/dp/B000LNTGTM/ref=sr_1_22?crid=ATHGPCDNKNXL&keywords=block+plane&qid=1653587915&sprefix=block+plane%2Caps%2C216&sr=8-22
>>
>>2393013
>>2392844
And dont shy away from wooden planes if you're on a budget.
>>
>>2386710
Please post kot, the little flutter looks cute
>>
>>2393047
cute kot is kot
(not my work)
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I have a 21x30x2cm sheet of this plastic covered plywood, what should i do with it?
>>
>>2393523
If you have a lathe, you could do some artistic stuff with it. Otherwise, just use to make some sort of jig.
>>
>>2389579
>>2389579
nobody? been thinking about this for a while now.
>>
>>2394260
you need a knife that is not too thin and with a very acute bevel angle, no secondary bevel.
>>
>>2394268
that sounds like solid info I can work with
>>
>>2393523
Make a sign with a router. The plastic sheeted stuff is pretty nice for contrast and you can set the router depth to a ‘white’ layer of the plywood.
>>
How would I patch damaged plywood? I want to use scraps for shelves but one piece has some damage near the edge. Approximately 3.5x12cm area (longer side along the edge). My current plan is to cut out the damaged area with two 45deg sides so that a replacement piece can rest on them and could be properly glued. I'm not confident I can make the fit perfect (although I can try), perhaps I should use something different than white glue, perhaps epoxy?
>>
>cut out the damaged area with two 45deg sides so that a replacement piece can rest on them
Draw that because I think I'm visualizing it wrong. I'm not sure what sort of glue you have available but find Titebond II or similar PVA glue. Can you patch the damage? Water putty or bondo can be sanded flat after filling the damage. You could use either to fill the edges, too.
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>>2394796
Cut a piece of veneer and just bondo it in.
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Old carpenter's widow selling her house
picked all this shit up for £10

>Wolf WD23 Drill
>Wolf ES14 Pillar stand
>2 planes
>Record Sash Clamp 3ft
>Record Sash Clamp 5ft

all rusted to shit, but worth a £10 imo.

oh and an Imperial typewriter, Torque wrench and Brother DB2-B763-3 industrial sewing machine.
and an extension cable
>>
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What do you make?
Little of everything, but mostly 1-off furniture for people
What woods do you like?
Pine, Ash, Poplar, Beech, Bamboo, sweet gum
Hand tools or machines?
Hybrid, but I use more handtools the more the project matters to me.
Favourite finishing?
I like most oil and wax finishes or burnishing.

I'm really frustrated with my current shop situation.
It's a 10'x20' cheap pre-built shed.
I know I need a few benches. I'm currently working off sawhorses, and a few folding tables.
I'm fairly good on basic handtools. I have several cheaper Japanese chisels and planes I use often, a Record #4 plane, and a bunch of random hand tools I've made myself over the years. I could make due with some measurement and marking tools, but I'd rather make those than buy.
I have a okay tablesaw, a floorstanding drillpress that isn't amazing but works and a bandsaw from the late 80s that used to be great but it's falling apart. Anything not made of out machined steel on it is crumbling away. Its not long for this world im afraid.

Are there any tools or stuff in your shop that just have made a world of difference for you?
I thought about getting a miter saw. I can crosscut on my tablesaw, but its not my favorite thing in the world. Like I Said I mostly do oddball 1-off furniture. Some is stylized, others is made to look like ikea-shit because the client wants it that way. I'm looking to ease some of that early-project frustration. Breaking down stock is a struggle in my current shop, and storage/organization is a nightmare.

Also I recently learned my great-great-grandfather, great-grandfather, and grandfather were all cabinetmakers. My granddad is who taught me about wood growing up. Pretty cool tho, I got to see a pic of my great-great-grandfather standing beside a cabinet he won recognition for in the late 1800s.
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at the house i bought, the previous owner built a shed himself. it's not a terrible shed. no leaks inside when it rains, but the door does not seal well at all.
it's a bit like pic related, and i guess i should have just taken a picture of the actual shed but the problems in the picture are basically identical.
there aren't any gaps in the actual planks of the door. the door itself is like, two layers thick with alternating planks, if that makes sense. no gaps in the door itself.

however, there are gaps all around the outside of the door. like, between the door and the floor, as well as between the door and the frame.
little animals and snakes and shit get in through the cracks and i would rather there not be snakes in my shed anymore.
i don't really know the correct way to fix this. i was thinking of maybe putting like, foam or weather stripping around the frame so the door is flush with it as a seal.
or, maybe cutting some wood pieces and building a wooden "seal" on the frame so when the door is closed there are no gaps anywhere.
it doesn't have to be properly secure like a house door, i just want the big gaps closed up so shit stays out.
>>
>>2396739

