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/diy/ - Do It Yourself

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ITT we show off your jigs furnances forges projects and tools, discuss propper method of manufacture ask for advide and give advice all around the manufacturing of edged implements from metal, knifes swords aces, foring and stockremoval all welcome.
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>>2268380
starting to post some of my stuff,
bollocksdagger, sadly build for reenactment with safety tip: would have liked to make it sharp but well i comission is comission
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dumb question, but whats a good size hammer to use?
Small or large? I fucked my wrist and dont want to strain it further trying "wrong" sizes.
Assembling a crude coal forge when i received the materials
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>>2268490
acutaly a good question
the weight of the hammer depends on your condition and what you are making
for a main forging hammer i recommend 2 pounds to 3 pounds. depending on what you feel more comfortable with,
the length of the handle depends also on your under arms length.
generally bigger hammers move more material
also the face of the hammer that strikes the metal should be smoth, the whole face should be slightly rounded, like i said depending on purpose. american hammers seem from my experience be more rounded than german hammers.
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I did something stupid as fuck, and I don’t know what to do next.

Making my first folding knife for my father as a Christmas gift, and it’s been going surprisingly well. However, while I was drilling the holes for Corby fasteners, I seem to have drilled a number of the holes too large. The scales are already epoxy’d to metal liners which are drilled correctly, and I’m happy with everything, minus these slightly outsized holes for the top of the corby. What can I do to fill in the gap around the brass? Will it fill with sawdust during the final sanding and finishing? Should I fill the gap with superglue? Ideas appreciated.
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>>2268490
Most of my lump and peening hammers are usually somewhere between 1.5-2kg heads, roughly in that 3-4lb bracket which does about as much as i expect with them. I do also have an 8lb striker but its just a bit unwieldy one-handed. I don't do a huge amount of forging though, its sort of a means to an end for me than a primary production method

If you're prone to RSI, carpal tunnel, tennis elbow and shoulder problems, it may well be worth your time training your off-hand.

>>2268622
Unless you've got a piece of tube slightly bigger and the internal diameter of the bolt, you'd have to do the old superglue and sawdust filling
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Metallurgist from the metallurgy thread here. Best of luck with the thread!

Remember kids: Just Say No to snowflake blade alloys! If it don't start with "10" and don't end with "60" it ain't worth the money!
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>>2268622
Fill the original hole with scrap wood and re-drill a correct size hole.
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>>2268811
>>2268858
Thank you both for the ideas
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>>2268398
Man that’s beautiful, excellent symmetry on the blade. Do you hand file for daggers?
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>>2268622
Put a little bushing in the hole
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>>2268908
handforged, and handfiled, actualy it is a lil bit twisted, but the twist is so small that it does not matter etc.
the balls were hell to carve btw
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first take on an asian style hilt
i would have made it less thick but the wooden ring in the front had square hole which was a retarded idea, so the corners were thinner and thinner. it was a gift and an impromptu idea

any one else has experience with these asian style hilts?
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Happy to see someone made another knifemaking thread!

Here's the design for my latest project. Got the blade mostly finished up. Forging the guard right now. Going to be very tricky to get everything perfect.

12" blade, 26c3 with a cool hamon.

Any thoughts on proportions?
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>>2269129
I don't particularly like them as I don't make a lot of Japanese knives, from what I've seen they cut the bolster hole to be the same size as the blade where it matches up, nice clean fit so no gaps.
Then they main handle they'll usually drill a half inch hole down it and then put the tang in a dowel with the width of the tang cut into it, slip it in there, bolster on, then glue up the tang + dowel into the hole. That way you're not trying to drill or chop out some rectangle in the main handle. I've done it, its done by other people but frankly I don't have time for that shit in my life as its just super-fiddly and difficult.
The fella on Simplelittlelife youtube channel has a few examples of how he does it and worth a look as he goes into detail

A little brushed N690 vegetable cutter for a custom order, about 60HRC with 316SS pins and a stabilised Huon Pine handle with a bit of birdseye in it.
Also finished off my renaissance cooks knife from the 15th century in modern materials that was done at the same time, I won't say its a replica, more an interpretation from an old timey woodcut illustration but it'll have to wait until I get some photos of it this afternoon.
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>>2269485
Ambitious piece. How hard do you think it’ll be to make? I’m 4 knives almost 5 in to this hobby and something like that is well beyond my capacities.
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>>2269642
Takedown knives are challenging to make and I have pretty much all the right tools to make them. Lathe, mill, granite flat plate,height indicator, micromotor, etc. Without the right tools it would be extremely difficult and even more time consuming.

Lots of little details and things you have one shot at or you have to start over.

Here's a chefs knife I made like a month ago that's in a similar build style to the bowie. The blade is 26c3 and the fittings are all stainless.
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>>2269689
amazing work
i am more of an oldschooler, but i lack a lot of tools
friend of mine built a CnC and we plan building a series of automatic knifes next year, i hope i can even be precise enough to make it work
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>>2269522
show off the rennaissance stuff pls
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Quillion dagger I made awhile ago, might have already posted here? Recently started nickel electroplating, and tried it out on the copper spacers, worked a treat.
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>>2269851
Longsword I'm currently working on to go with dagger. Still need to do the leather wrap handle (any anons with leather wrap handle tips would be greatly appreciated). And finish shaping the pommel locking nut.

Also fuck the new captcha
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>>2269857
Pair of 52100 camp knives I made in a timed test to see what I would have to charge if I wanted to sell knives as a side gig (took roughly 22hrs for both). Definitely can't make a marketable product grinding bevels with a gough jig, just too slow.
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>>2268490
The larger the better. What strains your wrist isn't really the weight of the hammer, but the rebound. For minimum strain, you want the heaviest hammer you can swing comfortably, and a thin, flexible handle that bends slightly during the swing and absorbs part of the recoil. be warned that thinned handles break easier though.

