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I've dabbled a bit on hobby chem for a few years now, and I'm wondering how prevalent this hobby is. I have never seen anyone else in RL do it. Is anyone on this board a hobby chemist? How common is it? Also i notice that even on the internet i have never seen a single female hobby chemist. I guess this thread could also double as AMA.
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>>2283639
theres some cool stuff in my book, always wanted to try some stuff out.
>>
http://sciencemadness.org/
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>>2285993
i do hobby chemistry. sciencemadness. there's some german forum that i can't remember the name of. and there's a handful of guys on youtube that are fun to watch.
>>
>>2286010
>>2286013
I do know about science madness. I've gotten a few books from their digital library. Pretty handy guys, and many of them seem to have professional knowledge
>>
It's a pretty rare hobby these days. Most people assume you're either a meth cook or a terrorist. And yeah, there's absolutely zero girls. It's kind of weird, you can do just about anything by sticking carbon atoms together in the right shape, yet nobody seems to care, or even be interested in thinking about it. I think part of the problem, as usual, is how it's taught. Chalkboards and math symbols. That's not chemistry. Teach kids how atoms are basically lego bricks that can do literal magic if you put the right ones together. Then actually mix some chemicals and watch the next generation's imagination run wild.
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>>2286024
This. Used to be every kid had a chemistry set, every kid wanted to learn about science and rockets and invent stuff. Now, thanks to the war on drugs and integration (no not math), school is more of a hell where you're indoctrinated and chemistry supplies are literally illegal in many places, even when not outright illegal glassware purchases will get you a "friendly visit" by the cops to ask WTF you want it for.
>>
>>2286024
Yeah, my family always assumes I'm either making drugs or explosives. Also...
> I think part of the problem, as usual, is how it's taught. Chalkboards and math symbols. That's not chemistry. Teach kids how atoms are basically lego bricks that can do literal magic if you put the right ones together
This is my exact thought. Most people i see taking chem classes don't care because they think it is irrelevant in life. Even i got bored in highschool chem because it was nothing by concepts and math. If people were actually taught practical reactions like soap making, homemade concrete, dyes, etc then people might actually remember it. Popular shows like Breaking Bad and MacGyver prove people like to see chemistry, they are just never taught how to use it practically
>>
>>2285993
>hobby chem
Depends. Are you trying to synthesize useful things? Doing your own experimentation? Reproducing published results? They're all avenues which are out there. But they rarely overlap much.
>>
>>2286029
>glassware
Now that's a hobby I want to pick up, i.e. scientific glass blowing. Corning offers a course that I've seriously considered taking a brief unpaid leave to live out of a motel and take.
>>
>>2286055
Mostlt trying to making useful things. I don't have much equipment for experimentation
>>
>>2286056
I thought about blowing glass at one point, but that dream was both figuratively and literally shattered immediately when i realized i don't get along well with hot glass
>>
>>2285993
I'm a real life chemist. I would love to have a small home lab to fiddle around in, but there's a reason there are no hobby chemists anymore: it's completely impractical to do. Let me list the reasons.

1. No one will sell you anything that you need to actually do real chemistry. No reputable supplier will sell to the general public, so you'll be trying to purify crap you bought at Home Depot or ordering who knows what from some Chinese supplier with zero QC.

2. It's stupidly expensive. Glassware is expensive, reagents are expensive, and any sort of useful laboratory instrumentation costs more than a used car. Plus finding someone to sell it to you is going to be really difficult.

3. Legal issues. If you have any sort of encounter with law enforcement, your life is going to suck. Because 99.9% of the people doing chemistry at home are making drugs.

4. It's dangerous. I don't think I've ever seen a home lab with proper ventilation, chemical storage areas, fire suppression, or eye rinse stations. Then add on top of that the fact that no one ever bothers to think about waste management and disposal (which is also ridiculously expensive). A home lab is hazardous to you, your neighbors, and the environment.

TL;DR chemistry is cool, but a terrible hobby. Try something else instead.

(It's also a terrible career path, in case you were wondering).
>>
>>2286168
>No one will sell you anything that you need to actually do real chemistry.
It is a bit of a problem, so i usually try to find a way to make it myself. For example, when i got started i tried getting my hands on nitrates and nitric acid, but ended up just building a Birkeland-Eyde reactor to make nitric acid.
>It's stupidly expensive. Glassware is expensive, reagents are expensive, and any sort of useful laboratory instrumentation costs more than a used car
Actually i found glassware on Amazon that was fairly cheap, and i don't need any of those giant instruments for what i do.
>Legal issues
I live in a flyover state that literally does not give a shit. The only illegal thing i have done is distill ethanol without a license, and that was for solvent purposes
>It's dangerous
Sometimes you have to live a little. Plus I'm not working with anything super toxic or explosive.
>>
>>2285993
you mean like making OTC decongestants much more exciting? nah i don't have the balls all the processes i could find you really gotta know what you are doing or you will poison yourself or blow up your garage
>>
>>2286185
I haven't worked with pharmaceuticals much. I'm a simple man. Right now I'm trying to make plastic from corn stalks
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>>2286181
>flyover state
Thats where they look for meth labs. Even if you aren't going to get in any actually trouble, having the cops stop by your house for a "friendly visit" and being put on a list is not enticing. This won't stop you, but it is a deterrent.
>>
>>2286009
>cross post leading to another cross post
Zoomers and plebbit tourists need to fuck off.
>>
>>2286168
1. ebay, consolidated chemical, lab direct llc, chemsavers, good alibaba sellers, etc.

2. wrong. chinks on ebay. i've done vacuum distillations, high heat atmospheric distillations, etc. and it has held up fine.

3. valid point. don't tell anyone and have a lawyer's phone number on hand.

4. most waste disposal firms just burn it, i'm not even memeing you. solvents can be evaporated or burnt. most things can be burnt.
>>
Hobby alchemy is really quite accessible.
>>
>>2286168
NileRed on YouTube completely mogs every point in your post.

But hey, you tried, mr "chemist".
>>
>>2286181
>ended up just building a Birkeland-Eyde reactor
Bullshit, and if not, post pics
>>
>>2286668
I have it put away, but it's just a gallon jar with steel wires in a slab of plastic to hold an arc. I put water in the bottom and use a neon sign transformer to make the arc. Probably inefficient as shit but it did work over long periods of time. Used that to make about 200 grams of sodium nitrate, as well as some extra acid i used for various purposes
>>
I bought 2 dozen boxes of glassware at auction. I have yet to use or sell any of it.
>>
It’s a dying, if not dead, hobby because there’s been so many restrictions on safety that companies can no longer sell accessible chemistry sets that have actual chemistry in mind. People are also super scared by “chemicals” nowadays.
I’m starting to get in to it and I’ll be using the “Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments” and the “All Lab, No Lecture” book to start off with. It can get expensive if you dive in and buy everything for the lab. But if you only buy what you need for the next experiment, it’ll spread out the costs so it’s not as bad.
>>
My father told me that once, in the 80s, the county Sheriff's Department opened up a chemical supply storefront, and in the 6 months it was open they had precisely one customer come in that wasn't looking for drug precursors.
>>
>>2286846
Man, i can only imagine how unbelievably based that one guy was
>>
>>2285993
Essential oil distillation apparatus is the women's corner atm.
>>
Brewing in a cobber Lambic is also chemistry
Placing the herbs for the full effect is also challenging, and keeping the temp optimal is a must, then there is the head and tail cuts that saves you from headaches.
Brewing is biological chemistry also
>>
>>2286708
I see tons of lab shit at local surplus auctions.
>>
>>2286846
>in the 6 months it was open they had precisely one customer come in that wasn't looking for drug precursors.
Was he looking for explosive precursors?
>>
>>2286916
>Brewing is biological chemistry also
This is true. Hobby chem has a lot of stuff like fermentations. Ethanol can be made from fermented sugars. Acetic acid can be made from fermented ethanol. Other strains of bacteria were used to manufacture acetone and butanol back in the early 20th century
>>
>>2287061
Any self-respecting hobby chemist would research the historical devices and method used before industrial revolution. Need nitric acid? Scrape it off the farmers cow barn.
>>
>>2287061
I think DIY biotech is going to be the next big leap in this hobby. NurdRage showed that tertiary alcohols make excellent catalysts for sodium metal production, but getting or making tertiary alcohols can be tricky. Imagine if you could just brew them up in a beer fermenter using a custom yeast strain. The tech is available with home CRISPR kits, we just need some brave experimenters to blaze a trail.
>>
>look for lye
>go to store to buy lye
>stores do not carry lye in Oklahoma because everyone is making meth