Frame in a real door, are you dense? Buy an exterior steel clad one pre hung for like 200$
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>>2396739
I would rather put a few planks around the doorframe to make the frame slightly smaller if that's practical. Make the frame meet the door rather than make the door meet the frame and make it heavier.
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>>2389579
doug linker has a good whittling channel. I like my opinel 7 3" blade for roughing things out then switch to something else for detail work.
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>>2386888
for cutting corners down, you can make a round stick from a square piece of wood with this
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>>2396884
And also plaining the cupboards if they get stuck or maybe wooden windows as well, i should really get one
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>>2396884
I believe that pic is not a spoke shave but a no 80 scraper. I dont know if they’re useful though
>>
new to wood working and need a recommendation for a wood working vise to mount onto my bench. best to buy something used? anything new is either very expensive or chinesium.
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>>2396894
I got pic related for €35 and a Chinesium metal vice for €20 or so. The combination is great, but I use the wood one much more than the metal one
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i'm new to wood-working, so i don't have many power tools at my disposal.
But i've managed to make:
>short planter
>wood-working table-top that i put on saw sleds for its feet
>a french cleat system
>a sickle-scythe for cutting tall grass (not finished)
>and some wood carving art
even made an odysee channel to archive short vlogs about my creations.
>>
>>2396894
i cant recommend you something but i gotta say i hate working on my french vise and regret choosing that style for my bench design.
Mine even is a proper 2 piece casting instead of galvanized bent sheets
>>2396928
>>
>>2394846
Sorry, I didn't notice the reply. The area around is bent a bit so I thought I'd try to replace it like pic related (dimensions exaggerated).
>>
I have a hammer, a handsaw, nails, some pallet wood and lots of interest
Any books i could read as a beginner, or any projects
>>
>>2397980
I know people find him annoying but Rex Kruger has some videos for people with little tools. If you don’t have a proper workbench, watch his and Sellers vids on easy work benches and start with that.
>>
>>2398152
>Rex Kruger

damn autocorrect. meant Rex Kramer
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I have gotten back into woodworking by making custom fight sticks for people as commission work and only charge materials since I use it as a learning process. Recently someone I made a stick for really wanted to learn and asked if I could teach him. Long story short, I do a lot to hide imperfections in my work, but actually having someone watch me for every step of the job made me feel like a fraud and I want to step up my game. My greatest struggle is trying to make everything square, straight, and flat. I've been starting to watch Paul Sellers and Rob Cosman as well as read some Tage Frid and cabinet making books since I used to lurk here sometimes. Anyone got any other suggestions?
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>>2399079
I really want to start making some jigs to make everything nice and square so that I can actually make a box that doesn't have gaps. I have an assortment of hand tools such as 2 japanese pull saws, a traditional chinese plane (lmao thought it was japanese when I bought it on amazon), and a chisel set. My power tools are a router I just bought (the bulky kind with handles) and a rusty table saw that is older than me with a wobbly fence (it doesn't cut straight because of this).
>>
>>2392844
> proper" ones cost upwards of 100$
Check out classified ads. There's lots of clueless people selling grandpa's old hand tools without knowing what they'd cost new out there.
>>
I want to get into whittling.
any idea where to start?
>>
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Can anyone tell me anything about these planes? I picked them up for $10 each at an estate sale. One is 27" long, and the other is 28" long, and the irons say "moulson brothers". It seems that they're antiques.
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Made a chest.
>>
>>2400910
>>2400910
Those are jointer planes, intended to create very flat surfaces on the faces or edges of boards. They have a double iron, which helps reduce tearout, and they appear to be in good condition. Clean up with some mineral spirits and wax, tune the irons, flatten the sole if needed and you should have plenty of life left in them.
>>
>>2401088
That’s a piece of art Anon, nice. Wouldn’t even know how to begin making carvings like that
>>
>>2392654
>inb4 he just does gay occult shit on a CNC
That's not woodworking but it will sell
>>
>>240126
Neither would he
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>>2399079
> I do a lot to hide imperfections in my work
Don’t be ashamed of this, that’s how it’s always been done as far as I know. But maybe try to draw more lines ‘as fits’ instead of using the dimensions from the plan. Sellers sometimes makes perfect fitting joints without using a ruler once, he just references everything to the actual size of the material instead of the intended size.

A back saw instead of a normal hand saw may go a long way. You take some long piece off stock, saw a bit off, check if square, figure out why not, repeat.
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I did a box at the same time as the chest to practice finishing techniques.
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>>2401267
No, it's not immediately apparent if you ever met me and I'm way out of the running for canonization, but I don't tolerate blasphemy. I was thinking like hanging planter boxes for all the new plant moms, maybe coffee tables or other stuff like that. I'm going to start with refinishing (actually refinishing, not just slapping paint) thrifted furniture and see how that does. I have a bunch of stuff to do at our new house to sharpen my wood working skills and practice on.
>>
>>2401469
>refinishing thrifted furniture
thats a fucking pain on alkyd resin coated shit that dominates the second hand market
>>
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hey guys next weeke i'd like to built a little cabin for some gardening tools, i'd like to buils it out of a bunch of tree that i'm going to fell the day before.
Here's my question how do i turn them into plank and what not ?
I have a chainsaw a chisel and an axe but it's a fiskar i can use it to cut a tree down but surely not to trim it into a plank.
>>
>>2401341
nice anon, I love carved boxes.
>>
retard here, finished putting together the trestles for my workbench. I put the fence on my dad's old table saw to 3" then to 6.5" but that didn't produce a 3.5" lap so I shoved the left over slivers in there to close the gap.
>>
>>2402244
one of the slivers fell underneath and I didn't realize it until after screwing it down. will it hurt anything by leaving it there?
>>
>>2402244
Yeah that kerf is a bitch to learn to compensate for.
>>
>>2402244
when you need to cut an exact size on a table saw, use a stiff ruler (not a tape)
measure from the fence to the edge of the teeth that faces the fence (assuming the piece you're keeping is between fence and blade)
>>
>>2402293
ya, will have to be more careful in the future. also it doesn't help they say "nominal: 2x4, actual: 1.5x3.5" but then actual doesn't actually mean actual as, after measuring, some of mine are 2 3/8 or 2 5/16 only furthering the gap.
all in a days work as a retard.
>>
>>2402324
Yeah unless it is literally sold as guaranteed a certain dimension by a reputable supplier, you can be sure there will be variation.
When you're just making garage furniture / shelves it hardly matters though.
You can still get great looking results by picking where you align joints from (usually outside faces, top, etc)
Tracing the actual board / one side of the joint onto where it goes instead of assuming it'll fit also works.