>>2269485
>thoughts on proportions?
That hilt looks too wide. I'd suggest making the hilt ~20% narrower. Unless you're making a flat, concealable knife, but it doesn't look like that.
Also, if you're planning on actually using the thing, forget about that profiled buffer at the front end of the grip. That'll be painful on you index finger. Smooth buffers are alright, unless they're metal and it's cold outside. Just make sure they're ground well, and the wood won't shrink. If it does, the small difference in height becomes extremely bothersome.
If you'll be using it for precise work (bushcraft, skinning, fencing etc) you should also consider rounding the blade between the guard and the edge, you you can hold it with your index in front of the guard. You have much more control that way.
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>>2269857
wow
i sadly lack the facilitys to build a longsword. one day i will though
I did a very big late rennaissance parry dagger, a complete overbuilt beast for reenactment fighting. as a comission
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>>2269862
hell that's long
honestly i work a good bit faster.
i think for knifes such as these i could press down to 12 hours maybe. but yeah i plan on building a series where i will streamline a lot and won't forge the blades
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Posting some OC just to fuel the thread, naturally I have a lot to learn, and this piece shows it. 4th knife, which I call “the gnome knife”. 1080 steel, zebra wood, brass rod pins taken from the Spiderco Sharpmaker set lol. Quenched in canola after being heated to non-magnetic. Food prep use has stained the blade quite a bit.
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>>2269917
that's pretty neat for the 4th one. nice finish on the handle, zebra wood, nice work.

i have taken a liking for the ol ebeny, since i ordered it for a comission, i think i will use ist more often in the future. i read that there are other kinds of ebony that even have patterns.
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>>2269879
>be warned that thinned handles break easier though.
i re handle all my stuff with hornbeam nowadays, the go to wood before machine made handles appeared.

Found a 1kg and 2kg usable for forge work, and a 4kg beater with marred face. Did a test piece today, heated with oxi propane torch and forged on a excavator tooth (i got a rail piece i will grind a horn on later). the 2kg isn't moving a lot, time to get that arm up to coomer strength and use the 4kg.
if that doesnt work, also got access to a 100 ton press lol
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>>2269879
Good advice. I've been wanting to try precious metal inlay, but I don't have the skills or tools to do it really, so maybe I'll spend some time practicing. I intend to do a hot blue or rust blue with a mirror polish, so silver or gold will have awesome contrast.

I printed out a to scale image of the knife and I've already decided to narrow the handle by around 20% good call on that.
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hey, i can reduce my flint down to a relatively even spear shape but it always seems like im left with a giant bump in the stone that i cant work down, when i try the whole thing ends up breaking in half. how do you guys deal with this?
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>>2269818
>show off the rennaissance stuff pls
So this is from the Opera Venetia by Bartolomeo Scappi (1500-1577) who was a cook to about 3 popes and probably the first guy to lay down a proper cookbook in the sense we'd know it as one with illustrations and how-to
There is the Coltrelli Martri da batrere which roughly translates to the 'master provender's knife' in one of the woodcuts inside and going by the fact there's no real way of determining the size, the length of much else- then add to that its stylised by someone just doodling out the basic shape.

So I did some thinkering and tried to brain out the idea of it being sort of a general purpose kitchen knife, there's a few aspects I didn't think would work and some others which mainly due to the time and diet would have been mostly around the cutting and serving of meat. The clip point mostly being for popping sockets out and some general duties, but I wasn't entirely happy with the overall curvature which would have made it a little less than ideal for a modern chef + the stylisation
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>>2270312
So here's my take on it
10" long, its from 2.5mm N690 Bohler stainless and has an extremely high bevel running from bottom to top, which is about 60mm high or about 2.5" and 10.5" long, she's a big damn knife!
Hardened and tempered it to about 60HRC, there's a bit of distal taper in there to knock off the weight, its about 2.5 across the spine near the tang and drops down to about 1mm for the last 1/3rd of its length and knocks a bit of weight out of it. Heavier than a normal chefs knife for sure but not much more than some of the asian cooks knives I've knocked out and far from being unwieldy.

Being this is a bit of an experiment I decided to just keep it as light as possible so no bolsters, had some really nice lace pattern Sheoak that was stabilised and decided to use that giving it a bit of a flair and colour, the rest is sort of a high satin finish which as I intended it to be a fairly practical bbq or line-cooks knife its pretty low maintenance. Just some 316SS pins and its done. Timber was really just given a light coating of gun stock oil to fill in any tiny pores, then polished
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>>2269857
Way that it makes sense to me is you sew up the leather inside out, then roll it out over the top of the leather while its a bit damp, then hopefully when it dries a bit then it'll shrink to shape after wrapping it up with some string to conform it to shape.
How or if you hide the seam could be done I guess, but its really out of my scope.
Personally, I'd go with wire wrap as I'm a bit more familiar with that as some hands-on practice and it can look really good.

I mean, overall its looking fucking great so far, so best of luck with it!
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>>2270312
oh i read about the cook, he was actualy quite famous for usin ridicolous amounts of sugar in every kind of dish wich was considered very posh at the time.
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>>2270315
>>2270315
oh that's indeed a very modern take. the handle especialy i thought you did a more rennaissance take.
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>>2270334
Yeah there's nothing in there but a slow death of heart disease and diabetus :)
Its just mounds of meat, jellies, pastry, pasta and fats. Must have been quite a time considering just how outrageously rich they were

>>2270336
Other people have done some stuff which is closer to the picture and I'm not entirely sure it would work (as) well as a serving and chefs knife as the picture does look almost like a heraldic blade you'd see on a coat of arms. Maybe if I do it again I'll throw in some bolsters, maybe a meaty pommel and a thicker blade for more medium duty chopping, but she works really well as a slicer. Its super fucking sharp to the point it will fillet skin doing a hair test on my arm, so I'm a bit scared of it!