God damnit I'm not making fucking meth
>>
>>2287182
Lye is fairly easy to DIY using electrolysis
>>
>>2287182
If you heat baking soda up really hot i think it eventually decomposes into sodium oxide which you can hydrate to make lye
>>
>>2287212
Actually now that i look at it i guess decomposing calcium carbonate to make lime is much easier. Dissolve the lime in water and add dissolved baking soda to perform a metathesis reaction making insoluble calcium carbonate and sodium hydroxide
>>
>>2287218
Can you use the lime they sell at hardware stores for lawns?
>>
>>2287138
I considered composting manure to make nitrates, but the warm season where i live is too short and it would take a couple years for me to get anything
>>
>>2287223
If it's calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide then yes
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>>2287223
The lawn "lime" i found though is actually mostly calcium carbonate and would need to be roasted first
>>
>>2287237
Ah, that makes sense. Seems like there's always a catch with cheap, plentiful, easy to get reagents. Think the old coffee can in a campfire method would work or do you need more extreme heat than that?
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>>2287243
It decomposes at 825°C and higher. With a forced draft like a bellows or fan you could probably reach that fairly easily. There are videos online of people making it
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>>2287243
>>2287263
Here's a handy chart for estimating temperature with color
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>>2287182
How much lye do you need, anon? While it's a pain in the ass to get in quantity, it's not controlled, and you can find it in one pound increments for drain clearing and soapmaking.
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>>2287224
Sounds like you should have started a couple years ago. The second best time to start is now.
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>>2287274
>its not controlled
Yeah but I'd bet they've got eyes on people who buy it in oklahoma and I'd rather keep the boys in blue from looking in my windows
>>
Do any of you guys ever get the urge to mass produce a common chemical for no reason?

Also WTF my captcha is PPDAD
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>>2287273
>the sun is ~1200k
hmmmmm
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>>2287391
This obviously means NASA is lying about something
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>>2287339
Yes. In fact one of my main autistic interests in chemistry is trying to replicate the most important industrial reactions on a hobby scale. Right now I'm looking at the Haber-Bosch reaction to produce ammonia. Apparently Haber's prototype reactor was in fact desktop-scale and used osmium as the catalyst. Really activates the almonds.
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>>2287542
Yeah that's one of the reasons I like home chemistry. The what if I was "sent back in time" could I make this question. Or who would even need 50gal of chloroform.
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>>2287542
I remember doing a research paper in my senior year of high school on nitrogen fixation. The Haber Bosch process is really fascinating. I thought about trying to do that myself but I'm not even sure how i would store the ammonia
>>
Is there anything nearly as based as a low-tech chemistry handbook?
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>>2287273
What about infrared thermometer?
>>
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>>2285993
Yes.

In fact I had a pretty decent setup but think my family have thrown out quite a few if the chemicals.

Indeed, there are precisely zero girla involved with DIY physics / chemistry / biology in general. It's yet another example of how laughable it is they're auto promoted into the positions.

E.g. I used to work at a pharmaceutical company in the r&d department. I was monitored and had my work signed off by a woman who had precisely zero qualifications in science and zero real interest in what she was doing, who had been promoted to "senior scientist" somehow. By comparison my own entry requirement was, PhD in science, ten years lab experience.

I've also seen this repeat elsewhere, female persons of color turning up and being promoted within literally three months to supervisor and then operations manager two weeks later. Absolutely crazy.

I've totally given up on it. Not engaging in that joke.
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>>2287720
No. Textbooks and manuals from the 50s and 60s are mega based and beat every modern book i have seen
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>>2287904
>mega
Speaking of which, do you have links please?
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>>2287908
Science madness library is a good source
http://library.sciencemadness.org/library/index.html
Organic chemistry by Morrison and Boyd is also a really nice source for starting organic chem
Also sci-hub is a useful resource for opening science journals and books that usually require a subscription. Just put in the doi
https://sci-hubtw.hkvisa.net/
>>
>>2286168
You can buy literally anything online with some btc
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>>2287158
Reagents for biotech are pretty expensive and hard to get so i doubt its gonna become popular any time soon
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>>2287939
Do you have any web links?
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>>2287916
Thank you, based mad scientist.
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>>2287723
Yeah, that could work too
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So let's say i wanted to make decent quality gasoline at home. Not ethanol or other substitutes, but actual gasoline that could run in an unmodified engine. What would be the best way of going about it? There is the Fischer Tropsch process, but that sounds like it would be difficult to control. Pyrolysis of organic material would be too unpredictable for a decent yield. I have a theoretical method of performing Kolbe electrolysis on fatty acids/soaps to make paraffin and olefin wax and then cracking the wax, but I'm not sure if that is even practical. What other methods exist?
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>>2288818
Thermal depolymerization of trash plastics, followed by fractionation to get a suitable fuel.
https://youtu.be/8CD_FZssFT4?t=78

His desktop machine is just a steel can with a heating element wrapped around it in an insulated container. As a bonus, you get gnarly tar as a byproduct that you can make asphalt with.
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>>2287998
You only need small amounts though. Just enough to do the gene splicing and then brew up a starter culture. And the biohacking community is already showing some promising results.
>>2288818
Good question. I think steam cracking is the most interesting possibility, but also one of the hardest methods to achieve. You need a really well controlled process to get good yields. But I'm convinced that it's possible if someone were in a position to spend some money and time on experimenting with it. One of the big problems with trying to make fuel is that you're going to end up with a lot of hazardous materials as waste products no matter what reaction pathway you use. It's not the kind of stuff you can just pour down the drain or even just burn safely in some cases (benzene for example). Real refineries reprocess this stuff until its useful, but that's a big project for a hobby lab. Even just figuring out exactly what's in your products might require sending samples to a lab for analysis. So I guess what I'm saying is, if you get serious about this, expect to have a lot of dangerous byproducts and be ready to store and dispose of them appropriately.
>>
While the music played you worked by candlelight
Those San Francisco nights
You were the best in town.

Just by chance you crossed a diamond with a pearl
You turned it on the world
That's when you turned the world around.

Did you feel like Jesus?
Did you realize that you were a champion in their eyes?

On the hill the stuff was laced with kerosene
But yours was crystal clean
Everyone stopped to stare at your technicolor motor home.

Every A-Frame had your number on the wall
You must have had it all
You'd go to L.A. on a dare
And you'd go it alone.

Could you live forever?
Could you see the day could you feel your whole world fall apart and fade away?

Get along, get along Kid Charlemagne
Get along Kid Charlemange

Now your patrons have all left you in the red
Your low rent friends are dead
This life can be very strange.

All those dayglow freaks who used to paint the face
They've joined the human race
Some things will never change.

Son you were mistaken
You are obsolete
Look at all the white men on the street

Get along, get along Kid Charlemagne
Get along Kid Charlemange

Clean this mess up else we'll all end up in jail
Those test tubes and the scale
Just get them all out of here.

Is there gas in the car?
Yes, there's gas in the car
I think the people down the hall
Know who you are

Careful what you carry
'Cause the man is wise
You are still an outlaw in their eyes.

Get along, get along Kid Charlemagne
Get along Kid Charlemange
>>
>>2288828
This is pretty interesting. Come to think of it, wouldn't it be easier to pyrolyze the plastic than it would be to process and purify crude oil? I wonder why this isn't done more often
>>
bumping for chemistry goodness
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>>2285993
Ja my mexican buddy rico white is his name, cool guy, he likes to make stuff in his kitchen.
>>
So I found a place I can buy undenatured ethanol (absolute alcohol) for $36/L just by providing fake business details, is there any reason I can't just mix it with water/soda and get shit faced on it?
>>
>>2290874
It's probably fine, if you can, ask specific questions about it's safety, pretend you're concerned about employees trying to take a sip or something.
>>
If you have a business address and a bit of space, hobby chemistry is great.
If you don't have a business address good luck getting literally anything remotely interesting happening.
You'll spend more time money and energy extracting useful materials from shitty products that contain all sorts of problematic additives.
Literally everyone on Youtube except for Explosions&Fire LARPs as a home chemist when in fact they're trustfund babbies with a business address.
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>>2285993
Maybe focus more on biology, as plants and funghi will make a lot of chemicals for you. You just have to know what organism makes what. I imagime its a lot cheaper
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>>2290874
you can make your own azeotropic ethanol for a lot cheaper than $36/liter.
>>
>>2290893
see >>2286598. these companies will sell you basically anything you want, especially aliexpress.
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>>2285993
>>2286024
>>2286031

I am a chemical engineer who works mostly in material science. I often use chemistry theory and will use our lab to prepare various reagents/compounds. I’ll echo what >>2286168 said.