Once you get into preparing boards with a jointer / planer / table saw setup it gets more reliable.
>>
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Thought I would ask here, just done derusting this old shovel head, if I have an identical shovel with the original handle is there any way I can use it as a template? also since this is well over a century old wood what would be the "period appropriate" finish
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>>2402477
There are lathe tools that can be used to copy shapes but afaik shove handles haven’t changed much so a new one might do. Afaik people used handles a bit bigger and made the end of the handle fit perfectly into the head with a file or something before riveting.

And I think boiled linseed oil was the common finish for uses like this. It will wear and blacken over time anyway
>>
>>2402113
There are jigs for chain saws, we call them Alaskan Mills. They are pretty expensive but you can make them out of scrap aluminium, or if you only need one thickness you could make a simpler jig out of wood
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>>2402247
It doesn't matter, it'll be flat enough
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>>2402546
thanks anon, is it alright to use a grinder to get it into a rough shape and then finish it by hand?
>>
>>2402583
I wouldn’t use a grinder on anything wood but yea could work. Have to say I’ve only done it once, buy handle, file to size, coat with oil, drill and rivet.
>>
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I make primative axes. Lately ive gotten some pieces of wood where the fork branch isnt straight and at a 45 degree angle.I'm used to straightening wood by heating and using my vise bench with three pegs of wood to straighten it however this doesnt really work for the branch as the peg pings out as the branch raises.

Whats the best way to approach this? Its just such an ackward angle to fix.
>>
any ideas for pressure treated pine? I had to modify some fences recently and got about 100 off cuts (1” x 6” x 3’ roughly). Already have too many planter boxes. Birdhouses are an option but I’m not sure if it’s toxic to birds
>>
So the city cut down some Cedar trees that were getting tangled with some power lines near my grandmas house. Problem is they left behind all the logs and they're no good for firewood in a chimney or a campfire.
I've made some estimates of how many planks I can get out of the pile, but I don't really know what I should make. A chest, or a birdhouse just seems a little too basic to me.
What do you think I should make with this wood.

20 Logs of length 22" and diameter 4" (estimated useful diameter 2")
5 Logs of length 22" and diameter 8" (estimated useful diameter 6")
3 Logs of length 24" and diameter 16" (estimated useful diameter 12")

Optimal plank yield
1 plank per small log of 2"x2"x20" [20 planks]

2 planks per medium log of 2"x4"x20" [10 planks]

4 planks per large log of 2"x8"x20" [12 planks]
>>
>>2403681
A visualization of what I might be working with.
>>
>>2403697
which sketchup is that one? i have a pirated copy but scared to install it lol
>>
>>2403719
Its just the free web browser version.
>>
I got it, I want to learn how to write caligraphy, so maybe a sloped writing table like this?
>>
>>2403719
SketchUp Make from 2015 is still free. It doesn't get updated but it works fine for me. Cost is a Trimble account, but I just used my spam trap google account.

https://www.howtogeek.com/720402/psa-you-can-still-download-the-old-free-version-of-sketchup/

There really isn't much in the new version compared to it, and runs solid as a rock on a Win11 machine. Every plug in and model I've downloaded works fine.
>>
>>2403777
Overkill. You can learn calligraphy on a kitchen table, or a desk. That looks really small for a standard paper size, too. And looks really fucking gay, on top. Does it come with a fedora and a feather quill?
>>
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>>2393523
>>
>>2403681
They’re pretty small but there maybe enough for a chair or two. Rietveld Crate Chair is a pretty cool project and iirc all parts are under 20”
>>
>>2399079
sign of a good craftsman is being able to hide the imperfections
>>
how sturdy is rhododendron?
i have a pile of decent sized off cuts and a trunk that's close to 5" in diameter, will it make a good walking stick or shillelagh
>>
>>2403894
be careful with that thing
>>
>>2404158
>R: 215 / I: 43 ▶ What workshop tool scares you the most?

yup
>>
>>2392830
>chamfers with chisel
>>
>>2404128
It’s pretty though but not very stiff. It’s fine grained and pretty good for whittling, people used to make spoons out of it, but also pretty flexible because of the softer core
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>>2401088
Super nice anon, your carving looks immaculate.
What did you use for the bottom of the inside? Aromatic cedar?
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>>2404628
Nah just some poplar. The rest is mahogany with walnut pegs.
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>>2392993
Ive got the same, you find it in hobby stores the autists model plane extravaganza kind, very based old man recommended to me
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>>2404518
huh, good to know, thanks anon
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>>2401088