Sort of one of those things where I'm not sure the interpretation is close enough yet, so we'll call it a work in progress for the aesthetics if I do a 2nd later on. But it was quite valuable in terms of learning the proportions and how it handles, so it should be ok for someone with a more traditional european chefs skills
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>>2270339

>Its just mounds of meat, jellies, pastry, pasta and fats.

the ideal italian diet( being quater italian myself)

it's just that i am a bit of a historical knife fanatic, and even started to polish my historical builds with stonemeal for historical authentic finish.
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>>2269880
Neither did I when I started this almost 3 years ago. Still bodging my way through, taking my time in baby steps. Still don't own a grinder, anvil, drill press or even a lathe, ya just gotta do it. Pic rel is the ghetto lathe I used for the pommel.

>>2269881
It was 22 hrs total not including heat treat so 11 hrs per knife. Still though I'd be asking ~250$aud w/o a sheath if I wanted to make minium wage. So can't imagine I'd sell many at that speed. I can say though, making multiple at a time definitely felt faster. Going with a simple satin finish also saves a lot of time.

>>2269485
Love the design, would look slick with a hollow grind. Guard looks a tad thin to me, though I don't know the scale. I agree with
>>2269879 on the width and I might even bring back the kick on the knuckle guard a smidge.

>>2270315
Nice stuff, love sheoak one of my favourites.
How did you find the N690, being a stainless does the heat treat require anything fancy like foil? Out of curiosity what was the final weight.

>>2270319
That was my understanding too, you can sort of mould it while damp (wet forming I think) then trim the excess and glue it. I was planning to have no stitching and just sort of fade/shave thin the leather at the seam to maximise glueing surface area. I was initially planning to wire wrap but leather won as it was a good excuse to buy more tools and learn another skill.
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>>2270383
I'm mostly about finding stuff that once existed and seeing if I can drag it back into the modern age, just as sort of a way of breaking up my usual cycle of german and french style cooking knives along with a couple of asian cooks knives. Lately also doing a lot of commission work which I'd normally knock back but its very slow sales even running up to christmas. After this I've got 5 small fish and game knives I've knocked out of thick stock of N690 and hoping to get them out in the next week.
Much as I like old things, a lot of the stuff I'm more interested in doesn't really last down the ages, things like cooking wares and utility blades used by common folk are very rare archaeology as its only the wealthy folks stuff surviving in museums as it was mostly decorative. Plus I'm still very much in the modern age and like modern materials

>>2270394
Most Australian timbers are really under rated, they're often very hard, dry and have a beautiful lustre to them. But they're also slow growing and usually quite small trees in some cases.
I've been using N690 for about 3 years now, its same as any full chromium stainless in that you need foil or oxygen free atmosphere to avoid decarb, but as a steel its one of my preferred ones for cook ware. Its not tough by any stretch but used to come in at a good price point with consistent results. The added cobalt also means its more or less full transformation at room temps too, so no need for cryo
Sadly, I'm pretty much out of it and theres not much about from my usual suppliers
But I have some plates of 26C3 and 1084 coming in which will tide me over for carbon steels in the meantime

Oh of course, yes the way you shave off the leather very thin and then glue it. That should work ok, most people still wrap it after with string just to make sure it beds down over the timber underneath. It might be worth giving the timber some kind of stabilisation like a thin coat of CA or epoxy to keep the water out as well.
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>>2270394
>sking ~250$aud w/o a sheath if I wanted to make minium wage.
well it depends on, i am trying to streamline more regular kinds of built, so i can press work time, but comissions wake long and depending on what you are building you can get actualy a decent pay, the thing is that i want to realy deliver for my high prices, etc so i am actualy improving my heattreatment etc with the help of a friend etc, actualy measuring hardness and buying quality steel.

>>2270396
yeah i get what you are doing, i'm already active in the reenactment spectrum, so i have always some requests for actualy period correct builds. and i kinda love the whole recreating part.

pic related is pretty much a combination of different surviving pieces around 1500 etc and i even harvested the wood myself and made sure it was used in the originals.
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>>2270394
>what was the final weight.
310grams, which is about 11oz or 0.7lb in burger units. Which I think is ok for something as big as it is
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>>2270396
there are actualy some findings of common people and low quality knifes , from themse river 15th century, and i think i read a paper or such about a find from a russian latrin or such where they found high medieval knifes, which you could see were more of the simple kind,
also museums have lots of simpler pieces in their magazines but often don't put them up because they are less impressive or less representative of one style.
but generally in europe since the high middleages utility knifes and such are actualy quite high in production value and even cruder pieces show some decoration, so i think that there were just no super plain things
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>>2270398
Cool, I've not seen many artisan-made baselard's. There's a fairly limited amount of sales for that out here in the colonies and most of the metal-weapons society types tend to just import their own from various mass-manufacturers. We also suffer from a lack of examples, like if I can see something in a museum I can probably come up with something much more accurate than going off a drawing or photograph but we don't really have much of anything older than about 200-250 years old, so delving much past that Regency-Victorian era is really scarce unless a collector brought it in- then its in private collections and you never see it.
Most of the older stuff that does exist is things like trade-knives from the UK, which I think are interesting but a bit of a hard-sell to most people.
To some extent a lot of what I do is a bit mercenary in the sense I've got to make some money off it or at least cover costs :)
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>>2270403
>baselard
actualy a swiss dagger, but i think they developed from baselard.
well i am from europe, but i actualy don't manage to go to museums often but i use their catalogues as good as i can.
yeah here a lot of stuff is also rather crude. also bc many swords are ofc for reenactment so things need to be changed like with the bollocksdagger i posted earlier..
well for me it has become kind of a sidebuisness while i try to get a degree.
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>>2270406
The Baselard was sort of going out of vogue with hooligans around the late 1400's and made a bit more refined with the Swiss dagger, which in turn had a much longer life ultimately. There's probably some finer points in the design as well to distinguish them but I'm no expert there.