In addition, I find chemistry to rarely be useful in a hobbyist capacity— I could make some dirty contaminated isocyanate to make PU foam with or I could get some from Sigma at work and then it goes “missing”.

It’s also a headache to properly dispose of waste if you are doing any interesting chem rather than simple stuff
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>>2290874
buy some everclear, why would you take the chance with impurities for industrial solvents.

The minute you open it up and start messing with it, it will start absorbing water from the atmosphere anyways
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>>2290978
also inb4 “just burn the solvents”, either you’re a backwoods hick or you’ve never handled chemicals beyond what’s in a highschool science lab
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>>2290982
>either you’re a backwoods hick or you’ve never handled chemicals beyond what’s in a highschool science lab

chemical waste processors distill solvents and resell them, or burn them and run the exhaust through a scrubber. they aren't perpetually storing thousands of gallons of untreated and contaminated solvents to be buried underground or whatever. a dumb and lazy hobbyist who refuses to recycle solvents could, in good conscience, just burn or evaporate them. paint thinner is sold by the gallon and is designed to evaporate into the atmosphere; your average contractor/house painter is releasing far more solvent vapors into the atmosphere than a home chemist.

non-solvent wastes are harder to manage. sometimes you can reduce it to a non-toxic form which can be legally washed down the drain e.g. hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. other times you have no option but to concentrate it and take it to a disposal facility. there's an easy way around this: don't do any (or many) experiments with shit like cadmium or mercury.

you're falling into the "appeal to authority" or ivory tower cuck mindset.
>>
>>2290948
No they will not. You cannot buy litres of synthetic grade solvents online. Courier literally refuse to handle them.
As for random powders and shit for synthesis, good luck getting a catalytic reaction going with bargain basement catalysts and solvents containing all sorts of shit that give you side reactions up the wazoo.
I am literally an industrial scientist and we have enough problems even when the materials are 99%+ purity. Miss me with the chinesium grubbs catalyst senpai.
>>
>>2291076
>You cannot buy litres of synthetic grade solvents online.
>As for random powders and shit for synthesis, good luck getting a catalytic reaction going with bargain basement catalysts and solvents containing all sorts of shit that give you side reactions up the wazoo.

why do you insist on arguing with me when i've literally done this exact thing within the past couple years? i've ordered DCM, ethyl acetate, DMF, acetonitrile, etc. and had it delivered to a residential address. i've ordered "exotic" liquid reagents and had them delivered to my residential address. i've spoken with these companies through email and requested chemicals they dont have listed on their website, and they were happy to help me out knowing that i'm at a residential address. most of these companies legitimately don't care because they're not run by turbocuck jew lawyers like sigma or thermo fischer. as long as you're not requesting retarded shit like dimethyl mercury or suspicious shit like a liter of nitroethane and a kg of red phosphorus, they're more than happy to help you out.

>muh super special sigma/thermo fischer quality
the american companies that i deal with are resellers of other american brands. they have batch/lot CoAs just like sigma. i've also ordered from chinks before and had good results. there are good chink sellers and bad chink sellers. it's on you to DYOR and select a good supplier with legitimate CoA results.
>>
>>2286056
Way back in the day that's what all scientists would do. All the specialised glassware that's named after some guy is named so because that guy was the one who came up with it to do some specific task.
>>
>>2291245
Erlenmeyer shall live forever.
>>
>>2291252
Pasteur, Petri, Buchner, Thiele.
When I was college I remember a story about Bunsen using his burner to make glassware too, the story said by the end of his life he had lost most sensitivity on his fingertips cause he burned his nerves away. I pretty sure the professor who told me that story showed me a picture of it but I can't find that on the internet now.
A glassware set used to be a common gift to newly graduated students, given to them by their mentors.
>>
>>2287391
you're not really this dumb are you
>>
>>2291274
i've been staring at the sun since before you were even sperm in your dads sack, maybe think before you call your senior dumb.
>>
Unemployed electronics dabbler here. I do etching and stuff on PCBs, tin plating on PCBs with tin chloride + thiourea, and intend on going down this method:
http://turtlesarehere.com/html/through_hole_plating.html
And getting myself some nice silver-plated vias and through-holes. For this I'll need ammonia, which is actually kind of a pain to refine from cloudy ammonia.

>>2287182
Drain cleaner pellets are basically 100% sodium hydroxide.
>>
>>2292651
Urea + 2NaOH
Use only as much water as you need, some ammonia will stay behind in solution cause it's just too soluble. Use an excess of hydroxide, it'll drive some of the ammonia out of solution so you get a better yield. Collect it on cold water for better yield.
>>
>>2292833
It's more of a collection of gas in a trap than it is a distillation, right? What sort of trap should I use to maximise gas absorption, besides chilling the water? Would a bubbling stone work? Filling up a balloon with the gas and water and shaking it around until the balloon is deflated? making a tall column full of inert boiling chips and stuff?

The instructions say to use ~27% ammonium hydroxide, which I'm wondering if I could get without distillation. And if I'm distilling anyhow, maybe it would make more sense to just distill cloudy ammonia.
>>
>>2292859
>27%
Distillation won't get you anywhere close to that and it'll take ages.
Ammonia is a gas and it is very soluble in water, if you just get a dilute solution and try distilling it most of the ammonia will stay behind in the water cause it's just that soluble and you'd need to set up a reflux column because you don't want the water passing through.
The idea either way would be to produce the gas somehow and them bubble it on water, it should dissolve right away and form your ammonia solution. Instead of producing that gas by precipitating the ammonia from an already very dilute solution, my suggestion is to produce it via some reaction. You could use the urea I mentioned but any ammonium salt should work as well, though it might be more expensive that way. You would dissolve your ammonium source in water on a flask that you can seal, then add the hydroxide solution and it will produce ammonium gas that you would, via a tube, either bubble on water or just kind of blow it over the water. With urea it should go like this:
>urea + 2 NaOH = 2 NH3 + NaCO3
The reagents might react at room temperature but you would want to heat them up a bit. You want the reaction to happen at a stable rate, if it reacts in "bursts" then it will suck water from the trap into the reaction chamber whenever NH3 stops being produced, if that happens you can place the tube on top of the water trap, the ammonia is very soluble and will dissolve even without bubbling, although at a lower yield. With urea the mixture of reagents should be stable enough for you to mix them all at room temperature and then put them on the system, all sealed up nicely.
>bubbling stone, balloon with water, boiling chips
It's overkill. You don't even need to get it to boil, just heat it up a bit to drive the reaction. If you're gonna heat it too much you might get some water boiling over along with the ammonia, it won't lower the yield but it will lower the concentration of the final product.
>>
>>2292888
>my suggestion is to produce it via some reaction
Yeah but isn't that reaction going to be aqueous? How do you stop water mixed with the urea+sodium hydroxide from coming over? Just minimise the amount of water so it gets saturated with ammonia and the excess escapes? That's basically the only thing that could make urea or an ammonium salt more effective than trying to boil ammonia off of household ammonium hydroxide solution.

>suck water from the trap
I saw E&F use a funnel trap that's immune to that.

>It's overkill. You don't even need to get it to boil, just heat it up a bit to drive the reaction
No the boiling chips were to extend the length of the water column and extend the duration the gas spends before escaping, without increasing the amount of water. For the purpose of maximising yield.
An aquarium bubbling stone is a cheap way to increase the surface area of the bubbles by a large amount, so there's basically no reason not to do so unless it dissolves so quickly normally that there's not even any bubbles coming out of a small solution. If I want 27% concentrated then I'll want to have a reasonably small amount of water there. I think as someone without glassware I'd have an easier time using vinyl tubing coming from a sealed bottle of the reagents.