Looks good other than those pegs right though the face of your piece, they don't match well and stick out look a sore thumb. Must be like 10 better ways to attach those panels than that
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>>2404785
Are you talking about this? These are hardly noticeable and are found in many types of fine furniture.
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>>2404333
>veritas
nice but he said he don't want to invest much

as another anon suggested a 10$ block plane would be good enough for chamfering
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>>2404785
It's a colonial era reproduction using drawbored mortise and tenon joinery and typical frame and panel construction. Those joints will stay tight for hundreds of years.
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>>2403784
Not a quill, but I do have a dip pen with several different nibs.
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>>2404932
he has an autistic complaint about the way the pegs stand out in the finished piece, not the strength of the joinery. personally i don't think they detract from the look but an plug cut from the face of a board and set in would take stain similar to the surrounding wood and blend in better than the dowels in the picture.
it is a very beautiful chest anon, i am jelly of your skill
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>>2404794
Not that anon but they also stand out a bit to me, maybe I’m autistic but I’d have preferred them a bit lower (in the center of the non carved part)
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You guys got any tricks for making a perfectly square frame with just a handsaw and a drafting triangle?
I'm making another card table like the one in pic. I'm happy with how the first one came out except the corners weren't totally flush (I filled the gaps with glue so it's passable for an amateur job) but I want this one to be nicer. The table will be 4'x4' so it should be easier. Should I use sand paper and trial-and-error? My only power tool is a drill.
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>>2405039
>a plug cut from the face of a board and set in

this. shift it down into the board that is flat, align the grain, try to match appearance, and it will pretty much disappear. as it is, it's not "autism" to say that it is an eyesore compared to the excellent finish elsewhere.
>>
I need to make seats and a 4' diameter top for some old outdoor furniture that's missing them. Nothing fancy, so to keep price down I'll probably use the laminated spruce boards sold at home improvement stores. They're pretty soft though so what can I do to make them more durable?
I'll use a good spar urethane to seal them but can I use wood hardener or something to make it a little more resistant to nicking/pitting with use? And if so, do I stain before or after applying it?
>>
>>2405397
>outdoor furniture
no matter what you spray or smear on, it will crack, swell and ruin the protection within the first year.
either let it raw, as it will turn ugly anyway
or get your hand on some leftover pieces of wood that will not rot or get infected after the first rain, like oak
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>>2405446
he could also use cedar, it's pretty weather resistant, or some other solid wood and do a burnt finish, i hear that holds up to weather fairly well though i haven't tried it
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>>2405563
https://youtu.be/8vXdWEFz2Q8?t=1155
>>
I'm working on a dining table, and one of my large oak planks for the top is slightly bowed (1/16" to 1/8" higher at the center than the other planks, but flush at the ends). It's 5/4, 6' long, and 10" wide ish, if I remember right. This is my first time dealing with bowed wood, what's the best way to handle it? Can I steam it back into flatness? Or should I try to get a plane and cut it down to flat?
I'll post a picture when I get home, since I've got the planks laid out for a mockup.
>>
>>2405397
Polyurethane gets harder the more coats you put. If you apply say 6 coats of PU then the hardness of the wood doesn’t matter that much anymore (it’s stiffness does ofc). If you’re going to drill holes and use fasteners, it will get grey slowly starting at the holes. There’s accoya if you want really expensive and durable

>>2405446
If you do it right it will need small touch ups every 4 years or so, but it’s not impossible.
>>
>>2405713
I’ve never tried steaming, also never seen someone who did it successfully with anything other than pine. Most woodworkers on YouTube either plane it flat or laminate it between two very straight planks (though yours may be too wide for that), force it flat, glue it up, and then plane the entire surface. If you have a big plane I’d recommend that
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>>2386710
What do you guys think of this bird feeder I made, its made from scrap wood that I had lying around, hopefully the birds like it
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>>2406048
neat
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>>2406048
That style works well.
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>>2406048
i like it anon
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>>2406073
Thanks, I tried my best for it, it's a little heavy but Im just having it sit ontop of my fence so it should be fine.
>>2406079
I tried to use the rough cut wood for the roof cause of the way it looks
>>2406086
Good to hear!
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>>2406048
Looks good, but make sure to squirrel-proof the fuck outta the shepherd's hook or w/e you hang it from, otherwise it'll be a tree rat feeder instead.
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>>2406102
my dad put all sorts of effort into stopping the squirrels and stellar jays from getting into the bird feeder, put chicken wire around it to so only small birds could get to the feed, put an old garbage can lid on top to keep the squirrels from getting to it.

then one night the bear grabbed it and snapped off the branch it was hanging from and ate the bird feed
>>
>>2406102
>>2406103
I own a Cooey .22 rifle, I'll just shoot them
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>>2406107
you can use them for soup!
also anon, i will be very disappointed if you don't learn how to tan the skins and make some furry undies
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>>2406112
Ive been killing them for years and usually what I do is I give them to a local guy who then skins them, turns the meat into dog food and then crushes the bones and I use that for fertilizer
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>>2406113
i still think you need some furry undies
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>>2406119
My balls sweat enough in this summer heat. but Ill take that into consideration when the months start to cool later in the year
>>
This weekends project, a tilting work light. The hardwood dowel makes an incredible creak when I rotate the lamp. I'm going to take it down and add some wax.