Locally its kind of hard to sell those, I can legally make and transport daggers to sell people as they're legal to own but they're mostly useless for most people even from a 'display' perspective that if you turned up wearing one to a medieval style fair, the cops could take a dim view of it and potentially confiscate it. I do know a guy who makes some really fucking crazy stilettos and they're even more useless than a dagger for anything practical but murdering people- he seems to do ok out of them. Awful lot of work goes into them too.
Ultimately I can't keep up with the price point and labour costs when it comes to competing against forged stuff
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Progress pic on a folding knife mentioned above, not fishing for commentary just fueling the thread. Critique welcome.
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>>2270553
Ugh
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>>2270553
lol I hope your dad really loves you if thats the one youre giving him for christmas
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>>2270556
Well hell, lmao. Thanks a lot.
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>>2270394
Pretty impressive work one way or another, but without power tools, damn. Hard to get them where you are? Got a full starter setup for under 350 through Harbor Freight well before I even knew what to do with most of it lol
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>>2270557
bro, theres too much for me to say about this knife, I looked at it again to try and give helpful critique but then I noticed more thats wrong. your attention to detail is seriously lacking, no matter how much oil you rub on that hog
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>>2270638
I have a feeling I'm being trolled, but if this is actually in good faith, like I said, it's a work in progress. Maybe it gives some perspective to say that it's a friction folder. Obviously the corbys have not been sawed and ground, epoxy hasn't been sanded off, etc. I think the file work, which I have not done before, is just so-so, but it's not awful. In this pic, the liner/spacer has not yet been sanded to match the profile of the scales, either. But again, I think you're trolling me.
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>>2270638
pls not be mean, i also don't like it, but hell
some people have seemingly a very different taste.
>>2270656
i try to constructive, the knife hase some problems apart from looks, for example the wood is rather fraggal, with this kind of construction, i would have preferred 2 metal sheets as carrier plates for the wood on the inside so it would be more stable. and idk why you shose this blade from, for me it#s not appealing but that's your thing not mine.
for the constructon it is rather fragile as the whole balde is fixed only at one point in the wood, and the wood looks as if it was rather brittle so the handle will break of force is extered
pic related had a constructon that is easiert for started in filding knifes and uses a full wood handle, and even here the rotating pin is supported by a metalreinforcement and is by no means perfect
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>>2270414
in europe you get up to 500 bucks for one of these daggers when propperly done
because the swiss see them as a national symbol and any swiss history buff wants one that is authentic in shape and construction and they are insanely into them. sadly the one i made was before i know it so i got not much out of it, but i may make more of them, but the handle work is hell, making all of that from 1 piece of wood from hand.
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>>2271108
I've only met a couple of Swiss and they did seem to be fairly nice people. Sort of friends of a really good friend that comes from the weird little area of northern Italy where they all speak a mix of Italian and German with their neighbours the Austrians and somehow she's ended up down here at the bottom of the world with us weirdos.

Been busy finishing these off, all the kydex sheaths are something to do tomorrow which will undoubtedly involve the usual clusterfuck of cooked plastic and shit everywhere but hopefully once I get these into the shops I can take some time off and just go do something less... knife-making for a bit. Finally got my big shipment of 26C3 and 1084 plates today which might mean I get to do some san-mai billets for funsies.
These ended up using up a lot of my nicer stabilised timbers so hopefully they'll sell well.
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>>2270638
>oily hogs
Shqueel lil piggeh! Shqueel! Ye har!
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>>2269689
Has anyone made an offer on it yet? You made me a knife but I won't see it until after Christmas, at which time I would like to make an offer.
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>>2272355
the swiss has an italian area, not italy a swiss area but yeah this is not a geograüphy board.
wait do you mean Südtirol? those are german austrians. not swiss, completely different tribe, siwss are highest allemannenmore related to els#ssers and schwaben. the tiroler are bavarians with heavy retroroman emphasis.
the knifes look very neat anyways
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>>2272393
>Südtirol
Yeah the South Tyrol-Tyrolean part of the world where they've got family essentially on both sides of the border and I think its locally called Alto Adige, but my Italian is significantly worse than my terrible grasp of German. Its a really interesting part of the world and very beautiful countryside, alps and mountains.
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>>2272372
Haven't put it up yet. After I figured out a better finishing step for the hamon polish I'm going to refinish it that way, and I'm going to make a cool little wrench to disassemble the blade. Copper jaws and matching wood handle.

I get so hyperfocused on a knife like that once I stop working on it it's a little tough to go back at it. All in time.
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>>2272355
Just about done for the year, or done with kydex for now at least. Nothing hugely fancy there but they do have about a half-inch standoff to the clip to clear the belt that I found was just more comfortable and easier to get to
I might get some san-mai shit done over the next week or so, or not as that thing tends to go sometimes when it doesn't work
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>>2273803
nice work anon
honestly i could never get into kydex i do mostly historical scabbard and sheat stuff with leather.
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>>2273551
damn that soiunds good, never did a hamon, also what steels best to use for it?
i am now mainly using D2 and L2 and similiar.
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>>2274891
I used to make wooden sayas and boxes for knives but its just really labour intensive, takes a fair bit of fiddling to get them nice and frankly, I fucking hate doing carpentry stuff most of the time. The only thing I'm really worse at is leatherwork as theres a squillion little tools, techniques and things I just don't have to do it properly.
So essentially I just needed a secure blade-cover for most of my knives so people can transport it without accidentally lopping something with razor sharp steel bouncing around- kydex more or less filled that role in the sense its cheap enough to do the job and fit for purpose. Its not pretty by any stretch of the imagination but for outdoor knives and stuff its really not too bad from a practical level. It does take some getting used to the temps it likes to form at and getting your press into something usable but otherwise it'll do pretty much anything I need it to do.