Also how as an amateur should I gauge the concentration of chemicals I produce? Should I buy some indicators like phenolphthalein and get a burette? Get precision scales to do a by-weight titration? Or are those dinky electronic pH meters good enough to use for this?
>>
>>2292904
Check this out:
>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-jJ5QF-EVE
>Just minimise the amount of water so it gets saturated with ammonia and the excess escapes
Yeah.
About determining the concentration you can do like on video related and weight the water and then then solution to determine the mass of ammonia dissolved in it. Titration works as well but it's gonna be more work. You could alternatively precipitate all of the ammonia as a salt but it'd have to be some organic salt cause the inorganic ones are all very soluble and you'd need to weight it still, so the video method is probably simpler unless you need to determine the concentration of a solution you haven't produced yourself.
>>
>>2292928
Alright, thanks for the info.
>>
>>2290874
Industrial or lab grade ethanol is usually distilled with benzene to break the azeotrope with water. Other denaturing agents are also fairly toxic
>>
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>>2290978
>>2286168
You guys aren't fooling anyone
>>
>>2292904
>Also how as an amateur should I gauge the concentration of chemicals I produce?
Generally you use a specific method for each individual chemical you're trying to quantify. Some methods work better than others depending on the specific properties of the specific chemical and what it's mixed with. There's unfortunately no "one ring to rule them all" for amateurs unless you have the money to send samples off for analysis or buy yourself a GCMS + supporting hardware/reagents.
>Should I buy some indicators like phenolphthalein and get a burette?
Indicators are very handy in general, so I would say yes. At the very least get some pH strips. Burettes are also handy for a lot of things other than just titration, so yes to that if you can afford it.
>Get precision scales to do a by-weight titration?
This can be done but tends to be tricky. Sometimes it's the only way, though. My suggestion is to get a 0.01g scale from Amazon. I got the Smartweigh brand, it works good for me, don't forget to buy a calibration weight too). Then you'll need an accurate volume measure, which is the harder part. Volumetric flasks are expensive. I would buy one or two, probably 100ml and 10ml or so depending on the quantities you're dealing with. This will get you the best bang for your buck as far as precision vs. cost for an amateur lab.
>Or are those dinky electronic pH meters good enough to use for this?
I would avoid these personally. They require consumables (calibration and storage fluid). They can buy you a little bit of extra precision over indicators, but I don't personally think that's worth the cost. A set of indicators for different pHs, a burette, or a volumetric flask would be a better investment in my opinion.
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>>2293345
>A set of indicators for different pHs
What specific type would you recommend? Brands or links would be helpful. I don't need great precision, I just want to check that the pH of a liquid is between 5.5 and 6.5.
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>>2293367
I'm pretty sure he means different indicators. The phenolphthalein you mentioned turns purple-ish pink above pH 8 and it's colourless bellow that. All it can do is tell you if your pH is above or bellow 8, it can't give you the exact pH.
You could maybe determine pH via some indirect method but then it's more work and not as precise.
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>>2293367
Red cabbage juice
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>>2293376
>The phenolphthalein you mentioned
This board could use userIDs; the post you replied to is my only post in this thread; thanks for the information.

I don't need an exact pH, just need to verify that the pH of a liquid is between 5.5 and 6.5. I have an inexpensive meter and the calibration powders for it, but a simpler method might be better for me.
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>>2293381
>Red cabbage juice
google tells me that it's something of a process to prepare for a test, and pic related implies that the results are hard to interpret. Take for instance, pH 4 to 6 is "purple to violet", which kinda strains my color knowledge.
>>
Won't isopropyl damage wooden shelves? I need to get rid of indian meal moth infestation.
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>>2293384
A single indicator can tell you if it is above or bellow a certain pH. You could get two indicators, one for testing if the solution is above or around 6.5 and one for checking if it is above or below 5.5, that way you could determine if it is or not between those two points. There's tons of tables for indicators, theirs colours and their operational range on the internet, just google them.
An indirect method would be let's say you have phenolphthalein and you know it will turn at pH 8, if your solution is acidic you would add an alkaline solution of a known concentration to it until it turns, knowing your final pH and the amount of alkali you added you would calculate the original pH. The results will depend a lot on how accurate the concentration of alkali is as well how well you can measure the volume of it added.
>>2293384
You detect the turning point more by the change in colour than the colour itself. The colour change isn't a gradual thing, it's like:
>ok, this is red
>nothing
>nothing
>nothing
>nothing
>still red
>nothing
>nothing
>it changed colour now
Usually it's pretty noticeable, also always do it on a clear flask and put a paper towel behind it as you go so you can better see the colour against a solid background.
>>2293393
Not sure about the wood itself, I don't think it will but it will mess with the finish.
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>>2285993
i made a earthen kiln thats still stands to make sodium and potassium hydroxide components in. i made it using sand and clay from the yard and mixed in wood ash from the wood waste disposal fire pit in my yard. i used vines and even tall grass to mix in to strengthen the structure . you kind fo make dirty clumps of stuff that are almost like your making rope covered in mud and spool it around to make the walls. its survived 4 years of weather in the south east of america. plenty of rain. after i fired it the 3rd time im pretty sure it made pottery just really crapy grade pottery

made calcium oxide from calcium carbonate with clam shells and even egg shells in it. also made hard wood ash in it. made sodium carbonate from sodium bicarbonate in my oven

end result way more concentrated than electrolysis. electrolysis has a max concentration that i approximate at about 12% without using much better set up. i got 40% from chemistry. it burns skin. electrolysis only made my fingers slick from making soap with skin oil
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>>2293367
Check pic related. For your range, bromocresol purple or chlorophenol red are the best matches. But you might be able to get away with using a pair of less-ideal indicators, like methyl red for the low end and bromothymol blue for the high end. Based on your range, I'm guessing you're using this for gardening/hydroponics? Hydroponics stores sell cheap pH test strips optimized for that range. I would just buy some of those.
>>2293384
Cabbage juice is a great, cheap, safe, easy to use indicator to get a rough idea of the pH. But it's precision is terrible. Use it as a starting point to choose an appropriate indicator to get a closer reading.
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>>2293421
>Hydroponics stores sell cheap pH test strips optimized for that range. I would just buy some of those.

Thanks. I should have thought of that.
>>
I'd like to make sulfuric acid electrolytically from copper sulfate (they don't sell the acid to consumers), but the MSDS for the fungicide I can buy says it's a liquid with copper sulfate, copper hydroxide, propylene glycol, and also probably some calcium ions. Is this worth trying to seperate out, or should I look for purer stuff? I can also find what is supposedly copper solid sulfate, but since there isn't any MSDS I can't say for sure.
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>>2293530
Copper hydroxide is insoluble in water, so just wash with water and filter it off. Afterwards take the copper sulfate/propylene glycol solution and heat it to boil off the water and propylene glycol
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>>2293530
>>2293532
Also forgot to mention the sulfate ion renders calcium insoluble so only a small trace of calcium will remain in the water
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>>2293536
Wait so the "liquid" will be a slurry of insoluble salts? To be honest I'd rather keep the copper and sulfate ions together, but if that's the cheapest method it's hardly a dealbreaker. No clue if there are any other anions in solution, probably chlorides, which aren't the best for doing electrochemistry. Well I'll try to get the dry stuff first.

Also the dry stuff is a lot cheaper.
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>>2293629
If you're really worried just recrystallize the copper sulfate. If there is any calcium in there it probably isn't enough to bind to all of the sulfate
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>>2293430
Don't feel bad. When I got interested in hydroponics I thought getting the raw indicator chemicals would be more useful so I looked into it pretty extensively. Turns out, in this case, the commercial product is highly optimized both for cost and performance. But that's not always the case. I've found a few other things where you really can do better via DIY. So sometimes this sort of research does pay off.
>>2293629
The calcium will be insoluble (mostly) but the copper, sulfate, and hydroxide ions should remain in solution with the propylene glycol. Boiling off the glycol will leave behind a solid residue of copper sulfate and copper hydroxide, which you can then rehydrate with water for your electrolysis.
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>>2293668
Right. I'll buy the dry stuff anyhow, which may still have calcium and hydroxides, and maybe also chlorides, but shouldn't have the glycol. May have anti-caking agents though, idk.