I found this light for $2 at the scrap yard. The driver was $14 on eBay. It's a full spectrum LED grow light, and is extraordinarily bright - I'll add the dimmer next weekend
>>
>>2406125

I'm also going to truncate, or flip the mounts do I can put up a sheet to hang tools.
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>>2406120
that's all i can ask
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>>2406125
neat!
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>>2406127
Neat! Was going to ask how it keeps in place, but looks like you added a screw on the right for holding it in position? Does that work well?
>>
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>>2405825
Thanks for the reply. Finally got around to taking a picture, and I measured it at just shy of 1/16". I have a couple of jointer planes I picked up recently (>>2400910), so I guess I'll figure out how to tune and use those.
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>>2406265
Seems like something you could easily plane off. Watch out for that knot
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>>2406268
Excellent, thanks. I'm pondering on the knots, there are a few on the tabletop... I like the character they add to it, though, so I'm thinking of filling them with epoxy or something.
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>>2406272
Was more of a warning that the grain direction is different near the knot so you may have some tear out when planing if you’re not careful. I usually drill them to slightly below the surface and then let the coating handle it
>>
I'm looking to make 5mm~1cm deep straight cuts in a board, to provide a break line for going in with a chisel- It's part of a small design, so I can't get at it with a hand saw.
I was considering getting my hands on a dremel, would a standard cut-off wheel be accurate/rigid enough to do that, or is there a better bit for precise, shallow carving?
>>
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>>2405373
Do you have a tape measure? Checking that the length from corner to opposite corner is the same in both directions will help keep it square
Would also recommend making one side of the cut then tracing it onto its match with the triangle between them (framing square here but you get the idea)
this way you only need to make one perfect cut per joint instead of two perfect 45's
>>
>>2406550
also just realized - using the first cut as a guide for the saw by holding it against it would work as long as you don't hit the triangle
a scoring knife (or just any old knife if you don't have one) would also give you a great starting track for the saw
>>
>>2406378
Dremel with a plunge router jig? I think they come in kits these days, 10mm should be doable in a few passes
>>
Does anyone know that the V-shaped cutout in a classic saw bench is for? I’m making a simple one to hand cut some sheets and stuff in my small garden, I’ve seen it a lot of times but can’t seem to find out what it’s used for and if I need it (left side of right bench in picture)
>>
>>2406236
yes. it's a machine screw with a threaded insert.
>>
>>2406576

I've always assumed clamping
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>>2406576
It's for fretsaw or coping work, supports the workpiece either side of the blade.

Likely not all that useful for most people.
>>
>>2399079
Hey, I used to do the same thing. Ironically I'm planning on buying some buttons and a few sticks to make me and my friend new fightsticks.
In the case of building fightsticks, i would say learning how to do layout and measurements is pretty important.. and learning how undercut your joints in the right spots so they fit together and hide gaps at the edges.
We all aim for perfect 90 degree cuts, but reality is we never get a perfect 90, so knowing when and how to compensate for error and "hide your mistakes" is important. Also, if you're a perfectionist like me, remember you will always see your mistakes and others likely will not. I screwed up a lot of boxes until I learned that lesson.
I'm not sure if you're using only handtools, powertools, or both- but from your pics it looks like you could benefit from making a few templates, or story sticks. Maybe look up some jigs that could be useful.. a shooting board or a miter box maybe.
Also my personal opinion, but I wouldn't shy away from using nails, screws, etc in their construction. Dolphin themed dovetails on the corners of your May fightstick may look awesome, but you can also dress up screw holes with decorative plugs etc to make them look fancy too.
You're already watching Paul sellers, and I think he's one of the better, if not best resource for woodworking out there. I would also go look up slagcoin and give it a read if that place is still up.
Other than that just practice laying out and making boxes. 76.3% of woodworking is just fancy boxes.
btw the bat-top stick is my favorite of those. You did a good job on it.
>>
>>2406673
> fretsaw
Ah of course, thanks a lot. Guess I’ll skip it then, could maybe be useful for the jigsaw too but I don’t use it that often
>>
What is the best way to fix a warped piece of wood? I am trying to fix up a cheap guitar's back and I tried placing it between two sheets of glass with some weight on top. While it is a lot better, there is still some parts that are curved out of shape.
>>
>>2407090
may need some heat, the guy in this video fixes a warped neck with heat and clamps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPNefplp5Ug
>>
>>2407090
>>2407091
Steam works better than just heat.
>>
>>2386710
Ok got a question.