5 little sheaths are about maybe 4hrs work just getting them tidy and usually come in at about $15-20 for a full sheet of 30x60cm, few bucks for the rivets and about $10-15 for the clips, the rest is just abrasives and no real other incidentals except time. So its not adding a huge amount to the end ticket price.
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This was my last project for se/k/ret santa, some lucky aussie now has it.
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>>2275230
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>>2274892
Shallow hardening steels are what you want. W2, 1095, and 26c3 all do very nice hamons. W2 and an actual water quench will guve you the most activity, but you'll also crack blades regularly unless you got the whole process down perfectly.

If you search for nuclayer systems they make excellent clay and anti scale that works better than satanite.
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I got a very very nice metallurgy microscope from an auction the other day and it came with a digital camera, so I can do some pretty sweet imaging if anyone has any ideas.

Sharpening a blade at 500, 1500, 4000, and some different natural stones is my first thought. I have the good nitric etching acid, so I might be able to do etches as well.

I think this is a straight razor edge or maybe a knife edge. I forget. Maybe 400x or 200x
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Been a while since I posted, I've done a lot of crazy shit.

I built a 29 ton hydraulic forging press that actually works (tracking could be improved, there's a little bit of wiggle in the moving carriage). Somehow I didn't fuck myself up screwing around with hydraulics not knowing anything going into the project.
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>>2275518
Since then I've made some attempts at San Mai billets.
First try was mild steel jacket to a 1084 core, worked wonderfully and i just need to make a blade from it
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>>2275520
I tried making a stainless jacket + carbon core billet at the same time as the mild, didn't know I needed to completely weld all the seams shut instead of simply using kerosene as flux.

You can see the different steels in the one section where they forge welded together. I had the billet welded completely enclosed on that half which is what led me to figure out how to forge weld stainless on my next try
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>>2275521
Second attempt with the billet seams welded closed forge welded properly
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>>2275522
And here's the blade I've ground from said stainless San Mai billet after a quick test etch in ferric chloride. For being only my third try at forge welding anything ever I'm pretty happy with myself.

Hopefully it survives heat treat in the next few days.
>>
>>2275523
And also a 154-CM stainless filet knife for a Christmas gift I finished up
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>>2275524
Testing the flexibility had me shitting bricks and praying my heat treat was good. I have a Paragon kiln and I know it's accurate, but still.
>>
Can anyone give some advice on working with bone for knifes.Im currently working on bronze age daggers with bone pommels.(pic related is the type of repo im aimimg for) what particular bones have a lot of solid bone to work with since many are hallow or have thin spongy blood vessels through them.I used a joint of a large cow leg bone.Dispite looking solid during cutting i found as i polished it.Its pocked with blood vessels meaning i cant get a true smooth finish like pic like the outer bone.
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>>2275230
>ebin benin knoif

>>2275518
29t is a heck of a machine, for a while I was thinking about making a super-dodgy 10-12t one out of a log-splitter just for my own amusement. The managed to slap myself back to reality that I'd probably do something extremely expensive and foolish.
>>2275521
Stainless-carbon is a tricky process. Its essentially get all contact sides scrupulously clean and then weld up the entire sides with a decent iweld like 309L which has a lot of strength
You can try to do the cladding with the 300 austenics but they're doing it the very hard way, if it does manage to hold there's no guarantee it'll survive the hardening cycle without splitting due to the different shrinkage rates. Most seem to work ok with the 400's like 410 and 416 stainless as there's not nearly as much chromium in them, not as much stain resistance either but that's sort of how it goes.

The best way is if you can fork out for some nickel sheet or foil and run that between the stainless and carbon, its sort of the great sticky intermediary metal in that it will bond with either metal (plus copper and other bases to some extent) and then just try the same welding temps and sealing off the edges- you're still looking at trying to hit about 2300F or 1250C temps to get it to stick properly, usually do three times and light hammer blows to set it and then try it under the press to draw out your billet to thickness.
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>>2275532
Giraffe or zebra bone is sort of the best for bones, especially when its been stabilised.
Otherwise you could look at horse shins or even boar tusk
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>>2275535
Are boar tusks solid bone all he way through?
I know that was used a lot in the bronze age so you might have just explained why lol.
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>>2275540
Near the base of them they're sometimes a little bit hollow where the nerves and blood vessels are, but towards the tips in the last 1/3rd they're quite a very solid lump
Also, some big molars like out of a cow might be suitable too
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>>2275546
>some big molars like out of a cow might be suitable too
thats idea actually.
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>>2275534
Be that as it may, it survived the quench just now. Had a decent amount of decarbeurization but I need to grind it a tad more anyway, so I'm calling it a success. Throwing it into the tempering oven overnight and I'll take a look tomorrow
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>>2275553
The other one I was thinking of and is kind of common, is sheep horn: its very thick, hard and not usually very expensive. It should have a fairly pale cream to a caramel colour on some sections you can grind away into different depths and see what patterns emerge.

>>2275557
Great success!
I've got a fair heap of billets to work on coming up to christmas, so it'll be time to dust off my shabby forging skills during what's typically the hottest time of the year. But at least its not pissing down rain just now so we'll see what turns out. I was planning on doing a 1084 cladding with a layer of nickel with a 26C3 core and hopefully won't fuck it up too much as its already gotten kind of expensive.
>>
guy i've seen some videos on yt on fluxless wielding with coalforge even, and full of clunkers of no high carbon steel but how?
i tried to get a low Oxy burn in my coalforge and it never worked out in any way, maybe steel too much carbon in the steel? maybe just too small pieces?
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>>2275559
Oh yeah, steel is about 400% more expensive comparedto two years ago here in the states. I've taken to browsing through Facebook and online classifieds for random steels that I can use. Even a 9.5mm bar of 304 stainless that used to be $15 - 20 is now $80.