Are there good ways to test for impurities? Do I have to make an EFNMR? Because that actually sounds like a really interesting electronics project. Making a spectroscope and observing a flame with added solution would work also, though I'm not sure how accurate it would be.
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>>2293668
>but the copper, sulfate, and hydroxide ions should remain in solution
Copper hydroxide is insoluble my dude, just like most transition metal hydroxides
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>>2293706
Good question. I don't know of any "general" test for impurities that doesn't involve expensive hardware. Most of the methods I've seen involve precipitation reactions or indicator chemicals that are specific to a small number of contaminants (sometimes just one). So if you find a good method let me know.
>>2293707
My bad, you're right
>>
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Since we're here, I'm going to ask about glassy carbon. Does anyone know much about this stuff? From what I've found it's an allotrope of carbon that has the mechanical properties of glass but the thermal, chemical, and electrical properties of graphite. It would be very useful for crucibles and electrodes, and in fact is already used for it. However, this stuff is never really talked about. It's also insanely expensive. From what I understand, it is made by carbonizing certain Polymers like phenolic resins or furan resins. However, there are no videos of it's synthesis that i can find.
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>>2293726
Gonna make an EFNMR spectrometer anyhow. Probably pretty easy electrically, though I can't say whether or not the required EMI shielding will be trivial or not. There are plenty of videos of people slapping a prism or diffraction grating in front of a camera to get a spectrometer, which is pretty easy to calibrate with a CFL.

>>2293735
I've heard about amorphous carbon, which may be the same thing since glasses are amorphous solids. IIRC Edison was having issues with his bamboo filament light bulbs burning up, due to negative temperature coefficient causing thermal runaway. The solution was to bake the filaments in a kiln in order to sinter them or whatever, making them into standard graphite instead of its amorphous form. I assume that the bamboo filaments were carbonising in a similar way to polymer chains. Carbon fibre is also carbonised polymer chain (aramid IIRC), might be interesting to measure the temperature coefficient of resistivity of one of those. Getting it in a sheet or solid volume instead of a filament may be tough, since the carbon density of the filament will never be as high as solid carbon so porosity is basically required. The tempco also makes me think they'd be semiconductors, but who knows.

Also look for patents by the people who manufacture the crucibles.
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>>2293745
>I've heard about amorphous carbon, which may be the same thing since glasses are amorphous solids
From what I've found it's different. Glassy carbon has a lot of sp2 bonds which make it conductive, while amorphous carbon from charcoal and whatnot has mostly SP3 bonds that make it only slightly conductive until it is graphitized
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>>2290978
Not my problem
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>>2294023
Based. These fags keep trying to pretend like big companies don't just dump the waste in the environment or third world countries
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>>2290978
Convert the waste into something insoluble, put it dry into a snap-lock bag, and put it in the landfill. Personally I wouldn't do it with lead or mercury, but basically all of your lighter transition metals it should be fine.
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>>2294043
>be university lab
>talk all day about green chemistry and the environment
>use fume hood to dump toxic chemicals outside the building like a medieval toilet
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>>2291101
then you must live in a literal 2nd/3rd world country because all 1st world countries and their respective courier networks are completely assfucked by chemical handling documentation and bullshit. part of that is a complete refusal to handover to residential adresses.
I'm guessing you live in Eastern Europe, Central/South America, or potentially Africa.
>>
>>2294228
Lol no. Chang will literally airmail you whatever you want right to your door. Of course it might get caught by customs if it's something sketchy, but that's your problem, not Chang's.
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>>2294177
They often have big filters though, don't they?

>>2294243
Based alibay sellers.
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>>2294292
>filters
Nope, not here at least. That wouldn't even be of any use, where would you discard the clogged filters? It goes straight to the atmosphere. The idea is that it would be so little fumes diluted is so much air that it won't do any harm.
>>
>>2294295
I was thinking more catalytic stuff, idk though.
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>>2286915
make a little saffrole oil..
make a little mdma..
profit?
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>>2294304
Nah. You don't know what kind of fumes you'd be producing, could be anything. Can't design a catalyst for all the possibilities there is.
You've probably heard of Heck's reaction and all the other ones that spawned because of it, right? Before Suzuki came around with his version there there a few popular ones that used organic Sn or Ar. Those were extremely toxic and usually done in a sealed box with gloves attached to the sides so you could manipulate all the apparatus while keeping it all sealed from the outside world.
>>
making illegal drugs is the only point really
I was just finished extracting dichloromethane from paint thinner in order to extract caffeine when I realized I could just buy pure caffeine anyway.
pretty much any useful, non-illegal chemical you can already buy
so what's the point?
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>>2294429
Same reason people cook at home instead of going out to eat
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>>2294292
4u
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>>2294243
>that's your problem not Changs
exactly the problem my dude. a guy in the UK literally got assraped for owning some small amounts of "restricted" chemicals.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/back-garden-chemist-jailed-for-selling-controlled-chemicals
You will be branded a terrorist and black bagged into oblivion if you do anything more interesting than esterfication.
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>>2294617
>a guy in the UK
You literally need a license for owning a knife. Brits are literally one of the worst nanny states to ever exist
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>>2294703
>You literally need a license for owning a knife.
You don't.
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>>2294712
https://www.gov.uk/buying-carrying-knives
>A court will decide if you’ve got a good reason to carry a knife or a weapon if you’re charged with carrying it illegally
They can literally send you to jail if they want to deem your knife illegal
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>>2294429
You can't buy a bunch of chemicals that depends on where you live. Basically everything that Explosions and Fire makes can't be bought. I use chemistry to make custom circuit boards.
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>>2294429
You can literally make anything you want with enough time and energy. Plus the knowledge obtained is more valuable than anything else.
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>>2294881
>Basically everything that Explosions and Fire makes can't be bought.
It perplexes me how E&F even manages to get those chemicals, since he lives in fucking Australia of all places, which is another massive nanny state that basically says fun is illegal
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>>2294900
Alibaba and he's a chemist, probably gets they sent to his uni and then they disappear from there.
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>>2294900
Well he gets stuff like chloroplatonic acid and other obscure but not dangerous stuff through alibaba. Things like DCM and ammonia and such he synthesises himself. The fact that he hasn't been v& for manufacturing that shit is kinda unusual though.
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>>2286024
you re a jew nigger
fuck normies
you think they would like chemistry if they saw how things reacted?
they wouldn't
why?
because they are retarded
they would be interested for like a week and after that they will get bored
i see a lot of comments in 3b1b videos saying how they would've liked math if it was thought the same in school
the thing with math is that if you don't enjoy math dry and boring as it is, it means you can't really see the beauty of it
look at how western education is failing by trying to teach every nigger retard the quadratic formula through dumb methods while ignoring the bright minds who are supposed to build our future
i would say more but this rant is getting too unintelligible
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>>2294900
>Australia of all places, which is another massive nanny state
The more women in government / longer they've been in government, the more of a (literal) nanny state you have. inb4 "hurr durr incel", just an honest observation, and understandable psychologically as women are communal family protectors by instinct, and tend towards authoritarian solutions to "protect" everyone.
>>2294986
>The fact that he hasn't been v& for manufacturing that shit is kinda unusual though.
If you look through his videos you'll see that he has had a couple of "polite visits" from the local police, usually when he buys (or randomly recieved a wrong shipment) of glassware. once they see he's not making drugs they leave him alone. not fun, but at least the locals are not 100% "chemistry must mean drugs and terrorism".
>>2295016
>trying to teach every retard the quadratic formula through dumb methods while ignoring the bright minds who are supposed to build our future
yes this again is the communal mindset, communal being the root of "communist", currently marketed as socialism, which currently pushes for equity of outcome rather than equality of opportunity (hence the common wisdom that communism makes everyone equally miserable and poor). doing great things requires some people ro move out ahead of the others. some caveman invented fire and his neighbors feared and hated him, why couldn't he just eat raw meat and wrap himself in a pile of leaves to stay warm like they did? also brings to mind the well-memed picture from the late 60's of the woman and child with sign that reads something like "20 billion to go to the moon and nothing for the poor". again, the adventurous, the smart, the doers, must leave behind the do-nothings in order to complete their great works. /end rant also, inb4 /pol/ is that way
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>>2295170
>at least the locals are not 100% "chemistry must mean drugs and terrorism"
Yeah I'd expect they'd be fine with the glassware. But he makes explosives. I'd expect a citizen without some sort of industrial explosives license would be forbidden from creating any amount of explosive.