I have 2 pieces of balsa wood, yes I know the material and what i'm doing is not ideal, this is a piss with the cock I got not one I want scenario, they are 1/16 inch thick, and i'm replacing a missing plastic backing with them. 1/16 is to thin for the job so i'm planning on doubling it up

now my question is this, do I go with the grain for both pieces, or do I glue one at a 90 degree angle to it to make it a bit stronger? again well aware balsa is not an ideal option for this, but its what I have access to and I don't want to pay out the ass for what I could get locally, I have already checked local prices for other projects and cost is a non starter.
>>
>>2407775
Depends on your application

If you go with the grain it’s stronger against bending against the grain but not much stronger against bending/snapping with the grain and vice versa.
So you put them at a 90 degree angle the result will be about equally stiff in both directions. Glue joint will be a bit stronger with the grain probably but since it’s sheet it shouldn’t make a big difference
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>>2407791
thanks more or less what I assumed, because the area it's taking up is a rectangle, I figured that it would probably take more with the grain strain and potentially snap because of it, just wasnt sure if what I was doing was the right call.

now one more thing, these are 4x9 sheets, ill have to cut one in half to cover the whole thing, think this will impact durability in any meaningful way? the grain is going with the 9 inch length, and I need to cover a 7 inch hole. there should be material to spare, any thoughts ot just glue it up?
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>>2407814
> now one more thing, these are 4x9 sheets, ill have to cut one in half to cover the whole thing, think this will impact durability in any meaningful way? the grain is going with the 9 inch length, and I need to cover a 7 inch hole. there should be material to spare
No clue, can you make a drawing?

> just glue it up?
Yea probably
>>
Bird Feeder update!
Wonderful news, its a smash hit, a local population of Grackles has seemed to be the biggest customer of my newly opened feedery (Sponsored by Sneed) Grackles are not the only customers however as I have seen birds like Robins, Blue Jays and Gray Jays popping in for a quick bite. I think the Grackles come by so often because they live in the taller trees surrounding the bird feeder, so its really convenient for them.
The next project is a bird house.
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>>2407971
Forgot pic
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>>2407876
>k this will impact durability in any meaningful way? the grain is going with the 9 inch length, and
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>>2407974
good job anon
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>>2390525
Cleats make the job really simple. I was taught to use bendable 1x2s to raise and lower uppers in, but cleats are so much faster and more manageable.

I need to learn how to make some door types and route a few hinges. Cabs are running 200-400 just starting retail. One of my vendors is so fubar I left a customer 3 months with an unfinished kitchen. I'm ready to build the undelivered pieces myself and leave the customer and vendor to fight it out. Online reviews show this vendor has a nationwide reputation for hanging customers out to dry.
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>>2408193
The euro hinges are easy to figure out and forgivng of slight misalognment. I'd shied away from hinges and doors before but no longer. They were actually the most fun part. It was only worth it since the size is weird and prebuilts didn't work; I think it still cost close to $400.


That project nearly ended in the trash though. After painting, I went to hang it and realized it was 2" too long to rotate into place in my closet-like area. I didn't think I could trim enough off thr corners but after sleeping on it, decided to give it a shot and just barely got it in. The gap on the front face got covered with molding anyway.
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>>2408301
> euro hinges
As a european I think it’s one of the worst thing that has the name euro attached. True they are easy to install, offset the door a bit when open and have this nice soft close. But man they are hideous on wood or classic looking cabinets because they look too much like robotic frogs.
>>
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Hey guys, I wamt to build a sturdy, neat looking cabinet rack for work. It doesn't even have to be made of wood, it just has to be sturdy, easy to make, and not ugly. What resources would you recommend? I'm looking for a book of blueprints or something like that. Thanks in advance!
>>
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retard here again, had some time to work on my workbench some more. finished the stretchers and tusked wedges. now the base assembly is complete.

for the mortise in the legs I tried copying the layout lines to the other side and chiseling in from both sides. but the legs must have not been perfectly square as the mortise didn't meet in the middle.
when I did the mortises for the stretchers I put a backing board and tried chiseling all from one side which that gave considerable tear out. I just continued cause doing the 5 degree angle for the wedge would be too hard when chiseling from both sides.
the base is still rock solid so guess it doesn't matter much.
>>
>>2396894
Thoughts on using logdogs, holdfasts, and a crochet instead of a vice?
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>>2409266
Nice. I really like wedges as a fixture method instead of hardware or glued joints, but mortises are so tedious I can’t get myself to build something like that

Also wouldn’t it be better to put the wedge through both parts?
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>>2410843
>Also wouldn’t it be better to put the wedge through both parts?
No clue and I never want to chop a mortise again.
>>
So I have a really cheap stanley plane. So cheap, in fact, that it's new production, but it comes with an old-style thin iron, and an old-style chip breaker. Still, it had been doing good enough work, but yesterday I noticed that the frog was set so far back, that the iron was sitting on the body of the plane instead of the frog, so I closed the mouth a bit, but the iron was still only making contact with the frog in one point. I realized the cause is that since the iron is so thin, the chip breaker is bending it away from the frog with any reasonable amount of pressure. If I loosen it so that it's not bending the iron, then it doesn't have enough friction to keep the iron forward. Why is this happening? Is stanley so retarded that they made the chip breaker harder than the iron? Am I the one who's retarded and doing something wrong? Actual old stanley planes didn't have this problem. Actually this all came about because I bought another plane from some guy in facebook marketplace and it had the exact same problem, which means it's an issue with all the planes in my country (it's the only model you can buy here). Should I just set the frog back again and keep pretending everything's fine? Should I bite the bullet and send for some thicker irons from amazon? would be expensive as shit since I'd have to pay like $20 for international shipping, but I can bundle it with some other stuff to make it more bearable.
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>>2411378
From googling, most people say it's normal for the iron to bend a bit, but mine is bent by like an 1/8 or maybe more. However, from the pictures, it seems that my chip breaker is really huge, so I'll try filing it down and see what happens.
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>>2409182
Seconding this
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AHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!
im retarded bros.
i was cutting dovetails for a wagon vise and got too excited to see my first dovetail come together and cut in from the sides. now there's no pins and two tails.
im going to bed.
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>>2411403
So I ground the chip breaker down and tightened the mouth to like 1/16th and it's working fine now. the still gets bent by the chip breaker but at least now it's making contact with the frog at two points instead of one.
>>
>>2411378
Which Stanley plane is it? I have a cheap one too and
> If I loosen it so that it's not bending the iron, then it doesn't have enough friction to keep the iron forward.
I don’t think the screw is supposed to keep the iron forward, but the adjustment screws on the top are. Normally the iron is not held by friction on cheap ones because it’s not reliable with cheap production
>>
>>2405446
>>
>>2411948
Oh fuck, I love twin tails!