Found somebody selling 4 enormous burnt up roller bearings for $100, each assembly weighs around 200 pounds and has brass bearing cages so I lucked out. Basically got a couple thousand dollars worth of high carbon steel (100Cr6 alloy) and lots of brass for almost nothing.
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>>2276079
I usually buy my cutlery stainless in sort of 1x3ft or 150x800mm plates and there's none of that for love or money to be had. Can still get the odd strip of 2" wide stuff here and there but its a bit more expensive way of getting knife steel when you're making a lot of them. Think I've got about half a small plate of 5mm N690 and a bit of thin stock S35VN left and that it- pretty much the end of stainless knives for a while
Did manage to get a bit of a 2-for-1 on some 1084 so there's a bit of that, couple of big plates of 26C3, some thin 15N20 and I also have a little bit of old O1 and 1095, also a couple of small plates of D6 I'm sort of hesitant to do a run out of because I don't think I'll be able to find it again.
>Not so magic 8-ball says I'm more or less going to be doing carbon steel for the foreseeable future
A260 Brass for bolsters is more or less evaporated locally and only a tiny bit left, still have a lot of 316SS I've had for a while but its always a bit of a fight to get that onto a knife
Not quite down to the bones of my arse, but it just sort of is what it is

Those bearings are really tasty, the outer casing is usually 52100 as well and I reckon you'd be chewing on it for quite some time. Though I don't envy the getting into it with anything less than the big manly angle grinder from hell. They always make for a really fine edged knife too, I don't think I've seen any for sale in about 2 years over here in bar stock or bearings as the blacksmiths leap all over it like hungry chimps!
>>
Where do you guys get your steels?
I mostly go with Alpha Knife Supply and am considering getting some 14c28n from Admiral Steel.
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>>2276321
buy them by Nordisches Handwerk, or big supplier for some larger projects, also i colelct every scrap of metal i come across
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>>2276086
2 hours and 4 cutoff discs on my 4.5" grinder - really wasn't too bad, especially once I cut through the outer bearing race.

Now I have 40 individual 1.5 pound rollers just from the one bearing, plus the races are about 0.75" thick on average AND a ton of brass from the roller cages. And this is just one of the two big bearings I have now
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And unfortunately the stainless San Mai knife is scrap. It forge welded along 95% of the length of the knife except for 1 cm just behind the bevels, right where I can't grind or cut it away.

Although there was so much decarbeurization in the high carbon core I had to grind about 5mm of width off the blade to get to hardened material, everything else was great. If only that one spot was forge welded everything would be great.

I'm 200% mad, because I know precisely where and how I fucked up the heat management and forging steps such that the entire billet welded properly except for the very center. And I only have myself to blame for it.

Plus someone apparently hit my car overnight, so I'm getting a cigar and drinking whiskey until I'm not seething today.
>>
>>2276321
AKS are pretty good, they also do international orders at decent rates, or used to as that's sort of up in the air lately
If you're in the US- Jantz, New Jersey Steel Baron and Texas Knife Supply also do a decent trade.
Overseas for me at least I use Artisan Supplies (Aust) and GroundFlatstock (UK), the EU area also has a lot of suppliers but I've found them kind of difficult to get shipping from there

>>2276485
The Brass is a bonus, might be worth getting a small crucible and making some bar-stock or plate moulds maybe?

>>2276492
Well, shit
I'm off to spend a joyous (sarcasm) afternoon doing a full fluids service on my shitbox which should put me in the mood for punching something
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>>2276654
I'm definitely going to get a crucible in the future, considering how much brass I have on my hands now. I just ordered a lot of refractory and Inswool insulation to build a new forge in which to use my ribbon burner I built the other week, if I have enough left over I might make a vertical furnace, or retrofit my old forge to use as a smelting furnace. Future project ideas for after the holidays.
>>
>>2270394
Just watching some stuff on the youtube which I thought might be handy for your leather wrapped handle and I'd never heard of it before
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4edojcfkE0

Gum Tragacanth
It seems like the go for keeping the fibres down in leatherwork really well so I hope that's of some use
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>>2276864
Brass isn't a really high melting point anyway so it'd do just in a round tube, regular old burner and around 950C or 1700F. It sort of likes a bit hotter just to flow easier but nothing too outrageous there.
You could even do a mould for some short pinstock too which would save heaps of time/money and make sure it blends in with your bar-plate stock
>>
Xmas bump. Have a good one all knife bros.
>>
Are OBM or Diktator 2x72 belt grinder chassis on ebay any good?
The cheaper lower end ones
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>>2279866
thanks!
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>>2280062
The cheap Diktator grinders are made by OBM. To be honest, they make decent grinders but their business practices are absolutely deplorable. They stole designs from another maker and have terrible customer support.

I personally have one of their grinder chassis and supplied my own motor+VFD. If I had the choice I'd have gone with a different company, they charged me twice (over $900) for that chassis and took them over a month and a threat of legal action to refund my money. I would go with a Housemade grinder by Brian Housewert or a Ameribrade grinder if I could do it over again
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>>2281047
>Housemade grinder by Brian Housewert or a Ameribrade grinder
These are both really well rated by just about everyone in the US that uses them, the Housemade is a good option if you're just building up the bits over time as you have the money and have a middling level of welding ability + welder... or know someone with a welder.