>20 billion to go to the moon and nothing for the poor
There's something to be said for the fact that it's taxpayer money going to a moon landing, something that was at least partially just a vector of cold war aggression. I don't think society as a whole progressed significantly due to manned spaceflight to the moon, though I'd say otherwise for manned spaceflight in general and unmanned spaceflight to the moon and mars. Once people start getting resources from the moon (aluminium for solar mirrors and such) that will change, but that was never going to happen with 60s tech. It's a lot cheaper to go to the moon now than it was back when the integrated circuit had barely just been invented, there's definitely an argument to be made that they should have spent that money elsewhere.

Not that the very poor pay much in taxes at all. And basically all of that taxpayer money stayed in the USA, which can't be said for other nations' investments of taxpayer money.

Printing money is a sin.
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>>2286846
Was there a time that chemical suppliers had actual storefronts? Sounds kinda neat.
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>>2295448
>Was there a time that chemical suppliers had actual storefronts?

The original drug stores were called chemists, because they sold chemical powders and liquids. From "A Tale of Two Cities": The chemist made up some small packets and gave them to Mr. Carton, who put them in the breast pocket of his inner coat one by one. He counted out the money for them, paid the shopkeeper, and left the shop.
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>>2294228
UPS and FedEx will absolutely deliver hazmat/DG to residential addresses, as long as someone is available to sign for it. I do it all the time. This doesn't matter in the slightest with the Chinese suppliers, however, because they misdeclare everything because of their outright refusal to pay hazmat fees or deal with customs.
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>>2295457
I guess I mean more like a modern laboratory supplier but with a physical store. Overnight shipping from fisher and such is nice but I think I'd like to pop over to the shop sometime to pick up a liter of DCM or whatever and chat with the shopkeeper.
>>
>>2295448
>>2295471
I wouldn't say there was an actual brick and mortar chemical supplier in every town, but stores like pharmacies and hardware stores were a lot less nervous about selling dangerous chemicals compared to now
>>
>>2289134
Crude oil is pretty average (when from a particular field). Trash is well, trash. It can vary a lot from batch to batch. But companies are starting around the world, looking to make oil from trash plastics. QuantaFuel is one, in the Nordics, iirc.
>>
>>2293530
Battery acid, where I'm from, is just sulfuric acid and water. Can't remember the concentration.
>>
>>2295629
It's around 30% to 40%, probably lower to the lower end on that since you'd probably be using old batteries from the scrapyard.
>>
>>2294228
i live in the USA. it has nothing to do with shipping restrictions. everything i've ordered from US companies has been shipped fedex or UPS with the appropriate hazardous contents labels and packaging. the stuff i ordered from chinkland was improperly labeled per US customs declaration but it wasn't hazardous so no one seemed to give a shit.

companies like sigma and thermo fischer don't refuse residential sales because of shipping restrictions. they refuse these types of sales because they don't want to deal with the administrative and legal overhead. it's not worth their time to process $50 sales orders or deal with the blowback of news headlines like RETARD CITIZEN POISONS HIMSELF WITH SIGMA ALDRICH BRAND POTASSIUM CYANIDE.

and on the topic of sales volumes, i've heard that smaller universities will seek out alternative suppliers because they're still "too small" for companies like sigma. they'll still let these small schools register an institutional account, but they'll offer them garbage prices with volume incentive discounts that are impossible to reach. it's their polite way of saying "fuck off, you're not worth our time."
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>>2295658
I didn't mean that you use old batteries, but that you'd buy new battery acid.
I bought a liter a couple of year ago, as I needed a 10% sulfuric acid to descale when making silver jewelry.

Just figured that sulfuric acid wasn't actually very hard to acquire, and that the poster would rather prefer to buy it, and spend his time and money on other more fun stuff.
>>
>>2295629
>>2295679
Yeah and I can't buy it from anyone. Battery merchants are the only people allowed to buy it or something stupid like that. In other countries you can buy it from the hardware store but not here.

I'd consider taking it from a battery, not sure where I'd get one though.

>>2295662
Doesn't NileRed buy from sigma on occasion? Or am I mistaken? I know he gets most of his stuff off alibay or the hardware store.
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>>2295679
Hardware stores have 90%+ H2SO4 here as drain cleaner. Pennsylvania anon here. You know it's the good stuff if it comes with the plastic bag around the bottle. Works fine for my WFNA synthesis when I need it, the dyes and inhibitors don't affect synthesis. Also works great for nitrations with the aforementioned WFNA. You can also order 10lb bags of KNO3 prills from Duda energy, that's typically who I use.
>>
>>2295719
I also seal all of my 24/40 glassware with Teflon tape. I felt proud of arriving at that on my own and then saw nurdrage's video on it
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>>2295720
Kek, I do that on my lab in uni too. I've had problems with solvents slipping past the joint and the reaction going dry before.
>>
>>2290978
>I am a chemical engineer
Shame on you then for trying to dis sway our friend.

>>2285993
If your going to be a hooby chem, you have to be a hobby chem, with some land (preferably) or garage. Basically you can't just buy your chemicals so you have to make them. Your number one priority is to make Olem or sulfuric acid via Contact process.

>Sulfur (Arsenic impurities may "clog" the catalyst
>Catalyst (vanadium (IV) oxide, Platinum?)

Sulfuric Acid is the key to deriving other chemicals with chemicals you can get legally or easily. After Sulfuric acid, you make Hydrophilic acid, nitric acid, etc.

If you want to be a hobbyist chemist, you will have to get into separation, saftey (get a fan, and tried to do it outside).

Biggest chance of success if you have land and/or empty warehouse. You will fail many times, it will seem impossible, but you also may succeed.

GOOD LUCK
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>>2295699
yeah I think I've seen sigma bottles on his videos. he must have friends at universities.
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>>2295759
He used to be a lab technician before jewtube.
>>
So, looks like there is maybe enough interest for a /diy/ chemistry general? I think I'd feel better about writing up an OP for it if I saw at least 5 or so people working on specific projects.

So on that note, what are you anons working on at the moment?
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>>2295759
Sigma and other supplier accounts aren’t too hard to get. I set one up for my company back when our “lab” was a literal storage unit with some metal tables and a shop fan. Nile has a business address with his new lab, and that’s about all it takes.
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>>2295788
>/diy/ chemistry general
I was thinking about asking that. Right now my planned project is trying to make furan resin from corn cobs so i can make glassy carbon. Unfortunately i have college and a busy family life so it'll take a while for me to get anywhere
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>>2295816
>it'll take a while for me to get anywhere
Yeah even more so than electronics, this is a hobby that can sorta be done without specialist equipment and ingredients, but after a lot of trial and error you'll often find yourself incrementally buying better stuff, be it glassware or purer chemicals than what the hardware store supplies.

I'm whipping up another batch of tin chloride solution for the purpose of tin-plating a circuit board. Think I added too much HCl this time, which is a problem because I think too low of a pH will decompose my thiourea. Also spilt some acid on myself, fun times.
>>
>>2295191
>I'd expect a citizen without some sort of industrial explosives license would be forbidden from creating any amount of explosive.
I can't speak for Aus, but here in Canada my understanding is that it's legal to do pyro synthesis in small amounts provided you obey all other laws. In other words, don't hurt anyone with it, don't illegally transport it on public roads, don't pour your toxic chemical waste down the drain, etc. and you should be fine. It's really not a big deal here (yet) if some autist makes a few grams of spicy powder and safely sets it off for purely educational purposes.
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>>2291255
The most glaswork i did was closing/thining capilary tubes, it's a shame those skills aren't thought anymore.
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>>2295878
I was taught to close capillaries too and that's it. Then I learned a bit more on my own and can do simple shit like properly closing ampules or manipulating test tubes a bit.
While I do think it's a great skill to have there really isn't much room for that in unis nowadays. You have so much stuff to learn in those 4 years that you can't make time to learn how make glassware. Even if you did, where would you do it at? The uni would probably have to make a shop for it and while that would be amazing it would also be a major headache for them, specially if some shithead hurts himself in there.
I wish they offered that on the side, though. For the people who are interested.
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>>2287733
i'm in undergrad and most undergrad and phd students are females. maybe it's a regional thing?
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>>2295889
Are there any youtube people doing that? I bet making the ground glass fittings would be the toughest part, but once you could do that it wouldn't be too difficult to make your own condensers and 3-necked flasks and other things that slot together. I guess you could just buy a bunch of male and female ground glass fittings and fuse them to your work.
Things that just sit on top of a rubber seal like the buchner funnels we used at uni would be easier I guess.