Sorry, at least the mistake was on the wood and not through flesh. Tired mistakes are a roll of the dice.
>>
>>2412089
I don't know about the model. But what I mean is that if I loosened the chip breaker too much, it wouldn't really do its job, and the iron would just slide back until it was at the same level as the chip breaker.
But yeah, like I said, I fixed it. the problem is that my chip breaker was "big" in the way that I show in my drawing, so I just ground that part down.
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>>2412374
i suspect your capiron didnt put on enough pressure.
This is how the chip breaker should look like, ground to a knife edge with the cutting edge facing side being 100 to 140° to the cutting iron
with the screw all the way turned in
>and the iron would just slide back until it was at the same level as the chip breaker.
this is a direct result of the loose screw. the attachment for the depth adjust is on the chip breaker.
>>
>>2406265
hi anon, i almost exclusively use old wooden planes. Once set up they can preform just as well as premium planes from modern makers. In my opinion they feel even nicer than those in use. Anyway. You should know that those don't have to both be jointer planes. You could set one up as a try plane. For wooden planes people will often use the progression of foreplane -> try plane - smoother to bring rough lumber to s4s. A try plane is set up like a really long jack plane. That is, very slightly cambered iron (less so than the foreplane) and slightly open mouth (more open than the smoother and less open than the foreplane).

For contrast a jointer would have a tight mouth and usually no camber on the iron at all. If you got both these planes from the same source it's likely that at one point they were a jointer and a try plane, and not 2 jointers.
>>
Anyone got suggestions for mid-range japanese chisels? I picked one up from Lee Valley and ended up loving the shit out of it and use it over my nicer western chisels. It's a Ioroi brand which I have come to find out is a shitty brand. This is great news because I love it, so the half-decent chisels must be quite a step up if this thing is considered shitty. All the makers that I've found recommended are in the $200 per chisel range though and that seems like too big of a jump.