Would also plug the 72" Steele Kit Grinder
That is actually the Australian made 84 engineering Shopmaster 72 which they've re-wired locally for burger volts and I do rate them very highly for their products, I own one of their 48"s and its a really refined product which runs really true: Considering its coming pre-wired with a vfd + motor for under 2k US dollarydoos and you just bolt it together with a couple of spanners and no welding required. (they also can come with a shitton of accessories from 84 engineering)

I think its generally a good rule of thumb to just buy a 'good' grinder over a cheap one, its a little more cash but a lot less fucking around at the end of the day or trying to find some parts or support later on down the track. Basically everything on a grinder is a 'wear item' in some way or another and will stuffed eventually
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>>2281093
>Would also plug the 72" Steele Kit Grinder
Your channel sucks
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>>2281047
>Housemade grinder by Brian Housewert

You can buy a Diktator Bandit which is the same exact design, with aluminum wheels included for $472
His kit is $580 without wheels.

Sure, its scummy to sell other peoples designs. But at the end of the day its just a pile of CNC cut steel that you have to weld together. You really going to pay a huge amount extra on principle?
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>>2281983
Also I find it funny how Diktator literally named it Bandit as a big fuck you to the detractors, breaking the 4th wall that they are in fact stealing designs and you cant do anything about it.
Cant beat the prices
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>>2269862
Attach your file to a reciprocating saw to make the process superfast.
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>>2281093
>Australian made 84 engineering Shopmaster 72 which they've re-wired locally for burger volts
Damn, this is a pretty nice looking grinder setup, but its not in stock and im not sure if I am ready to pull the trigger on something that expensive.

>>2281047
>Housemade grinder by Brian Housewert
I REALLY like this design and the diktator copy, but I dont have a welder that can weld 3/8" steel.

The shipping makes the low level grinders even that much more expensive, and they all have things that I dont like about them.
I was going to just get the Diktator Tubinator but its not even a standard attachment arm size and its $200 to ship to me.
At this point, I think I may just build one on my own.

I think im going to drop my cash into a better welder, build a basic bitch grinder like pic related for cheap from whatever scrap I can get, and going forward if I find im in love with it maybe go forward and build a Housemade type one down the line.
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>>2281982
Ain't my channel, its just adds now mostly but the product there is an honest one and not some chink shit

>>2282320
If you just need to get rolling on 'something' out of a box for cheap. They sell the Grizzly stuff in the US which is pretty basic and from all accounts, ok for what it is.
Otherwise you could look at something like a 48" Multitool and a bench grinder might be somewhere around 500US
Neither are exactly ideal for making knives, but you can make knives on them and plenty of people do.
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>>2282320
Honestly I did the same thing, I built a grinder from 1/4" wall square tubing. I ended up constantly fighting a clearance issue for some attachments and the tracking was always fucky. Eventually got sick of trying to flog a dead horse so I decided to just buy a chassis built with capabilities I didn't have in my home shop. Nowadays after I went through welding school I build a lot of my own tooling, but I still use that OBM chassis.

If you can source your own motor and VFD, then if I were you I would buy the pdf plans to Jeremy Schmidt's grinder and some simple steel bar stock and build your own chassis. If you have a basic stick welder or a flux core welder it's not difficult to weld 3/8" or 1/2" steel, you just need more passes after the root pass. Check Craigslist and other used places for an older Lincoln tombstone welder, you don't necessarily need a huge, powerful machine. I've made do with a basic 110v stick welder from Harbor Freight for 2 years building my stuff - just use 1/8" 6011 and 7018 rods and multiple passes.

https://jerswoodshop.com/gen-2-belt-grinder/
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>>2282507
Although keep in mind, EVERYTHING'S going to be extra expensive right now, what with material prices going through the roof.

If you can find a local supplier to negate shipping costs, get a long bar of 1.5" square aluminum for tooling arms, some 0.5" thick by 1.75" wide steel flat bar. Use some thin shim stock or even several pieces of paper between the aluminum square bar and the steel flat bar for clearance, clamp all four steel bars to the aluminum square and tack weld all the bars together, then add more substantial welds after removing the aluminum bar. Made a quick drawing of it, you'll just need to weld two equal length legs onto the bottom, drill and tap two holes for 0.5" bolts to hold the arm in the chassis and either buy or build a belt tracking setup
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>>2282539
Better pic
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>>2282507
This seems almost too good to be true
Pic related is like $90 on ebay, thats a 12" contact wheel, the arms are a little short at 15" vs OBMs 20" they are selling.
Contact wheels themselves go for ~$60 or more im seeing.
I almost want to pick it up and see how hard I get chinked. The platten looks like it could use work, but it feels like it could be usable.

I know I can locally get 1.5" X 2.5" aluminum for about $1 a foot, but it seems like it would be a big pain to try and take an inch off over 2 feet distance.
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>>2282556
Well, the size of the aluminum doesn't really matter if you're building the chassis yourself. Just design it around the aluminum bar you can get cheap. You can make an adaptor fitting to go into the socket later on if you pick up 1.5" square tooling arms. You could just put in two pieces of 0.5" bar and weld them in place on the ends to make it 1.5" square.