Makes you think that all the astronauts doing space chemistry on the moon would have limitless vacuum on-tap to do vacuum distillations and filtrations and stuff in. Cleaning too!
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>>2295917
Yeah, the glass joints are the hardest part. Before the scamdemic we would save the joints of broken glassware and send them to a local guy who would attach it to something else or fix whatever was broken. From what I understand condensers are harder but he could easily make round bottoms and attach the joint to it.
I don't know of any glassblowers on youtube who do lab glassware. I tried looking it up a long time ago but they all do artsy stuff.
Rubber seals won't work with everything, the solvents will destroy them.
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>>2295904
Anytime i watch something chemistry related from a university about 3/4 people are women. In the hobby chem world, however, i have never seen a single one. Makes me think women like to be in it merely as a career choice rather than an autistic obsession like science should be
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>>2295929
>Rubber seals won't work with everything, the solvents will destroy them.
Well in a buchner funnel the solvents shouldn't be getting up to the seal at all. If the solvents are getting up there then you're giving them to your vacuum pump, which is usually a bad idea.
PTFE seals may be able to work in most cases.

God watching E&F's shitty buchner funnel tube-feeding his vacuum pump bone juice hurt me.
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>>2295904
Happens here too till you reach master's, from there onward it's mostly males and the number of females only drops as you get higher and higher education. It starts off at around 70% female on the beginning of the course but a good chunk drops out during it, the ones who do get a degree then go on to become high school teachers.
>>2295930
I wouldn't blame this solely on gender. Amateur chemistry is a very expensive hobby. I also don't do it at home, I don't have the space or the money for it.
>>2295956
They inevitably get attacked by the fumes over time. Works fine of buchner funnels but won't be substitute for proper joints on other glassware. As the other anon mentioned teflon tape is good for better sealing joints but I only use it once and then replace it.
>>
I think you could probably make ground glass joints pretty easily using lapping. Make male and female tapered laps out of aluminum rod, embed coarse grinding grit in the surface, and spin it slowly with plenty of water to keep silica dust out of the air. Easiest to do on a lathe, but a clever person could probably get by fine with a drill press or even do it by hand if you have enough patience.
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>>2295956
he really needs to start using traps, it's painful
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>>2286168
>also a terrible career path

Heard this a few different places. Why is it so? Lack of jobs? Low pay? Chemists seems pretty l33t in the stem world so i always wondered why the career was shabby
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>>2296081
Oh in his vacuum lead? Never seen that before. Do you have a simple water trap followed by a desiccant? Humidity isn't great for a vacuum pump, then again you run a vacuum pump with aqueous solutions anyhow.
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>>2295958
>Amateur chemistry is a very expensive hobby
Depends on what you're doing. I myself probably haven't spent more than $200 on it, and i have a fair bit of glassware
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>>2296113
A cold finger trap is simple and common. Pic unrelated
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>>2285993
>being a virgin chemist
>not a based fermenter/mushroom grower/gardener
Shiggy diggy
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>>2296131
I'm a thirdie so maybe that's the real problem here.
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>>2296293
Real chads can do both
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Reminder that Erlenmeyer flasks are the superior flask for chads. Round bottom fags get BTFO
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>>2296594
unless you want to pull a vacuum.
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>>2296627
Only pussies vacuum distill. Real men crank up the heat until their product decomposes and then separate what little is left from the tar
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>>2296098
I think the jobs don't pay super well of you just want to do actual chemistry, especially if you factor in the amount of knowledge one has to have to do the job.

The chemists that get paid well are usually boring paper pushers or I guess you can work in a morally shit industry.

I dropped out of a chem degree because of this, doesn't seem worth the effort to get adegree if so can just carry on being a pleb with some electrical and cad knowledge and earn a pretty decent wage.
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>>2296594
Erylenmeyer
>Stands on its own two feet
>can use large magnetic followers
>can stir at 10krpm no problem
>absolute dogshit heat distribution
>doesn't fit in a mantle
>implodes when put inside the same fumehood as a vacuum pump
>can easily remove 99% of solid product
RBF
>Need a extra equipment just to stop it falling over
>high rpm stirring likely to either shatter the flask or create awful conditions
>god tier heat distribution
>excellent heating with a mantle
>can withstand the vacuum of space with ease
>virtually impossible to remove more than 10% of solid product
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>>2295699
NileRed literally has a business address. He is NOT a home chemist. Don't believe his lies.
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>>2297041
That's not really a high bar to clear though. You can rent them for a few bucks a month. Heck, it only takes a few hundred bucks in most places to set up an actual real company. Or a few thousand if you want to go all the way and make a corporation (hello limited liability!).
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>>2297064
When I say business address I mean an actual business address not some virtual office or something.
Sigma will not deliver to residential properties.
NileRed is a hack. Same for every other YT "scientist" (excluding Fire&Explosions).
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>>2297265
Yes, that's what I mean. You can rent a real business address. The only "gotcha" is that it's shared by everyone else renting it. But it's an actual business property, with an actual business address, and sometimes even an actual loading dock. Lot of real businesses use these for the same reason they use email forwarding, because it simplifies their logistics. I'm not talking about an office you rent by the hour here.
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>>2297039
>doesn't fit in a mantle
Yeah but with the flat bottom you can just set it on a hotplate without a mantle
>>
So what amateur chemistry stuff are useful in domestic situations? In my experience, it was mostly analyzing the actual concentrations of household chemicals, like finding out if my bleach was dead by adding hydrogen peroxide to it. If I had access to analytical glassware and chemicals, I'd autistically analyze the concentrations of household products then make a YouTube review.
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>>2297265
>Sigma
sigma won't even let you register for an actual purchase account if you're not a registered business. didn't stop Emad (al-Swealmeen) tho...
>proper british that bazza... brings unt tear 't me japs eye
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>>2295958
>They inevitably get attacked by the fumes over time.
hate to interrupt here but sigma actually has a pro airfree glassware kits that specifically uses rubber seals

kinda depends what rubber you're talking about, because fluoro oils / greases / elastomers are pretty much chemically invulnerable
>screws thread joints, for chad++s that are confident around exploding glassware
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>>2297972
You're not wrong but that conversation started because anon wanted to make glassware at home and so I was thinking of the more common plastics you can use in a home made scenario.
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>>2298094
>anon wanted to make glassware at home and so I was thinking of the more common plastics you can use in a home made scenario
If I can buy borosilicate tubing from chang, I can get some PTFE sheets or grease while I'm at it.
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>>2297968
God knows what he tried to make, because whatever he did only managed to kill himself and not even the cabbie.
I've had more explosive sharts than this meme terrorist.
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Oh wow i didn't realize Nurdrage was this much of a based Chad. Science publishers get fucked
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>>2298422
the worrying thing is, his lack of success had nothing whatsoever to do with policing and due entirely to his own incompetence. the thing apparently had projectiles built into it and given that it was right around bonfire night I'd hazard a guess it was packed with emptied out black powder. i would also hazard a guess he may have actually tried setting it off using a standard firework fuse. the sas were apparently dispatched to visit the connected addresses

a week later, a 12 year old was stabbed to death in the city on the way home from school
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the uk is a fucking joke
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Just spent like $30 to get 50cm of 0.1mm platinum wire to use with electrochemistry. From aliexpress. Here's hoping it isn't aluminium.
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>>2299490
Good luck man, you're gonna need it. I've been wanting to get into electrochemistry myself, so hopefully i can get the glassy carbon to turn out for cheap electrodes
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>>2299539
Ah that's what you're doing the glassy carbon for! Yeah I saw some glassy carbon shit while looking for electrodes, more expensive than platinum. I was told by someone here that using a normal graphite electrode for manufacturing sulfuric acid would fill my solution with soot and to use lead instead, which I didn't really like the sound of for contamination reasons, hence why I'm going for platinum.

That said, I wonder how normal cheap (uncoated) carbon fibres would work? A bundle of them could have a really high surface area, and I don't think they'd degrade. Crimping a conductive wire onto them may be an issue, but that's the same for glassy carbon. Not sure if the regular stuff is coated for resin adhesion, think I heard that somewhere, sure some piranha would fix that for you but that might also eat up the electrodes.