Not gonna buy singles from yahoo auctions because I'd like to find one maker and buy identical chisels one at a time.
>>
>>2389431
Good job.
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>>2405373
Measure both diagonals, they should have equal lengths.
>>
>>2399079
Wood by wright is pretty good too.
His second channel is better for learning
>>
>>2407090
Clamp between two bars across, multiple pairs possible. Leave in a steamy bathroom as you shower.
>>
Tried to make a varnish with pine resin and sun thickened oil. It did not turn out right because I added lye to the resin and it was probably strong enough to saponify through to the oil and it can wash off with water. It also stays tacky. Anyone have experience with natural oil resin varnishes? Mostly violin making boomers concern with this kind of varnish it seems, but it seems promising for a shiny yet durable natural finish for all works in wood if done correctly. Does it really jeed to he heated? My oil is already thick. Amber is out of the question for me unfortunately.
>>
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Building a pantry cabinet but my tablesaw is dying. After a while I need to disconnect the belt and let the motor spin without a load for 5 minutes or so. I'm going to piss off the ups guy and order a new motor soon. All that's left is adding a veneer to the countertop and making the drawer fronts, they'll be simple framed panels.
>>
Stanley Boomer Pattern No. 4
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>>2415683
im not a violin builder, just some food for though.
Id thin that shit with 5% real turpentine as this dissolves pine resin. and make a 4/1 cut of raw oil / thickened oil. From what i read you want to be really conservative with thickened oil.
I'd do a 50-50 raw oil-turpentine undercoat and a second 90-10. making sure the wood is pretty soaked through before applying any resin compounds that clog the pores.
Beware off that thickened oil takes longer to cure than unadulterated raw oil.
for my projects, raw oil takes 2 days to cure, but i wait 7 days between coats. I let it sun dry for additional UV blasting.
i also stay away from drying agents. every time i try to cheat adding by some % of BLO, i get a tacky finish
>>
>>2415715
its either a dull blade or the capacitor is on its way out.
>>
>>2415803
Violin makers size the wood before adding finish, which makes me doubt somewhat the benefit for having oil penetrate which is common today.
I cut it pretty well with good resin turpentine, so that it flows. The violin boomers say that you have to heat the oil with the resin so they bond but this goes against my intuition, which is that turpentine would freely mix with the oil and resin. Would anyone know if cold process is inferior to hot process?
Does not prepolymerized oil dry quicker? Does passively thickened oil thinned down with turpentine dry similarly to cold pressed oil of the same consistency?
>>
>>2415840
i think you got some words mixed up
>resin turpentine
pine resin is the leftover Rosin after the solvent turpentine has been distilled off during distillation.
That solvent will dissolve rosin again so you can spread on a thin coat, then it will evaporate off.
Linseed oil is a (bad) solvent too. the heating the boomers talk about is using that property of it.
A cold approach would be preparing the solvent/rosin mix in a separate container, wait until saturation is reached and then only mix that liquid with the oil, or dont mix it at all and apply that as topcoat.
Honestly i would stay away from heating the oil. Read from a chemist that prolonged heating under atmosphere (the stuff you can buy is done under vacuum) fucks with the oils ability to dry.
>Does not prepolymerized oil dry quicker
apparently it does, but pre polymerized oil will create a mechanical firm film finish
>Does passively thickened oil thinned down with turpentine dry similarly to cold pressed oil of the same consistency?
from my understanding, turpentine evaporating off does cause voids which should aid in drying, as it leaves room for oxygen to diffuse.
>>
>>2415804
It's a fairly new blade. I'm going to bump up the hp and rpm with a new motor
>>
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build myself a chair
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>>2416041
looks comfy anon
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>>2389637
Fuckers are expensive though, I recommend checking ebay every once in a while, got a set of 3 12" rulers for $20 because one of them had a dent in the corner
>>
>>2390149
Given enough skill sure you could, but for the amount of time and effort it'll take you may as well get a cheap low TPI saw with a wide kerf for shitty jobs like that and clean up the cuts later
>>
>>2392654
The biggest reason for having an LLC besides the legal protections is that you can elect to be taxed as an S corp from the IRS as an LLC, which is a passthrough entity that dodges the gay ass 15.3% fuck-small-business tax that sole proprietors get hit with.
>>
>>2415873
I wrote resin turpentine to distinguish it as turpentine that is distilled from actual resin/rosin/colphony/gum, not the foul-smelling kind from hardware stores.
Most recommend boiling linseed oil gently as possible, and some even say not to let the flame touch the vessel, and that linseed oil being ruined by heat is from heating it too strong. So far I have mostly encountered linseed oil drying tacky from standing, unsure about boiling, and perfectly drying if heated with lead pigments. Although there are technical reports on use of boiled oil that seem fine after centuries. I mostly hesitate due to fire hazard and my oil being already honey-like. And I stupidly thickened most of my oil. I waterwash my oil which takes a lot of time to do.
Do you mean prepolymerized oils dry brittle? The biggest problem I see is possibly wrinkling if put on thickly and tackiness with stand oil in particular, for which I hope there is remedy.
I'll do experiments with cold process mixing and hot process fusion of oil and colophony. Another problem is the raw colophony I have has some portions that remained pliable even after years, but I can't find any info on its effect for varnishing.
>>
>>2386710
is there a simple way to make a hardwood vanity?

It doesn't even need to have drawers. It just needs to look good and require minimal tools to make.
>>
>>2417383
i.e. is there a common place to download CAD files or similar and then take the dimensions to a hardwood machiner to machine the wood and then i assemble it?
>>
>>2404794
I agree that it could have been attached differently, but you can turn it into an advantage, try other finishes or even do them yourself, like golden/black/glossy/matte, such a small detail can take you out of the crowd easily
>>
>>2417387
sounds real, find it out at freelance platforms
>>
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this hardwood project timber comes pre-glued together.

Would I have any issues mounting it to a wall to use as a bench? It's one inch thick and weighs 20kg
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every fucking time
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>>2417452
It should be fine if the brackets are fine. Don’t get cheap shelf brackets, but like 50kg+ big brackets, as loads on bench are much more and more dynamic than on a shelf. And check if it’s not just drywall
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>>2417383
Get nice and straight wood, have it sawn at the store, join with dowels or biscuit joiner, done.
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>>2417843
are they called brackets or something else? the DIY videos on youtube show them using thick rods that get inserted into holes that you drill on the sides
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>>2417993
That’s for a floating shelf. They are pretty but it’s difficult to make them very strong. Wouldn’t recommend those for a desk
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Any of you guys build upholstered furniture like chairs and couches? I'm thinking of building some, I thought getting materials might be hard but was easily able to find a store selling individual quantities of stuff like foam, pocket springs, upholstery textiles, hardware for fold out sleeper couches, and lots of other stuff.

It seems like it would be pretty easy to make something decent for less than the cost of store bought furniture even including the cost of tools. Particularly since I like minimalist, rectangular designs anyway.

Anything I'm overlooking that would make it harder than it seems?
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>>2392895
>look up rithing
I did and still have no idea wtf you meant
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>>2418186
I’ve tried once but cutting textiles and fitting foam etc is a whole extra hobby and requires more tools too to do it right (powerful/pneumatic nail gun, sewing machine, spray glue, long measuring cutting and marking stuff) and for me didn’t really justify the investment. I took some cheaper couches apart though, only to find just cheap pine and MDF joined with PU glue and metal brackets inside so that’s pretty easy. Guess it’s like 40% design, 20% framing 40% cutting and sewing
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>>2418960
Sorry man, I misspelled riving. It's basically just using a axe/maul/wedge/froe to split a log in different operations.



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