$1 per linear foot of 1.5"x2.5" is ridiculously cheap. Jump on that shit man, I would kill for that
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This is my first knife.
Its not quite done, but it came out way better than I thought It was going to.
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>>2284837
That's pretty fuckin good for being your first knife. My first knife looked like a misshapen banana with a paracord wrapped handle epoxied onto the end.
>>
Do you guy's know what the HRC of early knives were? Specifically ones from before 1900's? I heard that the average knife was high 40 to low 50s in HRC. Reason I ask is I'm coping since my knife seems to be a nice, hard HRC near the tip and edge, but gets noticeably softer by the bottom of the edge, sorta like a right angle triangle (see pic related) due to me screwing up my quench.
Obviously, I'm going to work on my ability to heat my knife at an even temperature and then quench properly, but for now, it would be cool to know (and cope) with my soft knife by knowing what the exact HRC of early knives were.
>>
>>2284837
Great job, your handle in particular looks really good

>>2287005
Before the 19th century you do get the Bessemer process about 1850's or so, it eventually gets a bit more widespread over time to start making bulk, controlled amounts of easily available steel- but for the average knife they're still knocking around with whatever mad shit they got made, imported and bodged together locally. Its a really broad range starting in the low 40's to mid 50's for hardened steels somewhere in under 0.7% carbon steels that where quenched in water. Most would have been unalloyed and probably somewhere in the 0.4-0.6% carbon range with a really broad range of techniques, skills and quality.

By the late 1800's and early 1900's things are really only slightly better and it wasn't really until about WW1, interwar and WW2 you started getting some decent consistency in the metallurgy and alloying properties, some basic engineering properties and consistency in production to where its probably going to work as you expect it most of the time. Obviously that's in industrialised countries, the savages were still doing it old school of make steel, test a little bits of it to see what it do and then go make something usable with what remains and hopefully mirror the technique over from their test samples.

Gunna sound like a broken record, but a good quench oil is probably going to help you out a lot. 5L of fast oil will get you through the vast majority of common carbon steels, the Houghton's K and Parks 50 aren't hugely expensive and at least you'll know that's one aspect of your process that's not in question.
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>>2287005
What do you use to heat treat?
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>>2288540
A charcoal forge with a hair dryer for the forced air. I get worried about overheating, and despite using a pipe to try and even out the heat treat, I feel as if I keep going in too cold.
I'll reach the temperature once checked with the magnet, and then go a shade higher than non magnetic, but I feel as if I spaz out or take too long before actually quenching.
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>>2288559
First try flipping the knife so that the spine faces the fire for a few seconds before taking it to the quench. You might just not have enough heat on the back, since the tip still hardens. It could be that you do need a little more time in the heat overall if it takes more than 1 second to get to the quench tank. You might also be accidentally touching the tank, which would leave a softer section as you described. If you're concerned about the temperature buy a welding crayon that melts at your desired temp to verify how hot it is
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Did some more work on the mild steel and 1084 San Mai blade. Tried to do an edge quench using water like a fucking idiot because I didn't want the welds to rip the core in half, ended up with a 0.25" crack on the edge and what might be the start of a crack on the spine but it's so fine I can barely tell, so I'm just going to leave that be.

After I ground past the crack on the edge and cleaned up the bevels a bit it's looking pretty nice.
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>>2289469
Or an infrared thermometer meant for casting. I have one that reads up to 2300°F and I use that to check my billet temperatures when I'm trying to forge weld. I have a Paragon kiln for heat treating so that's about all I use it for.
>>
nice the threat is still going
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>>2284837
excellent firstie
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>>2287005
historical knifes have it all over the place some are super duper hard others are soft and soft in spots you would not expect, not even sure if quality does correlate much with hardness in historical knifes.
generally since the late middleages european stuff tends to be overhardened, so expect a range from 30hrc up to 56 hrc .
pre 1900 is an absurdly wide field. there are several heattreatment methods as well as steel compositons and even patternweielding used .
>>
>>2287005
>Reason I ask is I'm coping since my knife seems to be a nice, hard HRC near the tip and edge,

sounds like an ideal result to me, no need to cope, this probably related to the way you quenched it, or the way you heated it, or even to the grinding, as the steel that is closer to the surface looses carbon when heated and forged, when you grind a lot you basicly remove this decarbonized steel and law open the hard carbon high steel
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>>2289490
>it's looking pretty nice.
Sure is, I spent the better most of the afternoon beating on some san-mai billets. I'll anneal them tomorrow and then do some grinding to see what unholy mess it is inside.
Made 3 thicker (1/4") billets out of 1084-Nickel shim cladding with 26C3 core that I'm hoping to make hunting knives out of and 2 longer, thinner (3-4mm) billets with some Uddeholm saw steel similar to 15N20 with nickel shim and a 26C3 core which will probably be kitchen knives if they don't suck and delaminate. Fairly confident they're ok
Been ages since I did this, but I got a new forge for christmas so it was a chance to see how it goes and it wasn't too terrible and managed to use up all my gas
>>
I have never done anything DIY before and am completely talentless. I have been interested in beginning this hobby but don't have access to any of the necessary equipment. How much does it cost to get started with just a basic knife?
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>>2291220
well do you want to make it by forging or stock removal? main cost is time, rest? maybe 100 -200 bucks for a cheap selfbuild forge. you would need to buy a hammer tho. or borrow one from someone else idk
>>
>>2291220
You can make a knife with nothing but an old car leaf spring and an angle grinder. Spend enough time hand sanding and it can even look pretty nice.
>>
Kind of a weird question, but has anyone tried to make a Silver dagger? I'd imagine it would have to be cast bit i'm not sure. Never met any silversmiths.
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>>2294024
You can only work harden silver. It could theoretically work, but it wouldn't be very practical. The egyptians used bronze(?) razors to shave with, so there's that.
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>>2294037
Unfortunately not looking for practicality. Is there a home Hardening process or would it require industrial Chemicals?

I'd rather make Bullets but hey They're def going to be regulating Gunpowder :^)
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>>2294048
it hardens naturally as you work it, you could probably harden the edge hammering it, the same way as a bronze sword
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>>2289490
It looks good, but you probably should scrap it. That tiny crack will take in water and create a very weak rust spot
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>>2294024
are you gonna hunt vampires huh?
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>>2294024
you can make a steel dagger and then use electrolyte technique to cover it in silver tho
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>>2294024
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_agNcFYalT8



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