I'm building my own 3A 18V CV/CC PSU at the moment too, which I expect to use with electrochemistry. Making circuit boards and doing chemistry are strangely interlinked.
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>>2299490
I really want to try making a platinum catalyst for the Ostwald process. But the only example on youtube uses quartz wool as a substrate. I'm not 100% sure, but I think that's just another name for asbestos. Yikes. So I'd like to find out if there's another substrate that could work. Kind of wondering if ordinary fiberglass insulation or rockwool might do the job, but I don't know if they can handle the high temperature.
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>>2299578
>I think that's just another name for asbestos
It's no more asbestos than normal glass wool. Quartz wool is that but with purer fibres. Asbestos fibres are deadly by their short length, which I assume these artificial wools won't be. Quarts is likely needed due to the temperature resistance. Maybe some alumina wool might be cheaper, idk.
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>>2295788
>what are you anons working on at the moment

Just stealing equipment and chemicals from work thus far. Its weird, i’ve always wanted to have a lab setup at home but i cant think of any real use for it. Maybe when i quit academic research for a real job I’ll just do some chemistry out of nostalgia
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>>2299649
godspeed kleptochemist
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>>2299651
>first step: brew invisibility potion
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>>2299667
jokes on you i protect my chemicals with an elder guardian
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>>2294177
reminds me of "environmental analysis class" I took part in
>measuring chlorides in water by titration
>possibly the least problematic inorganic compound in water
>using mercurimetry with Mercury(II) nitrate
>possibly the most toxic inorganic compounds you can have in water
>as it's time for clean up, I ask "shouldn't we put the unused reagents in hazardous waste container?"
>she gave it a good, 20 seconds think
>"Nah, just leave the water running for a bit"
>k
since then I never drink tap water downstream from any university
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>>2299490
almost certainly aluminium sorry anon. normally precious metal wire and pellets are at least 20% above spot price.
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>>2299689
i believe universities typically have holding tanks the lab drains run to. i seem to recall one of the lecturers that used to be a lead at sigma mentioned something about the university getting into trouble over the mercury content of said tank

one of the more entertaining lab waste days was after someone had emptied nitric acid into one of the solvent waste tanks, which had started to get rather 'warm' and fumey.

the bin was also partly set on fire via a similar process. the lecturer wasn't happy about that but proceeded to do the same thing himself about 12 months later
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>>2299689
i have another, odder, chemical waste story. i used to work at gsk in Ware in the UK. the company has had a factory there for about two or three hundred years i think. they are or were allowed to discharge waste streams into the river next to the factor so long as it had been cleaned up.

the river is called the 'Lea'. adele released a song called 'river lea' while i was working there. even had it on the labs. the lyrics contain;

"There was something in the water, now that something's in me
Oh I can't go back, but the reeds are growing out of my fingertips
I can't go back to the river

But it's in my roots, in my veins
It's in my blood and I stain every heart that I use to heal the pain
Oh, it's in my roots, in my veins
It's in my blood and I stain every heart that I use to heal the pain

So I blame it on the River Lea, the River Lea, the River Lea
Yeah I blame it on the River Lea, the River Lea, the River Lea"
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>>2299834
for reference, picrel
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>>2285993
It's a dangerous hobby that to do safely requires space, forethought and decent amount of startup funds.

I really enjoy watching the chem channels, some of the reactions are pretty wild or interesting. The only chemistry I do is fucking with my pool though.
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>>2286024
What the hell happened to the US, they used to sell fucking chem kits to kids, and now its seen as something of a pariah hobby. I think I'll learn to do chem just as a fuck you even though I'm over the hill at 26.
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Cook crack.
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>>2286024
>Most people assume you're either a meth cook or a terrorist.

I'm almost certain this has more to do with the state of education's downfall. Paranoid state.
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>>2285993
The only reason I could see myself doing chemistry as a hobby is to make DMT at home
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>>2300546
Judging by the amount of responses who think all they can accomplish with home chem is drugs, seems about right. No imagination no curiosity for the wonders of life.
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>>2300732
>No imagination no curiosity for the wonders of life.
So, other than drugs and bombs, what do home chemists do? Fireworks?
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>>2300735
Battery Chemistry, Chemicals for etching, some experimental stuff regarding polymers come to mind. I've also been looking into an organic replacement to detergent that comes from the bark of a specific tree. There lots of things people can work on they just never seem to think about it, just DUDE LETS MAKE DRUGS DUDE, then the stigma propagates until thats all anyone thinks being a home chemist entails.
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>>2300738
Thanks for the examples. You probably have a lot of fun, and who knows, you might come up with something amazing.
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>>2285993
So, has anyone figured out that exploding bismuth perchlorate complex thing yet?
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>>2300425
That's what rich junkies do. You can buy the cocaine salt and make crack on your microwave.
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>>2286658

Nilered has a Chem degree and a business, if you meet those requirements you can purchase stuff legitimately.
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>>2300738

Everything you mentioned is boring, no offense.

I would be interested in seeing more non illicit drugs/synthesis though instead of psychoactive compounds.
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>>2301100
If thats what interests you then so be it
>>
are there *any* resources on hobby chem other than youtube videos and random threads on chans? Any forums, discords, groups, clubs, gatherings, anything? or is it a case of "first rule of chem club is do not talk about chem club"? It's hard to believe there isn't anything anywhere... even if it is just a handful of local underground meetups, or some darknet forum
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>>2301196
ok I posted the dumb, re-read the early part of this thread and found out sciencemadness has chemistry forums... anything else tho? for some reason I'm picturing local groups meeting at some guys secret barn lab in the country to have royal society-style demos and discussions.
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>>2301200
I've also found neat stuff on the Finishing forum. Relating to electroplating, etching, etc.
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>>2301196
>>2301200
>>2301202
There are a series of books on the subject matter for getting a home chem lab started. There's also a chemistry discord, and i'm sure there are stuff on element/matrix you can find. The issue is that they are usually just used by students asking for help with homework, gatekeepers who gawk at the idea that a mere normie would ever DARE to do home chemistry in this day and age, its just tooooo dangerous and its just toooooo expensive and its tooooo impossible to find the regants etc., don't even THINK about doing chemistry at home unless its simple baby leave the real stuff to the big boys in the grad slave labs. Then the last that makes up 99% of these groups are the people who just join and never actually say anything.
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bumping because actual interesting thread
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>got to wear a labcoat at home again today
feels good man

tried a novel approach to tin plating, turns out i can use way less thiourea if I paint on a small amount of tin chloride solution, wait a little, then add some droplets of thiourea-containing metal polish. Must have used less than a mL today, when usually I'd go through 10 or more.

actually if i plate the pcb before etching, i'd be able to electroplate it and not bother with the thiourea, and also be able to not worry about the incredibly slow time it takes to dissolve tin into tin chloride, and probably also not have to worry about tin(IV) forming. but that would require an etchant that can get through the plating and the copper within an hour, since after that the dry film photoresist gets too soft. an oxidiser plus acid should do the trick, avoiding HCl because it produces chlorine when it touches strong enough oxidants. might try concentrated citric, otherwise i'm sticking to my plan to make sulfuric from copper sulfate. as for oxidants, i've been using ammonium persulfate as it's clear and fast and what my local store stocks, guess i'll keep using it for now, but i am looking at electrochemically renewable copper-based or halogen-based oxidants.
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I wonder how well a black marketplace for non-drug chemicals would work. I'm talking chemicals that aren't used in illicit drugs but still banned in certain parts of the world, like nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, carbon tetrachloride, etc
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>>2303154
If there's no money in it, there's no reason for it to work unless the authorities are willing to look the other way for whatever reason.

Also if terrorists use that stuff to make bombs you'll face a world of crackdowns.
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>>2303157
Good point. I'll just start a terrorist organization so the US will give me explosives and then I'll sell them to home chemists
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Speaking of chemistry anyone know how to find cheap tools and glassware, i've seen this german guy get a shit ton offhand from a brewer/
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>>2303191
holy kek, thanks fbi

>>2303194
you mean apart from alibay? maybe unis and schools might get rid of old stuff, but in general if it still works there's no reason to replace it. if you were a glasswork artisan then you'd likely be able to get hold of quite a few damaged glassware items to patch up.
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>>2303194
Amazon and Ebay are hard to beat if you're like me and all you can afford is Chang Specials. They're also good for a lot of chemicals, although AliExpress is often better for the really obscure stuff
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>>2303207
Also I've got a few good deals off craigslist. Including some really rare and pricey items on occasion.
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bump





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